Skip to main content

Full text of "Struggles and triumphs, or, Forty years' recollections of P.T. Barnum"

See other formats


Google 



This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 

to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 

to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 

are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other maiginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 

publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing tliis resource, we liave taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 
We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain fivm automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attributionTht GoogXt "watermark" you see on each file is essential for in forming people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liabili^ can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 

at |http: //books .google .com/I 



*m 



(F7/i' 



<l,e..x/i-''-««r 



STEUG6LES AND TRIUMPHS: 



OB, 



FORTY YEARS' RECOLLECTIONS 



OF 






F. T. BARNUM. 



intlTTEir BT HUfSELF.* 

XTTHOR'S EDITION". 

''[bioosafht complete to AFBIL, 1871.] 



** " a map of btwy lifo| 
Itf fluctoatioDf, and its vast conoeni.'* 



NEW YORK: 

JOAN NE^V^S COMPANY. 

1871. 



Entered aooordi^g to Aet ot Oongran, in the ywr 1871, bj 

P. T. BARNUM, 
la the Dttoe of tlw LIbtaiUkn of ^Oongnis^ at WiKVigtoo. 

Sntared also »t Stattooic'i iUUi London, EnglMd. 






51/ 

A3 



TO 

MY "WIPE AND FAMILY 

I DBDICATB 

THIS STORY OF A LIPB lATHICH HAS BEEN LARGELY 

DEVOTED TO THEIR 

INTERESTS AND SERVICE. 



CARD INTRODUCTORY- 



7b the PuJtUc i — ^Although the large octavo edition of STRUGOLsa 
AND Triuhphs, upon fiae paper, has enjoyed an unprecedented large 
sale at $8.50 and upwards, according to styles of binding ; yet deter- 
mined to supply the popular demand for a cheaper edition, and thus in 
a measure ren4er to .the .great American peGiBle^irh9 have laTisfaed 
upon me so many fayors, a due recognition of their claims upon my 
gratitude and esteem,— I hare por^tosed, of the original publishers, 
the electrotype plates of text and engravings together with the copy- 

right of the work ; and, now enabled to control the publication myself, 
I give the same precise text ^ith the original, (together with an addi- 
tional chapter bringing the biography down to Apr. 2d, 1871,) at the 
low price of $1.50. 

Copies of the cheap edition can be had on application to the Amer- 
ican News Company, New York* 

Tour obedient humble servant, 

PHINEAS T. BARNDM. 
Na 488, Fifth Avenue, New York Qty, April 2d, 1871. 



PREFACE. 



This book is my Recollections of Torty Busy Tearg^ 
Few men in civil life have had a career more crowded 
with incident, enterprise, and various intercourse with 
the world than mine. With the alternations of success 
and defeat, extensive travel in this and foreign lands; 
a large acquaintance with the humble and honored ; 
having held the preeminent place among all who have 
sought to furnish healthful entertainment to the Amer- 
ican people, and, therefore, having had opportunities 
for garnering an ample storehouse of incident and an- 
ecdote, while, at the same time, needing a sagacity, 
energy, foresight and fortitude rarely required or ex- 
hibited in financial affairs, my struggles and experi- 
ences (it is not altogether vanity in me to think) caur 
not be without interest to my fellow, country men. 

Various leading publishers have solicited me to 
place at their disposal lAy BecoUections of what I 
have been, and seen, and done. These proposals, to- 
gether with the partiality of' friends and kindred, have 
constrained me, now that I have retired from all active 
participation in business, to put in a permanent form 
what, it seems to me, may be instructive, entertaining 
and profitable. 

Fifteen years since, for the purpose, principally, of 
advancing my interests as proprietor of the American 



n - PREFACE. 

Musenm, I gave to the press some personal reminis- 
cences and sketches. Having an extensive sale, they 
were, however, very hastily, and, therefore, imper- 
fectly, prepared. These are not only out of print, 
but the plates have been destroyed. Though includ- 
ing, necessarily, in'commoA.Witl Aem, some of the 
facts of my early life, in order to make this auto- 
biography a complete and cbnGnuous narrative, yet, 
as the. latter part of my, life has b^n the morp eyept- 
ful, and my recollections so various and abundant, 
this book is new and independent of the former. It 
is ihe matured and leisurely j^eview of almost half a 
century of 'work and struggle, and 'final success, iii 
spite of fraud and fire — ^the gtory of which is blended 
with amusing anecdotes, fiinny passages, felicitous 
jokes, captivating narrativeis, hovel experiences, and 
remarkable interviews — the sunny and sombre so in- 
termingled as not only to entertain, but convey useful 
lessons to all classes of readers. 

These Recollections are dedicated io those who are 
nearest and dearest to me^ with the feeling that they 
are a record which I am wi&ihg to leave in their 
hands, as a legacy which they wiH value. . . 

And above and beyond this personal satisfaction, I 
tave thought that the review of a li'ie, with the wide 
contrasts of humble origin and high and liohorable 
success ; of * ^piost fpnniaal)le\oTbstacles overcome by 
courage and constancy* oi affluence that had been 
patiently won, suddenly wrenched away, and triumph- 
antly regained — would be a help and incentive to the 
young man, struggling, it may be, with adverse for- 
tune, or, at the start, lopkiri^ into the future. with 
doubt or despair. 

All autobiographies are necessarily egotistical If 



PRSFAOB. VU 

my pages are as plentifully sprinkled with '^IV as was 
the chief ornament of Hood's peacock, " who thought 
he had the eyes of Europe on his tail," I can only say, 
that the ^Tb" are essential to the story I have told. 
It has been my purpose to nam^, not the life of 
another, but thaJ^ career in which I was the princi- 
pal actoi; 

There is an almost universal, and not unworthy 
curiosity to learn the methods and measures, the ups 
and doLs, the strifes and victories, the mental and 
moral personnel of those who have taken an active 
and {NTominent part in human affairs. But an auto- 
biographv ha^ attractions and merits superior to those 
of f^L4" written y>y .nother, .hjhowever in* 
mate with its subject, cannot know all that helps to 
give interest and accuracy to the narrative, or com- 
pleteness to the character. The story from the actor's 
own lips has always a charm it can never have when 
told by another. 

That my narrative is interspersed with amusing inci- 
dents, and even the recital of some very practical jokes, 
is simply because my natural disposition impels me to 
look upon the brighter side of life, and I hope my 
humorous experiences will entertain my readers as 
much as they were enjoyed by myself. And if this 
record of trials and triumphs, struggles and successes, 
shall stimulate any to the exercise of that energy, in- 
dustry, and courage in their callings, which will surely 
lead to happiness and prosperity, one main object I 
have in 3rielding to the solicitations of my friends 
and my publishers will have been accomplished. 

P. T. BARNUM. 



Waldehers;, Bridgeport, 
Connecticut, July 5, 1869 



] 



X VOKTBAIT OF:^. T. BABNtH, ...... ...„. 

J, lIY pEOPEkTV AND MV ■(ENANT, ... . ' . . . ■ , . a 

L Nt^i Htfit^RT VEDmi ixtKiajimiNf, ....'...' as 

t. EARNUM ON A BAIL, , . . , .,.,.■. ; . ; , , H 

ft.' tut: COiTAhD AHDtDB ''BBAVB," . V' .... 100 

6. yicroa* ovBtt vHSTttiiizM, ■. . ,■,■.'. ....■, t.,m 

T. sni'Ai.Ls ajTO Wrkes. ....:."..",,.. us 

8. BA;ria.i( M tSi »i*«rB,- ■■. . ,,.... ... . let 

S. TUB IJK^AT DUKE AND TBK LITXLB (tEmRAL, lU 

U. -RVTAIjUOnaBaiO rnBOISNXKAL, . . . ' i' . . 1 ]» 

11. uAnDRK CART EXFRtes, .,...,....,,, u: 

ir tm KB IK IR0N8, :' ."■'.■,' ,' '', , ' ; , . .' MS 

18. IRANISTAN, ■ , . . . K( 

14. WBLCOMB TO JKSNY LIND, ... ....... 28S 

18. J. a BBilNVIT aHd SIS nONKBT, . .'.'., • -. . . g2I 

U. BLB|>UANTINE JkORICULTUHB, .... . . . , , .888 

IT. MOONTAIN OROVB CUIVIBRT, .,......; MB 

18. THb'"0USTOM<" OF TUB COBKTBT^ lU 

M. ''THE'tOSO jiio SHORT OP.IT,--' .,.-...'..■, 610 

XI. oiuu).X|Aa<>iB,4ui ms FANiLT, . , .' . . .■ ,■ i . . tao 

ax. TEKPRlNCElS tllB WL-SBUM, MS 

m BABT BliloeKPOBT. ■■ . . . . .MB 

U. ,CAt'TUJt[Na,wniXB WHALB8, fiS^ 

H. fROtDLElN ATIiBKlBEI HAl^, . . . . -, . . . ' . CEO 

36. MARR1A0R IN MINIATCHE, ■ . . K|8 

3C. ALARM At LINDEICBOn, . • . . UK 

ar. THB oR^ukT ii>ii:m<<'Vr, . ; . . «n 

3B. AFtBB lOE FIRK, , . TO 

w. wAniiA tr,i iKovm aiu>, . . .'. *. m 

a). A GOOTESQUE >IBB COUPANT, QO 

31. HAir-SUATBIl, . '.'.,.,.,■ 7n 

31 SKA BIDE PARK, . : . BS 

SB. WALDiarisRB, ■ ' ' , Tea 



CONTENTS. 



»♦» 



CHAPTER I.— EARLY UFE. 

MT BlBm-r^lUBT PROPEBTT — FARMEB BOY LIFE — GOING TO BCHOOLi^EARLr 
ACQU10ITIVXIIE0S — A HOLIDAY FEDDLEB— FIRST VISIT TO NEW YOHK— 
LCARKIHO TO " SWAP " — ttiaESIKS FIlOM 3IOLAS8KS CANDY — "IVY ISLAND** 
— ESTTJnUfa UPON my estate — CLEEKSMIP IN A COUNTRY STORE — TRAD- 
ING MO&ALS^-THB BETHEL MEETING-HOUSE — STOVE QUESTION — SUNDAY 
SCHOOL AND JBIBLB CLAM — ^MY COMPOSITION — TilE ONE TIUNO NEEDX'UL, 25 

CHAP. II.— INCIDENTS AND ANECDOTES. 

r»T.ATH Op MT GRANDMOTHER — MY FATHER— HlA CflARACTEB— HtS DEAtH — 
BEGIKNINO THE WORLD BAREFOOTED— GOING TO GRASSY PLAINS— -THE TIN 
WARE AND GREEN BOTTLE LOTTERY — " CHARITY '* HALLETT— OUR FtRST 
MEETING — ^EVENING RIDE TO BETHEL — A NOVEL PUR TRADE — OLD " RUSKTA*' 
AND TOCNO "RUSHIa" — TIfE BUYER SOLD— COUNTRY STORE EXPERIENC7ES 
—OLD "UNCLE BIBBINS" — A TERRIBLE DUEL BETWEEN BENTON AND BIB- 
BINS^FALL OF BENTON— FLIGHT OF BIBBINS, 38 

CHAP. IIL-.IN BUSINESS FOR MYSELF. 

MY CLSAKSHIF IN BROOKLYN— -UNEASINESS AND DISSATISFACTIOV-^TSB 
•MALI« POX^-<»OllfO HOME TO RECHUIP—" CHARITY " HALLETT AOAUI — 
BACK TO BROOKLYN— OPENING A l*OIITKK-MOU8E— 4ELL1NG OUT—MY CLERK' 
SHIP Ut NBW YORK— 'MY 2iA|IIT(»-<-OBSBRirANCB OF fnTNOAY-^IN BBTHEL 
OKOB XOBE— HSBOlNVUfO BUSINESS ON MY OWN «LCO0UNT-M>PBNI2IG DAY 
— IAII0B 0AJJM AMD WUUa PR0V1T8«^-VBB -U>TTBRT /BVRIWBSS*** VIEWS 
TUEREON^-ABOUT A POCKET-BOOK— WITS AND WAGS — SWEARING OUT A 
FINE— FIRST APPEARAMCE AT THE BAB— SECUMRG "ARABIAN ''—A MODEL 
LOVE-LETTER, '. ' '. 48 

CJHAP. n^— STRUGGLES FOR A LIVELIHOOD. 

I 

PLBA^tTBB VISIT TO PHILADELPHIA — LIVING IN GRAND STYLE — THE BOTTOM 
OF THE PILE— BORROWING MONEY— MY MARRIAGE — RETURN TO BETHEL 
— ^XAXLY MARRIAGES — MORE PRACTICAL JOKING— SECOND APPEARANCE AS 
COCNftBL — GOING TO HOUSfiKEkPlNG — SELLING BOOKS AT AUCTION — TBB 
** YELLOW store" — A NEW FIELD— " THE HERALD OF PRKEDOm" — MY 
EDITORIAL CAEEBR — LIBEL SUITS — FINED AND IMPRISONED — LIFE IN THE 
DANBURY JAI I/— CELEBRATION OV MY LIBERATION — POOR BUSINESS AND 
BAD OKBTS — REMOVAL TO NEW YORK — SEEKING MY FORTUNE — " WANTS " 
IB TH£ " SUN " — WM. NIBLO — KKji^PING A BOARDING-HOUSE — ^A WHOLE 
SHIRT OR MY BACK, 59 



14 CONTENTS. 

CHAP, v.— MY START AS A SHOWMAN. 

THR AMUSEMENT nUA I XK98— DIFFERENT OKAPE8— CATBRINO FOR THE POIILIC 
•*MT CLAIMS, AIMS AND EFFORTS — JOICB HETH— APPARBNT GBNCINSNESS 

OF HER VOUCHERS BEOINNINO LIFE AS A BHOWMAR— SUCCESS OF MT 

FIRST EXHIBITION — SECOND STEP IN THE SHOW LINK«>S10N0R VI VALLA 

MY FIRST APPEARANCE OH 'ANT ' 8TAa»«-AT. WARHIITOTON — ^AHNE ROTALL 

STIMULATING THE PUBlilC-'^K^ONTBSTS RRTWRBK f ITAtLLA AND ROBERTS 

BXCITEMENT AT FEVER UBAT — CONNECTING MYSELF WITH A CIRCUS— BREAD 
AND BUTTER DINNER FOR THE WHOLE COMPANY— NARROW ESGaPB FROM 
SUFFOCATION^ LECTURING AN ABUALUI OLRBOYMAN — AARON TURRfcR — A 
TERRIBLE PRACTICAL JOKE — I AM REPRESENTBD TO BE A MURDEJUER — 
RAILS AMD LYNCH LAW— ^fOYRL MEANS FOR SRCURINa NOTORIETY, • 71 

CHAP. VI.— kY FIRST TRAVELINO COMPANY. 

VHREB HEALS AND LODGING IK OKB HOUR— TTTRNINO THE TABLV8 OK TiTltKER 
— A 80^ AS OLD AS HIS FATHER — LEAVING THE CIRCUS WlT^ TWBLTB 
HUNDRED DOLLARS— MY FIRST TRAVELLING COMPANY— PREACHING TO THE 
PEOPLE — APPEARING AS A NEGRO MINSTREL — THREATENED WITH ASSAS- 
SINATION — ^ESCAPES FHOM DANGER — TEMPERANC'E — REPORT OF MT ARRRST 
FOR MURDER — BE-ENFORCING MY COMPAWY — ''baRKUM'S ORANDSCIBNTIPIO 
AND MUSICAL THEATRE "—OUTWITTING A SHERIFF — "LADY HAYES's " 
MANSION AND PLANT ATlOK — ^A BRILLIANV AUDlBNdE— BASS DRUM SOLO-^ 
CROSSING THE INDIAN NATION — JOE PENT LAND ASA SAVAGE — TERROR AND 
FiilGHT OF V1VALLA—%A NONPLUSSED LEGJIRDBMAUT PSRFORM|» — ^A MAUE 
iBGO-LAYSB<^DlSUAIiDING MY COMPANY — A NEW PARTNERSHIP — PUBLIC 
UKCTURINO — ^DIFFICULTY WITH A DROVER — THE STEAMBOAT " CERES " — 
• aUODEN MARBIAGi: ON BOARD— MOBBED IN LOUISIANA.— ARRITAL JlX >'£W 
ORLEAHft» .'..«.........«.. 86 

CHAP. VII.— AT THE FOOT OF THK LADDER. 

AUGUST AT THM TRAVBLLIKa BUSINESS — AJDVBRTiapro JgQK AK A8800IATB— 

RUSH OF THE MILLION-MAKERS — COUNTBRFBITBRV, CHBAT6 AND QUAOKS 

A NEW BUSINESS— SWINDLED BY MY PARTNER — DIAMOND THE D4MCBR 

*A -KBW- CXMIPAinr-«-4>B8BRTIONI»««-BUOCRSeB8 AT K«W ORLttANB-'-'nrRONM 
rOWtm AKD FAOrNT BLIBLSR — TK JAIL AGAIN^HSrAOK TO WBW TORH' ■ ACl- 

INO AS A BOOK AOBMT— LBaSIKO TAUXRALL— FROM HAKB TO MOOTR 

DSmRXIKATfOir TO MAKB MMOlT^MroRTtmR OtBHSIfO HBR D0DB>^^«THE 
AMRSieAir MUSEUM Vmi ML»«4fB«OTIATieK8 FOR TRR F^rROMASM <IOPB8 

• » . ' « • 

• CfiiP. Vttl.— THT AMEllICAN MlTSEUM. 

A TRAP 8BT FORMR^I CATCH T«0 TRAJeTSR9— t BBCOMB FROPRTBTOR OP 
THE AMERICAN MUSEUM — HISTORY OF THE ESTABLISHMENT— HAB19 WORK 
.AKD €OU> DlNBBRfr—ADDITIONS TO THB MUSEUM— EXTRAORDINARY ADVER- 
TISING — ^barnum's brick-Man — excitikg publYC curiosity — ikct^bntb 

AND ANECDOTES — A DRUNKEN ACTOR — IMITATIONS OF THE BL1>BR "BOOTH 
— PLBAAING my PATRONS — SECURING TRANSIEHT NOVELTIES — ^LlTlKO CURI- 
.081TLES — MAKING PEOPLB TALK — A WILDERNESS OF WONDBRS — ^KiaC^ARA 
FALLS WITH REAL WATER — THE CLUB THAT KILLED COOK — SELLITm LOUIS 
QAYLORD CLARK — THE FISH WITH LEGS — THE FEJEE MERMAlt>— BOW IT 
CAME INTO MY POSSESSION — THE TRUE STORY OP THAT CURIOSITY— fl'APAN- 
£BE MANUFACTURE OF FABULOUS ANIMALS — THB USB I VADEOFTHti MKR- 
MAID— WHOLESAI^ ADVBRTI6IKG AGAIN— THB BALCONY BA^TD— DBIUMMON I> 
LIOHTB, :..'....' 116 



GUM'IISKIB. 15 



CRAP. nC-^/THE BOAB TO BIOHES. 

THB MOST POPULAR PLAGE OF AMUSEMENT IN THE WORLD— TRB MORAL 
IHUkMA— «MPOB]fnrO THE AII08E8 OP THE STAGE — FAMOUS ACTOHS AND 
A4STSB0SBS AT TMB MVBBDM — ^ADDINO TO THE SALOONS — AFTERNOON AND 
MOLIDAT PBKPOBaiARC8»--FOCRTH OF JtTLT FLAGS — ^THE MUSEUM CONNECT- 
KD WITH »T. P«0L'1— VICPORT OVER THE VESTRTMEN — THE E0RR9S — ST. 

Patrick's day ir vm morning — ^a wonderful animal, thb " aioress" 

-— nflOOHXKO OP KONRT--4SOOLOOICAL ERUPTION — THE CITY ASTOUNDED— 
RABT SHOWS) AWD TRBfR ORnCCT^-FLOWER, BIRD, DOG AND POULTRY 
SMOVB— GRABD IftRB BUFFALO HUNT IN HOBORBN— N. P. WILLIfl — ^TIIE 
WOOLLY HOBSB-^WBHRB HE GAME FROM— COLONEL BENTON BEATEN — 
OF TRR BZHIBITIOir— -AMERICAN INDIANS — P. T. DARNUM EXHIR- 
CORIOCS SPlRVTBRx^THB TOUCHINO STORY OP CHARLOTTE TEM- 
PLE — 8BRYICES IN THE LECTURE BOOM — A FINANCIAL VIEW OK TlIK 
MDBBUM*-AN "AWFUL RICH MAN," 133 

CHAP. X.— ANOTHER SUCCESSFUL SPECULATION. 

PKALE's MU8BUM — MYSTEIUOUS ME«MKRI«M — ^YANKEE HILL — ^RENRY BBKHBTT 
— THE RIYAL MUSEUMS — THE OKl'MEAN AND ORPHAN FAMILIES— THB FUDGBB 
MERMAID — ^BUYING OUT MX RIVAXr^RUNNlNO OPPOalTlON TO MYSBLF — 
ABOLISHING THRATRICAL KUXSANCES — ^MO CHECKS AND NO BAR-'^THE 
MUSEUM — MY MANIA — MY FIRST INTERVIBW WITH CHARLES S. STRATTON 
— GEX£RAL TOM THUMB IK NEW YORK — ^RB-ENGAOBMBNT — ^AN AI'T PUPIL 
— FREE FROM DEBT— THE PROFITS OF TWO YEARS— -IN SB ARCH OF A NEW 
FIELD— STARTING FOR LIVERPOOL — THB GOOD SHIP " YORKSHIRB "— Ml 
PARTY — ESCORT TO SANDY HOOK — THB YOYAGB — ^A TOBACCO TRIOK— A 
BRAGGING JOHN BOLL OUTWITTED — ARRIVAL AT UVBRPOOI^— A GENTLE- 
MAN BEGGAR — ^MADAME CBLESTE^-CHBAP DWARFS— ^TWO-PSmiY SHOWS — 
&XHIBITION OF GENERAL TOM THUMB .IN UVBRPOOL*-FIB8TK7LAM BR- 
GAGBMBMT FOR LONDON, 156 

CHAP. XI..-JGfiNSRAL TOM T&UMB IN BKeLAND. 

ARRIVAL IN LONDON — THE GENERAL'S DEBUT IN THB PRINCESS'S THEATRE 
—BBOBMOUS SUCCRS6 — MY MANSION AT THB WEST END— DAILY LBVBX8 
lOR THE MOBILITY AND ORNTRY — HON. BDWARD EVERETT— 4IIS INTER- 
B81* IK THB GERBRAIj— VISIT TO THE BARONgSS ROTHSOHILIK*KM9BHING 
IM BGYFTIAN HALL, PlCCADILLY-*-MR. CHARUBS JfURRAY, MA8TBR OF THB 
HmmK** noUBBROLD— AT BUCKINGHAM PALACE BY COMMAND OF BER 
MAJBRTY— *A ROYAL RBOBPTION-^THB FAVORABLB IMPRESSION MADB BY 
THB OBMBRAIr^-AMlMING INCIDENTS OF TBB VISIT— BACKIKO OUT— 
FIORT Wim A POOBUB^-COHRT JOURVAL NOT108— «B0OND VISIT TO THB 
^Vtjaf-^TVU FRIKCB OF WALBS AMX PRIRCBSS ROYAL— THB ^trSSir OF 
THB BBLGIANB— VHiKD VIBIT TO BUOKlllOllAM PAt*AO»-— KDIA tmOLD, 
OF MMMIIUM— ASSURED' S«rCCBSS*'*'^rRB BBITISH VmUO iaiieiTHD<^MGYP- 
TIAM HALL CROWDED— <|UEBN DOWAGER ADBLAIDB^^THB GKRBRA«<'S 
WATCH — ^NAPOLEON AND THB DUKE OF WELUNOTON — DISTINGUISHED 
FRIBVD6 173 

CHAP. Xn.— IN FRANCE. 

0«mrO OTBR TO ARRAVOB PRELIMINARIES— PREVIOUS VISIT TO PjUUS— ROB- 
RRT HOUDIN— WOKDERFUL MECHANICAL TOYS — THB AUTOMATON. LETTER- 
WBITER — ^DION ROUCICAULT — TAX ON NATURAL CURIOSITIES — ^HOW I COM- 
PROMISED— TfOE GENERAL AND PARTY IN PARIS — ^FIRST VISIT TO KING 
LOUIS PHILIPPE — ^A SPLENDID ?R?8JBNT— DIPLOMACY— I ASK A FAVOR AND 
BKP IT — ^LONG CHAMPS— THB ORNERAL'S EQUIPAGE — THE FINEST ADVER- 
TISBXENT EVER KNOWN — ALL PARIS IN A FUROR— OPENING OF THE IJiVkES 
— ^TOM POUCE" EVKRTWHERB— the GENERAL AS AN ACyOR — "PKTIT 
POUCBT" — SECOND AND THIRD VISITS AT THR T^tLERIBS — INVITATION TO 
ST. CLOUD— Thb general personating napoleon BORAPARTE— ST. DENIS 
—THB 1NVALIDES — RSGNIER — ^ANECpOTE QF FRANKLpI— LEAVIVP ?AB18— 
TOUR THROUGH FRANCE— DEPARTURE FOR BRUSSELS, .186 



16 CONTEKTO. 

GHAP. Xin.^IK BELGHTM. 

CXOSSINO THE FRONTIER— PSOFB880B PINTB-M)VAUnCATiOir8 OF A <KKn> 
BBOW^UJi— " SOFT 0UP "— OKNiSBOUS DISTAlBDTlMr 0V MBDAU'-^PIIBM^B 
<;haR1«£8 9TRAXTON— \T BKnaflELe-*PRlMKNTAT]€Xf TO K I NA LEOPOLD Ain> 
HIS QCBJblN— TH£ OENBBAL'e JBWBLe. STOLBN--THB TUrEF CAUOHT—BE- 
COVEBY.OF THE PKOPEBTY— THB FIL1J> OF WATEBLOO— JIIRACULOBSLT 
UULTIPLIBP UELICS— CAiniAIN TIPPITIWITOHBT OF TUB CONNEOTICUT 

iUBIIXKRA— AN ACCII>ENT*<-<G£TTINO BACK TO BBUBSBLS IH A CABT 

8TRATTON SWJNDLED^JLOSING AN EXHIBITION — TWO OOUBB IB THE BAIW 
ON THE ROAD— THE CUSTOM OF THE CODNTBY — ^A STRICT CONSTBDCTION- 
1ST— STBATTON's HEAD SHAVED—" BRUBMAQBH " BEUC»-*HOW THBT ABB 
PLANTED AT WATEBLOU^WHAT I.YONB 8AUBA0B6 ABB JIADB OF-^FBOM 
BBU68EL9 TO XA>NDON, 308 

CHAP. XIV.— IN ENGLAND AGAIN. 

LBVBBS IB BOTPTTAW tIAtL — VlTDlfiStTnBmHy srcCEBS— OTHER EVGAGEMEBTS 
— **IJP IB" A BALtX>OB *'-i-ttW>Vll*ClAL T6UR— rRAVBLtllfO BV POST— OOIBa 
10 AMBBIOA — ^A. T. STEWART — BAHVEL BO0BR8 — ^AN EXTRA TRAIN— AN 

ASTOHrSHBD RATtWAY SOPERINTENDENT — LEFT BEHTKD AND LOCKED VT 

SmrDATS IN LONDON -BUSINESS AND PLEASURE — ALBERT SMITH — A DAY 

WITH" «I5f AT WaBWTCK — STRATFORD ON AVON — ^\ POETICAL BXkBBR 

WABWIOK CASTLE— OLD OCY'S TRAPS — OFFISR TO BUT THE LOT — THREAT 
TO B0R8T THE SHOW— ALBERT SHITH AS A SHOWMAN— LEARNING THE 

Btranngss from barnum — ^the Warwick race's rival 'dwarfs — ^haku- 

FACTUBBD OtANTERSKS— TUB HAPPY FAMILY — THE BOAD FBOM WARWlClt 
TO COVBNTRT— PEEPING TOM — THE YANKEE GO-AHEAD PRIKCIPLB — AL- 
BBllT smith's AOOOUBT OP X DAY WITH BABNVM, ..'..... 228 

CHAP. XV,-nEETURN TO AXERICAv 

VBB WIZABD OF TBE BOBTB— -A JBGOLEB BEATEN AT HIB dtfK TBTOKS — 
SECOND VISIT TO THE TTNITBD STATES— RRVERBKD DOCTOR BOBEBT BAIBD 
--OAFTAni JVDKIKS THBEATHWS TO PUT ME IN IRONS — VIEWS WITH BE- 
GABO TO SECTS -A WIOKED WOMAN — ^TIIE SIMPSONS IN EUROPB— KBMlN- 
ISCBBCBS OF TRAVEL — SAUCE AND " SABS "—TEA TOO SWEBT^— A UNIVER- 
SAL . LANOtTAGE>^RO AST DUCK— SNOW IN AUGUST — TALES OF TBAVBLLKBS 
-HI1MF80K NOT TO BB TAKEN m»— HOLLANDERS IB BRUSSBLB— WBEBB ALL 
THE^BTCmiBN COMB FMOU<— THREE TEAB8 IN EUROPB<— WARM PBBSOKAI^ 
FlWBBBe— DOCTOB U. B. BBBWBnSR— HEKRY SUMNEB— <lB«ROB S. AV>'i:0- 
BBV3« DBAFBR-^OEOBBE P. P|}T»A««M)int IaAST PBBFOBMABGB IN DUBLIN 
•— fifANWn O^NBBLI/^EVD OP OUB TOCX^-BBPABTOBB Fd^B AMBBIOA*— 
AABITAL INiJTBW rOBK« ; . . ; S39 

CHAP. XVI.— AT HOME. 

BEBBWIVG. TBE LBAS^. OF THE MUSEUM BX^LDXBCH-TOM XBUX|I, IK AMXBIQXt' 
TOUR THROUGH THE COUNTRY-JOURNEY TO CUBA— BARNCM A, CU^IQBITT 
— ^RAI^ING TURKKY8— CEASiNi' TO BE A TRAVELLING .fiJlOiy.MAN— RETURN 
TO^ BRIDGEPORT — ^ADVAKTAGEd AND CAPABILITIES OF THAT CITX— SE^RPH 
FOR AHOSfE — THE FINDING — BUII^DING A>'D COXPLtTION QF (RAN^BTAN — 
GRA^TD HOUSB-^ ARMING— BUTING THE BALTIMORE MUSEIjJM — q^ENINQ TUB 
PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM — CATERING FOR QUAXEI^ — THE TEMPERANCE 
PL£p<>B AT tHB THEATBE — PURCHASil^O PEA;j:'|I^ PBII^PELPHIA COLLEC- 
TION — MY AGRIC^LTPRAL AND ABBORGULTCR4L p.OI|VqS — "OKRflX BLp>V " 
CHICKENS— ^HOW 'l SOLD *MY POTATOES^HOW \ ROUQUT.qXHtR PKOPI^S* 
POTATOES— <;UTTING OFF GRAFTS — MY' DEER PARK — MY QAMC-K£f;PER — 
JRAiTK LESCtE— PLEASURES OF HOWK, 255 



C0NT&NT8. IT 

CHAP. XVn.— THE JENNY LEND ENTERPRISE. 



GnXtTD 8CHB1IX— COKOBE88 09 ALL NATIOVB— A BOLD AKD BBJLLIAKT BKTBB- 
PBI8E — THB JENITT LIND E50A6EUENT — MY AGKNT IN EUROPB — BIB IH- 
6TRrCTIO!r8 — COERESPOVDENCE WITH VlfiS LIKD— BENEDICT AND BELLKTTI 
— aOSHUA UATKS — CHEVAUER WYCKOFP — THE CONTRACT SIGNED— MY RE- 
CEPTION OF THE NEWS — THE ENTIRE SUM OF MONEY FOR THB ENOAOE- 
UnKT BENT TO LONDON — MY FIRST LIND LETTER TO THE PUBLIC — ^A POOR 
PORTHAIT — MUSICAL NOTES ^ WALL STREET — ^A FRIEND IV NBBD| 270 



CHAP. XVm. THE NIGHTINGALE IN NEW YORK. 



FINAL COaCESTB IN UTXR^OOL-^DEPARTDRE FOR AMSBICA^ ARRIVAL OFF 
STATES ISLAND — MY FIRST INTERVIEW WITH JENNY LIND— THE TREMEN- 
DOUS IHRONQ.AT THE WHARF — TRIUMPHAL ABCH^-" WELCOME TO AMER- 
ICA? — EXCITEMENT JN THE CITY^SERE^ADE AT THE |RV|NG HOUSE — THE 
PRI2E ODE — BAYARD ^YLOR THE PRIZEMAN — " BARNUM's PARNAS8U3 " — 
" BARNUMOP^IS "— i'JRST CONC|iRT IN CASTLE GARDEN— A NEW AGREEMENT 
— ^RECEPTION OF JENNY LIND — UNBOUNDED ENTHUSIASM — ^BARNUM CALLED 
OUT — JULIUS BENEDICTt-THE success OF THE ENTERPRISE ESTABUSUED 
— TWO QRAND CIIAJUTY CONCERTS Ij^ NEW YORK — ^DATK OF THE FIRST 
ILZiiVUUl CQNCER7, . , •. <• 286 



CHAP. XIX*-SUCCSSSFUL MANAGEMENT. 



VBAD-WORK AND HAND-WORK — MANAGING PUBLIC OPXNION^-CREAXIITO A 
FCROR-^TllE NEW YORK HERALD — JEN^T LINDAS EVIL ADVISERS— JOHN 
JAY — ^SnSS LHTD's CTFARITIES — A POOR GIRL IN BOSTON — THE NIGHTINGALE 
AT YRaViSTAN — ^RtlMOR OP HER MARRIAGE TO p. T. BARNUM — TI^E STORY 
BASED Oy orR, "EKOAGEMENT*' — ^WHAT IRANISTAN DID FOR ME — ^A VOIDING 
CEOWDS — IN PHTLADELPniA AND BALTIMORE — ^A SUBSTITUTE FOR MISS 
LIND— OUR ORCHESTRA — PRESIDENT FILLMORE, CLAY, FOOTB, 3BNT0N, 
SCOTT, CASS, AND WEBSTER — ^V^StT TO MT. VERNON— CHRISTMAS PRESENTS 
— ^EW tear's eve— we go to" HAVANA — PLAYING BALLr-FREDERIKA 
! — ^A HAI*Y MONTH XK CfBAJ ...,,...,-».,. 301 

CUAP. XX.— INCIDENTS OP THE TOUR. 



ffUfnnft AOAtHWt PHI CHS IN''RAlrAN'A— THB CtTBANS SUCCTyMB— JENNT LIND 
TAKES Tins <riTT BY* s¥ORM— A MAQKIPICENT Ttti UMPM— COUNT PENALVER 
—A SPtENlJlD OI^PER— MR. BRINCKERHOFF — BENEFIT FOR THB HOSPITALS 
— IttFUSTNO TO'RECBirfc THANKS — ^VlVALlA AND HtS DOO — ^fiENRY B^N- 
KCrr^^RlS I^ARTIAL lNSANITT-*-OtJR VOYaOE TO NEW ORLEANS — THB 
tSMtOtt OF TRiS 'InSW YORK IKRALD ON BOARD— I SAVE THE LI^E OF 
JAMES OORDO!* BCNNBTT-^ARRlVAL AT THE CRESCENT CITY — bREATING 
THS CllOWD*-^A MPLICATB MISS tnn>-*A BOT IN RAPTURES — ^A MAMMOTH 
BOO — UP THE MISSISSIPPI — AMUSEMENTS ON BOARD-^IN LkAOUB WITH 
THB BVIL ONE^-AN AMAZED MULATTO, .,......••• 319 



18 cwnwre* 

ARftlTAL AT BT. ZX)UI8"«URPRIBIKa PS0P08ITI0V OF XX88 LIKD'S SECRKTAST 
— HOW THB MANAGER MANAGED— R£ADIKf:S8 JO QASCKh THK CONTRACT- 
CONSULTATION WITH '* UNCLE 8QI-." — DAHNUM KOT TO B£ HIRED— A "JOIUS" 
— TEMrEltANCB LECTURE IN TUB THEATUE — SOL, SMITH — A COMEDIAN, 
AUTHOR, AND LAW Y Eli — UNIQUE DEDICATION — JENNY LIND'S CHAKACTER 
AND CHARITIES — SHARP WORDS FROM THE WEST — SELFISH ADVIdERS — 
MISS LIND's GENEROUS I3IPUI^£9 — HER SIMPLE AND CHILDLIKE CHARACTER 
—CONFESSIONS OF A MANAGER — PRIVATE REPUTATION AND PURLIC RENOWN 
—CHARACTER AS A STOCK IN TRADE — LE GRAND SMITH — MR. DOLBY — ^THK 
ANGELIC SIDE KEPT OUTSIDE — MY OWN SHARE IN THE PUHLIC BENEFITS 
— JUSTICE TO MISS LIND AND MYSELF, 334 

CHAP. XXII.— CLOSE OP THE CAMPAIGN. 

PBNIT15NT TICKET PTTRCHASERS— TT8IT TO THE ** HTfRMTTAOB ** — ^"AFRIL-FOOL" 
FUN — ^THB MAMMOTH CAV»— SIONOR 8ALV1— <}EOROB D. PRBVTICB — ^PKR- 
rORMANCB IN A PORK ROTJ6E — ^RUSIS AT CTNCIKNATI — ^ANNOTAHCBS AT 
PITTSBURGH — LB GRAND SMITH'b GRAND JOKE-^RETURN TO KBW YORK — 
THE FINAL CONCERTS IN CASTLE GARDEN AND METROPOLITAN HALL-^TIIE 
ADVI8BR8 APPEAR — THE NINETY-THIRD CONCERT — MY OFFER TO CLOSE 

THE ENGAGEMENT — MlS« LIND^ LETTER ACCEPTING MY PROPOSITION 

BTORY ABOUT AN "IMPROPER PLACE*' — JBNNY'S CONCERTS 0!f HBR^ OWN 
▲CCOdrr— -HER MARRIAGE TO MR. OTTO GOLD8CHM IDT— CORDIAL RELATIONS 
BETWEEN MRS. LIND GOLDSCflMlDT AND MY8BLF-*~AT MOMB AOAIR— STATE- 
MENT OF TUB TOTAL RECEIPTS OF TUB CONCBItTB, S4i 

CHAP. XXlIL-OTfiRR BNTERPRISEB. 

ANOTHER VENTURE — " DARNUM's GREAT ASIATIC CARAVAN, XUflEUM, AMD 
menagerie" — HUNTING ELEPHANTS — GENERAL TOM TUQMB — ^BI^BPRAMX 
PLOWING IN CONNECTICUT — CURIOUS QUE8T10N8 FROM ALL <)UARX&R9 — 
THE PUBLIC INTKUEST JN ^Y NOVEL FARMING — MOW MUCU AN BUuPHANT 
CAN REALLY *' DRAW '^ — SIDE-SHOWS AND VARIOU8 £«T£AF]UBB»-^-OB8E- 
QUIES OF NAPOLEON — THE CRYSTAL PALACE— CAMPAVALOOLAM8—AMBIUCAN 
INDIANS IN LONDON — AUTOMATON' SPEAKER — THE DUKS OF WBLUNGTOK 
— ATTEMPT TO BL'V ^HAKESPEAKE'B HOUSE — DISSOLVINO VIBWB — ^TUB CHI- 
NESE COLLKCTION — WONpjiRFUL SCOTCH BOYS — >SOLVING THB MY8TBBY OF 
DOUBLE STOUT — THE UATEMAN CHI LDHEN— :CATU£RINB HAYBB — IRANIBTAN 
6v FIRB^MY BtDKST t)'AUGHTER's MARRIAGE — ^BBVBFlXS FOR XUK ABUWE- 
FOBT XJMBARY'ARD THB MOUNTAIN QROVB CEMETERY, . . . . • 868 

CHAP, XXjy.— WORK AND PLAY. 

▲&FBBD BUW, OF DRURT LAKE THEATRE — ^AVTTBIKO nrTXRVIXW— MB. JJSVT, 
OF THB LONDON DAILY TELEGRAPH — VACATIONS AT BOMB — ^MT PRBSIDBNCY 
.QF.T8».^.nur£KXJ> C:pinUT.A«RlCVI.XD|Ua..SOO»TT-HKaUUffXK« A. FfCK- 
FOCKET — ^PHILOSOPHY OF HUMBUG^— A CHOF-VALLBM TiCKBV-SBLUUI — ^A 
PROMPT PAYMASTBR-^BARMUM IN BOSTON — A DBUJDBD MAOK-VMrStL — 
PHILUFS'S FIRB AV«riUXLATOR--'-aONOBABUt ELISBA WHnTUBSBT— VIUAL 
OF THE AVNIHILAIOR IN NBW YORK*-P£QUONNOQK BA{«K Ctf BRIDeBFORT 
— TBE IIJI.U8TRATED NBW8 — THB W0RI>1>'B FAIBIN BBW YORK — ^MT FmBSl- 
X>fiNCY. OF THB ASSOCIATION — ATTEMPT TO BXCiTB PCBUC IMTBRB6T — 
MONSTER JULIBN CONCBRTS--4tBSIOMATIOW OF VBia ORYSTAI*.FA|<A«B FftBSI- 
DjRffCY^-FAlLURB .OF TU^ QOKOBBN, . • . . « 371 



CHAP. XXV.—THE.flWOiiS.OLQCK -CX^iPANir. ENTANGLEMENT. 

THB EAST BRIDGKPORT BNTESPRISE — ^W. H. KODLG — PLANS FOR A NEW CITT 

UK. TIMOTHY IiWIOHT'S TESTIMONY — INVESTING A FORTUNE — SELLING 

CITY LOTS — irfd*?<!Y-5lAKlNO A SECONtyARY ' CONhlOERATlON — CLOCK COM- 
PANY IN LrrCHYlHLl>— THE "TERRY AND BARNfJM MANUFACTURING COM- 
PANY"— ^IB JEKOMB CLOCK COMPANY — BATTING FOR BITE* — FaLSE REP- 
HtSENTATlONfli— HOW 1 WAS DELri>E»>— WHAT 1 AOR^IED TO DO — TlfE COCN- 
ITBK AGREEMENT— NOTES WfTH BtANK DATES — THE LIMFT OF MY HESPON- 
BTBILITY — M<yw IT WAS BXCEEDEI^— 8TARTTANG DISCOVERIES— A RUINED 
HAN — PAYIVO ilY OWN HbNE*T DEISTS — BARNUM DUl'ED — MY FAILURE — 
THE BARNUM AND JEROME CLOCK BUBBLE — MORALISTS MAKING USE OF MY 
inSFORTUNES— WHAT PREACHERS, PAWSRS, AND PEOPLE SAID ABOUT MB 
— ©OWN IN THE DEPtHS, 384 

CHAP. XXVI.— CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE. 

naRXDS TO THE RKSCUE— MONEY OI^FERS REFUSED— BENEFITS DECLINED — 
MAGNIFICENT OFFKli OF PROMINENT I^EW YOKK CITIZENS— WILLIAM E. 
BURTON — LAURA KEENE — ^WILLIAM NIBLO— GENKRAL TOM THUMB — EDITO- 
JIIAL SYMPATHY — "A WORD FOR BARNUJf " IN BOSTON — LETTER FROM 

**sn». rAiiTi«<nt>Nt"-^iTis£N0' meetiko in BR1I>«EI>0RT«-«RB«0LIJT10N8 

OF KfSSPEeT -ANDCONDOLKNCE — M.H LKTTBR ON THttMTUATIOK — TENDKR 
' f>F PI FT<y Tito US AN D DO LLA R^'-M AON IT U D E OF THE DECEPTIf m PRACTI CE I> 
UPON aU^^^FDOPeStTION OF €OMP»OMiaJi WITH MV CREDtTORS^^-A TRAP 
I.Af1X F-R- KH IN PHILADBUrillA'*-^U» MLVER LINING TO THB CLOUD — 
TIIK IIIjOW a ilHNKriT TO MY f AMIf.Y-«-TUE REV. DK. B. H. OHAPIN*-MY 
t>AU<>IITKR HKLEN>— A LETTER WOUTU TEN THOUSAND DOUiAB9<— OUR NEW 
ISnUI IN SEW YORK, . . « • ^ 395 

CUAP. XXVII.— REST, BUT NOT BUST- 

fALK OF TIIK «y,si;UM COLLECTION— SUPPLEMENTARY PROC|£S|nKG8 OF MY 
CRKI)IT«":> 'WAMryATinNS IV COURT BARNUM AS A BAR TENDER— PER- 
»K<IT10N — TIIK SIMMER SEASON ON LONG ISLAND — THE 3IUSKUM »fAN ON 

SHOW ClIAKLES HOWELL— A GREAT NATURAL CURIOSITY — VALUE OP A 

HONK — IJROPOSING XO BUY J^-T-A HUVClfr, WHALE PAYS MY s'uIUMER'S 
IrOAKD— A TUKN IN THE TIDBr— THE WKUfiLER AND WILSON SEWING MA- 
rUJNE CO MUTANT— THEIR REMOVAL TO EAST •RIDOEPORT — TM« TERRY 
AND BA^INUM CLOCK FACTOKY OCCUPAKD— NIfiW CITY PROPERTY LOOKING 
UP— A LP AS OF $5.00<i— TUK CAUSE OF MT UVIJX PROMtSBB TO BE MY RE- 
DEMPTION — SETTISG SAIL FQR ENGLAM>»^-aUK£ftAIl tOM VBaiiirB*«LITTLE 
CORDELIA^ UOW^B^ . .,., » . . .. . . « « • . & « ... . . 406 

CHAP. XXVni.— ABROAD AGAIN. 

OLD FRIENDS I]fl i9%^ fSff^hAXUt^J^lk^flmpininn AS A fBOWMAf^-rVIS ASCENT 
OF MONT BLANC — POPULARITY OF THE ENTERTAINMENT — THE OARRICK 
CLUB — "PHINEAS CUTECRAPT " — TH» ELEVEN THOUSAND VIRGINS OF CO- 
liOCNK-^UTILIZING INCIDENTS—SUBTERRANEAN TERRORS — A ^ANIO— EGYP- 
TIAN DAHKNES8 IN EGYPTIAN HALL-^WILLI AM il. THACKERAY — HIS TWO 
VISITS TO AMERICA — FRIENDLY RELATIONS WITH THE NOVELIST— I LOSE 
MIS SYMPATHY — Hit WARft KSGARD FOR HIS AMERICAN FRIEND*— OTTO 
GOLDSCHMIDT AND JENNY LIND GOLDSCHMIDT — ^TENDER OF THEIR AID — 
THE FORQ^p LIND LETTER — BENEDICT AND BELLBTTI-^GEOROB AUGUSTUS 
SALA— CHARLES KEAN — EDMtJND YATES— HORACE MAYHEW— GEORGE PEA- 
BODY — 5IR. BUCK8TONB — MY EXHIBITIONS IN ENGLAND— B, M. PETTINGILL 
•-MR. LUMLEY, ' . . 419 



20 CONTENTS. 

OBAP. XXIX.— IK aBRHANT. 



FROM tXOTDOTX TO BADEV-BADEK^-TftOUDLB IK FARM — ftXBA0BQUBO— «C3BirS 
IN A OSUMAK CU8TOM-HOU8B— A TERKIBLK BUfL^HJL €E2tTS 'WOJUH OF 
AOOXY^QAMBLIKO AT BAOEM-BAPiiN — 8Ul<;U>Ka— QOLPBX PJUCES *'OR 
TIIK OBNERAL— A CALL FROM THE KINO OJP UOU^XP — THJS OEHJiAJif BFAS 
— HAMBURG, BH8 AND AVEISUADEN— THE BLACK FOREST OttCUESTRION 
MAKER — XJH OFFERED SACRIFigE — ^THB SEAT OF THE ROXUSCHlLDS-iDlF- 

. FJCLLTIE8 IN FRANKFORT— A FOMFOU8 COHMISMOKEU.OF i-OLlCE-t-JtJftD- 
TAFK— AN ALARM--HEKRY J. RAYMOND—CALL ON . THE COMMISSION «Jt — 
CONFIDENTIAL DISCLOSURES — ^HALF QF AN ENTIRE FORXUfiE IN AN A.MERI- 
CAN RAILWAY — ASTOUNDING KKVELATIONS — DOWN THE RHINE — ^DEPAJiTURB 
FOR HOLLAND,* *30 

CHAP. XXX.— IN HOLLAND. 



tHB rlHBST AN© FLATTB8T COUBTRT IW THE WOftLD— SUPBR-CUJAirLIlWSS — 
HABITS AND CUBTOMS — "ItKBMlS" — THE ALBINO "TAtllLY— THB ltAQn»— 
AUGUST BELMONT — iIAPANHSB M08BUI*— WAWWFACJTURBD FABULOUS ANI- 
MALS — A GBNBROnS OFFER — ^VALUABLE PICTURES— AN A8TONISSBt> SmPBR- 
IN TEN DENT— BACK TO ENGLAKB— BWUBmOHS IN MAKOMBSflWR— I'RBWJMIf 
AGAIN TO AMERICA— FUN ON THB TOYAOB — AfOCK TRIAMh— BARWUM AS A 
pnoSRCUTOB AND AS A FRISONBH— COU> SHOULDERS IK KBW YORK— PRE- 
PARING TO MOVE INTO MV OLD HOME--KJAR BLESS PAIKVBRB AND OAttPKN- 
TER8 — IRANISTAN BURNED TO THE GROUND — ^NEXT TO KO INSURANCE — 
BALE OF THB PROPERTY — ^ELIAS HOWE, ilR.,^ • 441 

CHAP. XXXI.— THE ART OP MONEY GETTING. 



BACK OytE MORE TO ENGLAND— TOtTR THRO COB 8COTLAKB XNtt WALE«— 
HOW I CAME TO LECTURE — ^ADFIOK OF MY FRIENDS — MY tECtURE— HOW 
TO MAKB MONEY AND HOW TO KEEP IT— M'HAT THE PAPERS 8A1D ABOUT 
ME — PRAISE OF THE LONDON PRESS — ^LBCTURIKO TK THE PROVINCES — 
PERFORMANCES AT CAMBRIDGE— CALX. FOR JOICB IIETH — EXt^lAORblNXRY 
FUK AT OXrORD-^THB ACDtBNOB AND JLECttTRBR TAKING TURNS— a' UNI- 
▼BR3ITT BREAKFASX— MAGNIFICENT OPFlBft FOR A COrtTtlOHt— SfTCCESS 
OF KT ENTERPRISE — ^MORB XOKBT FOR THB CLOCK. CREDITORS, . . 4ft6 



CHAP. XXXn.— AN fiNTEftPRISING ENGLISHMAK. 



AN ENQU8H YAKKB^ — ^^ FIRST IKTERTISW WITH HIM^ — ^BIS PLAK8 BASED 
ON BARNUM'S BOOK — ADVERTI8INQ FOR PARTNERS — HOW MY RULES MADE 
HIM RICH— aiETHOD IN MADNESS— THB *' BARNUM ** OF BURY — DINNER TO 
TOM TUUMH AND COMMODORE NUTT — MY AGENT IK PARIS— MEASURING A 
MONSTER — HOW GIANT/a AND , DWARFS STRETCH AND .CONTRACT — AN UN- 
WILLING. FRENCHMAN — A PERaiSTENT MEASURER — A/GlCANTrt: HUMWIQ — 
TIMS , STEAM vENOlNES " BABNUM ", AJ«D '* CHARITY "— »WHAX " CHARITY " )>1D 
]^0R" BARNUM '' — SELLING THE SAME GOODS A THOUSAND TIMES — Till^ 
GRBAT 0AKB8 — SIIIKAL SUNDAY— THB BAKITART' COMUX8SION FAIR, 506 



CONTENTS. 21 

CHAP. XXXin.— RICHARD'S HIMSELF' AGAIN. 



AT KOJCB— KXTIXOOiailMKKT OF THB CU>C& DSBTg — A BASCALLT PBOP08I- 
TIOS — ^S^RXUM. OH HXa VKKT AOAIW— K^-PUBCHA8E OF THE MC8EUM — 
A GAUk. BAY — MY lUtCEPXION BY MY rUIENDS — THE STORY OF MT 
TROt'ALBS'^HOW 1 WAIAKD A8H0B£ — PROMISES TO THE PUUHC — THE I'UB- 
UC RKSPQS*E— MVSBUM VISITORS — ^THE RECEIPTS DOUBLED— HOW THE 
rBC«» KBCElYJtD THB KEWS OF RESTORATION— THE SYCOPHANTS — OLD 
AKD FAST FRXfi»DS---BOBI&RT BONNliR— CO.NSIDEP^TION AND COURTESY. OP 
CR£D.iTOBS — XHB BOSTON HATU^jDAY EVENING GAZETTE AGAIN — ^ANOTHER 
WORD FOR BAEMDM, .,,-<•.,.. 516 

CHAP. XXXIV.— MENAGERIE AXD MUSEUM MEMORANDA; 

A KEXABKABLE CHABACTBR — OLD GRIZZLY ADAMS — ^THB CALIFORNIA MENAOE- 

RIB TEKBIBLT WOUNDED BY BEARS — MY UP-TOWN SHOW — EXTRAORDI- 

KART WILL AND VIGOU — A LESSON FOR aiUNCHAUSEN— THE CALlFORN'lA 
GOLDEN PIGEONS — P)G£0N9 OF ^I'L COLORlJ — PROCESS OF THEIR CREATION 
— M. GUILLADtU — A NATURALIST DECEIVED — THE MOST WONDERFUL BIRDS 
IN TUB WOULD — THE CURIOSITIES TRANSFERRED TO THE MENAGERIE — OLD 
ADAMS TAKEN IX — A CHANGE OF COLOR — MOTLEY THE ONLY WEAR — OLD 
GSIZZLY UNDECEIVED-:— TOUR OF THE BEAR-TAMER THROUGH THE COUNTRY 
— A BBAUTIFUL HUNTING SUIT— A LIFE ^ND DEATH SIRUGGLE >OR A 
WAGEB— OLD ADAMS WINS — ^IflS DEATH — THB LAST JOKE ON BAnNU^I — 
THE PRISCE OP WALES VISITS THE MUi^EUM — I CALL ON THE PRINCE IN 
BOSTON — 8TBPHBN A. DOUGLAS — "BEFORE AND AFTKB** IN A BARBER SHOP 
— BOW TOM HIOGIIIBOM "DID" BARNUM — THB MUSEUM FLOURIBUINO, 529 

CHAP. XXXV.— EAST BRIDGEPORT. 



ANOTHER KBW HOME — UNDBNCROFT'^FROOBESS OF MT PET OITT*-^HB 
CBEBTNUT WOOD FIBB-rHOW IT BEOAMB OLD <iIICKORT— INDUCEMENTS TO 
:fETTLBBB — ^MY OFFBB — BVBRY MAN HIS OWN HOUSB-OWNBR-^WUiSKY 
AND XO^VACCO— tBIftB IN- IlBAL-£8TATB--*mMBR0KE LAKE — WASHINGTON 
PARK. — 0RMT,MAN¥yA(»rOllIBB-*-WffE«LBK AlfD WILSO> — 8CHDTLEK, HART- 
LEY AND. GB,U4AM-i— IU)TQMK4»6»- BON AWD COMPANY— STREET NAMES— 
MANT THOUSAND MIAPB TBBa8->-HI 08 11*180 'IN THB NEW CITY— UNPARAL- 
LELEI> C&OWTH AND PB08PERITY — ^PROBABILITIES IN THB FUTURE — SITUA- 
TION OP BRlDQBPeNT-^JT» A»VAKTAG«9TAin> PROBPBCTe^^HB SECOND, IF 
SOT THE FOREMOST CITY IK CONNECTICUT, 549 

CHAP. XXXYL— MORE ABOUT THE MUSEUM. 



AHOTHBaH RE-OPB9IN«— >A GHEBBT-OOLORBD CAT-^SB OAT LBT OUT OF THE 

BAG MT FIB8T WHALING EXPEDITION — PLANS FOR CAPTURE— SUCCESS 

OF THE <«OH£MK**TRAN$PORTllM» LIVING WHALES BY LAND— PUBLIC EX- 
riTKNENT — TOE OliBAT TAITI^— SALT WATER PUMPED FROM THE BAY TO 
THE MUSy:QM-*<NOBB WHALES^EXPBOITION TO LABRADOR — ^THB FIRST 
HIPPOPOTAMUA 19 AMERICA — TROPICAL FISH — COMMODORE NUTT AND HIS 
FIR»T *'AJ(»AQBMGff'^"--^HB TWO DBOMIOS— PRESIDENT LINCOLN &EES 
COXMOIKUIB NUIT— WAPINO A»HORErr-A QUESTION OF LEGS — SBLF-OEOEP- 
TIO«C — TUB pOLDEK ANOBL P.I8I| — AKJfA SWAN. THE NOVA SCOTIA OIANT- 

E»a ^THB TALLB8T WOMAN IN THB WOBLD — INDIAN GHIBF8 — EXPEDITION 

TO CTFBCS — ^MY AOBBT IN A PABHA's HAREM, . 560 



22 CWXfiNTS. 

CHAP. XnVIL-.ia, ANDICfi^ PEN)^f(iJL.TOH THUMB. 

MIS8 LAVIXIA WARRKN — A CHA&MI170 LITTLE LADY — BUPFOSBD TO BE THE 
$30,000 NUTT IN DISGUISE — HER WARDROBE AND PBE8KNT8 — STOKY OF A 
RING— THE LITTLE COMMODORE IK LOVE — TOM THCMB SXITTKK — ^RlVALRY 

OF THE DWARFS — JEALOUSY OF THE GENERAL — ^VISIT AT BRIOOEFORT 

THE GKNERAL's STYLISH TURN-OUT — MISS WARREN IXPRES8EI>*><;aLL OF 
THE GENERAL — A LILLli'UTIAN I>OVE 8CKNE — TOM THUMB'S INVKNTORY OP 
HIS PROPERTY — HE PROPOSES AND IB ACCEPTED— ARRIVAL OF THE COM- 
MODORU — HIS GRIEF — EXCITEMENT OVER THE ENOAOEMENT — ^THE WED- 
DING IN GRACE CHURCH — REVEREND JUNIUS WILLET— A SPICY LETTER 

BY DOCTOR TAYLOR— O RAND RECEPTION OF MR. AND MH8. 8TRATTON 

THE COMMODORE IK SEARCH OF A GREEN COUKTRT QIRL, .... 583 

CHAP. XXXVin.— POLITIOAL AND PERSONAL. 



MY POLITICAL PRINCIPLES — REASONS FOR MT CHANGE OF PARTIES— KANSAS 
AND SKCE8SION — WIDE-AWaKES — GRAND ILLUMINATION OF LlNDENCHU^i' — 
JOKE OX A DEMOCRATIC NEIGHBOR — ^PEACE MEETINGS — ^THE STEPNEY EX- 
CITEMENT — TEARING DOWN A PEACE FLAG — A LOYAL MEETING ^BEC|£P- 

TION IN BRIDGEPOJtT — DESTRUCTION OF TllE " FARMER** OFFICE — ^ELIAS 
UOWE, JR. — SAINT PETER AND SALTPETRE — DRAFT RIOTS — BURGLARS AT 
LINDENCROFT — Ml' ELECTION TO THE LEGISLATURE — BEGINNING OF MY 
WAR ON RAILROAD MONOPOLIES — WIRE-PULLING — ^THE XIV. AMENDMENT 
TO THE UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION — STRIKING THE WORD " WHITE*' 
jnSOM THE CONNECTICCT CONSTITUTION — ^MY SPEECH^ ^00 

CHAP. XXXIX.-.THE AMERICAN MITSEXTM IN RUIN& 

A TERRIBLE LOSS — HOW I RECEIVED THE KEW8 — ^BURNING OF THE AMERICAN 
MUSEUM— DETAILS OP THE DISASTER— FAITH IN HBRRINO'S SAFES— BAKED 
AND BOILED WHALES-^THlB tmw YORK TRlBt7NV ON tHE DESTRUCTION OF 
THE MCBETM-^tA public CALAHITY-HTrMPATinr OF TtTE LEaDINO EDITORS 
— AMOUNT OP'MT LOSS— «M<ALL INSURAMCE-^MY PROPKTtTY— INTENTION TO 
RETIRB TO PRIVATE LIPS'^HORACK OlttBLlnr ADyiSES ME TO OO A-FIStlINO 
— OENEFIT TO THE MUBEVM BMPI>OTBBS AT' «■ AiDADEMY OF= MIT8IC— MY 
SPEECH— WHAT THE NEW YORK SCm'»AII> A'BOVT IT— *HB NEW tJP-TOWN 
MU8SUM— OPENING THB'ESTABUSHKBIfT to TBE lOtBLIC, . . 63S 

OTAP. XL.— MT WAR ON THE RAILROADS. 

SCENES IK THE LEGISLATURE — SHARP-SHOOTING — ^PROPOSITIONS FOR A NEW 

CAPITAL OF .iCPXlfl90tI0fS«--TU& JUVAXBY «V CltlES-r-CUUIINATION OF 

THE RAILROAD CONTROVERSY — EXCITEMENT AMONG THE LOBBYISTS — A 

BILL FOR THE BENEFIT OF COMMUTERS — ^PEOPLE PROTECTED FROM THE 

'FLU^RRERB — HOW SETTLERS ABE DRAIW INTO A STATE AND TltEN 

"CHEATED II Y THE RAILROAD COMPANFES-^EQUAL RIGHTS FOR COMMUTERK 
AND TIJANSIKST PASSENGERS — WHAT COMMODORE VANDEKBILT DID— WHAT 
THE NEW YORK AND NEW HAVEN RAILROAD COMPANY WANTED TO DO — 
EXI'OSCME OF THEIR PIX)T — CONSTERNATION OF THE CONSPIRATORS — MY 
VICTORY — AGAIN ELECTED TO THE LEGISLATURE — UNITED STATES SENATOR 
FERRY — EX-OOVERKOR W. A. BUCKINGHAM — ^THEODQRB T I LTON— GOVERNOR 
MAWLEY — FRIENDS AT LINDENCROFT — NOMINATBO FOR C0HGMB8S AND 
DEPEATSD, 649 



I 



I 



CHAP. H<I.H-BS2!IVBIT ANi^^EBS. WSBULLD. 



THE JHtntCA-^ llt%fiTTlt USAB*— ITS VAtTTE-^BiniBTT 01^ TflE itERALD UtTTS- 
rr Fdlt'$90D,609^^4tC PtmCHAflES TfiE «lOrE»nr^— OTtRBittMATE OP ITS 
WOHTM—StAX MARfiTZEk— -VTftS OT.AEA LO0I8B KELLOOO'S ESTHffATE OP 
CEETAtK PEOPLE^— THE POt^'ER BEHIND TtlE HERALD THRONE — ^THE HEE- 
ALd'S lNPLLEirCE*AiEB*WBTT KICRED AND COWHIDED — HIS LAWYER INSISTS 
CPOV iir TAKINO BACR THE HtJSElJM LEASE — I DECLfNE — ^BENNETT RE- 
rrPBS MY ADTERtWEMENl'B — INTERVIEW WlTff MR. HUDSON — ^^AR bP THE 
VAVAGEt^ VTtnf THE HeRAL1>-^BENNETT HtMBLED— loss OP THE HERALD's 
PHEsrtOE-^MbNElr* DAMAOE TO BENNETT^ EBTABLIimMENT— /THE EDITOR 
BVEI>^-FEACB tiSTWEEK THtf HERALD A^D THE ' MANAGERS, .... 666 



CHAP. XW.— PUBUO LECTURING. 



XT TOUR AT THE WEST — THE CITRIO^ITT EXQUBJTOU HI3(SELF A .CURI08ITX— 
BUYING A FARM IN WISCONSIN — HELPING THOSE \jrHq HELP THEMSELVES 
—A RIDE ON A LOCOMOTIVE — PUNCTUALITY!^ MY ENGAGEMENTS — TRICKS 
TO SECURE SEATS IN THE tAI>^E8^ CAR — I SUpDEN^Y BECA9IE FATHER TO 
A YOUNG MARKIED COUPLE — MY IpENTJlTY DENIED— PITY AND CHARITY — 
REVEREND DOCTOR CHAPIN PULLS THE ^ELL — TEMPERANCE — ^HOW I BECAME 
A TEETOTALKR — MODERATE DRINKING ^ND , ITS . DANGERS — DOCTOR CHA- 
PIN's LECTUBE in BEIDGEPORT— my OWN EF^OR;r0 IN TH^B TEMPERANCE 
CAUSE — LECTURIXO THROUGHOUT THE COUNTRY—NE^l^SP^FIiR ARJ^Cl^S — 
The STORY OF VINELAND, IN NEW JERSEY, . ' .' ' . . . , . . "^ ^^6 

CHAP. iSXIIL^tHfi KBW MUSEUM. 



1 GXOAVZIO UkXUSEMSNT .COMPANY — ^IMUJSNJBE ApDIXiONS XO TUB KBW COlr 
UCT|O9(7r-CURi0SLTi«S FROM SVi^Y,WHKRE-n-THE «ORDQN CUMMINOS' COL- 
UUTIIOJ^ MUQ» ^FHlCArv-TUE» GftBIF I.A^r^WHAi; THE PAPEHS »AJD AJtOUT 
ins MOyftTKR*^Mdr PRIVATE V.IEW OF; THE, ANIMAL*— AMUSING INTERVIEW 
WJTI^ PAUf. l>li CMAUJ.U-PA 6UPERM MENAGERIE— O'HE . VEW ■ THEATRE — 
raurLCT ^On A'FRES 2fAJiOMAL.<4M«XXIUTIONTrM.ES^R9. E.. D. MORGAN, 
RIXXIAM C.^4W(YAI<Tf BOftAC^ . ^REELEV A1U> , OTHERS - FAVOR MY PLAN — 
PRE»IDKKT JOHNSON INDOKI^KS IT — pB^TRVOJlQH ,OV »A|Y SECOND MJISEUM 
BT FIRE — THE ICE-CLAD RUINS — A SAD, YET SPLENDID SPECTACLE — OUT 
OP THE BCSUrSSS — FOOT RACES AT THE WHITE MOUNTAINS — ^HOW I WAS 
KOT BEATEN— OPENING OF WOOD'S MUSEUM IK KEW YORK — MY ONLY 
lETEREST IH THE KMTERPRI8E, 692 

CHAP. XUV.— CURIOUS COINCIDENCES.— NUMBER THIRTEEN. 

POPULAR SUPERSTITIONS — ^UNLUCKY FRIDAY — UNFORTUNATE SATURDAY 

RAINY SUNDAYS— TERRIBLE THIBTEEN— THE BRETTELT^ OF LONDON— I N- 
CIDB.NTS OF MY WESTERN TRIP— SINGULAR FATALITY— NUMBER THIRTEEN 
IN El'ERY HOTEL — ^NO ESCAPE FROM THE FRIGHTFUL FIGURE— ADVICE OF 
A CLERICAL FRIEND — THE THIRTEEN COLONIES— THE THIRTEENTH CHAP- 
TER OP CORINTHIANS— THIRTEEN AT MY CHRISTMAS DINNER PARTY— THIR- 
TEEN DOLLARS AT A FAIR — TWO DISASTROUS DAYS— THE THIRTEENTH 
DAY U TWO MONTHS— THIRTEEN PAGES OF MANUSCRIPT, .... 708 



24 



CONTENTS. 



a 



' dHAP. kLV.— A BTORY CHAPTEtL 

SYB&T UAH TO Uia TOQATIQH** AND ''NATURE WILL AIWBBT BMWBBI^w"^- 
BSaT BY THB WAYSIPEt^A MALF-SHAVED FARTT— CQKSTBBITATIOV OF A 
CL£HOYMAN — NATIVES IN NEW YOKK — DOCTOBJNO A COBN-POCTOR*— RELI- 
GIOUS RAILWAYS — TUK BK1GIITOX DUGLE BUfilNKSS — CASH AND GON8CIEVCE 
^-CASTLES IN THE AIR — ^A DELUDED ,ANTIQU<4RI AN ttOAMBLINO AKD POLI- 
TICS—IRISH WIT — ABOUT CONl)lJCTOR8-^DB. f^HAFIN A& A PUN8TER — FOWL 
ATTEMPTS — A PA|R o' DOCKS— CUTTING A SICK FRIENp— BBV. RICHARD 
VARICK DEY — ^HJS CRIME AND ITS CONSEgUENCES-rFQBEORDINATION — 
PRACTICAL ^JOKING BY MY rATHER — A VALUABLE BACB-flOBSE — ^BOW H»- 
WAS LET AND THEN KILLED - AGONY OF T^B HORftf^KILUSR — ^TIL« FINAL 
"sell"— FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FRENCH-— COCKNEYI8M — ^WICKED WORDS 
IK EXETER HALL, 718 

CflAt. XLVI.— SEA-SIDE PARK. 



IlTTERBST IN PUBLIC tMPROVEMENTS— OLD PARK PROJECTS— OPPOSITION OF 
OLD FOGIES — ^THE SOUND. SHORE AT RRIDGEI'ORT — INACCESSIBLE PROP- 

' KRTY — THE EYE OP FAltU^^TALKlNG T<^ THE FARMERS — REACHING THE 
PUBLIC THROUGH THE I*APERS — ttO^ fUE LAND WAS SECURED FOR A 
GREAT PLKASL'RK-CJHOUND — GIFTS TO TUB PEOPLE— <)PEN1NP 0;F SEA-^IDE 
PARK -THE MOST IIEAt7TITUL GROUND BAtWEEV TfEW YORK AND BOSTON 
-tMAONIFTCEKT DRIVI^S — TIlE ADVANTAGES OF THE LOCATION — MUSIC FOR 
THE MILLlt>N — BY THfe ^£A-8IDE — ^FUTURE OF THE PARK— A PERPETUAL 

. '^LSSaiNO to POSTBRlTYy . ,..,...• .758 

CHAP. XLVIL— WAIaDEMERE. 



MY PRIVATE LIFE — PLANS FOR THB PUBUG BENEFIT IN BRIDGBPOST-^OFEIT- 
ING' AVB*WE»i— PLANTING* SH ADtPHlBES— OLD FOGlCfl — c6l<8BRTAtli^ k 
CURSE TO ClTlES-^BBNEFITlNe BAtlNUM's PROPKBTY — SALE OF LXNbKN- 
CROFT-i-MVINO ' m A FARlt^HOtMrt— «r THE 'BBA-^TR^K — HftotlfEn wfew 
HOME — WALDEMERE-oROW IT CAME TO BE SmLT^M^AGlO A«D"MONET— 
WiVEWOOD AND THE^^^BTREl's NBftt — Mt FARM— TAB ROtlAltb BLANKET 
OATTLE~>MY OJTY RESlDBNCe— GOMFORTfl OF €ITT LIFE BikoOtNG LET- 
TERS — MY FAiritYk-^RBLIGieUft BEFLECIlOirfl — Mt FIFTt-MNTM BIRTHDAY 



-^«TU£ BKD OF THS'RBOORD,' 



768 



I • 



/ t 






I 



t 



CHAPTER L 



■EABIiT LEFB.' 



- I. • > ■■ 



XT BXBTH — FIB8T PBOPESTT -^ FABMB9-BOT XJUBf-^QOIBra'TO jBGHOati— BABXiT 
AOQtTKrnVEKlSSS — A HOUSAT PEDDIaER — FIRJsT VISIT TO NEW YOBBJ — UEABK- 

iNq TO **8WAP** — KisEam taoec k^ulmes . oansv ^'^lyt uijAim"-^ 

XSTBRCrO UPOK JIY ESTATE — CLBBXSHIP IN A OpUITVBX 8T0BE— TBJUDIirO 
ICORALB — THE BSTBEI. XEETlNt^-lTOtTBB-^ STOVE •<|l7EirTlOil'--SUNi>At SCJaOOL 
AMD B^EXJi CXAW— XT OOXPOttTlbef — TXE QSm TSOf^ jnfDTOL. : 

■ t • > •' 

I MTAs bom in the toWn of Bethel^ in . the Sta,te oi 
Coimecticut, July 5, 1810^ My namei Phif^eas TAylor, 
is derived from my material grandfather, whp Wft» a 
great wag in h^s w^y, and w^o^ as I was hi^. first grand- 
child, gravely handed over to my mother at. my christen- 
ing, a gift-deed, in my oehalf, of five acreft; pi* Iimd 
situated in ^hat part of th^ pariah :.Gjf JBeth^l kpowji as 
the "Plum Tirees,", X jvas. t^fe^ns;^, jr^aj eatate , o>f ner 
almost at my yery hjrth;,,|^4 pfmx.prpperty* "Ivy 
Island," something shall be said . f^^pn. 

My father, Philo Bamum, was the son of ij^phraim 
Bamum, of Bethel, who was a c9.ptaiQ in thp revolu* 
tionary war. My father. wa9; a tailor^ a fsrmer, and 
sometimes a tavem^eeper, i^pid my, advantages and dis- 
advantages were such as fi^U to the general run of 

shelled ccnrn, iveed^d the, garc^ » as ; I gi;ew : larger, I 
rode horse for plaug]^g» turned f^^ .raked;^hay ; 19 due 
time I honied the ahpv^ and the hpeb and when I 
could do so I went to schooL 



26 EABLY UFB. 

I was six years old when I began to go to school, and 
the first date I remember inscribing upon my writing- 
book was 1818. The ferule, in those days, was the 
assistant school-master; but in spite of it, I was a 
willing, and, I thi^k,,a pvet^y apt scholar; at least, I 
was so con8ideredl)y my teachers and schoolmates^ and 
as the years went on there were never more than two 
or three in the school who were deemed my superiors. 
Ifl'teMimfetie Itras raustiaHy feady atid fecCitfftle, audi 
TCBwmbeffy.atthe age>af tie^ys 7Mm, being caUed-out 
of 'Tj^d'one nigjht by iiiy'teach.ejf Who had wagered with 
a iieighbor4kat'I-«ould<<mknl«ite'%he oorrecft oMiKiber of 
feet in a load of wood in five minutes. The dimensions 
giytftt-t S^itxdie «tt«'fhe rteulf ilii iMs m&ri'Wo mihutes, 
to tile giwMiicleligfW'of toy li^achei' i^d td ' the'^^Ual 
a8torii8h*tttot>«f'lfid"fa«fighb6t." '"• " ' ' * ' ' " ' 

My drgatt.«f.*''«KitU8itJyenete"-^ta4hateifet ait to 
early age; >> BeftnM I "watf fhre y^arfr 'df- %e, I bi»g«n ' to 
aoettmulate '^niticis attd ''"fdttt'ptftleei','' etnd^'Whto I iltidi 
six jtam- old^ 'my •capital' «inlO«t«f()ed' to 'a' MsA- siiiffifai^i^ to 
ex6has^'f<nr 4 i^v^r''Mlsa<,'tl^ po^^ebsioii'bf whii6h 
made Ha 'I^A'fajtnOidt^knd <indf6 ihdeptod^ht ihitil'I 
have ever since iMi'iii the \W*lti."' V"''""" ."'•'•' 

Not did trfydollto 4obg>>klittiak \Udiie. ' A« { ^w 
older I ^iiinHid ' Wk ceitts «'• dA^ ' fot 'iMSta^ 'thfe' fcdtse 
which )«a"ih6 dtC't^ni i<i-^ldtl^faitig;'imdbn' h61id^ys 
and '«'trahfiftg daysr iWteaa ' <>f • 6^«idhig ttobey; 1 
earnied it. I t^as'tt'^nMtll'peddier'icifmblasaes bandy ((!^f 
home ttakl^, ^gifigett%re«td,'idM»kie^ ahd cheiVy rthn^ahd 
I generally ftmnd ihysblf b ddlat 'ot'two ridi^r'at (he 
end«f 'tf'hblidiiy thtti fwtiA «t'1!Ii^"begiMing.""r'^a8 
al#ttyrf'5fe«*y «»^«i'tiJadfeian4'15^^ «i6tlnlfe''r%aB tw^lVe 
years old, besides other "ptope^, I Was the iiPniet of 



SABLY LISE. 27 

a sheep and a Mlf, aiiid shot^ 80dtt,« no 4cubt, have 
become u flmaU- GnMus, kad AOt urf father kkidly 
pennitted • me to purehasd my oi^' dtdthltig, ^wliich 
somewhat redueedi my litHefitoret * '"' 

When J iTBA nearly twelve years old •! made -my first 
visit to the metropolis. It- happened islk this wise : Late 
one afternoon in January, 1822^ 'Mr. iDaniel B^wn, of 
Southbiary, Gonnectieut, arrived at my fathers tavern, 
in BetheU iwith eomo>fat eattie- he^was driving* «o New 
York to sell./ ' The cattle were put into 'onr large '1>am- 
yard, the horsee were iMabled, *emd Mr. 'BtoWn and^* his 
^ssistantfli^ewtprovided with a watHfk s^ippiei^ and lodging 
for theaight. After supper T-heard Mr. Browil sarf to 
my&thor that >ta^ itfM;enddd to buy mttte^eatttlo, aiDid' that 
he wottid'be f;lad<to^hire^»'boy to a)^i^ in driving- the 
cattle. I immediately befi^^ht miy fkth^t' to ^e^te the 
situation for me, and he did so» My mother's consent 
was also gfainedi and^^at ^Lylight ne^t mv^inmg, affcer a 
Hghb breakf«Mi'I 'Mart^ OU' foot'in fjhe midst of a 
heavy mom • atorm to • help drive th*' ^ttlei Before 
reaching Bidgefidd, Iwao eent><Mi horseback ttfbet'^ a 
stray mq and, in'galtopitig',^ttie horsO^llatid 4iy -ankle 
was sprainedr ^I iwoSet^d ^seyet^ly, M<7'did 'not com- 
plain leal nay elmployey i^llottld' settd mfe bMk. UtA he 
coQsidenit^ permitted me-tO' ride behind him on his 
^onei ondv indeed^ dkt ^so most of 'thd^ way to New 
Yorkywkeie we arrived "in tixree or four dayvi. 

We put up«tlii0 BttiyaHiead Tavern,' whelie we were 
to stay tLmttk while the df over was disposing of his cat- 
tle, end^ivw ware-^tiieB to tetttm home in a sleigh. It 
was an eventful week for me. Before I' Ifift jiOme my 
motfaflc Jhad gif«niBe« dollaaif mlsMi I supposed would 
supplf.e^ory w«iil;tiifttlmnrt<eoiddwi6h. My first out- 



26 SABIiY UF£. 

lay wasjfoi; or^ngOA i^ltich: J ww t^d wenib^r pence 
apiege, . and a9,..^'fJWr-pe1H)e/^ ui Coimeoticiiit ima six 
cents, I, offered. t^a cents foK tWQ. .oranges which; iras of 
course readily taken; and thxxBi instead .of saving two 
ce^ts, fis I tibhofight^ I ^a^^y p9tid two* cente .iBMe than 
thQ pric^ doman/ie^ I;thenJ)oughttwo moice oranges, 
reducing n;iy . pftpit*^. to pighty.qisnts* - Thirtyione cents 
was.the/^Vcl^Wgft" fer aj/BfuiflJl. gun , which wwJid **go 
off" ^d ^cffd^a st^i^ soiQ^i lUtle disJlanc««)tod' this gun 
I bgughtjit APttWlBglwys^f. wltb. Ais toy;iit the^b^ 
room pf i\kf^ ]l$3ill>;Head| the ai^^w happened to hit the 
.bar!^eeppr4,i^h9c^o^t^Wiith eat|)e,f^^ behind theioodinter 
an4.£ihQq}c.me aip/d soi^n^ly boi&edmy ^lurs, jbdliAg.me to 
put titiat gW^ out Q^,^he way ^ir he.¥^ould .put it int6 the 
fire. , I, 8|ie§)5e4 to/:my xppp^.put mty. treasure under 
thc.piUQ]sr, /4i4. ^i^^^ out i for . 4B0ther ^^t to the toy 
shop..., ,11 I .'!' ,. '^ •• ' . 

Xjictre ]! i^vesjtpd 6ij^> ^W^ lin .^t torpedeesy" with 
which. I; intended .(o ^tpi^h .my:^€boplznateSrin'>BB^eL 
X could nqt rpJ^ai^^ howeveri, fipmieKperimaiUBng upon 
the.giie^faf ftf ttifi tw^i .wWsh I (Kd ;whbn t^y Iwexc 
going. i^ 1o 4^atu I ^r.eiif: twifft ;o£ the toxyadoes 
against the wa|l),,pf t)i^ ;^iaJll thronig^ whi^h: Che < guests 
W]ere .passing,, a^^ $h^ ii^Rie^t^t rdsuto' .weire as fol- 
lows:, two Iqad ]^po]rts,c-^.f^toGDifth0d*wgi»ist&y'*^irate 
landlord, -^dispQv^ry of ^e ^cipJipriJt, and summai^ pun- 
ishment -T- fof . t^e . l^i^cff^ jfljoiif^ifktely floored 4n& with 
a singly bloif with.^ qpe4ihMd»:and;99ad{2; < ' 

\'TheTey you, l^le^^^^ilMroiJQe.if.tlM.wiU .^ 
you better than tQ ^s^plcM^jy^t^r^is^jEotJial/fise ctadkors in 
my hpi;^f flgfiif.".,; , ..j. i 'i^ii :l y>r .;' ni .; ...: 
. ThieiJ^pi^.waf 8<#«Me9^i>foiV9^.(Wllielyi sa l A if i wUiry, 
I deposited the balance of . the torpe^Pes/wilii/ jn^ gun, 



fiABLY LIFB. 39 

and as a solace for my wounded feelings I again visited 
the toy shop) where I bought a watch, breastpin and 
top, leayiug but eleven cents of my original dollar. 

The following morning found me again at the fasci- 
nating toy shop, where I saw a beautiful knife with two 
llades, a gimlet, and a corkscrew, — a whole carpenter 
>hop in miniature, and all fur thirty-one cents. But, 
alas ! I had only eleven cents. Have that knife I must, 
however, and so I proposed to the shop woman to take 
back the top and breastpin at' a slight deduction, and 
w iih my eleven cents to let me have the knife. The 
kind creaturer consented, and this makes memorable my 
Hrst "swap/' Some fine and nearly white molasses 
candy then caught my' eye, and I proposed to trade the 
watch for its equivalent in candy. The transaction 
was made and the candy was so delicious that before 
night my gun was absorbed in the same way. The next 
morning the torpedoes "went off" in the -same direc- 
tion, and before night even my beloved knife was simi- 
larly exchanged. My money and my goods aU gone I 
tiaded two pocket handkerchiefs and an extra pair of 
Ftockings I was sure I should not want for nine more 
rolls of molasses candy, and then wandered about the 
city disconsolate, (Sighing because there was no more 
molasses candy to conquer. 

I doubt not that in these first wanderings about the 
city I often passed the comer of Broadway and Ann 
Street — never dreaming of the stir I was destined at a 
future day to make in that locality as proprietor and 
manager e( the American Museum. 

After wandering, gazing and wondering, for a week, 
Mr. Brown took me in his sleigh and on the evening of 
the following day we arrived in Bethel. I had a 

. 2* A 



80 BASLY UFE. 

thousand questions to answer, and then and for a long 
time afterwards I was quite a lion among my mates 
because I had seen the great metropolis. My brothers 
and sisters, however, were m*uch disappointed at my 
not bringing them something from my dollar, and when 
my mother examined my wardrobe and found two 
pocket handkerchiefs and one pair of stockings missing 
she whipped me and sent me to bed. Thus inglori- 
ously terminated my first visit to New York. 

Previous to my visit to New York, I think it was in 
1826, when I was ten years of age, I*made my first 
expedition to my landed property, " Ivy Island." This, 
it will be remembered, was the gift of my grandfather, 
from whom I derived my name. From the time when I 
was four years old I was continually hearing of tllis 
" property." My grandfather always spoke of me (in 
my presence) to the neighbors and to strangers as 
the' richest child in town, since I owned the whole of 
" Ivy Island," one of the most valuable farms in the 
State. My father and mother frequently* reminded 
me of my wealth and hoped I would do something for 
the family when I attained my majority. The neigh- 
bors professed to fear that I might refuse to jilay 
with their children because I had inherited so large 
a property. 

These constant allusions, for several years, to " Ivy 
Island" excited at once my pride and my curiosity 
and stimulated me to implore my father's permission 
to visit my property. At last, he promised I should 
do 80 in a few days, as we should be* getting 
some hay near " Ivy Island." The wished for day at 
length arrived and my father told me that as we 
were to mow an adjoining meadow, I might visit my 



EARLY LIFE. 31 

property in company with the hired man during the 
• nooning." My grandfather reminded me that it was 
to his bounty I was indebted for this wealth, and 
that had not my name been Phineas I mjght never have 
■oen proprietor of " Ivy Island." To this my mother 
added : 

" Now, Taylor, do n't become so excited when you see 
your property as to let your joy maTce you sick, for 
remember, rich as you are, that it will be eleven years 
before you can come into possession of your fortune." 

She added much more good advice, to all of whiah I 
promised to be calm and .reasonable and not to allow 
my pride to prevent me from speaking to my brotheris 
and sisters when I returned home. 

When we arrived at the meadow, which was in that 
pat of the " Plum Trees " known as " East Swamp," 
I asked my father where " Ivy Island " was. 

" Yonder, at the north end of this meadow, where 
YOU see those beautiful tre-^s rising in the distance." 

All the forenoon I turned grass as fast as two men 
could cut it, and after a hasty repast at noon, one of our 
hired jnen, a good natured Irishman, named Edmund, 
took an axe on his shoulder and announced that he was 
ready to accompany me to " Ivy Island." We started, 
and as we approached the north end of the meadow we 
found the groimd swampy and wet and were soon 
obliged to leap from bog to bog on our route. A mis- 
step brought me up to my middle in water. To add to 
the dilemma a swarm of hornets attacked me. Attain- 
ing the altitude of another bog I was cheered by the 
iissurance that there, was only a quarter of a mile of this 
kind of travel to the edge of my property. I waded on. 
In about fifteen minutes more, after floundering through 



32 BAELY LIFE. 

the morasS) I found myself half-drowned, hornet-stung, 
mud-covered, and out of breath, on comparatively dry 
land. 

" Never mind, my boy," said Edmund, *' we have only 
to cross this little creek, and ye'U be upon your own 
valuable property." 

We were on the margin of a stream, the banks of 
which were thickly covered with alders. I now dis- 
covered the use of Edmund's axe, for h6 felled a small 
oak to form a temporary bridge to my " Island " prop- 
erty* Crossing over, I proceeded to the centre of my 
domain ; I saw nothing but a few stunted ivies and strag- 
gling trees. The truth flashed upon ine. I had been 
the laughing-stock of the family and neighborhood for 
years. My valuable '* Ivy Island " was an almost 
inaccessible, worthless bit of barren land, and while I 
stood deploring my sudden downfall, a huge black snake 
(one of my tenants) approached me with upraised head. 
I gave one shriek and rushed for the bridge. 

This was my first, and, I need not say, my last visit to 
" Ivy Island." My father asked me " how I liked my 
property ? " and I responded that I would sell it pretty 
cheap. My grandfather congratulated me upon my 
visit to my property as seriously as if it had been indeed 
a valuable domain. My mother hoped its richness had 
fully equalled my anticipations. The neighbors desired 
to know if I was not now glad I was named Phineas, 
and for five years forward I was frequently reminded 
of my wealth in *''Ivy Island." 

As I grew older, my settled aversion to manual labor, 
farm or other kind, was manifest in various ways, which 
were set down to the general score of laziness. In 
despair of doing better with me, my father concluded to 



EABLY UFB. . 33 

make a merchant of me. He erected a building in Bethel, 
and with Mr, Hiram Weed as a partner, purchased a 
stock of dry goods, hardware, groceries, and general 
notions and installed me as clerk in this country store. 

Of course I '• felt my oats." It was condescension on 
my part to talk with boys who did out-door work. I 
stood behind the counter with a pen over my ear, was 
polite to the ladies, and was wonderfully active in wait- 
ing upon custome.rs. We kept a cash, credit and barter 
store, and I drove some sharp bargains with women 
who brought butter, eggs, beeswax and feathers to 
exchange for dry goods, and with men who wanted to 
trade oats, com, buckwheat, axe-helves, hats, and other 
commodities for tenpenny nails, molasses, or New 
England rum. But it was a drawback upon my dignity 
that I was obliged to take down the shutters, sweep the 
store, and' make the fire. I received a small salary for 
my services and the perquisite of what profit I could 
derive from purchasing candies on my own account to 
sell to our younger customers, and, as usual, my father 
stipulated that I should clothe myself. 

There is a great deal to be learned in a countiy 
store, and principally this — that sharp trades, tricks, 
dishonesty, and deception are by no means confined 
to the city. More than once, in cutting open bundles 
of rags, brought to be exchanged for goods, and 
warranted to be all linen and cotton, I have discovered 
in the interior worthless woolen trash and somatimes 
stones, gravel or ashes. Sometimes, too, when measur- 
ing loads of oats, corn or rye, declared to contain 
a specified number of bushels, say sixty, I have found 
them four or five bushels short. In such cases, some 
one else was always to blame, but these happenings 

3 



34 . 3CABLY LIFE. 

• 

were frequent enough to make us watchful of otu: 
customers. In the evenings and on wet days trade was 
always dull, and at such times the story-telling and 
joke-playing wits and wags of the village used to 
assemble in our store, and from them I derived coii- 
siderable amusement, if not profit. After the store was 
closed at night, I frequently joined some of the village 
boys at the houses of their parents, where, with story- 
telling and play, a couple of hours would soon pass by, 
and then as late, perhaps, as eleven o'clock, I went 
home and slyly crept up stairs so as not to awaken my 
brother with whom I slept, and who would be sure 
to report my late hours. He made every attempt, and 
laid all sorts of plans to catch me on my return, 
but as sleep always overtook him, I managed easily to 
elude his efforts. 

Like most people in Connecticut in those days, I was 
brov^ht up to attend church regularly on Sunday, and 
long before I could read I was a prominent scholar 
in the Sunday school. My good mother taught me my 
•lessons in the New Testament and the Catechism, 
and my every effort was directed to win one of those 
" Rewards of Merit," which promised to pay the bearer 
one mill, so that ten of these prizes amounted to 
one cent, and one hundred of them, which might 
be won by faithful assiduity every Sunday for two years, 
would buy a Sunday school book worth ten cents. 
Such were the magnificent rewards held out to the 
religious ambition of youth. 

There was but one church or " meeting-house " in 
Bethel, which all attended, sinking all differences 
of creed in the Presbyterian faith. The old meeting- 
house had neither steeple nor bell and was a plain 



EAKLY LIFE. 35 

edifice, comfortable enough in summer, but my teeth 
chatter even now when I think of the dreary, cold, 
freezing hours we passed in that place in winter. A 
stove in a meeting-house in those days would have been 
a sacrilegious innovation. The sermons were from 
an hour and one half to two hours long, and through 
these the congregation would sit and shiver till they 
really merited the title the profane gave them of " blue 
skins." Some of the women carried a " foot-stove " 
consisting of a small square tin box in a wooden frame, 
the sides perforated, and in the interior there was a small 
>(iuare iron dish, which contained . a few live coals 
covered with ashes. These stoves were usually replen- 
ished just before meeting time at some neighbor s near 
the meeting-house. 

After many years of shivering and suffering, one of 
the brethren had the temerity to propose that the 
hurch should be wanned with a stove. His impious 
proposition was voted down by ' an overwhelming 
luiijority. Another year came around, and in November 
the stove question was again brought up. The excite- 
ment was immense. The subject was discussed in the 
\ilJage stores and in the juvenile debating club; it 
was prayed over in conference ; ^and finally in general 
'' society's meeting," in December, the stove was carried 
! y a majority of one and was introduced into the meet- 
ing-house. On the first Sunday thereafter, two ancient 
maiden ladies were so oppressed by the dry and heated 
atmosphere occasioned by the wicked innovation, that 
tliev fainted awav and were carried out into the cool air 
''lere they speedily returned to consciousness, espe- 
cially when they were informed that owing to the lack 
{j( two lengths of pipe, no fire had yet been made in the 



36 EARLY LIFE. 

stove. The next Sunday was a bitter cqld day, and ttie 
stove, filled with well-seasoned hickory, was a great 
gratification to the many, and displeased only a few. 
After the benediction, an old deacon rose and reqnestecj 
the congregation to remain, and called upon them tq 
witness that he had from the first raised his voice 
against the introduction of a stove into the house of the 
Lord; but the majority had been against him and ^ he 
had submitted; now, if they mtist have a stove, h^ 
insisted upon haying a large one, since the present end 
did not heat the whole house, but drove the cold to tliG 
back outside pews, making them three times as cold as 
they were before ! In the course of the week, this 
deacon was made to comprehend that, unless ou 
unusually severe days, the stove was sufficient to warm 
the house, and, at any rate, it did not drive all the cold 
in the house into one corner. 

During the Rev. Mr. Lowe's ministrations at Bethel, 
he formed a Bible class, of which I was a member. We 
used to draw promiscuously from a hat a text of scrip- 
ture and write a composition on the text, which compo-^ 
sitions were read after service in the afternoon, to siichl 
of the congregation as remained to hear the exercised 
of the class. Once, I remember, I drew the text, Lukel 
X. 42 : " But one thing is needful ; and Mary hath 
chosen that good part which shall not be taken away 
from her." Question^ ** What is the one thing need- 
ful 1 " My answer was nearly as follows : . , 

" This question ' what is the one thing needful ? ' is 
capable of receiving various answers, depending much 
upon the persons to whom it is addressed. The mer- 
chant might answer that * the one thing needful ' is 
plenty of customers, who buy liberally, without beating 



EAKLY lilFE. 37 

down and pay cash for all their purchases/ The farmer 
might reply, that > the one thing needful is large har- 
vests and high prices.' The physician might answer 
that 'it is plenty of patients.' The lawyer might be 
of opinion that ' it is an unruly community, always en- 
gaged in bickerings and litigations/ The clergyman 
might reply, * It is a fat salary with multitudes of sin- 
ners seeking salvation and paying large pew rents/ 
The bachelor might exclaim, * It is a pretty wife who 
loves her husband, and who knows how to sew on but- 
tons/ The maiden might answer, / It is a good hus- 
band, who will love, cherish and protect me while life 
shall last/ But the most proper answer, and doubtless 
that which applied to the case of Mary, would be, ' The 
one thing needful is to believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, 
follow in his footsteps, love God and obey His com- 
mandments, love our fellow-man, and embrace every 
opportunity of administering to his necessities. In short, 
' the one thing needful ' is to live a life that we can 
always look back upon with satisfaction, and be enabled 
ever to contemplate its termination with trust in Him 
who has so kindly vouchsafed it to us, surrounding us 
with innumerable blessings, if we have but the heart 
and wisdom to receive them in a proper manner." 

The reading of a portion of this answer occasioned 
some amusement in the congregation, in which the 
clergyman himself joined, and the name of " Taylor 
Barnum " was whispered in connection with the compo- 
sition ; but at the close of the reading I had the satisfac- 
tion of hearing Mr. Lowe say that it was a well written 
and truthful answer to the question, " What is the one 
thing needful?" 



CHAPTEE n. 



INCIDENTS ,AND ANECDOTES. 



DEATH OF »Y GBANDUOTHSB — HT FATHBB— HIS CHABACTEB — HIS DEATH — 
BEGINSIM* THE WORLD BAICEFOOTED — GOINO TO GRASSY PLAtKB — THE TIN 
WABB AKD ORBEK BOTTLE li^TTERY — " CHAIBY " HALLETT— OUR FIRBT HBET- 
INO — EVENDJO RIDE TO BETHEL— A JTOVEL FUR TRADE — OLD "rUSIIIA" 
AKD TOUKO **BU8HIA"-^THB BUYBR SOLD — COUNTRY STORE EXPERIBNCEft 

— 02^ " UNGLB BIBUXNS " -^ A TERIBLE DUE 

— FALL OF BENTON — FLIGHT OF BIBBINS. 



— 02^ " UNGLB BIBUXNS " -^ A TERIBLE DUEL BETWEEN BENXON AND BIBBINB 



In the month of August, 1825, my maternal grand- 
mother met with an accident in stepping on the point 
of a rusty nail, and, though the matter was at first con- 
sidered trivial, it resulted in her death. Alarming 
symptoms soon made her sensible that she was on her 
death-bed ; and while she was in full possession of her 
faculties, the day before she died she sent for her grand- 
children to take final leave of them. I shall never 
forget the sensations I experienced when she took me 
by the hand and besought me to lead a religious life, 
and especially to remember that I could in no way so 
effectually prove my love to God as by loving all my 
fellow-beings. The impressions of that death-bed scene 
have ever been among my most vivid recollections, and 
I trust they have proved in some degree salutary. A 
more exemplary woman, or a more sincere Christian 
than my grandmother, I have never known. 

My father, for his time and locality, was a man of 
much enterprise. He could, and actually did, " keep a 
hotel " ; he had a livery stable and ran, in a small way, 



INCIDKKTS AJSJD AJMECDOTEa 39 

what in our day would, be called a Norwalk Express ; 
and he also kept a country store. With greater oppor- 
tunities and a larger field foi\ his efforts and energies, he 
might have been a man of mark and means. Not that 
he was successful, for he never did a profitable busi- 
icss ; but I, who saw him in his various pursuits, and 
acted as his clerk, caught something of his enterpris-* 
iug spirit, and, perhaps without egotism, I may say 
I inherited that characteristic. My business education 
was as good as the limited field afforded, and I soon 
[Jut it to account and service. 

On the 7 th of September, 1825, my father, who had 
been sick since the month of March, died at the age of 
forty-eight years. My mother was left with five 
children^ of whom I, at fifteen years of age, was the 
eldest, while the youngest was but seven. It was soon 
V pparent that my father h^d provided nothing for the 
upport of his family ; his estate was insolvent, and it 
(lid not pay fifty cents on the dollar. My mother, 
i)y economy, industry, and perseverance, succeeded in a 
lew years afterwards in redeeming the homestead and 
becoming its sole possessor ; but, at the date of the 
death of my father, the world looked gloomy indeed ; 
tlie few dollars I had accumulated and loaned to my 
father, holding his note therefor, were decided to bo 
tlie property of a minor, belonging to the father and so 
to the estate, and my small claim was ruled out. I was 
obliged to get trusted for the pair of shoes I wore to 
my father's funeral. I literally began the world with 
uo thing, and was barefooted at that. 

Leaving Mr. Weed, I went to Grassy Plain, a mile 
northwest of Bethel, and secured a situation as clerk in 
the store of James S. Keeler & Lewis Whitlock at 



40 INCIDEKTS AND ANECDOTES. 

8ix dollars a month and my board. I lived with Mrs. 
Jerusha Wheeler and her daughters, Jerusha and Mary, 
and found an excellent home. I chose ray uncle, 
Alanson Taylor, as my guardian. I did my best to 
please my employers and soon gained their' confidence 
and esteem and was regarded by them as an active 
derk and a 'cute trader. They aflForded me many 
facilities for making money on my own account and 
I soon entered upon sundry speculations and succeeded 
in getting a small sum of money ahead. 

I made a very remarkable tiade at one time for 
my employers by purchasing, in their absence, a whole 
wagon load of green glass bottles pf various sizes, for 
which I paid in unsalable goods at very profitable 
prices. How to dispose of the bottles was Ahen the 
problem, and as it was also desirable .to get rid of a 
large quantity of tin ware which had been in the shop 
for years and was considerably ^' shop-worn,'' I con- 
ceived the idea of a lottery in which the highest prize 
should be twenty-five dollars, payable in any goods the 
winner desired, while there were to be fifty prizes 
of five dollars each, payable in goods, to be designated 
in the scheme. Then there were one hundred prizes 
of one dollar each, one hundred prizes of fifty cents 
each, and three hundred prizes of twenty-five cents 
each. It is unnecessary to state that the minor prizes 
consisted mainly of glass and tin ware ; the tickets 
aold like wildfire, and the worn tin and glass bottles 
were speedily turned into cash. 

As my mother continued to keep the village tavern 
at Bethel, I usually went home on Saturday night and 
stayed till Monday morning, going to church with my 
mother on Sunday. This habit was the occasion of an 



INCIDENTS AND ANECDOTES. 41 

experience of momentous consequence to me. One 
Saturday evening, during a violent thunder shower. Miss 
Mixry Wheeler, a milliner, sent me word that there was 
a girl from Bethel at her house, who had come up on 
horseback to get a new bonnet ; that she was afraid to 
go back alone ; and if I was going to Bethel that even- 
ing she wished me to escort her customer. I assented, 
and went over to " Aunt Rushia's " where I was intro- 
duced to " Chairy " (Charity) Hallett, a fair, rosy- 
checked, buxom girl, with beautiful white teeth. I 
assisted her to her saddle, and moimting my own horse, 
wc trotted towards Bethel. 

My first impressions of this girl as I saw her at the 
lioiisc were exceedingly favorable. As soon as we 
started [ l)ogan a conversation with her and finding her 
v( ry uliublc I regretted that the distance to Bethel was 
not five mil(*s instead of one. A flash of lightning gave 
nio a distinct view of the face of my fair companion and 
thru 1 wished the distance was twenty miles. Paring 
our ride I learned that she was a tailoress, working 
^^ith Mr. Zerah Benedict, of Bethel. We soon arrived 
at our destination and I bid her good night and went 
liome. The next day I saw her at church, and, indeed, 
many Sundays afterwards, but I had no opportunity to 
renew the acquaintance that season. 

Mrs. Jerusha Wheeler, with whom I boarded, and her 
(laughter Jerusha were familiarly kno^vn, the one as 
"Aunt Rushia,'^and the other as ** Rushia." Many of 
our store customers were hatters, and among the many 
kinds of furs^ we sold for the liap of hats was one known 
to the trade as " Russia." One day a hatter, Walter 
iJibble, called to buy some furs. I sold him several 
kinds, including "beaver" and ^'cony," and he then 



42 INCIDKNTS AND ANECDOTES. 

asked for some " Russia," We had none, and, vs I 
wanted to play a joke upon him, I told him that Mrs. 
Wheeler had several hundred pounds of " Russia." 

" What on earth is a woman doing with ^ Russia ? ' " 
said he. 

I could not answer, but I assured him that there 
were one hundred and thirty poimds of old Rushia and 
one hundred and fifty pounds of young Rushia in M rs. 
Wheelers house^and under her charge, but whether or 
not it was for sale I could not say. Off he started to 
make the purchase and knocked at the door. Mrs. 
Wheeler, the elder, made her appearance. 

" I want to get yonr Russia," said the hatter. 

Mrs. Wheeler asked him to walk in and be seated. 
She, of course, supposed that he had come for her 
daughter *' Rushia." 
," What do you want of Rushia? " asked the old lady. 

" To make hats," was the reply. 

" To trim hats, I suppose you mean ? " responded 
Mrs. Wheeler. 

" No, for the outside of hats," replied the hatter. 

" Well, I do n't know much about hats," said the old 
lady, " but I wjll call my daughter." 

Passing into another room where ^' Rushia " the 
younger was at work, she informed her that a man 
wanted her to make hats. 

" Oh, he means sister Mary, probably. I suppose he 
wants some ladies' hats," replied Rushia, as she went 
into the parlor. 

" This is my daughter,'' said the old lady. 

"T want to get your Russia," said he, addressing 
the young lady. 

" 1 suppose you wish to see my sister Mary ; she is 
our milliner," said young Rushia. 



INCIDEirPS AND ANECDOTES. 43 

"I vnsh to sea whoever owns the property," said 
the hatter. 

tiister Mary was sent for, and as she was introduced, 
the hatter informed her that he wished to buy her 
" Russia/' 

'' Buy Rushia ! " exclaimed Mary in surprise ; " 1 
do n t understand you." 

" Your name is Miss Wheeler, I believe," said the 
Iiatter, who was annoyed by the diifieul^y he met with 
ia being understood. 

" It is, sir." 

"Ah! very well. Is tliere old and young Eussia 
in the house ? " 

"I believe there is," said Mary, surprised at the 
faraiUar manner in which he spoke of her mother and 
sister, who were present. 

" What is the price of old Russia' per pound 1 " asked 
the hatter. 

"I believe, sir, that old Rushia is not for sale," 
replied Mary indignantly. ' 

''Well, w^hat do you ask for young Russia?" pur- 
sued the hatter. 

"Sir," said Miss Rushia the younger, springing to 
her feet, " do you come here to insult defenceless 
females ? If you do, sir, we will soon call our brother, 
^v]jo is in the garden, and he will punish you as you 
ioserve," 

'• Ladies ! " exclaimed the hatter, in astonishment, 
• what on earth have I done to offend you ? I came 
-ere on a business matter. I want to buy some Russia. 
I was told you had old and young Russia in the house, 
udeed, this young lady just stated such to be the fact, 
>ut she Bays the old Russia is not for sale. Now, if 



44 INOmBNTO AND ANBCDOXES. 

I can buy the young Russia I want to do so— -but 
if that can't be done, please to say so and I will trouble 
you no further." 

'* Mother, open the door and let this man go out ; he 
is undoubtedly crazy," said Miss Mary. 

" By thunder J I believe I shall be if I remain here 
long," exclaimed the hatter, considerably excited. " I 
wonder if folks never do business in these parts, that 
you think a m^ is crazy if he attempts such a thing T' 

'' Business ! poor man ! " said Mary soot^ngly, ap- 
proaching the door. 

^' I) am not a poor man, madam," replied the hatter. 

" My name is Walter Dibble ; I carry on hatting exten- 

• 

sively in Danbury ; I came to Grassy Plains to buy fur, 
and have purchased some * beaver ' and ' cony,' and 
now it seems I am to be called ' crazy ' and a ' poor 
man,' because I want to buy a little > Russia ' to make 
up my assortment." 

The ladies began to open their eyes ; they saw that 
Mr. Dibble was quite in earnest, and his explanatiom 
threw considerable light upon the subject. 

*' Who sent you here 1 " asked sister Mary. 

" The clerk at the opposite storey" was the reply. 

** He is a wicked young fellow for making all tbis 
trouble," said the old lady ; " he has been doing this 
for a joke." 

" A joke ! " exclaimed Dibble, in surprise. " Have 
you no Russia, then ? " 

" My name is Jerusha, and so is my daughter's," said 
Mrs. Wheeler, " and that, I suppose, is what he meant 
by telling you about old and young Rushia." 

Mr. Dibble bolted through the door without another 
word and made directly for our store. ^^You young 



INCIDBNTS AKD AIOBCDOTBS. 45 

scamp ! '' said he as he entered ; '^ what did you mean 
by sending me over there to buy Russia I " 

"• I did not send you to buy Rushia ; I supposed you 
were either a bachelor or widower and wanted to marry 
Rushia," I replied, with a serious countenance. 

" You lie, you young dog, and you know it ; but 
never mind, I'Upay you off some day" ; and taking his 
furs, he. departed with less ill-humor than could have 
been expected under the circumstances. 

Among our customers were three or four old Revolu- 
tionary pensioners, who traded out the amounts of their 
pensions before they were dues leaving their papers as 
security. One of these pensioners was old Bevans, 
commonly known as " Uncle Bibbins," a man who loved 
his glass and was very prone to relate romandc Revolu- 
tionary anecdotes and adventures^ in which he, of 
course, was conspicuous. At one time he was in our 
debt, and though we held his pension papers, it 
would be three months before the money could be 
drawn. It was desirable to get him away for that 
length of time, and we hinted to him that it would be 
pleasant to make a visit to Guilford, where he had rela- 
tions, but he would not go. Finally^ I hit upon a plan 
which " moved " him. 

A journeyman hatter, named Benton, who was fond 
of a practical joke, was let into the secret, and was 
persuaded to call "Uncle Bibbins" a coward, to tell 
him that he had been wounded in the back, and thus to 
provoke a duel, which he did, and at my suggestion 
" Uncle Bibbins " challenged Benton to fight him with 
musket and ball at a distance of twenty yards. The 
challenge was accepted; I was chosen second by " Uncle 

Bibbins,'' and the duel was to come off immediately. 



46 INCroENTS AKD ANECDOTES. 

My principal, taking me aside, begged me to put noth- 
ing in the guns but blank cartridges. I assured him it 
should be so, and therefore that he might feel perfectly 
safe. This gave the old man extra courage; he 
declared that he had not been so long in bloody battles 
" for nothing," and that he would put a bullet through 
Benton's heart at the first shot. 

The ground was measured in the lot at the rear 
of our store, and the principals and seconds took their 
places. At the word given both parties fired. *' Uncle 
Bibbius," of course, escaped unhurt, but Benton leaped 
several feet into the air, and fell upon the ground with 
a dreadful yell, as if he had been really shot. " Uncle 
Bibbins" was frightened. As his second, I ran to 
him, told him I had neglected to extract the bullet from 
his gun (which was literally true, as there was no 
bullet in it to extract), and he supposed, of course, he 
had killed his adversaiy. I then whispered to him to 
go immediately to Guilford, to keep quiet, and he should 
hear from me as soon as it would be safe to do so. He 
started up the street on a run, and immediately quit the 
town for Guilford, where he kept himself quiet until it 
was time for him to return and sign his papers. I then 
wrote him that "he could return in safety; that his 
adversary had recovered from his wound, and now for- 
gave him all, as he felt himself much to blame for 
having insulted a man of his known courage." 

"Uncle Bibbing" relumed, signed the papers, and 
we obtained the pension money. A few days thereafter 
he met Benton. 

" My brave old friend," said Benton, " I forgive you 
my terrible wound and long confinement on the brink 
of the grave, and I beg you to forgive me also. J 
insulted you without a cause." 



INCIDENTS AND ANECDOTES. 47 

"I forgive you freely," said "Uncle Bibbins": 
" but," he added, " you must be careful next time how 
vou insult a dead shot." 

■ Benton promised to be more circumspect in future, 
and " Uncle Bibbins " supposed to the day of his death 
that the duel, wound, danger, and all, were matters of 
fact 



CIJ AFTER HI. 

IN BtrSINESS FOR MYSELF. 



I 



MT GI^ERKSHIP IN BROOKLYK — UNEASDrESS AKD DISSATISFACTION — THE 6MAIX 
POX — GOING HOME TO RECBUIT — " CHAIBY " HALLETT AGAIN — BACK TO 
BROOKLYN — OPENING A FORTER-HOCTSE — SELLING OCT — MY CLERKSHIP IN 
NEW YORK — MY HiUJITS — OBSERVANCE OF SUNDAY — IN BETHEL ONCE 
MORB — BEGINNING BUSINESS ON MY OWN ACCOLTfT — OPENING DAY — LARGE 
SALES AND GREAT PROFITS — THE LOTTERY BUSINESS — VIEWS THEREON — 
ABOUT A POCKET-BOOK — WITS AND WAGS — SWEARING OUT A FINE — FIRST 
APPBARANCB AT THE BAR — SECURING "ARABIAN" — A MODEL LOVE-LETTER. 

Mr. Oliver Taylor removed from Danbury to 
Brooklyn, Long Island, where lie kept a grocery store 
and also had a large comb factory and a comb store in 
New York. In the fall of 1826 he offered me a situa- 
tion as clerk in his Brooklyn store, and I accepted it. I 
soon became conversant with the routine of my em- 
ployer's business and before long he entrusted to me the 
purchasing of all goods for his store. I bought for cash 
entirely, going into the lower part of New York City 
in search of the cheapest market for groceries, often 
attending auctions of teas, sugars, molasses, etc.,. watch- 
ing the sales, noting prices and buyers, and frequently 
combining with other grocers to bid off large lots, which 
we subsequently divided, giving each of us the quantity 
wanted at a lower rate than if the goods had passed 
into other hands, compelling us to pay another profit 

Situated as I was, and well treated as I was by my 
employer, who manifested great interest in me, still I 
was dissatisfied. A salary was not sufficient for me. 
My disposition was of that speculative character which 



IN BUamESS FOR MYSELF. 49 

refused to be satisfied unless I was engaged in some 
business where my profits might be enhanced, or, at 
least, made to depend upon . my energy, perseverance, 
attention to business, tact, and " calculation." Accord- 
ingly, as I had no opportunity to speculate on my own 
itccount, I became uneasy, and, young as I was, I 
j( gan to talk of setting up for myself ; for, although I 
4ad no capital, several men of means had offered to fur- 
bish the money and join me in business. I was in that 
uneasy, transitory state between boyhood and manhood 
♦vhen I had unbounded confidence in my own abilities, 
lud vet needed a discreet counsellor, adviser and friend. 

In the following summer, 1827, 1 was taken down 
Trith the small-pox and was confined to the house for 
several months. This sickness made a sad inroad upon 
m means. When I was sufficiently recovered, I started 
ibr home to recruit, taking passage on board a sloop for 
Nor walk, but the remaining passengers were so fright- 
eued at the appearance of my face, which still bore the 
murks of the disease, that I was obliged to go ashore 
iigain, which I did, stopping at Holt's, in Fulton Street, 
i^'HDg to Norwalk- by steamboat next morning, and 
arriving at Bethel in the afternoon. 

During my convalescence at my mother's house, I 
visited my old friends kZA neighbors and had the oppor- 
tunity to slightly renew my acquaintance with the 
attractive tailoress, " Chairy " HaUett A month after- 
wards, I returned to Brooklyn, where I gave Mr. Taylor 
notice of my desire to leave his employment ; and I then 
o])oned a porter-house on my own account. In a few 
months I sold out to good advantage and accepted a 
fivorable offer to engage as clerk in & similar estab- 
lishment, kept by Mr. David Thorp, 29 Peck Slip, 

4 



60 IN BTTSIXBSS Bt)R ItfYSELF. 

New York, It was a great resort for Danbury and 
Bethel comb makers and hatters and I thus had frequent 
opportunities of seeing and hearing from my fellow- 
townsmen. I lived in Mr. Thorp's family and was 
kindly treated* I was often permitted to visit the 
theatre with friends who came to New York, and, as I 
had considerable taste for the drama, I soon became, in 
my own opinion, a discriminating critic — nor did I fail 
to exhibit my powers to my Connecticut friends who 
accompanied me to the play. Let me gratefully add 
that my habits were not bad. Though I sold liquors to 
others, I do not think I ever drank a pint of liquor, 
wine, or cordials before I was twenty-two years of age. 
I always had a Bible, which I frequently read, and *I 
attended church regularly. These habits, so far as they 
go, are in the right direction, and I am thankful to-day 
mat they characterized my early youth. However 
worthy or unworthy may have been my later years, I 
know that I owe much of the better part of my nature 
to my youthful regard for Sunday and its institutions — 
a regard, I trust, still strong in my character. 

In February, 1828, 1 returned to Bethel and opened a 
retail fruit and confectionery store in a part of my grand- 
father's carriage-house, which was situated on the main 
street, and which was ofifered to me rent free if I would 
return to my native village and' establish some sort of 
business. This beginning of business on my own 
account ifras an eventful era in my life. My total capi- 
tal was one hundred and twenty dollars, fifty of which 
I had expended in fitting up the store, and the remain- 
ing seventy dollars purchased my stock in trade. I had 
arranged with fruit dealers whom I knew in New York, 
to receive my ord^ra, and I decided to open my estab- 



IJ BUSIXESS FOR MYSELF. 61 

lishment on the first Monday in May — our " general 
training " day. 

It was a "red letter" day for me. The village was 
nowded with people from, the surrounding region and 
the novelty of my little shop attracted attention. Long 
b fore noon I was obliged to call in one of my old 
school mates* to assist in waiting upon my numerous cus- 
tomers and when I closed at night I had the satisfaction 
»f reckoning up sixty-three dollars as my day's receipts. 
Xor, although I had received the entire cost of my 
joods, less seven dollars, did the stock seem seriously 
diminished ; showing that my profits had been large. I 
ijced not say how much gratified I was with the result 
^'f this first day's experiment. The store was a fixed 
i K t. I went to New York and expended all my money 
n a stock of fancy goods, such as pocket-books, combs, 
'cads, rings, pocket-knives, and a few toys. These, 
^ith fruit, nuts, etc., made the business good through 
■be summer, and in the fall I added stewed oysters to ^ 
the inducements. 

My grandfather, who was much interested in my suc- 
cess, advised me to take an agency for the sale of lottery 
tickeU, on commission. In those days, the lottery was 
not deemed objectionable on the score of morality. 
^ ery worthy people invested in such schemes without a 
liought of evil, and then, as now, churches even got 
'jp lotteries^ with this difference — that then they were 
illed lotteries, and now they go under some other 
iame. While I am very glad that an improved public 
^m^lment denounces the lottery in general as an illegit- 
MVte means of getting money, and while I do not see 
ow any one, especially in or near a New England 
^tate, can ei^age in a lottery without feeling a reproach 
3* 



52 ^ BUSINESS FOB MYSELF. 

which no pecuniary return can compensate ; yet I can- 
not now accuse myself for having been lured into a 
business which was then sanctioned by good Christian 
people, who now join with me in reprobating enter- 
prises they once encouraged. But as public senti- 
ment was forty years ago, I obtained an agency to sell 
lottery tickets on a commission of ten per cent, and this 
business, in connection with my little store, made noty 
profits quite satisfactory. 

I used to have some curious customers. On one occa- 
sion a young man called on me and selected a pocket- 
book which pleased him, asking me to give him credit 
for a few weeks. I told him that if he wanted any 
article of necessity in my line, I should not object to 
trust him for a short time, but it struck me that a 
pocket-book was a decided superfluity for a man who 
had no money ; I therefore declined ' to trust him a& I 
did not see the necessity for his possessing such an 
article till he had something to put into it. Later in 
life I hava been credited with the utterance of some 
sagacious remarks, but this with regard to the pocket- 
book, trivial as the matter is in itself, se^ms to me quite 
as deserving of note as any of my ideas which have 
created more sensation. 

My store had much to do in giving shape to my 
future character as well as career, in that it became a 
favorite resort; the * theatre of village talk, and the 
scene of many practical jokes. For any excess of the 
jocose element in my character, part of the blame 
must attach to my early surroundings as a village clerk 
and merchant. In that true resort of village wits 
and wags, the country store, fun, pure and simple, 
will be sure to find the surface. My Bethel store 



m BUSINESS FOR MYSELF. 53 

was the scene of many most amusing incidents, in 
some of which I was an immediate participant, 
though in many, of course, I was only a listener or 
spectator. 

The following scene makes a chapter in the history 
of Connecticut, as the State was when " blue-laws " 
were something more than a dead letter. To swear in 
those days was according to custom, but contrary to 
law. A person from New York State, whom I will call 
Crofut, who was a frequent visitor at my store, was 
a man of property, and equally noted for his self-will 
and his really tenible profanity. One day he was 
m my little establishment engaged in conversation, 
when Nathan Seelye, Esq., one of our village justices 
of the peace, and a man of strict religious principles, 
came id, and hearing Crofut's profane language he told 
him he considered it his duty to fine him one dollar for 
swearing. 

Crofut responded immediately with an oath, that he 
did not care a d — ^n for the Connecticut blue-laws. 

*' That win make two dollars," said Mr. Seelye. 

This brought forth another oath. 

'• Three dollars," said the sturdy justice. 

Xothing but oaths were given in reply, until Esquire 
Seelye declared the damage to the Connecticut laws to 
amount to fifteen dollars. 

Crofut took out a twenty-dollar bill, and handed it to 
the justice of the neace, with an oath. 

" Sixteen doUa^' said IVlr. Seelye, counting out four 
dollars to hand tJftfr. Crofut, as his change. 

*'0h, keep it, keep it," said Crofut, "I do n't wamt 
any change, I 'U d— <l soon swear out the balance." He 
did 80, after which he was more circumspect in his 

B 



54 IN BTTSINES8 FOB MYSELF. 

I 

conversation, remarking that twenty dollars, a day for 
swearing was about as much as he could stand. 

On another occasion, a man arrested for assault and 



battery was to be tried before my grandfather, who was 
a justice of the peace. A young medical student named 
Newton, volunteered to defend the prisoner, and Mr. 
Couch, the grand^juryman, came to me and said that 
as the prisoner had engaged .a pettifogger, the State 
ought to have some one to represent its interests and 
he would give me a dollar to present the case. I 
accepted the fee and proposition. The fame of the 
" eminent counsel " on both sides drew quite a crowd 
to hear the case. As for the case itself, it was useless 
to argae it, for the guilt of the prisoner was established 
by evidence of half a dozen witnesses.- However, New- 
ton was bound to display himself, and so, rising with 
much dignity, he addressed my grandfather witK, *' May 
it please the honorable court," etc., proceeding with a 
mixture of poeti-y and invective against Couch, the 
grand-juryman whom he assumed to be the vindictrve 
plaintiff in this case* After alluding to him as such 
for the twentieth time, my grandfether stopped Newton 
in the midst of his splendid peroration and informed 
him that Mr. Couch was not tilie plaintiff in the case. 

" Not the plaintiff J Then may it please your honor 
I should like to know who is the plaintiff] " inquired 
Newton. 

He was qiiietly informed that the State <£ Connecti- 
cut was the plaintiff, whereupon Nei||pn dropped into 
his seat as if he had b^en shot, fliereupon, I rose 
with great confidence, and speaking from my notes, 
proceeded to show the guilt of the prisoner from the 
evidence ; that there was no discrepancy in tiie testi- 



IN BUSINESS FOR MYSELF. 56 

mony ; that none of the witnesses had been impeached ; 
that no defence had been offered ; that I was astonished 
at the audacity of both counsel and prisoner in not 
pleading guilty at once ; and then, soaring aloft on gen- 
eral principles^ I began to look about for a safe place 
to alight, when my grandfather interrupted me with — 

" Young man, will you have the kindness to inform 
the court which side you are pleading for — the plaintiff 
or the defendant 1 " 

It was my turn to drop, which I did amid a shout of 
laughter from every comer of the court-room. Newton, 
who had been very downcast, looked up with a broad 
grin and the two "eminent counsel" sneaked out of 
the room in company, while the prisoner was bound 
over to the next County Court for trial. 

While my business in Bethel continued to increase 
beyond my expectations, I was also happy in believing 
that my suit with the fair tailoress. Charity Hallett, was 
duly progressing. Of all the young people with whom 
I associated in our parties, picnics, and sleigh-rides, she 
stood highest in my estimation and continued to im- 
prove upon acquaintance. 

How I managed at one of our sleigh rides is worth 
narrating. My grandfather would, at any time, let me 
have a horse and sleigh, always excepting his new 
sleigh, the finest in the village, and a favorite horse 
called " Arabian." I especially coveted this turnout for 
one of our parties, knowing that I could eclipse all my 
comrades, and so I asked grandfather if I could have 
" Arabian " and the new sleigh. 

'' Yes, if you have twenty dollars in your pocket," 
was the reply. 

I immediately showed the money, and, putting it 



56 IN BUSINESS FOB MYSELF. 

back ia my pocket, said with a laugh : ^' you see I have 
the money. I am much obliged to you ; I suppose I 
caa hav6 ' Arab ' and the new sleigh ? " 

Of course, he meant to deny me by making what he 
thought to be an impossible condition, to wit: that I 
should hiie the team, at a good round price, if I had 
it at all, but I had caught him so suddenly that he was 
compelled to consent, and '' Ghaixy " and I had the crack 
team of the party. 

There was a young apprentice to the tailoring trade 
in Bethel, whom I will call John Mallett, whose educa- 
tion had been much neglected, and who had been pay- 
ing his addresses to a certain '' Lucretia " for some six 
months, with a strong probability of being jilted at last. 
On a Sunday evening she had declined to take his arm, 
accepting instead the arm of the next man who offered, 
and Mallett determined to demand an explanation. He 
accordingly came to me the Saturday evening following, 
asking me, when I had closed my store, to write a strong 
and remonstratory '^ love-letter " for him. I asked Bill 
Shepard, who was present, to remain and assist, and, in 
due time, the joint efforts of Shepard, Mallett, and 
myself resulted in the following production. I give the 
letter as an illustrative chapter in real life. In novels 
such correspondence is usually presented in elaborate 
rhetoric, with studied elegance of phrase. But the true 
language of the heart is always nearly the same in all 
time and in all tongues, and when the blood is up the 
writer is far more intent upon the matter than the 
manner, and aims to be forcible rather than elegant. 
The subjoined letter is certainly not after the manner of 
Chesterfield, but it is such a letter as a disappointed 
lover, spurred by 

Tho groeri'^yeii monator, which doth mock 
The meat it feeds on, 



IN BUSINESS FOB MYSELF. 57 

frequently indites. With a demand from Mallett that 
we should begin in strong terms, and Shepard acting 
as scribe, we concocted the following : 

Bethel, , 1^—. 

Miss Lucbetia, — I write this to ask «a explanation of your conduct in giving 
T'lf the mitten on Sunday night last If you think, madam, that you can trifle 
1' th ray affections, and turn me off for every little whipper-snapper that you can 
■» k up, you will find yourself considerably mistaken. [We read thus far to" 
:^lMllett, and it met his approval He said he liked the idea of calling her 
•ma<lam,'* for he thought it sounded so "distant," it would hurt her feelings 
' • TV much. The term " little whipper-snapper " also delighted him. He said 
h' jnit-pscd that would mak^ her feel cheap. Shepard and myself were not quite 
^» nuTfi of its aptitude, since the chap who succeeded in capturing Lucretia, on 
•'u' o'.'casion alluded to, was a head and shoulders taller than ^laUett. However, 
'^1- rlid not intimate our thoughts to Mallett, and he desired us to "go ahead and 
.ri ve her another dose."] You do n't know me, madam, if you think you can snap 
.*'' up in this way. I wish you to understand that I can have the company of 
jbh as much above you as the sun is above the earth, and I won't stand any 
• ■! your impudent nonsense no how. [This was duly read and approved. "Now," 
-ill Mallett, "try to touch her feelings. Kemind her of the pleasant hours we 
■ avc ppent together"; and we continued as follows: ] My dear Lucretia, when I 
^ \. Mill of the many pleasant hours we have spent together — of the delightful walks 
^-h^-h we have had on moonlight evenings to Fenner's Rocks, Chestnut Ridge, 
«rn*.sy Plains, Wildcat, and Puppy-town — of the strolls which we have taken 
']t")n Shelter Bocks, Cedar Hill — the visits we have made to Old Lane, Wolfpits, 
i«^<l-hole and Plum-trees* — when all these things come rushing on my mind, 
i»ii'[ when, my dear girl, I remember how often you have told me that you loved 
' V- Itotter than anybody eLie, and I assured you my feelings were the same as 
vciire, it almost breaks my heart to think of last Sunday night. ["Can't you 
^:i* k in some affecting poetry here?" said Mallett. Shepard could not recollect 
-.:iv to the point, nor could I, but as the exigency of the case seemed to require it. 
we coQclnded to manufacture a verse or two, which we did as follows:] 

Lucretia, dear, what bare I done, 

That yoQ shoald nse mo thas and so, 
To take the arm of Tom Beers' son, 

And let your dearest truc-lovo go ? 

Miserable fate, to loec you now, 

And tear this bleeding heart asunder I 
Will you forget your tender vow? 

I can't believe it— no, by thunder 1 

[Mallett did not like the word " thunder," but being informed that ho other 
^^- -«1 crtuld be substituted without destroying both rhyme and reason, he 
' •j-'^nted that it should remain, provided we added two more stanzas of a softer 
iM t -.1 ' e ; .«t<)me thing, he said, that would make the tears come, if possible. We then 
^.iind ont the foHowing:] 

Lnerctia, dear, do write to Jack, 

And say wltli Becrn you aro not emlttou ; 
And thns to mo In love come back, 

And give all other boya the mitten. 

* These wcro the euphoniona names of localities In tlH? vicinity of Bethel. 



58 TS BUSINESS FOB MYSKUT 

Do this, Lacrctiai end till death 

I '11 love yoa to Intcnso distraction; 
1 'U spend for you roy every breath. 

And wo will live In satisfaction. 

["That will do very well," said Hallett. " Now I guess you Jiad better blow 
her up a little more." We obeyed, orders as follown:] It makes me matl 
to think what a fool I was to give you that finger-riiig aud bosom-pin, and spend 
so much time in your company, Just to be flirted* and bamboozled aa I was 
on Sunday night last. If you continue this course of conduct, we part for ever, 
and I will thank you to send back that jewelry. I w^ould sooner see it crushed 
under my feet than worn by a person who abused me as you have done. I shall 
despise you for ever if you don't change your conduct towards me, aud send me a 
letter of apology on Monday next. I shall not go to meeting to-morrow, fur I 
would scorn to sit in the same meeting-house with you until I have an explana- 
tion of your conduct. If you allow any young man to go home with you 
to-morrow night, I shall know it, for you will be watched.. ["There," said 
Mallett, " that is pretty strong. Now I guess you had better touch her feelings 
once more, and wind up the letter." Wo jjroceeded as follows:] My sweet girl, if 
you only knew the sleepiness nights which I have spent during the present week, 
the torments aud sufferings which I endure qn your account; if you could but 
realize that I regard the world as less than nothing without you, I am certain 
you would pity me. A homely cot and a crust of bread with my adorable 
Lucrctia would be a paradise, where a palace without you would be a hades. 
["What in thunder is hades?" inquired Jack. We explained. He considered 
the figure rather bold, and requested us to close as soon as possible.] Now, dear- 
est, in bidding you adieu, I implore you to reflect on our past enjoyments, look 
forward with pleasure to our future happy meetings, and rely upon your 
affectionate Jack in storm or calm, in sickness, distress}, or want, for all those 
will be powerless to change my love. I hope to hear from you on Monday next, 
and, if favorable, I shall be happy to call on you the same evening, when in 
ecstatic joy we will laugh at the past, hope for the future, aud draw oonaolattoa 
from the fact that " the course of true love never did run smooth." This from 
your disconsolate but still hoping lover and admirer, Jack MaIjLBIT. 

P. S. — On reflection I have concluded to go to meeting to-morrow. If all is 
well, hold your pocket-handkerchief in your left hand as you stand up to sing 
with the choir — in which case I shall expect the pleaaure of giving you my arm 
to-morrow night. J. m. 

. The effect of this letter upon Lucretie, I regret to 
say, was not as favorable as could have been desired or 
expected. She declined to remove her handkerchief 
from her right hand and she returned the " ring and 
bosom-pin " to her disconsolate admirer, while, not many 
months after, MaUett's rival led Lucretia to the altar. 
As for MaUett's agreement to pay Shepard and myself 
five pounds of carpet rags and twelve yards of broad- 
cloth " lists," for our services, owing to his ill success, 
we compromised for one-half the amount 



CHAPTER IV. 

8TEUGGLES FOE A LIVELIHOOD. 

PLRASCMB VISIT TO PBII«AI>BLPHIA — UTOTO IK GBAKt» STYLB — THE BOTTOM 
OP THE PILK — BOBROWINO MONEY — MY MARRIAGE — RETURN TO BETHEL — 
EAJtLY MARRIAGES —MORE PRACTICAL JOKING — SECOND APPEARANCE Aft 
COUh'SSJL — GOING TO UOUSEKEEPINO — SELLING BOOKS AT AirCTlON — THE 
"yellow STORE "-^ a NEW FIELD — "tHE HERALD OF FREEDOM" — MY 
EDUOBIAI. CABSB]^— UBEL suits — YTKBO Ain> niPRISONED — LIFB IN THE 
D.OfBCRY JAIL — CELEBRATION OF MY LIBERATION — POOR BUSINESS AND 
BAD DEBTS — REMOVAL TO NEW YOI«K — SEEKING MY FORTrNR — "W^VNTS*, 
D» THE "sun" — WM. VTBUO — E2BEPINO A BOABDINO-H0U6E — A WHOItB 
6HIBT ON MY BACK. 

During this season I made arrangements with Mr. 
Samuel Sherwood, of Bridgeport, to go on an exploring 
expedition to Pittsbnrg, Pennsylvania, where we under- 
stood there was a fine opening for a lottery office and 
where we meant to try our fortunes, provided the pros- 
pects Bhould equal our expectations. We went to New 
^ork where I had an interview with Mr. Dudley S. 
Gregory, the principal business man of Messrs. Yates 
and Mclntyre, who dissuaded me from going to Pitts- 
burg, and offered me the. entire lottery agency for the 
State of T^messee, if I would go to Nashville and open 
'in office. The offer was tempting, but the distance 
was too far from a certain tailoress in Bethel. 

As the Pittsburg trip was given up, Sherwood and I 
went to Philadelphia for a pleasure excm-sion and put 
^p at (^ongress Hall in Chestnut Street where we lived 
ui much grander style than we had been accustomed to. 
"^ array of waiters and display of dishes were far 



60 STBUGGLES FOB A LIVELIHOOD. 

ahead of our former experiences and for a week we lived 
in clover. At the end of that time, however, when we 
concluded to start for home, the amount of our hotel 
bill astounded us. After paying it and securing tickets 
for New York, our combined purses showed a balance 
of but twenty-seven cents. 

Twenty-five cents of this sum went to the boot-black, 
and as our breakfast was included in our bill we secured 
from the table a few biscuits for our dinner on the way 
to New York. 

Arriving in New York we carried our own baggage 
to Holt's Hotel. The next morning Sherwood obtained a 
couple of dollars from a friend, and went to Newark and 
borrowed fifty dollars from his cousin. Dr. Sherwood, 
loaning me one-half the sum. After a few days' sojourn 
in the city we returned home. 

During our stay in New York, I derived considerable 
information from the city managers with regard to the 
lottery business, and thereafter I bought my tickets 
directly from the Connecticut lottery managers at what 
was termed ^^the scheme price," aoid also established 
agencies throughout the country, selling considerable 
quantities of tickets at handsome profits. My uncle, 
Alanson Taylor, joined me in the business, and, as we 
sold several prizes, my ofl[ice came to be considered 
" lucky," and I received orders from all parts of the 
country. 

During this tiihe I kept a close eye upon the attract- 
ive tailoress, Charity Hallett, and in the summer of 
1829 I asked her hand in marriage. My suit was 
accepted, and the wedding day was appointed ; I^ mean- 
while, applying myself closely to business, and no one 
but the parties immediately interested suspecting that 



STRUGGLES FOR A LIVBLIHOOD. 61 

tbe event was so near at hand. Miss Hallett went to 
New York in October, ostensibly to visit her uncle, 
Nathan Beers, who resided at No. 3 Allen Street. I 
followed in November, pressed by the necessity of pur- 
chasing goods for my store ; and the evening after my 
arrival, November 8, 1829, the Rev. Dr. McAuley 
married us in the presence of sundry friends and rela- 
tives of my wife, and I became the husband of one of 
the best women in the world. In the course of the 
week we went back to Bethel and took board in the 
family where Charity Barnum as " Chaiiy " Hallett had 
previously resided. 

I do not approve or recommend early marriages. 
The minds of men and women taking so important a 
step in life should be somewhat matured, and hasty 
marriages, especially marriages of boys and girls, have 
been the cause of untold misery in many instances. But 
although I was only little more than nineteen years old 
when I was married, I have always felt assured that if I 
had waited twenty years longer I could not have found 
another woman so well suited to my disposition and so 
admirable and valuable in every character as a wife, a 
mother, and a friend. 

My business occupations amply employed nearly aH 
my time, yet so strong was my love of fun that when 
the opporunity for a practical joke presented itself, I 
could not resist the temptation. On one occasion I 
engaged in the character of counsel to conduct a case 
for an Irish peddler whose complaint was that one of 
our neighbors had turned him out of his house and 
Lad otherwise abused him. 

The court was just as " real " as the attorney, — no 
more, — and consisted of three judges, one a mason. 



62 BTE0GOLB8 FOR A MVBLIHOOD. 

the second a butcher, and the third an old gentleman of 
leisure who was an ex-justice of the peace. The consta- 
ble was of my own appointment, and my "writ" 
arrested the culprit who had turned my client out of 
house and home. The court was convened, but as the 
culprit did not appear, and as it seemed necessary that 
my client should get testimonials as to his personal 
character, the court adjourned nominally for one week, 
the client consenting to " stand treat " to cover imme- 
diate expenses. 

I supposied that this was the end of it. But at 
the time named for the re-assembling of the " court," 
a reed lawyer from Newtown put in an appearance. 
He had been engaged by the Irishman to assist me in 
conducting the case ! I saw at once that the joke was 
likely to prove a sorry one, and immediately notified the 
members of the " court," who were quite as much 
alarmed as I was at the serious turn the thing had 
taken. I need not say that while the danger threatened 
we all took precious good care to keep out of the way. 
However, the affair was explained to Mr. Leiden, the 
lawyer, who in turn set forth the matter to the client, 
but not in such a manner as to soothe the anger so 
natural imder the circumstances — in fact, he advised 
the Irishman to get out of the place as soon as possible. 
The Irishman threatened me and my " court " with 
prosecution — a threat I really feared he would carry 
into execution, but which, to the great peace of mind 
of myself and my companions, he concluded not to 
follow up. Considering the vexation and annoyance of 
this Irishman, it was a mitigation to know that he was 
the party in the wrong and that he really deserved 
a severer punishment than my practical joke had put 
upon him. 



STRUOGLES FOB A UVEI4IHOOD. 63 

« 

la the winter of 1829-30, my lottery business had so 
extended that I had branch offices in Danbury, Nor- 
walk, Stamford and Middletown, as well as agencies 
in the small villages for thirty miles around Bethel. 
I had also purchased from my grandfather three 
acres of land on which 1 built a house and went to 
housekeeping. My lottery business, which was with 
a few large customers, was so arranged that I could 
safely entrust it to an agent, making it necessary 
for me to find some other field for my individual 
enterprise* 

So I tried my hand as an auctioneer in the book 
trade. I bought books at the auctions and from dealers 
iind publishers in New York, and took them into the 
coimtry, selling them at auction and doing tolerably 
well ; only at Litchfield, Connecticut, where there was 
then a laWySchool. At Newburgh, New York, several 
of my best books were stolen, and I quit the business 
in disgust. 

In July, 1831, my uncle, Alanson Taylor, and myself 
opened a country store in a building, which I had put 
u[) in Bethel in the previous spring, and we stocked the 
" yellow store," as it was called, with a full assortment 
of groceries, hardware, crockery, and " notions " ; but 
we were^ not successful in the enterprise, and in 
October following, I bought out my uncle's interest and 
we dissolved partnership. 

About this time, circumstances partly religious and 
partly political in their character led me into still 
another fielH of enterprise which honorably opened to 
me that notoriety of which in later life I surely have 
had a surfeit. Considering rfiy youth, this new enter- 
prise reflected credit upon my ability, as well as energy. 



64 STRUGGLES FOB A LIVELIHOOD. 

and so I may be excused if I now recur to it with some- 
thing like pride. 

In a period of strong political excitement, T wrote 
several communications for the Danbury weekly paper, 
setting forth what I conceived to be the dangers of 
a sectarian interference which was then apparent iii 
political affau's. The publication of these communica- 
tions was refused and I accordingly purchased a press 
and types, and October 19-, 1831, I issued the first 
number of my own paper. The Herald of Freedom. 

I entered upon the editorship of this journal with all 
the vigor and vehemence of youth. The boldness 
with which the paper was conducted soon excited wide- 
spread attention and commanded a circulation which 
extended beyond the immediate locality into nearly 
every State in the Union. But lacking that experience 
which induces caution, and without the dread of conse-* 
quences, I frequently laid myself open to the charge of 
libel and three times in three years I was prosecuted. 
A Danbury butcher, a zealous politician, brought a civil 
suit against me for accusing him of being a spy in 
a Democratic caucus. On the'first trial the jury did 
not agree, but after a second trial I was fined several 
hundred dollars. Another libel suit against me was 
withdriayvn and need not be mentioned further. The 
, third was sufiiciently important to warrant the follow- 
ing detail : 

A criminal prosecution was brought against me for 
stating in my paper that a man in Bethel, prominent in 
the church, had " been guilty of taking usury of an 
orphan boy," and for severely commenting on the fact 
in my editorial columns. When the case came to trial 
the truth of my statement was substantially proved by 



STRUGGLES FOR A LIVELIHOOD. 66 

several witnesses and even by the prosecuting party. 
But '' the greater the truth, the greater the libel," and 
then I had used the term " usury," instead of extortion, 
or note-shaving, or some other expression which might 
have softened the verdict. The result was that I was 
sentenced to pay a fine of one hundred dollars and 
to be imprisoned in the common jail for sixty day^. 

The most comfortable provision was made for me in 
Danbury jail. My room was papered and carpeted ; I 
hved well ; I was overwhelmed with the constant visits 
of my friends ; I edited my paper as usual and received 
large accessions to my subscription list; and at the 
end of my sixty days' term the event was celebrated by a 
large concourse of people from the surrounding country. 
The court room in which I was convicted was the scene 
of the celebration. An ode, written for the occasion, 
was sung ; an eloquent oration on the freedom of the 
press was delivered; and several hundred gentlemen 
afterwards partook of a sumptuous dinner followed 
by appropriate toasts and speeches. Then came 
the triumphant part of the ceremonial, which was 
reported in my paper of December 12, 1832, as 
follows : 



'* p. T. BABSxni and the hwad of muBic took their seats in a coach drawn by 
f»ix horses, which had been prepared for the occasion. The coach was preceded 
l)y forty horsemen, and a marshal, bearing the national standard. Immediately 
in the rrar of the coach was the carria|;e of the Orator and the President of the 
•lay, followed by the Committee of Arrangements and sixty carriages of citizens, 
which joined in escorting the editor to his home in Bethel. 

"When the procession commenced its march amidst the roar of cannon, three 
••beers were given by several hundred citizens who did not join in the procession. 
Tlie band of music continued to play a variety of national airs until their arrival 
in Bethel, (a distance of three miles,) when they struck up the beautiful and 
ippropriate tune of * Home, Sweet Home I ' After giving three hearty cheers, the 
Ifroce»8ion returned to Danbury. The utmost harmony and unanimity of feeling 
preva!le<l throughout the day, and we are happy to add that no accident occurred 
to mar the featiTitieB of the occasion." 



66 STRTTGOMJS FOR A LIVELIHOOD. 

My editorial career was one of continual contest. I 
however published the 160th number of The Herald of 
Freedom in Danbury, November 5, 1834, after which my 
brother-in-law, John W. Amerman, issued the paper for 
me at Norwalk till the following year, when the 
Herald was sold to Mr. George Taylor. 

Meanwhile, I had taken Horace Fairchild into partner- 
ship in my mercantile business, in 1881, and I had sold 
out to him and to a Mr. Toucey, in 1833, they forming a 
partnership under the firm of Fairchild & Co. So far 
as I was concerned my store was not a success. Ordi- 
nary trade was too slow for me. I bought largely and in 
order to sell I was compelled to give extensive credits. 
Hence I had an accumulation of bad debts ; and my old 
ledger presents a long series of accounts balanced by 
"death," by "running away," by "failing," and by 
other similarly remunerative returns. I had expended 
money as freely as I had gained it, for I had ah-eady 
learned that I could make money rapidly and in large 
sums, when I set about it with a will, and hence I did 
not realize the worth of what I seemed to gain so 
readily. I looked forward to a future of sating when I 
should see the need of accumulation. 

There was nothing more for me to do in Bethel ; and 
in the winter of 1834-5, 1 removed my family to New 
York, where I hired a house in Hudson Street. I had no 
pecuniary resources, excepting such as might be deiived 
from debts left for collection with my agent at Bethel, 
and I went to the metropolis literally to seek my for- 
tune. I hoped to secure a situation in some mercantile 
house, not at a fixed- salary, but so as to derive such 
portion pf the profits as might be due to my individual 
tact, energy, and perseverance in the interests of the 



STJRUGGJUES FOB A LIVJESUHOOB. 67 

busiaesB. But I could find no snch position; my 
resources began to fail ; my family were in ill health ; I 
must do something for a living; and so I acted as 
*-' drummer " to seyeral concems which allowed me a 
small commission on sales to customers of my introduc- 
tion. 

Every morning I used to look at the.*' wants " in the 
SuH for someUiij^ that would suit itie ; and I had many 
a wildgoose chase in following up those^^ wants." In 
some instances success depended- upon my advancing 
from three hundred to : five hundred dollars ; in other 
cases a new patent life-pill, or a self-acting luouse trap 
was to make my fortune. An advertisement announc 
ing '^ An. immense speculation on a small capital ! 
^10,000 easily made in one year ! " turned out to be an 
offer of Professor Somebody at Scudder's American 
Museum to sell a hydro-oxygen microscope, offered to 
me at two thousand dollars -*^ one thousand in cash and 
the balance in sixty and ninety days, on good security, -— 
and warranted to secure an independence after a short 
public exhibition through the country. / If I had the 
desire to undertake this exhibition aod experiment, I 
had not the capital. Other and many similar tempta- 
tions were extended, but none of them seemed to open 
the door of fortune to me. 

The advertisement in the Shm^ of Mr. William Niblo, 
of Niblo's Grarden, for a barkeeper first brought me in 
contact with that gentlemanly and justly-popular pro- 
prietor. He wanted a well-recommended, well-behaved, 
trustworthv man to fill a vacant situation, but as he 
\rished him to bind himself to remain three years, I, 
who was only seeking the means of temporary support, 
was precluded from accepting thei position. 



68 8TBUGGLSS FOB A LIVBLIHOOD. 

Nor did all my efforts secure a situation for me 
during the whole winter ; but, in the spring, I received 
several hundred dollars from my agent in Bethel, and 
finding no better business, May 1, 1835, I opened 
a small private boarding-house at No. 52 Frankfort 
Street. We soqu had a very good run of custom from 
our Connecticut acquaintam^es who had occasion to 
visit New York, and as this business did not sufficiently 
occupy my time, I bought an interest with Mr. John 
Moody in a grocery store. No. 156 South Street. 

Although the years of manhood bi^ought cares, 
anxieties, and struggles for a livelihood, they did not 
change my nature and the jocose element was still 
an essential ingredient of my being. I loved fun, 
practical fan, for itself amd for the enjoyment which -it 
brought. During the year, I occasionally visited 
Bridgeport where I almost always found at the hotel a 
noted joker, named Darrow, who spared neither friend 
nor foe in his tricks. He was the life of the bar-room 
and would always try to entrap some stranger in 
a bet and so win a treat for the company. He made 
several ineffectual attempts upon me, and at last, one 
evening, Darrow, who ^stuttered, made a final trial 
as follows : . ^* Come, Bamum, I 'U make you another 
proposition ; 111 bet you hain't got a whole shirt 
on your back." The catch consists in the fact that 
generally only one-half of that convenient garment is 
on the back ; but I had anticipated the proposition — 
in fact I had induced a friend, Mr. Hough, to put 
Darrow up to the trick, — and had folded a shirt nicely 
upon my back, securing it there with my suspenders, 
The barroom was crowded with customers who thought 
that if I made the bet I should be nicel) caught, and I 



44 



STBUGOLES FOB A UVEUHOOD. 69 

made pretence of playing off and at the same time 
stimulated Darrow to press tlie bet by saying: 

" That is a foolish bet to make ; I am sore my shirt 
is whole because it is nearly new ; but I do n't like to 
bet on such a subject." 

"A good reason why," said Darrow, in great glee; 
" it s ragged. Come, I'll bet you a treat for the whole 
company you hain't got a whole shirt on your b-h-b- 
back ! " 

I'll bet my shirt is cleaner than yours," I replied. 
That's nothing to do w-w-^with the cade ; it's ragged, 
and y-y-you know it." 

" I know it is not," I replied, with pretended anger, 
which caused the crowd to laugh heartily. 

." You poor ragged f-f-fellow, come down here from 
D-D-Danbury, I'm sorry for you,'' said Darrdw tantaliz* 
ingly. 

" You would not pay if you lost," I remarked^ 

'' Here's f-f-five dollars I'll put in Captain Hinman's 
(the landlord's) hands. Now b-b-bet if you dare, you. 
ragged c-c-creature, you." 

I put five dollars in Captain Hinman's hands, and 
told him to treat the company from it if I lost the bet. 

" Eemember," said Darrow, " I b-b-bet you haiii't got 
a whole shirt on your b-b-back ! " 

" All right," said I, taking off my coat and com- 
mencing to unbutton my vest. The whole company, 
feeling sure that I was caught, began to laugh heartily. 
Old Darrow fairly danced with delight, and as I laid 
my coat on a chair he came running up in front of me, 
and slapping his hands together, exclaimed : 

" You need n't t-t-take off any more c-c-c-clothes, for 
if it ain't all on your b-b-back, you Ve lost it." 



70 STRUGGLES FOR A LIVELIHOOD. 

" If it is, I suppose you have ! " I replied, pullini: 
the whole shirt from off my back ! 

Such* a shriek of laughter as burst forth from tl.t 
crowd I scarcely ever heard, and certainly such a bhiiii 
countenance as old Darrow exhibited it would be har^ 
io conceive. Seeing that he was most incontinent!} 
" done for," and perceiving that his neighbor Hoii^^; 
had helped to do it, he ran up to him in great anger 
and shaking his fist in his face, exclaimed : 

" H-H-Hough, you infernal r-r-rascal, to go again- 
your own u-n-neighbor in favor of a D-U-Danbury man 
I'll pay you for that some time, you see if I d-d-do n't.* 

All hands went up to the bar and drank with r 
hearty good will, . for it was seldom that Darrow g 
taken in, and he was such an inveterate joker they like 
to see him paid in his own coin. Never till the du\ 
of his death did he hear the last of the " whol 
shirt." 



Ol 



M 



CHAPTER V. 

HT STABT AS A SHOWKAK. 

THE AMUSEareNT BCSDTESS — DIFFERENT GRADES — CATERINO FOR THE PUBLIC — 
KT CliAHfS, AIMS AKO EFFOBT8---JOICB HBTH — AFPARETtT Q KHUiNI C J I K ag OF 
HEfi VOUCHSRS — B£GINN£NO LIFE AB A SROWJilAN —SUCCESS OF MT FIRST EX- 
HIBITIOX— SECOND STEP IN THE SHOW LINE — SIOXOR VTVALLA — MY FIRST 
▲FPSARANCB ON AKX STAGE-* AX WASHINGTON -^ANXB RO Y ALL -^^TIMULAT- 
I>-r, THE PUBIJC — CONTESTS BETWEEN VIVALLA AND B0BP:RT8 — EXCITEMENT 
AT PEVEIl HEAT — CONNECTING MYSELF "WTTH A CIRCUS — BREAD AND BUTTER 
DINNER FOR THE WHOLE COMPANY — N^VRROW ESCAPE FROM SUFFOCATION — 
LECTURING AN ABUSIVE CLERGYMAN — A^VBON TURNER — A TERRIBLE PRACTI- 
CAL JOKB — I AM BEPRESRITBDTO BE AMT7BDB&BB--BAtLS AND LYNCH LAW — 
NOVEL MEANS FOR SECURING NOTORIETY. 

By this time it was clear to my mind that my proper 
position in this busy world was not yet reached. I had 
displayed the faculty of getting money, as well as get- 
ting rid of it ; but the business for which I was des- 
tined, and, I, believe, made, had not yet come to me; or 
rather, I had not found that I was to cater for that insa- 
tiate want of human nature — the love of amusement ; 
that I was to make a sensation on two continents ; and 
that fame and fortune awaited me so soon as I should 
appear before the public in the character of a showman. 
These things I had not foreseen. I did not seek the 
position or the character. The business finally came in 
my way ; I fell into the occupation, and far beyond any 
of my predecessors on this continent. I have succeeded. 

The show business has all phases and grades of dig- 
nity, from the exhibition of a monkey to the exposition 
of that highest art in music or the drama, which en- 
trances empires and secures for the gifted artist a 



72 •MY START AS A SHOWMATir. 

world-wide fame which priAces weft might envy. Such 
art is merchantable, and so with the whole range of 
amusements, from the highest to the lowest. The old 
word " trade " as it applies to buying cheap and selling 
at a profit, is as manifest here as it is in the dealings at 
a street-comer stand or in Stewart's store covering a 
whole square. This is a trading world, and men, women 
and children, who cannot live on gravity alone, need 
something to satisfy their gayer, lighter moods and 
hours, and he who ministers to this want is in a busi- 
ness established by the Author of our nature. If he 
worthily fulfils his mission, and amuses without corrupt- 
ing, he need never feel that he has lived in vain. 

Whether I may claim a pre-eminence of grandeur in 
my career as a dispenser of entertainment for mankind, 
I may not say. I have sometimes been weak enough 
to think so, but let others judge; and whether I may 
assume that on the whole, I have sought to make 
amusement harmless, and have succeeded to a very 
great degree, in eliminating from pubUc entertainments 
certain corruptions which have made so many theatrical 
" sensations " positively shameful, may safely be left, I 
think, to the thousands upon thousands who have known 
me and the character of my amusement so long and so 
well. 

But I shall by no means claim entire faultlessness in 
my history as a showman. I confess that I have not 
always been strong enough to rise out of the exceptional 
ways which characterize the art of amusing — not .more, 
however, th^n any other art of trade. When, in begin- 
ning business under my own name in Bethel, in 1831, 
I advertised that I would sell goods " 25 per cent 
cheaper " than any of my neighbors, I was guilty of a 



IfV WSAWJt AS A SHOWHAlSr. 78 

trick of trade^ bat 86 common a trick, &at very few 
who saw my promise were struck with a sense of any 
; ttrticular enormity therein, while, doubtless, a good 
iiiitny, who claim to be specially exemplary, thought they 
vere ie£(dix^ one of their own advertisements. • And 
u the ahow business I was naver guilty of a greiU:er am 
nan this ^^pt tnithfuli^^ss and fair, dealing. . 

The li^ast deseryi«g Qf aU vxyt efforts in tbe show line 
was the OQ0 wJ^iph ip^brodueedx Ifte to tbe bttsineas; a 
scheme in no ,&^nse ,<>f n^y owo^ devising ; one which 
.lad b^^i soin^n^ before tbe public and which had -so 
many voucherf , { fpf: it§ gt^uifieoess that at the time of 
taking possessiojoi, cf it I, honestly belietedit to be 
jrenuii^ ; sopi^thing^ too,, which) as . I have said, I did 
uot seek, but whic^ by. accident came in my way and 
-eemed almost jto con^p<9l my' agency — such was 4;he 
'* Joice Heth " exl^bidon- which first brought me for^ 
ward as a shpwm^p. .1 . , . . 

In the sumflo^.pf 1^95 ^fMx. (Joley. Bwftraan, of Eead^ 
ing^ Cpnnjecticut^ il^fqrmed jae that be> had owned an 
iuterosit in a. ];eix^*kalf le J^^gr^ woman whom he believed 
to be Q^e hundred and si^ty^one years Qld« and whom he 
ilso beUeye^ t9 hav^ ^eeu the nurses of General Waah-> 
ingtop^, He , then., showed me. a copy of the following 
advertisement in the Pent^yi^imia .Inquirer, of July Id^ 

-"^^Sf. . .. ;.. ...... 

Crmosmr. — llic cJ^zensrof Plulaclelphia and its vicinity have an opportunity ot 

\- • t iipflgin^ at tbe Masonio Hall, one of the greatieftt natural curiosities ever wit- 

.•■="«1, viz: JoicB Hbth, a nogress, aged IGl years, who'forinerly l)elQUged to the 

.th*T isi fl^tk^il Warfilngton. Shte hits been a member of the Baptist Church 

- hundretl and sUtoea years^ ax»d can rehearse many hymns, aud Altu; them 

. .r«llnj; to fonucr custom. She was born near the old Potomac Iliver in 

■nzinia, and haA for nine^ or one hundred years lived in Parts, Kentucky, with 

'h'^ Bowling family. 

All who have seen this extraordinary woman arc satisfied of the truth of tho 
o^xx^oat oC iier ac». Xlse etideneo of Ihe Bonrlial; family, which ia respectable, is 

4* 



74 ^BCY STABT AS A SHOWMAN. 

atroikgt but the original bill of sale of Augustine Waabingtoni in bia own bajod* 

writing, and otber evidences which the proprietor has in his possession, will satisfy 
even the most incrednlous. 

A lady will attend at the hall during the afternoon and evening for the a«coixL- 
modation of those ladies who may call. 

Mr. Bartram further stated that he had sold out his 
interest to his partner, R. W. Lindsay, of Jefferson 
County, Kentucky, who was then exhibitiDg Joice Heth 
in. Philadelphia, but was anxious to sell out and 
go home — the alleged reason being that he had very 
little tact as a showman. As the New York papers had 
lUso contained some account of Joice Heth, I went on 
to Philadelphia to see Mr. Lindsay and his exhibitiou* 

Joice Heth was certainly a remarkable curiosity, and 
she looked as if she might have been far older than 
her age as advertised. She was apparently in good 
health and spirits, but Trom age or disease, or both, 
was unable to change her position ; she could niove 
one arm at will, but her lower limbs could not be 
straightened ; her left arm lay across her breast and she 
could not remove it ; the fingers of her left hand were 
drawn down so as nearly to close it, and were fixed ; the 
nails- on that hand were almost four inches long 
and extended above her wrist ; the nails on her large 
toes had grown to the thickness of a quarter of an 
inch ; her head was covered with a thick bush of grey 
hair; but she was toothless and totally blind and 
her eyes had sunk so deeply in the sockets as to have 
disappeared altogether. 

Nevertheless she was pert and sociable, and would 
talk as long as people would converse with her. She 
was quite garrulous about her protege '' dear little 
George," at whose birth she declared she was present, 
having been at the time a slave of Elizabeth Atwood^ a 



MY SXABT AB A SHOWMAK. * tS 

half-sister of Augustine Washington, the father of 
George Washington. As nurse she put the first 
clothes on the infant and she claimed to have '' raised 
him." She professed to be a member of -the Baptist 
church, talking much in her way on religious subjects, 
and she sang a variety of ancient hymns. 

In proof of her extraordinary age and pretensions, 
Mr. Lindsay exhibited a bill of sale, dated February 5, 
1727, from Augustine Washington, County of West* 
moreland, Virginia, to Elizabeth Atwood, a half-sister 
and neighbor of Mr. Washington, conveying "one 
negro woman, named Joice Heth, aged fifty-four years," 
for and in consideration of the sum of thirty-three 
pounds lawful money of Virginia." It was further 
claimed that as she. had long been a nurse in the. 
Washington family she was called in at the birth of 
George and clothed the new-bom infant. The evi- 
dence seemed authentic and in answer to the inquiry 
why so remarkable a discovery had not been made 
before, a satisfactory explanation was given in the 
statement that she had been carried frorii Virginia 
to Kentucky, had been on the plantation of John 
S. Bowling so long that no one knew or cared how old 
she was, and only recently the accidental discovery 
by Mr. Bowling's son of the old bill of sale in the 
Record Office in Virginia had led to the identification 
of this negro woman as " the nurse of Washington.'* 

Everything seemed so straightforward that I was 
anxious to become proprietor of this novel exhibition, 
which was ofiered to me at one thousand dollars, 
though the price first demanded was three thousand. I 
had five hundred dollars, borrowed five hundred dollars 
mere, sold out my interest in the grocery business to my 



70 • Wt WBAS^ AB A SHOWMAN. 

parfaa^^ and Xfegjm. life a» a showman. . At the outset 
(^ my qareer I- aaw that everything depended lipon 
getting people to thinks and talk, and become curious 
and escited over and about the "rare spectacle." 
AoQoxdingly* posters, tranapareUGies, advertiseBientd, 
newspaper paragraphs — all calculated to extort attea^ 
tion — wwe ^employed^ regardleas erf expeoise. My 
exhijbition rpoms mKew^ York, Bofiton^ Phileiddi^hia, 
Albany «and in other laxge and small cities, wece 
coirtmuaUy thrpnged and much money was .made^ : In 
the following Februa)^, Joice Heth Kjded, literally of i^d 
age, . and her rsn^ ains received a* respectahloi Imrial in 
the town of: Bi^thel.. > . , . ' ' - 

At a post-mortem examination of iToice Heth by Dr. 
David >L. Rogers, in the presence of some medical 
st}idents^ it was thought that the absence of .ossification 
indicated t^nsiderably less e^e than had been assumed 
for her; but the doctors i^i^^^^d, and t^is "dark 
8i]ii;^ect" will probaUy always.continuo to he shrouded in. 
mystery. 

I had at last &und my true vocatioUi ' Indeed, 
soon after I began to - exhibit Joioe Heth, I had 
eobnisted her to an ' agmit and had entw^d upon 
my 8ec(md step in the show line^ The next v^iiture, 
whatever it may have been in other sespects^ had the 
merit of being, in . every essential, unmistakably 
genuine* I engaged . from the Albany Museum an 
Italian who* caUed himself '' Signer Antonio ": and who 
performed certain remarkable feats of balancing, stilt- 
walking, plate-spinning, etc. He^ had gone from 
England to Canada, and thence to Albany, and 
had performed in other American cities. I made terms 
with him for one year to exhibit anywhere in the 



MY 8TABT AS A SHOWI^IAW. T7 

States Qt twelye dollars a w^eek and expenses, 
and induced him to change his stage name to " Signor 
Vi valla." I then wrote a notice of his wonderful 
qualities and perfontfances^ pmted it in one of the 
Albany papers as news, sent copies to the theatrical 
managers in New York and in other cities, and went 
with ViviJla to the metropolis. 

Manager Williftm Dinneford, of the Franklin Theatre, 
had seen so many performances of thd kind that he 
declined to engage my ** eminent Italian artist " ; but I 
persuaded him to try Viyalla oiie night fdr' nothing and 
by the potent aid of printer'scink the house wte crammed. 
I appeared as a supernumerary to assist Vivaila in arrang- 
ing h» plates ajid •cither " properties " ; and to hand him 
his gun^ to fire* while he was hopping on olie stilt ten feet 
higii. TWs was ^* my first apptiarance on any stage.*' 
The applause whidb followed Viralla's feats was tretnen- 
dons, and Manager Dinneford was so delighted that he 
engaged him for tiie remainder of* the week at fifty 
dollars. At the clote of the performance, in response 
to a call from the house, i made a speech for Vivaila, 
thanking «k^ audience for their appreciation land an- 
nouncing a repetition of the exhibition every evening 
danog' the week. 

Vivaila remained a second week at the Franklin 
Theatre, foi which I received f 150. I realized the 
same sum for a week in Boston. We then went to 
Washington to fulfil an engagement which was far from 
successful, since my remuneration depended upon the 
receipts, and it snowed continually during the week. I 
was a loser to such an extent that I had not funds 
enough to return to Philadelphia. I pawned my watch 
and ehain for thirty-ftre dollars, when fortunately 



78 MY STABT AS A SHOWMAK. 

Manager Wemyss arrived on Saturday morning and 
loaned me the money to redeem my property. 

As t\m was my first visit to Washington I was much 
interested in visiting the capitol and other ' public build- 
ings. I also satisfied my curiosity in seeing Clay, Cal- 
houn, Benton, John Quincy Adams, Eichard M. Johnson^ 
Polk, and other leading statesmen of the time. I was 
also greatly gratified in calling upon Anne Boyall, author 
of the Black Book, publisher of a little paper called 
'^ Pa.ul Pry," and quite a celebrated personage in her 
day. I had excl\anged The Herald of Freedom with her 
journal and she strongly sympathized with me in my 
persecutions. She was delighted to see me and although 
she was the most garrulous old woman I ever saw, I 
passed a very amusing and pleasant time with her. 
Before leaving her, I manifested my showman propen* 
sity by trying to hire her to give a dozen or more lec- 
tures on " Cfovemment," in the Atlantic cities, but I 
could not engage her at any price, although I am sure 
the speculation would have been a very profitable one. 
I never saw this eccentric woman again ; she died at a 
very advanced age, October l, 1854, at her residence in 
Washington. 

I went with Vivalla to Philadelphia and opened at . 
the Walnut Street Theatre. Though his performances 
were very meritorious and were well received, theatri- 
cals were duU and houses were slim. It was evident 
that something must be done to stimulate the pubhc. 

And now that instinct — I think it must be — which 
can arouse a community a^d make it patronize, pro- 
vided the article offered is worthy of patronage — an 
instinct which served me strangely in later years, aston- 
ishing the public and surprising me, came to my reUef, 



MY STABT AS A SHOWMAN. 79 

and Hie help, curiously enough, appeared in the sh^pe 
of an emphatic hiss from the pit ! 

This hiss, I discovered, came from one Roberts, a cir- 
cus performer, aiid I had an interview with him. He 
was a professional balancer and juggler, who boasted 
that he could do aU Vivalla had done and something more. 
I at once published a card in Yivalla's name, offering 
)|10(K> to any one who would pubhcly perform Vivalla's 
feats at such place as should be designated, and Koberts 
issued a counter card, accepting the offer. I then con- 
tracted with Mr. Warren, treasurer of the Walnut St 
Theatre, for one-third of the proceeds, if I should 
bring the receipts up to $400 a night — an agree- 
ment he could well afford to make as his receipts the 
night before had been but seventy-five dollars. From 
him I went to Roberts, who seemed disposed to '^ back 
down," but I told him I should not insist upon the 
terms of his published card, and asked him if he was 
under any engagement ? Learning that he was not, I 
offered him thirty dollars to perform under my direction 
one night at the Walnut, and he accepted. A great trial 
of skill between Roberts and Vivalla was duly announced 
by posters and through the press. Meanwhile, they 
, rehearsed privately to see what tricks each could per- 
form, and the '^ business '' was completely arranged. 

Public excitement was at fever heat, and on the night 
of the trial the pit and upper boxes were crowded to 
the full ; indeed sales of tickets to these localities were 
soon stopped, for l;here were no seats to sell. The 
" contest" between the performers, was eager and each 
had his party in the house. So far as I could learn, 
no one complained that he did not get all he paid 
for on that occasion. I engaged Roberts for a month 



eO MY STAKT AS A SHOW^IAN. 

md ids subsequent *' ccmtests " wifh Yivadla amused the 
public and put money in my prase. 

Vivalla continued to piftrform for me m -various places, 
including Peak's Museum, in New York, and I took 
bim to different towns in Connectient and in New 
Jersey, with poor success* sometimes, as iPrequently the 
expenses exceeded the reoeipts. 

In April, 18^6, I connected myself' Willi Aaron 
Turner's travelling circus^ K^ompfm^ as ticket-seller, 
-iscretaary aiid treasurer, at tbirPf dollars a irtontih and 
oHe-iifth of the entire pi*ofit9, while Vitalla was to 
receive a salary of fifty debars. • As I t^^s already pay- 
ing him eighty dollahs a mt)irifa, otir joint salaries 
reimbursed me and left mte the chance of twenty per 
cent of the net receipts. We started A*om Danbuj-y for 
West Springfield, Massachusetts, April 5?6th, arid on 
the first day, instead* ^f halting to dine, as I expected, 
Mr. Turner regaled the whol^ company with three loaves 
of rye bread and a pound of butter, bought at a farm 
house at a cost of fifty cetits, and, after watering the 
horses, we went on our way. 

We began our performances at West 'Springfield, 
April 28tfa, and as our expected band of music had not 
arrived from Providence, I made a prefatory speech 
annonncing our disappoiirtment, tix^ our ' intention 
to please our patronii, neverthekfis^ - The two Turner 
boys, sons of the pro )rietor, rodfe fijiely. Joe Pent- 
land, one of the wittie '<t, best^ and most original of 
clowns, with VivaUa's' tricks aftid other performances in 
the ring, more than made up for the feck of music. In 
a day or. two our band arrived and our "houses" 
improved. My. diary is full of inc^devits of our sum* 
ma tour through num^Kms 'vfllagito, towns^ and cities 



^ti START AS A SfiOWMAK. 81 

in New England, New York, New Jersey, Ptetinsyl- 
vania, Delaware, Marylanfl, District of Columbite, 
Virginia, and North Carolina. 

While we were at Cabottille, Massachusetts, on going 
to bed one night otie of my room-tfi^tes threw a lighted 
stnmp of a cigar into a spit-box 'filled with Sawdust 
and the result was that about oliei b'clbbk T. V. Tniner, 
who slept in the room, aWoke in the ' midst of a densei 
smoke and barely managed to crawl to the^ window to 
open it, and to awaken us in time to save Us from suf- 
focation. 

At Lenox, Massachusetts, one Sunday I attended 
chiu-ch as usual, and the preacher denounced our circus 
and all connected with it as immoral, and was very 
abusive; whereupon when he had tead the closing , 
hymn I walked up the pulpit stairs and handed him a 
written request, signed "P T. Bamum, connected 
Tvith the cSrctts, Junfe 6, 1836," to be permitted to reply 
to him. He declined to notice it, and after the benedic- 
tion I lectured him for not giving me an opportunity 
to vindicate myself and those with' whom' I was con- 
nected. The affkir created considerable excitement 
and some bf the members of the church apologised to 
me for their clergyman's ill-behavior. A similar affair 
happeiiW afterwards git Poirt Deposit, on the lower Sus- 
queba!nna, and in this icfstance I addbresbed the Audience 
for half an hour, defending the circus company against 
the attacks of the cl^gyman, ^nd the people listened, 
thougfe theiif pastor repeatedly Implored them to go 
home. Often have I cbllected oitk* company on Sunday 
and read to them the Bible or n printed serthon, and 
(me or more of' the men frequently accompanied me to 
chinrch. Wc? made no pretence of religion, but we 

6 



82 M7 8TABT AS A SHOWHAfiT. 

were not the worst people in the world, and we thought 
ourselves entitled to at least .decent treatment when we 
went to hear the preaching of the gospel. 

The proprietor of the circus, Aaron Turner, was a 
self-made man, who had acquired a large fortuse hy his 
industry. He believed that any man with health and 
common sense could become rich if he only resolved to 
be SO9 and he was very proud of the fact that he began 
the world with no advantages, no education, and with- 
out a shilling. Withal, he was a practical joker, as I 
more than once discovered to my cost. While we were 
at Annapolis, Maryland, he played a trick upon me 
which was fun to him, but was very nearly death to me. 

We arrived on Saturday night and as I felt quite 
" flush " I bought a fine suit of black clothes. On Sun- 
day morning I dressed myself in my new suit and started 
out for a stroll. While passing through the bar-room 
Turner called the attention of the company present to 
me and said : 

'^ I think it very singular you permit that rascal to 
march your streets in open day. It would n't be 
allowed in Rhode Island, and I suppose that is the rea- 
son the black-coated scoundrel has come down this 
way." 

Why, who is he t " asked half a dosen at once. 
Do n't you know ] Why that is the Rev. E. K. 
Avery, the murderer of Miss Cornell ! " 

*^ Is it possible ! " they exclaimed, all startrng for the 
door, eager to get a look at me, and swearing vengeance. 

It was only recently that the Rev. Ephraim K. 
Avery had been tried in Rhode Island for the murder of 
Miss Cornell, whose body was discovered in a stack- 
yard, and though Avery was acquitted in court, the gen- 



et 



mr STABT AB A SHOWMAN. 83 

era! sentiment of the country condemned him. It was 
this Avery whom Turner made me represent. I had 
not walkcii far in my fine clothes, before I was over- 
taken by a mob of a dozen, which rapidly increased to 
at least a hundred, and my ears were suddenly saluted 
with such observations as, '^the lecherous old hypo- 
crite," "the sanctified murderer," "the black-coated 
villain," " lynch the scoundrel," " let's tar and feather 
him," and like remarks which I had no idea applied to 
me till one man seized me l^y the collar, while five or 
six more appeared on the scene with a rail. 

^* Come," said the man who collared me, " old chap, 
you can't walk any further ; we know you, and as we 
always make gentlemen ride in these parts, you may just 
prepare to straddle that rail I " 

My surprise may be imaguied. <"Good heavens!" 
I exclaimed, as they all pressed around me, " gentlemen, 
what have I done 1 " 

'' Oh, we know you," excla,imed half a dozen voices ; 
^* you need n't roll your sanctimonious eyes ; that game 
do n't take in this country. Come, straddle the rail, and 
TtmmAtr the stack-yard / " 

I grew more and more boMrildered; I could not 
imagine what possible offence I was to suffer for, and I 
continued to exclaim, " Gentiemen, what have I done ? " 
Don't kill me, gentiemen, but tell me what I have 
done." 

" Come, make him straddle "the rail ; we'll show him 
how to hang poor factory girls," shouted a man in the 
crowd. 

The man who had me by the collar then remarked, 
" Come, Mr. Avery ^ it 's no use, you see, we know you, 
and we'll give you a touch of Lynch law, and start you 

m 

for home again." 



84 MY SI'ART AS A SHOW^IAK. 

"My name is not Aven% gentleman j you are mis* 
taken in your man," I exclaimed. 

"Come, come, none. of y6ur' gammon; straddle the 
rail, EpKraim.'' ' ■ - : 

' The rail was brought and I was fthotit to be ]f)laced on 
it, when the truth flashed uj^on me. ' ' 

" Gentlemen," I exclaimed, ** I am riot Avery ; I des- 
pise that villain as much a& ^Gii cata ; my name is Bar- 
nutn ; I belong to the ' circus wfiich arrived here last 
night, aiid I am sure Old Tnrtier, my pattnet, has 
)ioaxed you with this ridiculoiis itbry." 

" If he has we'll lynch Wm,'^ said one of the mob. 

"Well, he has, IIB ai^sure you, and if Von will walk 

to the hotel with me; III eonVihce you of th^ fact." 
«... * ' - • • 

This they reluctantly assented fo, keeping, however, 

•a cTose hand upon me. As we walked up the main 
street, the mob received a re-enfoi*emerit of -^ome Hfty or 
sixty, and I was marched like a malefactor np to the 
hotel. ' Old Turiier stood on thfe piazza ready to explode 
with laughter. I "appedled to him for heaven's sake to 
explain this matter, that I 'might be liberated. He 'con- 
tinued to laugh, but finally told them " he believed there 
was some mistake about it. The fact iii;" said he, "'my 
frfend Barnum has a new suit bf black clothes on and 
he looks so much'Hkfe a priet^t that I thoiight he must 
beAv*ry." ■ •' '• -' ' ' ^ ^ 

The crowd saw the joke and seemed satisfied. My 
ncw\*oat hiid'bcett half torn ftoni'my back and 1 had 
bceri very roughly handled.' But^ sHiti'e of the crowd 
apologized for the outrage, declaring that Turner ought 
to be served in the Siime Way, while othei's hd\4sed vne 
-to "get even with*'him."'^ I was* v6ry much offended, 
and when the mob dispersed I asked Turner what could 
have induced him to jilay such a trick upon me. 



MY STAKT AS A SHOWMAN. 85 

** My dear Mr. Bamum," he replied, " it was all for 
our good. Remember, all we need to insure success 
is notoriety. You will see that this will be noised all 
about town as a trick played by one of the circus 
managers upon the other, and our pavilion will be 
crammed to-morrow night." 

It was even so ; the trick was told all over town and 
every one came to see the circus managers who were in 
a habit of playing practical jokes upon each other. 
We had fine audiences while we remained at Aimapolis, 
but it was a long time before I forgave Turner . for 
his rascally "joke." 



/ 

* 






. CHAPTER VL 

' itt UtR^T tR AVteLLl^a COMpXNt'. ' * 

n ■ ■ . ' • f • • •■ ■ 

ZRBSS STEAfiS AKD ;x>D01jro IJf OKP BOCB — TUUNnJO T«B tUBI^Se Olr -tUB^KJI 
— A 805 AS OLD AH itfS FATtlEIl — LEAVINO THE ClttClTfl WiTU TWELVE HIN- 
t^BJ99 WH/LA^-nllY nUST; Tn«V11tU9«0 CK»|rAV£'^nt&lCtllHO 1ti TKf? 
PEOPLE — AJ^PEARIXO AS A NECIRO MI^^STIIEL —THREATENED AVITH . .V^PAS- 
BlNXTWlt'^-fcHCA^fefe Wir>M bAXf^#:R*-rte»rrEnAycK— REPOUT or my akiiest 
FOR MIT1U>BB — RE-EXrOBCINO MY COMPANY— **HAl«nm'fB eRANI> WMWr'nand 
AND MUSICAL THEATRE"— OUT WITTING A HIIERIPF — "lADY MAYEs's" MAN- 
SION AND PLANTATION— A BRIClIANT AUDIENCE — DA8S) DRUM M>IX> — CBOSS- 
tNO TUB INDIAN NATION — JOE PENTLAND AS A SAVAC.E — TEBBOB AND 
FLIGHT OF VIVALLA — A NONPLUSSED LEGERDEMAIN PERFORMER — A MALR 
EGO -LAYER — DISBANDING MY COMPANY — A NEW PARTNERSHIP — PUBLIC 
LECTURING — DIFFICULTY WITH A DROVER— THE STEAMBOAT "CEUEs" — 
SUDDEN MARRIAGE ON BOARD — MOBBED IN ]:X>UI8IANA — ARRIVAL AT ISTEW 
ORLEANS. 

An amusing incident occurred when we were at 
Hanover Court House, in Virginia. It rained so heavily 
that we could not perform there and Turner decided to 
start for Richmond immediately after dinner, when he 
was informed by the landlord that as our agent had 
engaged three meals and lodging for the whole 
company, the entire bill must be paid whether we went 
then, or next morning. No compromise could be 
eflFected with the stubborn landlord and so Turner 
proceeded to get the worth of his money as follows : 

He ordered dinner at twelve o'clock, which was duly 
prepared and eaten. The table was cleared and re-set 
for supper at half-past twelve. At one o'clock we all 
went to bed, every man carrying a lighted candle to his 
room. There were thirty-six of us and we all 
undressed and tumbled into bed as if we were going to 



MY FtBST TRAVELT.mO COMPANY. 87 

stay all night. In half an honr we rose and went down 
to the hot brtokfast which Turner had demanded and 
which we found smoking on- the table. Turner was 
very grav6, the landlord was exceedingly angry, and the 
rest of u« were convulsed with laughter at the absurdity 
of the whole proceeding. We disposed of our break- 
fast as if we had eaten nothing for- ten hours and 
then started for' Richmond with the satisfaction that 
we fti-rly'^ettfed'with our unreasbttuble landloi^d. 

At Richttiondv after performances' were ovtt om 
nis^ht; I manageld'to paiiiaHy pay 'Turner for his Avery 
trick. A' domett or more df us were eiijoylng oui-selves 
in the sitting room of the hotel, telling stories and 
stngfng song^, when some of the c6mpany propofsed 
sundry amusing arithmetical (Jtie^ions, followed by one 
from Turner, which was readily solved. Hoping to 
cntch Turner I then proposed the following problem: 

" Suppose a min is thirty years of age land he has 
a child one year of age ; he is thirty times older than 
his child. When the child is thirty y^ars old^ the 
f ither, being sixty, is only twice as old as his child* 
When the child is sixty the father is ninety, and there- 
fore only one-third older than the child. When the 
cliild is ninety the father is one 'htmdred * and twenty^ 
and therefore only one- fourth- older than the child. 
Thus you see^, the .child is gradually but surely gaining 
i)n the parent, and as he certainly continnes to come 
nearer and nearer; in time he must overtafke him. The 
question theref6re is, suppdse it wias possible for them to 
live long enotiofh, how old would the father be when 
the child overtook him atid became of the same age?'* 

The Company generally saw the catch;* but Tnrnerr 
was Very much- interested in the problem, and althongh 



88 H7 I1B8T TBAVBUilNG GOMPAKT. 

he admitted he knew nothing about arithmetic he was 
convinced that as the son was gradually gaining on the 
father he must reach him if there was time enough •*— 
say, a thousand years, or so r^ for the race. But an old 
gentleman gravely remarked that the idea of a son be- 
coming as old as his father while both were living was 
simply nonsense, and he offered to bet a dozen of cham* 
pagne that the thing was impossible, even ^' in figures." 
Turner, who was a betting man, and who thought the 
problem might be proved, accepted the wager ; but he 
was soon convinced that however much the boy might 
relatively gain upon his father, tiiiere would always be 
thirty years difference in their ages. The champagne 
cost him $25, and he failed to see the fun of my arith- 
metic, though at last he acknowledged that it was a fsix 
offset to the Avery trick. 

We went from Richmond to Fetersbui^, and from 
that place to Warrenton, North Carolina, where, Octo- 
ber 30th, my engagement expired with a profit to myself 
of $1,200. I now separated from the circus company, 
taking Vivalla, James Sanford, (a negro singer and 
dancer,) several musicians, horses, wagons, and a small 
canvas teAt vidth which I intended to begin a travelling 
exhibition of my own. My company started and Tur- 
ner took me on the way in his own csirriage some twenty 
miles. We parted reluctantly and my friend wished me 
every success in my new venture. 

On Saturday, November 12, 1836, we halted at Rocky 
Mount Falls, North Carolina, and on my way to the 
Baptist Church, Sunday morning, I noticed a stand and 
benches in a grove near by, and determined to speak to 
the people if I was permitted. The landlord who was 
with me said that the congregation, coming from a dis- ' 



MY FtBST TBAVBUilNG COMPAIJY. 89 

tance to attend a single service, would be very glad to 
hear a stranger and I accordingly asked the venerable 
clei;gyman to announce that after service I would speak 
for half an hour in the grove. Learning that I was not 
a clergyman, he declined to give the notice, but said 
that he had no objection to my making the announce- 
ment, which I did, and the congregation, numbering 
about three hundred, promptly came to hear me? 

I told them I Was not a preacher and had very little 
experience in public speaking ; but I felt a deep interest 
in matters of morality and religion, and would attempt, 
in a plain way, to set before them the duties and privi- 
leges of man. I appealed to every ' man's experience, 
observation and reason, to confirm the Bible doctrine of 
wretchedness in vice and happiness in virtue. We can- 
not violate the laws of God with impunity, and he will 
not keep back the wages of well-doing. The outside 
show of things is of very small account. We must 
look to realities and not to appearam^es. ^^ Diamonds 
may glitter on a vicious breast»" but '^ the soul's calm 
sunshine and the heart-felt joy is virtue's prize." The 
rogue, the passionate man, the drunkard, are not to be 
envied even at the best, and a conscience hardened by 
sin is the most sorrowful possession we can think of. I 
went on in this way, widx some scriptural quotations and 
familiar illustrations, for three-quarters ,of an hour. At 
the close of my bddress several persons ^took me by 
the hand, expressing themselves as greatly pleased and 
desiring to know my name ; and I went away with the 
feeling that possibly I might have done some good in 
the beautiful grove on that charming Sunday morning. 

When we were at Camden, South Cacolina, Sanford 
suddenly left me, and as I had advertised negro songs 



SfD M* Ff M* TllAVKLLIN6t COMPANY. 

and none of my cmtopaaay v^i competent to fill Sairfoid's 
place, not to- disappoint my audience, I 'blacked myself 
and Sung the 'advertised songs, " Zip Ooon,'' etc., and to 
my surprise was much applauded, whil^ two of the 
songs were encored. One. evening after singing my 
songs 1 heard a disturbance outside the tent and- going 
to the spoft feund a; pel^on disputing tt^ith my men. I 
took part^ri !!he'iSidfe'of (hem^n, when the person who 
^as" qaai'feffii% Witti -them drew a pistol and eidiiming, 
** j^u bJacfc stedutldrel}^ how dareyoti nse such latigtiage 
to a white man,''%e proceeded tb cock' M. I sav^ that 
he ^otight I was a negro and meaht to blow my ■ briains 
Out Qtnck as thought I rolVed my sleeve np, showed 
my skin, and said, *' I am As* white aS yon are, sfr:" Ho 
dropped his pfetol* in positive fright and begged' my 
pardon. Myptesbncieof nrind savdd me. 

On fonr' different t)ec^siOns fe my life I hatv6 had a 
loaded pistol {Jointed at my head and ea6h time I have 
escaped death' by What seemed a- miracle. I have also 
often been, in deadly peril ' by accidents, and when I 
think of these tlnngs I realiase my indebtedness to an 
all-profectiiig Providtence. Eetiewing my career, too, 
and considering the kind of company t kept ftr years 
and the -a^o^diatioiis 'iHrith whlth I Was surronnded and 
connected, I am sWprised as ^eW ks gr^tefiil that I was 
not rain'ed. ' I honestly ^believe that I owe my preserva- 
tion from the- degradation of living and dying a loafer 
and a vagaibondi 'ft^ the^ single fact- that 1 *w<ts never 
addicts to. strong drink; To be sure, I have^in 'times 
past drank liquor, but I have generally wholly abstained 
from intoxicating bevemges, and f6v more than twenty 
ycuBfr past j I am glad to say, I have been u strict " tee- 
totaUeri" . - j ^ .». * i • •/ • 



At Camden I lost oibb oi my mwioiwi^rf^ Scot^bman 
oamed. CochnNi) who w^s > axr^8ted £9r advisijig . the 
negro • barber who was shaviag him to rua away to the 
Free States or to Canada. I made every effort to effect 
Cochran 6 release, but he was imprisoned more tban six 
months. . . , 

While X waf away from home I generally wrote twice 
a week to my.famil^ and received, lattery. nearly us often 
from my wife. Ojae of hei? lette?*,, which:! r^cpp^dia 
Colambia, South C^olij^ay.infoarmed me it^ was qfurontly 
reported in Connecticut that I was lynder -se^tei^e pf 
cieath in Canada fax murder ! Tbe^story gr^awout of a 
nimoi: aboiM' a difficojlty in Canada between SQPie row- 
dies and a circus comply — not Tumer^q, -^r- fpr wie met 
his troupe at Colui^ihia, Deoember 5, 18g6. That com- 
pany wa& then to be disbanded and .1 bought four horses 
and twowagoms and hir^d Joe Fentlandf md Robert 
White to join my cwnpany. Whit^, as a negro singer, 
would relieve m^ from tha,t roUi and .Peptla^di besides 
being a capital down, was: celebrated, aa a ventriloquist, 
comic dinger, balancer, and legecdfrnfupa pei^ormer. 
My reinforced exhibition was caUied/^BaiTlum's Gxand 
Scieiitific and fMueical Theatre.'' ' , > 

Some time previously, ifi Baleighi Noi;th C^irotina, I 
had 8ol4 <ai0-half qf m^ Qstablishmeirf to^ a jom^ whom 
I will call Henry) who ijioyrt ftcted as treasurer and 
ticket-t^Hctr. At Aijigu^tar Gaorgiavihe sheriff se^^ 9i 
writ upon this Henry for a debt of $500; As Hem7 
had $600 of the company's money in his possession, I 
immediately procured a bill of sale of all his property in 
the exhibition and returned to the theatre where Henry's 
creditor and the creditor's lawyer were waiting for me. 
They demanded the keys of the staUe so as to levy on. 



92 MY FIBST TEAVEIiMNG COMPANY. 

the horses and wagons. I begged delay till I could 
see Henry, and they consented. Henry was anxions to 
cheat his creditor and he at once signed the bill of sale. 
I returned and informed the creditor that Henry refused 
to pay or compromise the claim. The sheriff then de- 
manded the keys of the stable door to attach Henry's 
interiest in the property. " 'Not yet," said I, showing a 
bill of sale, ** you see I am in full possession of the 
property as entire owner. Yon confess that you have 
not yet levied on it, and if you touch my property, you 
do it at your pefil." 

They were very much taken aback and the sheriff 
immediately conveyed Henry to prison. The next day 
I leatned that Henry owed his creditors thirteen hun- 
dred dollars and that he had agreed when the Saturday 
evening performance was ended to hand over five 
hundred dollars (company money) and a bill of sale 
of his interest, in consideration of which one ' of the 
horses was to be' ready for him to run away with, 
leaving me in the lurch ! Learning this, I had very 
little sympathy for Henry and my next step was 
to secure the five hundred dollars he had secreted. 
Vivalla had obtained it from him to keep it from 
the sheriff ; I received it from Vivalla, on Henrj^'s 
order, as a supposed means of procuring bail for him 
on Monday morning. I then paid the creditor the full 
amount obtained from Henry as the price of his half 
interest in the exhibition and received in return an 
assignment of five hundred dollars of the creditor's 
claims and a guaranty that I should not be troubled 
by my late partner on that score. Thus, promptness of 
action and good luck relieved me from one of the most 
unpleasant positions in which I had ever been placed. 



MY FIfiST TBAYEIililNG COMPANY. 93 

• 

While trayelling with our teams and show through a 
desolate part of Georgia, our advertiser, who was in 
advance of the party, finding the route, on one occasion, 
too long for us to reach a town at night, arranged with 
a poor widow woman named Hayes to furnish us with 
meals and let us lodge in her hut and out-houses. It 
was a beggarly place, belonging to one of the poorest of 
'' poor whites/' Our horses were to stand out all night, 
and a farmer, six miles distant, was to bring a load 
of provender on the day of our arrival. Bills were 
then posted announcing a performance under a canvas 
tent near Widow Hayes's, for, as a show was a rarity 
in that region, it was conjectured that a . hundred 
or more small farmers and '' poor whites " might be 
assembled and that the receipts would cover the 
expenses. 

Meanwhile, our advertiser, who was quite a wag, 
^v^ote back informing us of the difficulties of reaching 
a town on that part of our route and stating that he 
had made arrangements for us to stay over night on the 
plantation of '' Lady Hayes," and that although the 
country was sparsely settled, we , could doubtless give 
a profitable performance to a fair audience. 

Anticipating a fine time on this noble ^' plantation," 
^e started at four o'clock in the morning so as 
to arrive at one o'clock, thus avoiding the heat of 
the afternoon. Towards noon we came to a small river 
where some men, whom we afterwards discovered to be 
down-east Yankees, from Maine, were repairing a bridge, 
tvery flooring plank had been taken up BJsd it was 
impossible for our teams to cross. " Could the bridge 
he fixed so that we could go over ] " I inquired ; " No ; 
it would take half a day, and meantime if we must 



94 MY FIHST TRAVELLIKG COMPAISY. 

cross, there was apkoe about 'Sixteett miles- dc^vrn -the 
river where we could get over/' . " But we -oan't goso &ir^ 
as th.at ; we are under engagement to perform on Lady 
Hayes's place to-night and we must cross here. 
Fix the bridge and we will pay you handsomely." 

They wanted no money^ but if we would give them, 
some tic^eta to oar show they though^; (faey might do 
something for us^ I gladly consented and in fifteen 
minuiea we cvossed that^ bridge. The oteinniBg rasc^Qs 
had seen our posters, and ki^eW we were eoming t so 
they had taken op the plonks of the bridge and had 
hidden tham till they had levied Aipon us^ for tickets, 
when (he .floor was re-laid, in- a quarter of an hour. We 
laughed heartily at the trick and *were very glad, to 
cross so cheaply. 

Towards dinner time, we began to look out for the 
grand , mansion of ^^ Lady. Hayes,'' and seeing nothings 
bat little huts we quietly pursued onr journey. Atone 
o'clock—^ the time. when weishould ha'jfe awived at our 
destination— L became. impatient aiid riding up to a 
poverty-stricken hovel and a^ng a ragged, barefooted 
old. woman, with hep ^eves rolled up to her shoulders, 
who was washing clothes* in finmt of*4^e door, I in« 
qniredr*^ - * .. j , 

"Hallo! can yoa tell me where Lady Hayes lives?" 

The old woipoain iraised her head, which was covered 
with tangled locks mnd matted hair, and exclaimed — 

"Heyr 

" No, Hayes, Lady Hayes ; where is her plantation ? '' 

" This is the place," she answered ; " I'm Widder 
Hayes and you are all to stay here to-night." 

We could not believe our ears or eyes ; but after put- 
ting the dirty old woman through a severe cross-exami* 



MY FIHSt TRAVBIJiINQ COMPANY. 95 

nation she finally produced a contract, signed by our 
advertiser, agreeing for board and lodging for the com- 
pany and we found ourselves booked for the night. It 
appeared that our advertiser could find no better quar- 
ters in that forlorn section and he had indulged in a 
joke at our expense by exciting our appetites and ima- 
ginations in anticipation of the luxuries we should find 
in the magnificent mansion of " Lady Hayes." 

Joe Pentland grumbled, Bob White indulged in 
some very strong language, and Signer Vivalla laughed. 
He had travelled with his monkey and organ in Italy 
and could put up with any fare that offered. I took 
the disappointment philosophically, simply remai-king 
that we must make the best of it and compensate our- 
selves when we reached a town next day. 

When the old woman called us to dinner we crept 
into her hut and found that she had improvised benches 
at her table by placing boards upon the only four chairs 
in her possession^ and at that, some of us were obliged 
to stand. The dinner consisted of a piece of boiled 
smoked bacon, a large dish of " greens," and corn bread. 
Three plates, two knives, and three forks made up the 
entire table furniture and compelled a resort to our jack- 
knives. " A short horse is soon curried," and dinner 
was speedily despatched. It did not seem possible for an 
audience to assemble in that forsaken quarter, and we 
concluded not to take the canvas tent out of the wagon. 

By three o'clock, however, at least fifty persons had 
arrived on the ground to attend the night show and 
they reported " more a coming." Accordingly we put 
up the tent and arranged our small stage arid curtains, 
preparing seats for two hundred ptople. Those who 
had already arrived were mostly women, many of them 

5* 



96 MY FURST TRAVELLING COMPAKY. 

from sixteen to twenty years old — poor, thin, sallow- 
faced creatures, wretchedly clad, some of them engaged 
in smoking pipes, while the rest were chewing snuff. 
This latter process was new to me ; each chewer was 
provided with a short stick, softened at one end, by 
chewing it, and this stick was occasionally dipped into a 
snuff box and then stuck into the mouth, from whenee 
it protruded like a cigar. The technical term for the 
proceeding is " snuff- dipping." 

Before night, stragglers had brought the number 
of people on Lady Hayes' plantation up to one 
himdred, and soon after dark, we opened our exhibition 
to an audience of about two hundred. The men were 
a pale, haggard set of uncombed, uncouth creatux'es, 
whose constantly-moving jaws and the streams of 
colored saliva exuding from the comers of their mouths 
indicated that they were confirmed tobacco chewers. ' I 
never saw a more stupid and brutish assemblage, of 
human beings. The performance % delighted them ; 
Pentland's sleight-of-hand tricks astonished them and led 
them to declare that he must be in League with the evil 
one; Signer Vivalla's ball-tossing and plate spinning 
elicited their loudest applause ; and Bob White's negro 
songs and break-downs made them ftdrly scream with 
laughter- 

At last, the performance terminated and Pentland 
stepped forward and delivered the closing address, which 
he had repeated, word for word, a hundred times, and 
which was precisely as follows : 

" Ladies and Gentlemen : The entertainments of the 
evening have now come to a conclusion, and, we hope, 
to your general satiflf action." 

But now came a dilemma; the meaning of this 



MT FIRST TRAVELLING COMPANY. 97 

announcement was- quite above the comprehenBion of 
the audience ; they had not the remotest idea that the 
performance was finished, and they sat like statues. 

With a hearty laugh at Pentland I told him that his 
language was not understood in this locality and that 
he must try again. He was chagrined, and declared 
that he would not say another word. Little Vivalla 

r f 

laughed, danced around like a monkey, "and said, in his 
broken English : 

'* Ah, ha! Signer Pentland ; you no speak good Eeng- 
Ush, hah ! These educated peoples no understand you, 
eh ? By gar what d — ^--d fool's. Ah, Signer Bamum, 
let me speaks to them ; I will make them jump double 
qiieek." 

I quite enjoyed the fun and said, " Well, Signor, go 
ahead." 

» 

The little Italian jumped upon the stage and with a 
broad grimace and tremendous gesture exclaimed — 

" Eet is feenisH !'* 

He then retired behind the curtain, but, of course, 
the audience did not understand that he had told them 
the performance was finished. No one would hare 
understood him. Hence, the spectators sat still, won- 
dering what would come next. " By gar," said Vivalla, 
losing his temper, "I will give them a hint," and he 
loosened the cord and down fell the curtain on one 
side of the stage. 

*• Good, good,** cried out an enthusiastic " poor 
white," giving his quid a fresh roll to the other side ot 
his mouth, " now we are going to have something new." 

" I reckon they's totin' that plunder off to get ready 
for a dance," said a delicate " dippet," making a lunge 
into her box for another ttiouthful of the dust* 

7 



98 My FDBtST TRAVELLIKG COMPANY. 

ThmgB were becoming serious, * and I saw that in 
order to get rid of these people they must ,be addressed 
in plain language ; so, walking upon the stage, I simply 
said, making at the same time a motipn for them to 
go,— 

"It is all over; no more performance; the show is 

out." 

» « 

This was jouderstood, but they still stood upon the 
order of their going and were loth to leave, especially 
as the, to them, extraordinary apnouncements of, Pent- 
land and Yivalla had, prepared them for somethings 
fresh. Several days before, our band of musicians had 
left us, reducing our orchestra to ^n organ and pipes, 
ground and blown by an Italian whom we had picked 
up on the road. We had, in addition, a large bass 
drum, with no one to beat it, and this drum was espied 
by some of the audience in going out. Very soon I 
was waited upon by a masculine committee of three, 
* who informed me that " the young ladies were very 
anxious to hear a -tune on the big drum." Pentland 
heard the request and replied, " I will accommodate the 
young ladies," and strapping on the drum he took a 
stick in each hand and began to pound tremendously. 
Occasionally he would rap the sticks together, toss one 
of them into the air, catching it a^ it came down, and 
then pound away again like mad. In fact, he cut up 
all sorts of pranks with that big drum and when he 
was tired out and stopped, he was gratified at being told 
by the " young ladies " that they had never heard a big 
drum before, but he " played it splendid," and they 
thought it was altogether the best part of the entire 
performance ! 
The next forenoon we arrived at Macon, and congra- 



MY FIBST TRAVELLING COMPANY. 99 

talated ourselves that we had again reached the re^ons 
of civilization. 

In going from Columbus, Georgia, to Montgomery, 
Alabama, we were obliged to cross a thinly-settled, 
desolate tract, known as the *' Indian Nation," and as 
several persons had been murdered by hostile Indians 
m that region, it was deemed dangerous to travel the 
road without an escort. Only the day before we started ^ 
the mail stage had been stopped and the passengers 
murdered, the driver alone escaping. We were well 
armed, however, and trusted that our numbers would 
present too formidable a force to be attacked, though 
we dreaded to incur the risk. Vivalla alone was fear- 
less and was ready to encounter fifty Indians and drive 
them into the swamp. 

Accordingly, when we had safely passed over the 
entire route to within fourteen miles of Montgomery, 
and were beyond the reach of danger, Joe Pentland 
determined to test Vivalla's bravery. He had secretly 
purchased at Mount Megs, on the way, ati old Indian 
dress with a fringed hunting shirt and moccasins and 
these he put on, after coloring his face with Spanish 
brown. Then, shouldering his musket he followed 
Vivalla and the party and, approaching ^stealthily, 
leaped into their midst with a tremendous whoop. 

Vivalla's companions were in the secret, and they 
instantly fled in all directions. Vivalla himself ran like 
a deer And Pentland after him, gun in hand and yelling 
horribly. After running a full mile the poor little 
ItjJian, out of breath and frightened nearly to death, 
dropped on his knees and begged for his life. The 
** Indian ** levelled his gun at his victim, but soon 
seemed to relent and signified that Vivalla should turn 



100 MY FIRST TBAVELLING COMPANY. 

his pockets inside out — which he did, prodaciiig and 
handing over a purse containing eleven dollars. The 
savage then marched Vivalla to an oak and with a 
handkerchief tied him in the most approved Indian 
manner to the tree, leaving him half dead with 
fright. 

Pentland then joined us, and washing his face and 
changing his dress, we all went to the relief of Vivalla, 
Jle was overjoyed to see us, and when he was released 
his courage returned ; he swore that after his compan- 
ions left him the Indian had been re-enforced by six 
more to whom, in defi^ult of a gun or other means to 
defend himself, Vivalla had been compelled to surren- 
der. We pretended to believe his story for a week and 
then told him the joke, which he refused to credit, 
and also declined to take the money which Pentland 
offered to return, as it could not possibly be his since 
seven Indians h^ taken his money. We had a great 
deal of fun over Vivalla's courage, but the matter made 
him so cross ^and i^urly that we were finally obliged to 
drop it altogether. From that time forward, however, 
Vivalla never boasted of his prowess. 

We arrived fit Montgomery, February 28th, 1837. 
Here I met Henry Hawley a legerdemain performer, 
about forty-five years <^{ age, 6ut as he was prematurely 
gray he looked at least seventy, and I sold him onje-half 
of my exhibition. He had a ready wit, a happy way oi 
localizing his tricks, was very popular m that part, of the 
country, where he had been performing for several years, 
and I never saw him nonplussed but once. This was 
when he was performing on one occasion the well- 
known egg and bag trick, which he did with his usual 
sucoess, producing egg after ^gg £rom the bag and 



3ir FIBST TRAVELLING OOMPAKY. 101 

finally breaking one to show that they were genuine. 
" Now," said Hawley, *' I will show you the old hen 
that laid them." It happened, however,* that the negro 
boy to whom had been intrusted the duty of supplying 
the bag had made a slight mistake which was manifest 
when Hawley triumphantly produced, not " the old hen 
that laid the eggs," but a rooster ! Thfe whole audience 
was convulsed with laughter and the abashed Hawley 
retreated to the dressing room cursing the stupidity of 
the black boy who had been paid to put a hen in the 
bag. 

After performing in dijfferent places in Alabama, 
Kentucky, and Tennessee, we disbanded at Nashville in 
May, 1837, Vivalla going to New York, where he per- 
formed on his own account for a while previous to sail- 
ing for Cuba, Hawley staying in Tennessee to look after 
our horses which had been turned oat to grass, and I 
returning home to spend a few weeks with my family. 

Early in July, returning west with a new company of 
performers, I rejoined Hawley and we began our cam- 
paign in Kentucky. We were not successful ; one of 
our small company was incompetent ; another was in- 
temperate — both were dismissed ; and our negro-singer 
was drowned in the river at Frankfort. Funds were 
low and I was obliged to leave pledges here and there, 
in payment for bills, which I afterwards redeemed. 
Hawley and I dissolved in August and making a new 
partnership with Z. Graves, I left him in chai'ge of the 
establishment and went to Tiffin, Ohio, where I re-en- 
gaged Joe Pentland, buying his horses and wagons and 
taking him, with several musicians, to Kentucky. 

During my short stay at Tiffin, a religious conversa- 
tion at the hotel introduced me to several gentlemen 



102 MY ElliST TBAVBLI^INO; GOMPAKY. 

who requested me to lecture on the subjects we had dis- 
cussed, and I did so to a crowded audience in the schcx)!- 
house Sunday afternoon and evening.- At the solicitation 
of a gentleman from iRepublic, I also delivered two 
lectures in th^at town on the evenings of September 1th 
and 5th. 

On our way to Kentucky^ just before we reached 
Cincinnati, we met a drove x>f hogs and one of the 
drivers makin,g an insolent /emark becauj^e joax wagons 
interfered with his swine, I replied in the same vein, 
when^he dismounted and pointing a pistol at my breast 
swore he would shoot me if I did not apologize* I begged 
him to permit me to consult with a friend in the next 
wagon, and the misunderstanding should be satisfac- 
torily settled. My friend was a loaded double-barreled 
gun which I pointed at him and said : 

*' Now, sir, you must apologize, for your brains are 
in danger. You drew a weapon upon me for a trivial 
remark. You seem to hold hu^uul life at a cheap 
price; and now, isir, you have the choice betweeu 
a load of shot and an apology.'^ ^ 

This led to an apology and a friendly ccmversation in 
which we both agreed that many a life is sacrificed 
in sudden anger because one or both of the contending* 
parties carry deadly weapons. 

In our subsequent south.em tour we exhibited 
at Nashville ( where I visited Genial Jackson, at 
the Hermitage), HuntsvUle, Tuscaloosa, Vicksburg and 
intermediate places, doing tolerably well. At Vicks- 
burg we sold all our land conveyances^ excepting 
the band wagon and four horses, bought the steamboat 
•^' Ceres " for six thousand dollars, hired the captain and 
qrew, and started dpiwn ^he riv^y.to exhibit at places on 



MIT FIBST TBAVBIXING COMPANY. 103 

the way. At Natchez our cook left us and in the 
search for another I found a white widow who would 
go, only she expected to marry a painter, I called 
on the painter who had not made up his mind whether 
to marry the widow or not, but I told him if he would 
marry her the next morning I would hire her at twenty- 
five dollars a month as cook, employ him at the same 
wages as painter, with board for both, and a cash bonus 
of fifty dollars. There was a wedding on board the 
next day and we had a good cook and a good dinner. 

During one of our evening performances at Fran- 
cisville, Louisiana, a man tried to pass me at the door 
of the tent, claiming that he had paid for admittance* I 
refused him entrance ; and as he was slightly intoxicated 
he struck me with a slung shot, mashing my hat 
and grazing what phrenologists call " the organ of 
caution/* He went away and soon returned with a 
gang of armed and half-drunken companions who 
ordered us to pack up our " traps and plunder " and to 
get on board our steamboat within au hour. The 
big tent speedily came down. No one was permitted to 
help us, but the company worked with a will and 
within five minutes of the expiration of the hour we 
were on board and ready to leave. The scamps who had 
caused our departure escorted us and our last load, 
waving pine torches, and saluted us with a hurrah as we 
swung into the stream. 

The New Orleans papers of March 19, 1838, 
announced the arrival of the " Steamer Ceres, Captain 
Barnum, with a theatrical company." After a week's 
performances, we started for the Attakapas country. 
At Opelousas we exchanged the steamer for sugar and 
molasses; our company was disbanded, and I started 
for home, arriving in New York, June 4, IS^S. 



CHAPTER VII. 

AT THE FOOT OF THE LADDER 

DIBGCrST AT THE TBAVSLUNO BUBDnSSS— ABYERTISIirO FOB AS ASSOCIATE -- BTTSif 
OF THE MIIiLION-MAKEBS — COUNTERFEITERS, CHEATS AND QUACKS-— A NEW- 
BUSINESS — SWINDLED BY MY PARTNER — DIAMOND THE DANCER— A NEW COM- 
PANY—DESERTIONS — SUCCESSES AT NEW OBLSANS — TYRONE POWER ANX» 
FANNY ELLSLER — IN JAIL AGAIN — BACK TO NEW YORK — ACTING AS A BOOK 
AGENT — LEASING VAUXHALL — FROM HAND TO MOUTH — DETERMIKATIOK TO 
HAKE MONEY — FORTUNE OPENING HER DOOR — THE AMERICAN MUSEUM FOR 

SALE— NEGOTIATIONS FOR THE PURCHASE — HOPES AND DISAPPOINTMENTS 

THE TRAIN LAID — 8JCASHINO A RIVAL COMPANY. 

I HAVE said that the show business has as manv 
grades of dignity as trade, which ranges all the way 
from the mammoth wholesale establishment down to 
the corner stand. The itinerant amusement business is 
at the bottom of the ladder. I had begun there, but 
I had no wish to stay there ; in fact, I was thoroughly 
disgusted with the trade of a travelling showman, and 
although I felt that I could succeed in that line, yet I 
always regarded it, not as an end, but as a means to 
something better. 

Longing now for some permanent respectable busi- 
ness, I advertised for a partner, stating that I had 
$2,500 to invest and would add my unremitting personal 
attention to the capital and the business. This adver- 
tisement gave me an altogether new insight into human 
nature. Whoever wishes to know how some people 
live, or want to live, let him advertise for a partner, 
at the same time stating that he has a large or small 
capital to invest. I was flooded with answers to my 
advertisements and received no less than ninety-three 



AT THE FOOT OF THE LADDER. 105 

different propositions for the use of my capital. Of 
these, at least one-third were from porter-house keep- 
ers. Brokers, pawnbrokers, lottery-policy dealers, patent 
medicine men, inventors, and others also made applica- 
tion. Some of my correspondents declined to specifi- 
cally state . the nature of their business, but they 
promised to open the door to untold wealth. 

I had interviews with some of these mysterious mil- 
lion-makers. One of them was a counterfeiter, who, 
after much hesitation and pledges of secrecy showed 
me some counterfeit coin and bank notes; he wanted 
i^2,500 to purchase paper and ink and to prepare new 
dies, and he actually proposed that I should join him in 
the business which promised, he declared, a safe and 
rich harvest. Another sedate individual, dressed in 
Quaker costume, wanted me to join him in an oat specu- 
lation. By buying a horse and wagon and by selling 
oats, bought at wholesale, in bags, he thought a good 
business could be done, especially as people would not 
be particular to measure after a Quaker. 

" Do you mean to cheat in measuring your oats T I 
asked. 

" O, I should probably make them hold out," he an-, 
swered, with a leer. 

One application came from a Pearl street wool mer- 
chant, who failed a month afterwards. Then came a 
^*^ perpetual motion" man who had a fortune-making 
machine, in which I discovered a main-spring slyly hid 
in a hollow post, the spring making perpetual motion 
— till it ran down. Finally, I went into partnership 
with a German, named Proler, who was a manufacturer 
of paste-blacking, water-proof paste for leather, Cologne 
water and bear's grease. We took the store No. 101>^ 



106 AT THE FOOT OP THE LADDER 

Bowery, at a rent (inoludiug the dwelling) of $600 per 
annum, and opened a large manufactory of the above 
ai'tides. Proler manufactured and sold the goods at 
wholesale in Boston, Charleston, Cleyeland, and various 
other parts of the country. I kept the accounts, and 
attended to sales in the store, wholesale and retail. For 
a while the business seemed to prosper — at least till 
my capital was absorbed and notes for stock began to 
fall due, with nothing to meet them, since we had sold 
our goods on long credits. In January, 1840, I dis- 
solved partnership with Proler, he buying the entire in- 
terest for $2,600 on credit, and then running away to^ 
Botterdam without paying his note, and leaving me 
nothing but a few recipes. Proler was a good4ooking, 
plausible, promising — scamp, 

Um'ing my connection with Proler, I became ac- 
quainted with a remarkable young dancer named John 
Diamond. He was one of the first and best of the 
numerous negro and " break-down " dancers who have 
since surprised and amused the public, and I entered 
into an engagement with his father for his services, put- 
ting Diamond in the hands of an agent, as I did not 
wish to appear in the transaction. In the spring of 
1840, 1 hired and opened the Vauxhall Garden saloon, 
in New York, and gave a variety of performances, in- 
duding singing, dancings Yankee stories, etc. In this 
saloon Miss Mary Taylor, afterwards so celebrated as an 
actress and singer, made her first appearance on the 
stage. The enterprise, however, did not meet my ex- 
pectation and I relinquished it in August. 

What was to be done next? I dreaded resuming the 
life of an itinerant showman, but funds were low, I had 
a family to care for, and as nothing better presented I 



AT THE«FOOT OF THE LADPEBL 107 

made up my miad to endure the vexations and uncertain- 
ties of a tour in the ^est and South. I collected a 
compauy, consisting of Mr. C. D. Jenkins, an excellent 
singer and delineator of Yankee and other characters 5 
Master John Diamond, the dancer; Francis Lynch, an 
orphan vagabond, fourteen years old, whom I picked up 
at Troy, and a fiddler. My brother-in-law, Mr. John 
Hallett, preceded us a^ agent and advertiser, and our 
route passed through Buffalo, Toronto, Detroit, Chicago, 
Ottawa, Springfield, the intermediate places, and St. 
Louis, where I took the steamboat for New Orleans with 
a company reduced by desertions to Master Diamond 
and the fiddler. 

Arriving in New Orleans, January 2, 1841, 1 had but 
3100 in ray purse, and I had started from New York 
four months before with quite as much in my pocket. 
Excepting some small remittances to my family I had 
made nothing more than current expenses ; and, when I 
had been in New Orleans a fortnight, funds were so low 
that I was obliged to pledge my .watoh as security for 
my board bill. But on the leth, I received from the 
St. Charles Theatre $500 as my half share of Diamond's 
benefit; the next night I had $50; and the third night 
^4:79 was my share of the proceeds of a grand dancing 
match at the theatre between Diamond and a negro 
dancer from Kentucky. Subsequent engagements at 
Vicksburg Und Jackson were not so sucqegsful, . but 
returning to New Orleans wp again succeeded admira- 
bly and afterwards at Mobile. Diamond, however, after 
extorting considerable sums of money from me, finally 
ran away, and, March 12th, I started homeward by way 
of the Mississippi and the Ohio. 

While I was in New Orleans, I piade the acquaint* 



108 AT THE FOOT OF THE LADDER 

ance of that genial man, Tyrone Power, who was just 
concluding an engagement at the St. Charles Theatre. 
In bidding me farewell, he wished me every success and 
hoped we should meet again. Alas, poor Power! All 
the world knows how he set sail from our shores, aud 
he and his ship were never seen again. Fanny Ellsler 
was also in New Orleans, and when I saw seats in the 
dress circle sold at an average of four dollars and one- 
half, I gave her agent, Chevalier Henry Wyckoff, great 
credit for exciting public enthusiasm to the highest 
pitch and I thought the prices enormous. I did not 
dream then that, within twelve years, I should be selling 
tickets in' the same citv for full five times that sum. 

At Pittsburg, where I arrived March 30th. I learned 
that Jenkins, who had enticed Francis Lynch away 
from me at St. Louis, was exhibiting him at the 
Museum under the name of "Master Diamond," and 
visiting the performance, the next day I wrote Jenkins 
an ironical review for which he threatened suit and 
he actually instigated K. W. Lindsay, from whoot I 
hired Joice Heth in Philadelphia in 1835, and whc^n I 
had not seen since, though he was then residing in 
Pittsburg, to sue me for a pipe of brandy which, it was 
pretended, was promised in addition to the money paid 
him. I was reqmred to give bonds of $500, which, 
as I was among strangers, I cbuld not immediately 
procure, and I was accordingly thrown into jail till four 
o'clock in the afternoon, when I was liberated. The 
next day I caused the arrest of Jenkins for trespass in 
assuming Master Diamond's name and reputation for 
Master Lynch, and he was sent to jail till four o'clock in 
the afternoon. Each having had his turn at this amuse- 
ment, we adjourned our controversy to New York whei-e 



AT THE FOOT OF THE LADDER 109 

I beat him. As for Lindsay, I heard nothing more of 
his claim or him till twelve years afterwards when he 
called on me in Boston with an apology. He was yery 
poor and I was highly prosperous, and I may add that 
Lindsay did not lack a friend. 

I arrived in New York, April 23rd, 1841, after an 

absence of eight months ; finding my family in good 

health, I resolved once more that I would never again 

be an itinerant showman. Three days afterwards I 

contracted with Robert Sears, the publisher, for five 

hundred copies of " Sears' Pictorial Illustrations of the 

Bible,'* at ^500, and accepting the United States agency, 

I opened an office, May 10th, at the comer of Beekman 

and Nassau Streets, the site of the present Nassau 

Bank. I had had a limited experience with that book 

in this way : When I was in Pittsburg, an acquaintance, 

Mr. C. D. Hanker, was complaining that he had nothing 

to do, when I picked up a New York paper and saw the 

advertisement of " Sears's Pictorial Illustrations of the 

Bible, price $2 a copy." Mr. Harker thought he 

could get subscribers, and I bought him a specimen 

copy, agreeing to furnish him with as many as he 

wanted at $l.31H a copy, though I had never before 

seen the work and did not know the wholesale price. 

The result was that he obtained eighty subscribers in 

two days, and made $50. My own venture in the work 

was not so successful ; I advertised largely, had plenty 

of agents, and, in six months,' sold thousands of copies ; 

but irresponsible agents used up all my profits and my 

capital. 

WTiile engaged in this business I once more leased 
Vauxhall saloon, opening it June 14th, 1841, 
employing Mr. John Hallett, my brother-in-law, as 



110 AT THE FOOT OF THE LADDER. 

manager under my direction, and at the close of the 
season, September 25th, we had cleared about two 
hundred dollars. This sum was soon exhausted, and 
with my family on my hands and no employment I was 
glad to do anything that would keep the wolf from the 
door. I wrote advertisements and notices for the 
Bowery Amphitheatre, receiving for the service four 
dollars a week, which I was very glad to get, and I 
also wrote articles for the Sunday papers, deriving a fair 
remuneration and managing to get a living. But I was 
at the bottom round of fortune's ladder, and it was 
necessary to make an effort which would raise me above 
want. 

I was specially stimulated to this effort by a letter 
which I received, about this time, from my esteemed 
friend, Hon. Thomas T. Whittlesey, of Danbuty. He 
held a mortgage of five hundred deltas on a piece 
of property I owned in that place, and, as he was 
convinced that I would never lay up anything, he wrote 
me that I might as well pay him then eis ever. This 
letter made me resolve to live no longer from hand 
to mouth, but to concentrate my energies upon laying 
up something for the future. 

While I was forming this practical determination 
I was much nearer to its realization than my most 
sanguine hopes could have predicted. The road to 
fortune was close by. Without suspecting it, 1 was 
about to enter upon an enfberprise, which, while giving 
full scope for whatever tact, industry and pluck I might 
possess, was to take me from the foot of the ladder and 
place me many rounds above- 
As outside clerk for the Bowery Amphitheatre I 
had casually learned that the collection of curiosities 



AT T*IE EOOT OF THE LADDER 111 

com prising Scudder's American Museum, at the comer 
of Broadway and Ann Street, was fox sale. It belonged 
to the daughters of Mr. Scudder, and was conducted for 
their benefit by John Furzman, under the authority 
of Mr. John Heath, administrator. The price asked 
for the entire collection was fifteen thousand dollars. It 
had cost its founder, Mr. Scudder, probably fifty 
thousand dollars, and from the profits of the estabUsh* 
ment he had been able to leave a l^ge competency 
to his children. The Museum, however, had been 
for several years a losing concern, and the heirs were 
anxious to sell it. Looking at this property, I thought 
I saw that energy, tact and liberality, were only needed 
to make it a paying institution, and I determined to 
purchase it if possible. 

"You buy the American Museum!" said a friend, 
who knew the state of my funds, ^ what do you intend 
buying it with ? " 

'^ Brass," I replied, " for silver and gold have I none." 
The Museum building belonged tp Mr, Francis W. 
Ol rasted, a retired merchant, to whom I wrote stating 
my desire to buy the collection, and that although I had 
no means, if it could be purchased upon reasonable 
credit, I was confident that my tact and experience, 
added to a determined devotion to business, woxdd en- 
able me to make the payments when due. X therefore 
asked him to purchase the collection in his own name ; 
to give me a writing securing it to me provided I made 
the payments punctually, including the rent of his build- 
ing ; to allow me twelve dollars and a half a week on 
which to support my family ; and if at any time I failed 
to meet the instalment due, I would vacate the premises 
and forfeit all that might have been paid to that date 



112 AT THE FOOT OF THE lA)DEB. 

"In fact, Mr. Olmsted," I continued in my earn,estuess, 
" you may bind me in any way, and as tightly as you 
please — only give me a chance to dig out, or scratch 
out, and I will do so or forfeit all the labor and trouble 
I may have incurred." 

In reply to this letter, which I took to his house my- 
self, he named an hour when I could call on him, and 
as I was there at the exact moment, he expressed him- 
self pleased with my punctuality. He inquired closely 
as to my habits and antecedents, and I frankly narrated 
my experiences as a caterer for the public, mentioDing 
my amusement ventures in Vauxhall Garden, the circus, 
and in the exhibitions I had managed at the South and 
West. 

" Who are your references ? " he inquired. 

" Any man in my line," I replied, " from Edmund 
Simpson, manager of the Park Theatre, or William 
Niblo, to Messrs. Welch, June, Titus, Turner, Angevine, 
or other circus or menagerie proprietors ; also Moses Y. 
Beach, of the New York Sun. 

" Can you get any of them to caU on me?" he con- 
tinued. 

I told him that I cotJd, and the next day my friend 
Niblo rode down and had an interview with Mr. Olm- 
sted, while Mr. Beach and several other gentlemen also 
called, and the following morning I waited upon him 
for his decision. 

" I don't like your references, Mr. Barnum," said Mr. 
Olmsted, abruptly, as soon as I entered the room. 

I was confused, and said " I regretted to hear it." 

" They all speak too well of you," he added, laugh- 
ing ; " in fact they all talk as if they were partners of 
yours, and intended to share the profits." 



AT THE FOOT OF THE LADDER. 113 

NotibLing could have pleased me better. He then 
asked me what security I could offer in case he concluded 
to make the purchase for me, and it was finally agreed 
that, if he should do so, he should retain the property till 
it wa3 entirely paid for, and should also appoint a ticket- 
taker and accountant (at iny expense), who should ren- 
der him a weekly statement. I was further to take an 
apartment hitherto used as a billiard room in an adjoin- 
ing building, allowing therefor, $500 a year, making a 
total rent of $3,000 per annum, on a lease of ten years. 
He then told me to see the administrator and heirs of 
the estate; to get their best terms, and to meet him on 
his return to town a week from that time. 

I at once saw Mr. John Heath, the administrator, and 
his price was $15,000. I offered $10,000, payable in 
seven annual instalments, with good security. After 
several interviews, it was finally agreed that I should 
have it for $12,000, payable as above — possession to 
be given on the 15th November. Mr. Olmsted assented 
to this, and a morning was appointed to draw and sign 
the writings. Mr. Heath appeared, but said he must 
decline proceeding any farther in my case, as he had 
sold the collection to the directors of Peale's Museum 
(an incorporated institution), for $15,000, and had re- 
ceived $1,000 in advance. < 

I was shocked, and appealed to Mr. Heath's honor. 
He said that he had signed no writing with me ; was in 
no way legally bound, and that it was his duty to do the 
best he could for the heirs. Mr. Olmsted was sorry, 
but could not help me ; the new tenants would not re- 
quire him to incur any risk, and my matter was lEit an 
end. 

Of course, I immediately informed myself as to the 

s 



114 AT THE FOOT OF THE LADDER. 

character of Peale's Museum company. It proved to 
be a band of speculators who had bought Peale's col- 
lection for a few thousand dollars, expecting to join the 
American Museum with it, issue and sell stock to the 
amount of $50,000, pocket $30,000 profits, and permit 
the stockholders to look out for themselves. 

I went immediately to several of the editors, including 
Major M. M. Noah, M. Y. Beach, my good friends 
West, Hcftrick and Ropes, of the Atlas^ and others, and 
stated my grievances. "Now," said I, *'if you will 
grant me the use of your columns, I'll blow that specu- 
lation sky-high." They all consented, and I wrote a 
large number of squibs, cautioning the public against 
buying the Museum stock, ridiculing the idea of a board 
of brolcen-down bank directors engaging hi the exhibi- 
tion of stuffed monkey and gander skins ; appealing to 
the case of the Zoological Institute, which, had failed 
by adopting such a plan as the one now proposed ; and 
finally I told the public that such a speculation would 
be infinitely more ridiculous than Dickens's " Grand 
United Metropolitan Hot Muifin and Crumpet-baking 
and Punctual Delivery Company." 

The stock was as " dead as a herring ! " I then went 
to Mr. Heath and asked him when the^irectors were to 
pay the other $14,000. " On the 26th day of Decem^ 
her, or forfeit the $1,000 already paid," was the reply, 
I assured him that they would never pay it, that they 
could not raise it, and that he would ultimately find him- 
self with the Museum collection on his hands,' and if 
once I started off with an exhibition for the South, I 
would not touch the Museum at any price. " Now," 
said I, " if you will agree with me confidentially, that in 
case these gentlemen do not pay you on the 26th ^ 



AT THE FOOT OF THE LADDER 115 

December, I may have it on the 27th for $12,000, 1 
will run the risk, and wait in this city until that date.'* 
He readily agreed to the proposition, but said he was 
sure they would not forfeit their $1,000. 

" Very well," said I ; " all I ask of you is, that this 
arrangement shall not be mentioned." Hp assented. 
'• On the 21th day of December, at ten o'clock A. M., I 
wish you to meet me in Mr. Olmsted's apartments, pre- 
pared to sign the writings, provided this incorporated 
company do not pay you ^14/)00 on the 26th." He 
agreed to this, and by my request put it in writing. 

Frdm that moment I felt that the Museum was mine. 
I saw Mr. Olmsted, and told him so. He promised 
secrecy, and agreed to sign the documents if the other 
parties did not meet their engagement. 

This waa about November 15th, and I continued my 
shower of newspaper squibs at the new company, which 
could not sell a dollar's worth of its stock. Meanwhile, 
if any one spoke to me about the Museum, I simply 
replied that I had lost it 



CHAPTER Vm. 

* 

THE AMEEICAN MTJSETXM. 

A TRAP 8BT FOB MB — I CATCH THE TRAPPERS — I BECOME PROPBIBTOB OF 
THE AMERICAK BrOSBCU — HISTORY OF THE BSTABUSBMENT — HARD WORK 
AND COLD DXNKBRS — ADDITIOIiS TO THE MUSEUM — EXTRAORDINARY ADVER- 
TISING — BARNUM's BRICK-MAN — EXCITINO PUBLIC CURIOSITY — INCIDENTS 
AND ANECDOTES — A DRUNKEN ACTOR — IMITATIONS OF THE ELDER BOOTH — 
PLEASINO MY PATRONS — SECURING TRANSIENT NOVELTIES — LIVING <;URIOSI- 
TIES — MAKING PEOPLE TALK — A WILDERNESS OF WONDERS — NIAGARA FALLS 
WITH REAL WATER — THE CLUB THAT. KILLED COOK — SELLING LOUIS GAY- 
LORD CLARK — THE FISH WITH LEGS — THE FEJEE MERMAID — HOW IT CAME 
INTO MY POSSESSION — THE TRUE STORY OF THAT CURIOSITY — JAPANESE 
MANUFACTURE OF FABULOUS ANIBlAIiS — THE USB I MADE OF THE MERMAID 
— WHOLESALE ADVERTISING AGAIN— THE BALCONY B AND — DRUHMOND 
LIGHTS. 

My newspaper squib war against the Peale combina- 
tion was vigorously kept up ; when one morning, about 
the first of December, I received a letter from the Sec- 
retary of that company (now calling itself the *' New 
York Museum Company,") requesting me to meet the 
directors at the Museum on the following Monday morn- 
ing. I went, and found the directors in session. The 
venerable president of the board, who "was also the ex- 
president of a broken bank, blandly proposed to hire 
me to manage the united museums, and though I saw 
that he merely meant to buy my silence, I professed to 
entertain the proposition, and in reply to an inquiry as 
to what salary I should expect, I specified the sum of 
$3,000 a year. This was at once acceded to, the salary 
to begin January 1, 1842, and after complimenting me 
on my ability, the president remarked : " Of course, Mr. 
Bamum, we shall have no more of your squibs through 



THE AMERICAN MUSEUM. 117 

the newspapers'* — to which I replied that I should 
'* ever try to serve the interests of my employers," and 
I took my leave. 

It was as clear to me as noonday that after buying 
my silence so as to appreciate their stock, these direct- 
ors meant to sell out to whom they could, leaving me 
to look to future stockholders for my salary. They 
thought, no doubt, that they had nicely entrapped 
me, but I knew I had caught them. 

For, supposing me -to be out of the way, and having 
no other rival purchaser, these directors postponed the 
advertisement of their stock to give people time to 
forget the attacks I had made on it, and they also 
took their own time for paying the money promised 
to Mr. Heath, December 26th — indeed, they did not 
even call on him at the appointed time. But on 
the following morning, as agreed, I was promptly and 
hopefully at Mr. Olmstead's apartments with my legal 
adviser, at half-past nine o'clock ; Mr. Heath came with 
his lawyer at ten, and before two o'clock that day I was 
in formal possession of the American Museum. My 
first managerial act was to write and despatch the 
following complimentary note : 

Akkbioan Musxuh, Kbw Yobk, Dec 27, 184L 

7b the Pn$idmtimdJHreclonof the New York 3hueum : 

Gkttlbxsx : — It gives me great pleajsure to inform you that yon are placed 
upon the Free list of this establiBlimeiit tintfl fhrtber notide. 

P. T. Babvuh, Prfiprkior, 

It is unnecessary to say that the " President of the 
New York Museum" was astounded, and when he 
^called upon Mr. Heath, and learned that I had bought 
and was really in possession of the American Museum, 
he was indignant. He talked of prosecution, and 



118 THE AMEBICAN MUSEUM. 

demanded the f 1,000 paid on his agreement, but he did 
not prosecute, and he justly forfeited his deposit money. 

And now that I was proprietor and manager of the 
American Museum I had reached a new epoch in my 
career which I felt was the beginning of better days, 
though the full significance of this important step I did 
not see. I was still in the show business, but in a settled, 
substantial phase of it, that invited industry and enter- 
prise, and called for ever earnest and ever heroic 
endeavor. Whether I should sink or swim depended 
wholly upon my own energy. I vonst pay for the 
establishment within a stipulated time, or forfeit it with 
whatever I had paid on account. I meant to make it 
my own, and bi^ains, hands and every effort were 
devoted to the interests of the Museum. 

The nucleus of this establishment, Scudder's Museum, 
was formed in 1810, the year in which I was born. It 
was begun in Chatham Street, and was afterwards 
transferred to the old City Hall, and from small begin- 
i;iings, by purchases, and to a considerable degree by 
presents, it had grown to be a large and valuable 
collection. People in all parts of the country had sent 
in relics and rare curiosities ; sea captains, for years, 
had brought and deposited strange things from foreign 
lands ; and besides all these gifts, I have no doubt that 
the previous proprietor had actually expended, as was 
stated, ®50,000 in making the collection. No one 
could go through the halls, as they were when they came 
under my proprietorship, and see one-half there was 
worth seeing in a single day; and then, as I always 
justly boasted afterwards, no one could visit my Museum 
and go away without feeling that he had received the 
full worth of his money. In looking over the immense 



THE AMERICAN MtTSBUM. 119 

collection, the accumulation of so many years, I saw 
that it was only necessary to properly present its merits 
to the public, to make it the most attractive and 
popular place of resort and entertainment in the United 
States. 

Valuable as the collection was when I bought it, it 
was only the beginning of the American Museum as I 
made it. In my long proprietorship I considerably 
more than doubled the permanent attractions and 
curiosities of the establishment. In 1842, 1 bought and 
added to my collection the entire contents of Peale's 
Museum ; in 1850, I purchased the large Peale collec- 
tion in Philadelphia; and year after year, I bought 
genuine curiosities, regardless of cost, wherever I could 
find them, in Europe or America. 

At the very outset*, I was " determined to deserve 
success. My plan of economy included the intention 
to support my family in New York on ^600 a year, and 
my treasure of a wife not only gladly assented, but 
was willing to reduce the sum to $400, if necessary, 
Some six months after I had bought the Museum, Mr. 
Olmsted happened in at my ticket-office at noon and 
found me eating a frugal dinner of cold corned beef and 
Uf ead, which I had brought from home. 

" Is this the way you eat your dinner? " he asked. 

" I have not eaten a warm dinner, except on Sun- 
days,** I replied, "since I bought the Museum, and 
I never intend to, bn a week day, till I am out of 
debt." 

" Ah ! " said he, clapping me on the shoulder, " you 
are safe, and vrill pay for the Museum before the year is 
out." 

And he was right, for within twelve months I was in 



120 THE AMERICAN MUSEUM. 

full possession of the property as my own and it was 
entirely paid for from the profits of the business. 

In 1865, the space occupied for my Museum pur- 
poses was more than double what it was in 1842. The 
Lecture Room, originally narr'ow, ill-contrived and incon- 
venient, was so enlarged and improved that it became 
one of the most commodious and beautiful amusement 
halls ii^ the City of New York. At first, my attractions 
and inducements were merely the collection of curiosi- 
ties by day, and an .evening entertainment, consisting of 
such variety performances as were current in ordinary 
shows. Then Saturday afternoons, and, soon after- 
wards, Wednesday afternoons were devoted to entertain- 
ments and the popularity of the Museum grew so rap- 
idly that I presently found it expedient and profitable to 
open the great Lecture Room every afternoon, as well 
as every evening, on every week-day in the year. The 
first experiments in this direction, more than justified 
my expectations, for the day exhibitions were always 
more thronged than those of the evening. Of course I 
made the most of the holidays, advertising extensively 
and presenting extra inducements ; nor did attractions 
elsewhere seem to keep the crowd from coming to the 
Museum. On great holidays, I gave as many as twelve 
performances to as many different audiences. 

By degrees the character of the stage performances 
was changed. The transient attractions of the Museum 
were constantly diversified, and educated dogs, industri- 
ous fleas, automatons, jugglers, ventriloquists, living 
statuary, tableaux, gipsies, Albinoes, fat boys, giants, 
dwarfs, rope-dancers, live " Yankees," pantomime, 
instrumental music, singing and dancing in great 
variety, dioramas, panoramas, models of Niagara, Dub- 



yHB AMEBIC AK MUSEUM. 121 

lin, F^ris, and Jerusalem ; Hannington's dioramas of 
the Creation, the Deluge, Fairy Grotto, Storm at Sea ; 
the first English Punch and Judy in this country, Italian 
Fantoccini, mechanical figures, fancy glass-blowing, 
knitting machines and other triumphs in the mechanical 
arts ; dissolving views, American Indians, who enacted 
their warlike and religious ceremonies on the stage, — 
these » among others, were all exceedingly successful. 

I thoroughly understood the art of advertising, 
not merely by means of printer's ink, which I have 
always used freely, and to which I confess myself 
so much indebted for my success, but by turning every 
possible circumstance to my account. It was my mono- 
mania to inake the Museum the town wonder and town 
talk. I often seized upon an opportunity by instinct, 
even before I had a very definite conception as to how 
it should be used, and it seemed, somehow, to mature 
itself and serve my purpose. As an illustration, one 
morning a stout, hearty-looking man, came into my 
ticket-office and begged some money. I asked him 
why he did not work and earn his living ? He replied 
that he could get nothing to do and that he would 
be glad of any job at a dollar a day. I handed him a 
quarter of a dollar, told him to go and get his breakfast 
and return, and I would employ him at light labor at a 
dollar and a half a day. When he returned I gave him 
five common bricks. 

" Now," said I, " go and lay a brick on the sidewalk 
at the comer of Broadway and Ann Street; another 
close by the Museum; a third diagonally across the 
way at the comer of Broadway and Vesey Street, by 
the Astor House ; put down the fourth on the sidewalk 
in front of St Paul's Church, opposite; then, with 






122 i^HB ambhiga:^^ museum. 

the fifth biick in hand, take up a rapid march ftpm one 
point to the other, making the circuit, exchanging your 
brick at every point, and say nothing to any one." 
What is the object of this ] " inquired the man. 
No matter," I replied ; " all you need to know is 
that it brings you fifteen cents wages per hour. It is a 
bit of my fun, and to assist me properly you must seem 
to be as deaf aa a post ; wear a serious countenance ; 
answer no questions ; pay no attention to any one ; but 
attend faithfully to the work and at the end of every 
hour by St Paul's clock show this ticket at the Museum 
door; enter, walking solemnly through every hall in 
the building ; pass out, and resume your work." 

With the remark that it was " all one to him, so long 
as he could earn his living," the man placed his bricks 
and began his round. Half an hour afterwards, at 
least five hundred people were watching his mysterious 
movements. He had assumed a military step and bear- 
ing, and looking as sober as a judge, he made no 
response whatever to the constant inquiries as to the 
object of his singular conduct. At the end of the first 
hour, the sidewalks in the vicinity were packed with 
people all anxious to solve the mystery. The man, as 
directed, then went into the Museum, .devoting fifteen 
minutes to a solemn survey of the halls, and afterwards 
returning to his round. This was repeated every hour 
till sundown and whenever the man went into the 
Museum a dozen or more persons would buy tickets and 
follow him, hoping to gratify their curiosity in regard 
to the purpose of his movements. This was continued 
for several days — the curious people who followed the 
man into the Museum considerably more than paying 
his wages — till finally the policeman, to whom I had 



THE AMERICAN MUSEUM. 123 

imparted my object, complained that the obstruction of 
the sidewalk by crowds had become so serious that I 
must call in my *' brick man." This trivial incident 
excited considerable talk and amusement; it adver- 
tised me ; and it materially advanced my purpose of 
making a lively comer near the Museum. 

I am tempted to relate some of the incidents and 
anecdotes which attended my career as owner and man- 
ager of the Museum. * The stories illustrating merely my 
introduction of novelties would more than fill this book, 
but I must make room for a few of them. 

An actor, named La Kue, presented himself as an 
imitator of celebrated histrionic personages, including 
Macready, Forrest, Kemble, the elder Booth, Kean, 
Ilamblin, and others. Taking him into the green-room 
for a private rehearsal, and finding his imitations excel- 
lent, I engaged him. For three nights he gave great 
satisfaction, but early in the fourth evening he staggered 
into the Museum so drunk that he could hardly stand, 
and in half an hour he must be on the stage ! Calling 
an assistant, we took La Hue between us, and marched 
him up Broadway as far as Chambers Street, and back 
to the lower end of the Park, hoping to sober him. At 
this point we put his head under a pump, and gave him 
a good ducking, with visible beneficial eflfect, — then a 
walk around the Park, and another ducking, — when he 
assured me that he should be able to give his imitations 
" to a charm." 

" You drunken brute," said I, '' if you fail, and disap- 
point my audience, I will throw you out of the window." 

He declared that he was " all right," and I led him 
behind the scenes, where I waited with considerable 
trepidation to watch his movements on the stage. He 
began by saying * 



124 THE AMERICAN MUSEUM. . 

" Ladies and gentiemen : I will now give you an imi- 
tation of Mr. Booths the eminent tragedian." 

His tongue was thick, his language somewhat incohe- 
rent, and I had great misgivings as he proceeded ; but 
as no token of disapprobation came from . the audience, 
I began to hope he would go through with his parts 
vdthout exciting suspicion of his condition. But before 
he had half finished his representation of Booth, in the 
soliloquy in the opening act of Bichard III., the house 
discovered that he was very drunk, and began to hiss. 
This only seemed to stimulate him to make an effort to 
appear sober, which, as is usual in such cases, only made 
matters worse, and the hissing increased. I lost all 
patience, and going on the stage and taking the drunken 
fellow by the collar, I apologized to the audience, as- 
suring them that he should not appear before them 
again. I was about to march him off, when he stepped 
to the front, and said : 

^' Ladies and gentlemen : Mr. Booth often appeared 
on the stage in a state of inebriety, and I was simply 
giving you a truthful representation of him on such 
occasions. I beg to be permitted to proceed with my 
imitatibus.** 

The audience at once supposed it was all right, and 
cried out, " go on, go on" ; which he did, and at every 
imitation of Booth, whether as Bichard, Shylock, or Sir 
Giles Overreach, he received a hearty round of applause. 
I was quite delighted with his success ; but when he 
came to imitate Forrest and Hamblin, necessarily repre- 
senting them as drunk also, the audience could be no 
longer deluded ; the hissing was almost deafening, and 
I was forced to lead the actor off. It was his last ap- 
pearance on my stage. 



THE AMERICAN M08EUK. 125 

From the first, it was my study to give my patrons a 
superfluity of novelties, and for this I make no special 
claim to generosity, for it ^as strictly a business trans- 
action. To send away my visitors more than doubly 
satisfied, was to induce them to come again and to bring 
their friends. I meant to make people talk about my 
Museum ; to exclaim over its wonders ; to have men 
and women all over the country say : " There is not 
another place in the United States where so much can 
be seen for twenty-five cents as in Bamum's American 
Museum." It was the best advertisement I could possibly 
have, and one for which I could afford to pay. I knew, 
too, that it was an honorable advertisement, because 
it was as deserved as it was spontaneous. And so, in 
addition to the permanent collection and the ordinary 
attractions of the stage, I labored to keep the Museum 
well supplied with transient novelties; I exhibited 
such living curiosities as a rhinoceros, giraffes, grizzly 
bears, ourang-outangs, great serpents, and whatever else 
of the kind money would buy or enterprise secure. 

Knowing that a visit to my varied attractions and gen- 
uine curiosities was well worth to any one three times 
the amount asked as an entrance fee, I confess that I 
was not so scrupulous, as possibly I should have been, 
about the methods used to call public attention to my 
establishment. The one end aimed at was to make men 
and women think and talk and wonder, and, as a practi- 
cal result, go to the Museum. This was my constant 
study and occupation. 

It was the world's way then, as it is now, to excite 
the community with flaming posters, promising almost 
everything for next to nothing. Tconfess that I took no 
pains to set my enterprising fellow-citizens a better ex- 



126 THE AMERICAN MUSEUM. 

ample. I fell in with the world's way ; and if my " pnflF- 

ing " was more persistent, my advertising more andacious, 
my posters more glaring, my pictures more exaggerated, 
my flags more patriotic and my transparencies more 
brilliant than they would have been under the manage- 
ment of my neighbors, it was not because I had less 
scruple than they, but more energy, far more ingenuity^ 
and a better foundation for such promises. In all this, 
if I cannot be justified, I at least find palliation in the 
fact that I presented a wilderness of wonderful, instruct- 
ive and amusing realities of such evident and marked 
merit that I have yet to learn of a single instance where 
a visitor went away from the Museum complaining that 
he had been defrauded of his money. Surely this is an 
oflFset to any eccentricities to which I may have resorted 
to make my establishment widely known. 

Very soon after introducing my extra exhibitions, I 
purchased for $200, a curiosity which had much merit 
and some absurdity. It was a model of Niagara Falls, 
in which the merit was that the proportions of the great 
cataract, the trees, rocks, and buildings in the vicinity 
were mathematically given, while the absurdity was in 
introducing "real water" to represent the falls. Yet 
the model served a purpose in making " a good line in 
the bill " — an end in view which was never neglected 
— and it helped to give the Museum notoriety. One 
day I was summoned to appear before the Board of Cro- 
ton Water Commissioners, and was informed that as 
I paid only $25 per annum for water at the Museum, 
I must pay a large extra compensation for the supply 
for my Niagara Falls. I begged the board not to be- 
lieve all that appeared in the papers, nor to interpret 
my show-bills too literally, and assured them that a 



yiHE AMEBIC AN MUSEUM. 127 

single barrel of water, if my pump was in good order, 
would furnish my falls for a month. 

It was even so, for the water flowed into a reservoir 
behind the scenes, and was forced back with a pump 
over the falls. On one occasion, Mr, Louis Gay lord 
Clark, the editor of the Knickerbocker, came to 
view my museum, and introduced himself to me. As 
I was quite anxious that my establishment should 
receive a first-rate notice at his hands, I took pains to 
show him everj^thing of interest, except the Niagara 
Falls, which I feared would prejudice him against mv 
entire show. But as we passed the room the pump 
was at work, warning me that the great cataract was 
in full operation, and Clark, to my dismay, insisted 
upon seeing it. 

" Well, Bamum, I declare, this is quite a new idea ; 
I never saw the like before." 

"No? "I faintly inquired, with something like re- 
viviDg hope. 

" No," said Clark, " and I hope, vnth aU my heart, 
I never shall again." 

But the Knickerbocker spoke kindly of me, and 
refrained from all allusions to " the Cataract of Niagara, 
with real water." Some months after, Clark came in 
breathless one day, and asked me if I had the club with 
which Captain Cook was killed? As I had a lot of 
Indian war clubs in the collection of aboriginal curiosi- 
ties, and owing Clark something on the old Niagara 
Falls account, I told him I had the veritable club with 
documents which placed its identity beyond question, 

and I showed him the warlike weapon. 
'•Poor Cook! poor Cook!" said Clark, musingly. 

** Well, Mr. Bai-num," he continued, with great gravity, 



128 THE AMEBIC Ay MUSEUM. 

I 

at the same time extending his hand and giving mine a 
hearty shake, " I am really very much obUged to you 
for your kindness. I had an irrepressible desire to see 
the club that killed Captain Cook, and I felt quite cou- 
fident you could accommodate me. I have been in half 
a dozen smaller museums, and as they all had it, I was 
sure a large establishment Uke yours would not be with- 
out it." 

A few weeks afterwards, I wrote to Clark that if he 
would come to my office I was anxious to consult him 
on a matter of great importance. He came, and I 
said: 

" Now, I do n't want any of your nonsense, but I want 
your sober advice." 

He assured me that he would serve me in any way in 
his power, and I proceeded to tell him about a wonder- 
ful fish from the Nile, oflFered to me for exhibition at 
$100 a week, the owner of which was willing to 
forfeit $5,000, if, within six weeks, this fish did not 
pass through a transformation in which the tail would 
disappear and the fish would then have legs. 

" Is it possible ! " asked the astonished Clark. 

I assured him that there was no doubt of it. 

Thereupon he advised me to engage the wonder 
at any price ; that it would startle the naturalists, wake 
up the whole scientific world, draw in the masses, and 
make ^20,000 for the Museum. I told him that 1 
thought well of the speculation, only I did not like the 
name of the fish. 

" That makes no difference whatever," said Clark ; 
** what is the name of the fish?" 

" Tadpole," I replied with becoming gravity, " but it 
is vulgarly called ' polly wog. ' " 



THS AHEBIGAN MaSEUH. 129 

" Sold, by thunder ! ** exclaimed dark, and he left. 

A curiosity, which in an extraordinary degree served 
my ever-present object of extending the notoriety of the 
Museum was the so-called " Fejee Mermaid." It has 
been supposed that this mermaid was manufactured by 
my order, but such is not the fact. I was known as a 
successful showman, and strange things of every sort 
were brought to me from all quarters for sale or exhibi- 
tion. In the summer of 1842, Mr. Moses Kimball, of 
the Boston Museum, came to New York and showed 
me what purported to be a mermaid. He had bought 
it from a sailor whose father, a sea captain, had pur- 
chased it in Calcutta, in 1822, from some Japanese 
sailors. I may mention here that this identical pre- 
served specimen was exhibited in London in 1822, as I 
fully verified in my visit to that «ity in 1858, for I found 
an advertisement of it in an old file of the London 
Times, and a friend gave me a copy of the Mirror^ pub- 
lished by J. Limbird, 335 Strand, November 9, 1822, 
containing a cut of this same creature and two pages of 
letter-press describing it, together with an account of 
other mermaids said to have been captured in different 
parts of the world. The Mirror stated that this 
specimen was "the great source of attraction in the 
British metropolis, and three to four hundred people 
every day pay their shilling to see it." 

This was the curiosity which had fallen into Mr. 
Kimball's hands. I requested my naturalist's opinion of 
the genuineness of the animal and he said he could not 
conceive how it could have been manufactured, for he 
never saw a monkey with such peculiar teeth, arras, 
hands, etc., and he never saw a fish with such peculiar 
fins ; but he did not believe in mermaids. Neverthe- 

9 



130 THE A^JDERICAN MUSFVM. 

less, I concluded to hire this curiosity and to modify the 
general incredulity as to the possibility of the existence 
of mermaids, and to awaken curiosity to see and 
examine the specimen, I invoked the potent power ot 
printer's ink. 

Since Japan has been opened to the outer world 
it has been discovered that certain *' artists " in that 
country manufacture a great variety of fabulous animals, 
with an ingenuity and mechanical perfection well 
calculated to deceive. No doubt my mermaid was a 
specimen of this curious manufacture. I used it mainly 
to advertise the regular business of the Museum, 
and this effective indirect advertising is the only feature 
I can commend, in a special show of which, I confess, I 
am not proud. I might have published columns in the 
newspapers, presenting and praising the great collection 
of genuine specimens of natural history in my exhi- 
bition, and they would not have attracted nearly so 
much attention as did a few paragraphs about the mer- 
maid which was oijy a small part of my show. News- 
papers throughout the country copied the mermaid 
notices, for they were novel and caught the attention of 
readers. Thus was the fame of the Museum, as well 
as the mermaid, wafted from one end of the land to the 
other. I was careful to keep up the excitement, for 
I knew that every dollar sown in advertising would 
return in tens, and perhaps hundreds, in a future 
harvest, and after obtaining all the notoriety possible by 
advertising and by exhibiting the mermaid at the 
Museum, I sent the curiosity throughout the country, 
directing my agent to everywhere advertise it as 
"From Barnum's Great American Museum, New 
York." The effect was immediately felt ; money flowed 



THE AMERICAN MUSEUM. 131 

in rapidly and was readily expended in more adver- 
tising. 

While I expended money liberally for attractions for 
the inside of my Museum, and bought or hired every- 
thing curious or rare which was offered or could be 
found, I was prodigal in my outlays to arrest or arouse 
public attention. When I became proprietor of the 
establishment, there were only the words : " American 
Museum," to indicate the character of the concern; 
there was no bustle or activity, about the place ; no 
posters to announce what was to be seen ; — the whole 
exterior was as dead as the skeletons and stuffed skins 
within. My experiences had taught me the advantages 
of advertising. I printed whole columns in the papers, 
setting forth the wonders of my establishment Old 
" fogies " opened their eyes in amazement at a man who 
could expend hundreds of dollars in announcing a show 
of ^^ stuffed monkey skins " ; but these same old fogies 
paid their quarters, nevertheless, and when they saw 
the curiosities and novelties in the Museum halls, they, 
like all other visitors, were astonished as well as pleased, 
and went home and told their friends and neighbors and 
thus assisted in advertising my business. 

For other and not less effective advertising, — flags 
and banners, began to adorn the exterior of the build- 
ing. I kept a band of music on the front balcony and 
announced " Free Music for the Million." People said, 
'* Well, that Bamum is a liberal fellow to give us music 
for nothing," and they flocked down to hear my out- 
door free concerts. But I took pains to select and 
maintain the poorest band I could find — one whose 
discordant notes would drivis the crowd into the Museum, 
out of earshot of my outside orchestra. Of course. 



132 THE AMERICAN MUSEUM. 

the music was poor. When people expect to get 
" something for nothing " they are sure to be cheated, 
and generally deserve to be, and so, no doubt, some of 
my out-dooi' patrons were sorely disappointed; but 
when they came inside and paid to be amused and 
instructed, I took care to see that they not only received 
the full worth of their money, but were more than sat- 
isfied. Powerful Drummond lights were placed at the 
top of the Museum, which, in the darkest night, threw a 
flood of light up and down Broadway, from the Battery 
to Niblo's, that would enable one to read a newspaper 
in the street. These were the first Drummond lights 
ever seen in New York, and they made people talk, 
and so advertise my Museum. 



: 



'4 



CHAPTER rX. 

THE BOAD TO EICTBDBS. 

THB MOflV POFULAB ^LACK OF AMUBSMENT IN THE WOBIJ> — THE MOBAL 
XmAHA — KEFOBHINO THB ABUSES OF THB STAGE — FAMOUS ACT0B8 AND 
ACEBX8SEB AX THB MUBBUH— ADDIKO TO THB SAIiOOITB — AITEBNOOM A2I1> 
HOUDAT PKBFOBMANCES — F0X7BTH OF JULY FLAGS — THE IfUSEUH OONNECT- 
SD WITH ST. PAUL'S — VICTOBY OYEB THB YESTBYlOeK — THE EOBE6B — ST. 
PAXBI£X.*B DAY IN THE MOBNINO — A WOITDBBFUIj AlTQltAL, THB 
•*AIOBESS" — DfPOURINO OF MONEY — ZOOLOGICAL EBUPTION — THE CITY 
ABTOtnCDKl) — BABY SHOWS, AND THEIB OBJECT — FLOWER, BIBD, DOG AND 
FOCLTBY SHOWS — GBAND FBEB BUFFALO HUNT IN HOBOKEN — N. P. 
WILLIS — THE WOOLLY HOBSE — WHEBE HE CAME FBOM — COLONEL BENTON 
BBATKK — FUBP08E OF THB EXHIBITION — AMEBIGAK INDIANS •*- P. T. B ABNUK 
E jmUUXE D — A GUBIOUS SPINSTEB — THE TOUCHINO STOBY OF CHARLOTTE 
TEMPLE — SEBVIGES IN THE LECTUBE BOOM — A FINANCIAL VIEW OF THB 
MUSEUM — AN *' AWFUL BICH MAN." 

The American Museum was the ladder by which I 
rose to fortune. Whenever I cross Broadway at the 
head of Vesey Street, and see the Herald building and 
that gorgeous pile, the Park Bank, my mind's eye 
recalls that less solid, more showy edifice which once 
occupied the site and was covered with pictures of all 
manner of beasts, birds and creeping things, and in 
which were treasures that brought treasures and 
notoriety and pleasant hours to me. The Jenny Lind 
enterprise was more audacious, more immediately 
remunerative, and I remember it with a pride which I 
do not attempt to conceal ; but instinctively I often go 
back and live over again the old days of my struggles 
and triumphs in the American Museum, 

The Museum was always open at sunrise, and this 
was so well known throughout the country that stran- 



134 THE BOAD TO RICHES. 

gers coming to the city would often take a tour through 
my halls before going to breakfast or to their hotels. I 
do not believe there was ever a more truly popular 
place of amusement. I , frequently compared the 
annual number of visitors with the number officially 
reported as visiting (free of charge), the British 
Museum in London, and my list was invariably the 
larger. Nor do I believe that any man or manager 
ever labored more industriously to please his patrons. 
I furnished the most attractive exhibitions which money 
could procure ; I abolished all vulgarity and profanity 
from the stage, and I prided myself upon the fact that 
parents and children could attend the dramatic perform- 
ances in the so-called Lecture Room, and not be 
shocked or offended by anything they might see or hear; 
I introduced the " Moral Drama," producing such 
plays as " The Drunkard," '" Uncle Tom's Cabin," 
"Moses in Egypt," "Joseph and His Brethren," and 
occasional spectacular melodramas produced with great 
care and at considerable outlay. 

Mr. Sothem, who has since attained such wide-spread 
celebrity at home and abroad as a character actor, was 
a member of my dramatic company for one or two sea- 
sons. Mr. Barney Williams also began his theatrical 
career at the Museum, occupying, at first, quite a sub- 
ordinate position, at a salary of ten dollars a week. 
During the past twelve or fifteen years, I presume his 
weekly receipts, when he has acted, have been nearly 
$3,000. The late Miss Mary Gannon also commenced 
at the Museum, and many more actors and actresses of 
celebrity have been, from time to time, engaged there. 
What was once the small Lecture Room was converted 
into a spacious and beautiful theatre, extending over 



THE ROAD TO RICHES. " 135 

the lots adjoining the Museum, and capable of holding 
about tjiree thousand persons. The saloons were greatly 
multiplied and enlarged, and the " egress " having been 
made to" work to perfection, on hoUdays I advertised 
Lecture Room performances every hour through the 
afternoon and evening, and consequently the actors and 
actresses were dressed for the stage as early as eleven 
o'clock in the morning, and did not resume their ordi- 
nary clothes till ten o'clock at night. In these busy days 
the meals for the company were brought in and served 
in the dressing-rooms and green-rooms, and the com- 
pany always received extra pay. 

Leaving nothing undone that would bring Bamum 
and his Museum before the public, I often engaged 
some exhibition, knowing that it would directly bring 
no extra dollars to the treasury, but hoping that it would 
incite a newspaper paragraph which would float through 
the columns of the American press and be copied, per- 
haps, abroad, and my hopes in this respect were often 
gratified. 

I confess that I liked the Museum mainly for the 
opportimities it aflforded for rapidly making money. 
Before I bought it, I weighed the matter well in my 
mind, and was convinced that I could present to the 
American public such a variety, quantity and quality of 
amusement, blended with instruction, " all for twenty-, 
five cents, children half price," that my attractions 
would be irresistible, and my fortune certain. I myself 
relished a higher grade of amusement, and I was a fre- 
quent attendant at the opera, first-class concprts, lectures, 
and the like ; but I worked for the million, and I knew 
the only way to make a million from my patrons was to 
give them abundant and wholesome attractions for a 
small sum of money. 



136 THE EOAD TO BICHES. ' 

About the first pf July, 1842, I began to make 
arrangements for extra novelties, additional perform- 
ances, a large amount of extra advertising, and an out- 
door display for the " Glorious Fourth." Large parti- 
colored bills were ordered, transparencies were prepared, 
the free band of music was augmented by a trumpeter, 
and columns of advertisements, headed with large capi- 
tals, were written and put on file. 

I wanted to run out a string of American flags across 
the street on that day, for I knew there would be thou- 
sands of people passing the Museum with leisure and 
pocket-money, and I felt confident that an unusual 
display of national flags would arrest their patriotic 
attention, and bring many of them within my walls. 
Unfortunately for my purpose, St. Paul's Church stood 
directly opposite, and there was nothing to which I 
could attach my flag-rope, unless it might be one of the 
trees in the church-yard. I went to the vestrymen for 
permission to so attach my flag rope on the Fourtix of 
July, and they were indignant at what they called my 
" insulting proposition " ; such a concession would be 
"sacrilege." I plied them with arguments, and ap- 
pealed to their patriotism, but in vain. 

Returning to the Museum I gave orders to have the 
string of flags made ready, with directions at daylight 
on the Fourth of July to attach one end of the rope to 
one of the third story windows of the Museum, and the 
other end to a tree in St. Paul's churchyard. The great 
day arrived, and my orders were strictly followed. The 
flags attracted great attention, and before nine o'clock I 
have no doubt that hundreds of additional visitors were 
drawn by this display into the Museum. By half-past 
nine Broadway was thronged, and about that time two 



THE ROAD TO MCHBa 137 

gentlemen in a high state of excitement mshed into my 
office, announcing themselves as injured and insulted 
vestrymen of St. Paul's Church. 

"Keep cool, gentlemen," said I; "I guess it is all 
right" 

"Right!" indignantly exclaimed one of them, "do 
you think it is right to attach your Museum to our 
Church ? We will show you what is * right ' and what 
is law, if we live till to-morrow ; those flags must come 
down instantly." 

" Thank you," I said, " but let us not be in a hurry. 
I will go out with you and look at them, and I guess 
we can make it all right." 

Going into the street I remarked : " Really, gentle- 
men^ these flags look very beautiful ; they do not injure 
your tree ; I always stop my balcony music for your ac- 
commodation whenever you hold week-day services, and 
it is but fair that you should return the favor." 

" We could indict your * music,' as you call it, as a 
nuisance, if we chose,'' answered one vestryman, " and 
now I tell you that if these flags are not taken down 
in ten minutes, I will cut them down." 

BQs indignation was at the boiling point. The crowd 
in the street was dense, and the angry gesticulation of 
the vestryman attracted their attention. I saw there 
was no use in trying to parley with him or coax him, 
and so, assuming an angry air, I rolled up my sleeves, 
and exclaimed, in a loud tone, — 

" Well, Mister, I should just like to see you dare 
to cut down the American flag on the Fourth of July ; 
vou must be a * Britisher ' to make such a threat as 
that ; but I'll show you a thousand pairs of Yankee 
hands in two minutes, if you dare to attempt to take 



138 THE KOAD TO RICHES. 

down the stars and stripes on this great birth-day 
of American fire^dom ! " 

" What's that John Bull a-saying," asked a brawny 
fellow, placing himself in front of the irate vestryman ; 
" Look here, old fellow,'' he continued, " if you want to 
save a whole bone in your body, you had better slope, 
and never dare to talk again about hauling dowTi 
the American flag in the city of New York." 

Throngs of excited, exasperated men crowded around, 
and the vestryman, seeing the effect of my ruse, 
smiled faintly and said, " Oh, of course it is all right," 
and he and his companion quietly edged out of the 
crowd. The flags remained up all day and all night. 
The next morning I sought the vanquished vestrymen 
and obtained formal permission to make this use of the 
tree on following holidays, in consideration of my 
willingness to arrest the doleful strains of my discord- 
ant balcony band whenever services were held on week 
days in the church. 

On that Fourth of July, at one o'clock, P. M., my 
Itluseum was so densely crowded that we could admit 
no more visitors, and we were compelled to stop the sale 
of tickets. I pushed through the throng until I reached 
the roof of the building, hoping to find room for a few 
more, but it was in vain. Looking down into the -street 
it was a sad sight to see the thousands of people 
who stood ready with their money to enter the Museum, 
but who were actually turned away. It was exceed- 
ingly harrowing to my feelings. Rushing down stairs, 
I told my carpenter and his assistants to cut through 
the partition and floor in the rear and to put in a 
temporary flight of stairs so as to let out people by that 
egress into Ann Street. By three o'clock the egress 



THB BOAD 90 BIOHIS. IQI) 

ymts opened snd at few |iebpie w^ro |)aaiid dtortrtt' the 
iievn BtmiSj mhile a. coraespoaWng nntoibei' cBstAe in 
at the front. But I ■ lost « lai^e amovtit ^ ' nioii^f tiiat 
dajr'iby/ not hiairif^i stifllciealdy^ efiUmalird th^ 'V^ii& of 
my' oim ) adterdsitigr teid 'tonbequentlTf nbt )iavin|; ]^?o- 
vide4 ftt <lie'4:houi»xld8' -whO' hftd' i^aid^^iiay a^^ 
ineMs' aadb sMnfbty Qutade ehbW) cmd' had taken- th3 
first leisure da;/ ti^ iikib>^ka Mbs^cn^J ' I hadl^afti^ 
ofio^'lisMft;h)o'*Mtti?^iand'thiU;'Wa8'to tiaM the* #gtess 
teddyjoikltekik^lkiKMays/ '''''' .' ' " ^''' '•' »"•>'"'' 

Baify iofehefott€iif!kii^Md;<tV r^e^vid ^noiidQ fteia 
souie of tb^ Irish '^oj^nlatibn - that they laeatfi Uf iisit 
me ui gteat ntttnberM'on '' Stl. Patrick's day in the morn- 
ing," '<* All' rigbt,^ Bttid I t6 my carpenter, <^get your 
egre^ ready fdr March 11 '"> and I added, to my assistant 
matfagei^^ ♦*!€ ^»e'i*^Wieh''ef a crowd, don't let a 
nngle ^non^pabs'odt^ at the front, ^ven if it were St 
Patrfok liimMlf 'I put ch^ry miA titt through tlie egtess 
in tte t^mS' The' day ca^me, und before noon wewiere 
caught in ¥te same dilemma as we weie on the Fourth of 
July'; the Museum was jammed and the sale of tickets was 
stepped* I WeAttothe egi^s^'aAd asked tile sentinel 
how many hundreds had passed out? 

"Hundreds," he replied, "why only three persons 
hflrmgooe out fay this why and ihey (slune bacl^ saying 
that it was a- miistiice and begging to be let in igainL" 

" What does tins mean I" I inquired ; *^ surely thea- 
sanda ef people hnve heen all ojss - the MuseuiA ainee 
they eame^in*'' 

" Qertainly ," waa the reply, ^^ but after they have 
gone £iPom one saloon to another and have been on 
every floor, even to the roof, they come down and 
travel the same route over, again." 

7* 



JS^ SI<»E BOiuD TO BIQHEB. 



goodHaUed .ohUdreiiL . whom I haduhappeiiecL to i notice 
wJ^^ tbi»ffiCMti9 iftoaily iathc rnQrningi" . i r>iti . . 
j . . V 3^ 4bis 1 way, »ada«i»" fliad: I\ poUfcdlyt ^' you^wiU 
lieafes,:^a<tblQi(p!:getrii9to th« litxwfe bjr ttiefmabdrMr 
vi^^lMAAifii^^^bi^ .tWeliaTetopeued 

f^i^ai^iegiBSfi l«»rfi aadi|jN3U'Qan'pa89*i>y:tbtB«,Maf.film^ 

going out at all, at all, nor the cbilidjtMl 9iti^^ ^ ivKa-ve 

c^«WgU^:0^r :diH^eI:§ qnd' w^' t^^^ goifuft fax H^i alli.diiy." 

Fi^tlB^Y ii^ v6&tigatlOQl^bQW|^d. that pretty* muob aU 

,^.Wi wHpi»- had hiCQiight tljait .dwnfir^. .witj^; ♦Up 
e^yi^ept .iatentipQ. of litwiUy 'f qiajking a dp-jl of it/' No 
09CI asp«ptQ4 to igo hoi9^ tiU pigt^j t^Q bnUdii^ was 
pwjifcijowdpd,. and n^eai^whii^ ,hA)ndjr€)di3 were iniidtpig i^ 
J^Q^£fpjiii fnt^r^oe t^ get in.; when th?5: 9mld«i In 
d^^*ir,j.s^i;aieri0fl mpqa t^e st^e. hehiiid.th^ W»ne$, 
Iji^pgjpajfi Jijps. >vith ye^i^aliqp,. when I. happftwid tpi see 
.f^^.sp^iierp^x^er alwofk a^4 a happy i;h9l^g^t*i|titwk 
iW ; *.' Jif nji" tl exid^imed, " ,t^e a pj^oe of; caQVas 49 V 
;^t fiflfiai^ 9pd paiat 9A,it« a4 sQwi^^siyqu^ qan, wi Ivge 
letters — . • w : .•! • - ■ 

ly TO THE EGRESS." ,. . 

Seising'hBit htnsh he fiiished the- sign in fifteen imimles, 
and i I directed the carpenter tov nail it of w Mi6 door 
ImdiQg to tiie back stairs. H0.4id m^ and as the 
CKQwdfi^tei: making ahe entixe tou <i£ ih$ astaNi^- 
ment, came pouring down the main stems * firom die 
tfaii^ stdty^ thay stopped* and looked at . the ii6f# ' sign, 
while some of tiiemread audibly: '^Tathe Aiglesa" 

f The .Aigjsees," said others, ^^ sure tiiat!s anJ animal 
we have n't seen/' andlhe throng began to pomr dowtx 



ik% bMli<fl(ai»«iljr;>tb find ^bs^tthBi^M^mm^'imii^^^ 

BO omebixf it «i:^gtth ^wMi Aain ^Btt^ta^M^aM^Mle^ 
Ihegmi -<t»t<ado«iin|iAtei(aitoe iwko:litt4^'l<ilig beM 
w«ltiagt^th«4Mk«|ndte]r<iitiii|9 Bimiiirajt dttxa^eb^***^ > 

2iami|i0iifiiidfutttt«Mttmks^w liiiiti^ ilfty^todafeui^ 

o£4hw^ Oiiita^!^ iibtiey>lpooiitfd ffa^Hfom iiib{M.ra^y 
that I WM BO]netim«li»M(iMdiyti«iit^«nM99d^^»^ 

eBttietprfffito of tilM ifirtt 3MKr'4n4dydrti6li]^^) J me*ntt 

pliDi IwhioheMftt ari)tt»g^8u«d, te^tUat'Hva^^tt pct^pate 
latgr G^rai«ikJpaiiitogs40ibef ftkMted bettf eM« the^wftiiditlira 
^ thii^dstiM \>tt|]diiisr^ t«i|HMMMbfgiixettly.evM^dmp€fxw 
tant animal known in zoologyi<>>!TJii^ paiiMiogs tW&te 
pat im^4in^MlldSsk^' ta^ a^tok^te >iii^«; AndiBd^cbm^lete 
a ttiHnii0ilMAtimHiB^v<ttot.iiipfiektt 
B^<kiimMtn6Bd^{^ ^Wh^i^tb^ ilvHttg^Btre^dii roileA 
d«ii#*fltttafltlliy< '^4" ttoxbt-ntt)hrttlg^ anA tfe^dbed <the 

to oaMVl^Sfe if^«f|ld«iiii ttlitcki > a^fi««e# b«fo|»i «ieMr 
6o niaiyf lo^n^^^iMiMtib^ and ^fdAidh^d^ ey^I Bdme 
ped^'Ware ^poikled to kndW? wtt&t it^ ^ mentft ; > Mnie 
kwteftiaii'if tttifey> thotigttt::ki»vratiian: elilitaalhldi palao^ 
thaft*'diad'tttiMB«ily<' apriiBgl <^p} t^oih^s >iestlatteed, 
'' W^UieiaMittaLsidtt MeAltto^faarreisteokbtt'Ottt' ilwt 
niglili' aDdih^ibcidp* eattieidn>te'BM(ff0i¥ ihb ^atajMisb- 
laent jfuorrdidLf Ale iiSiidMn «nqrtAMii* ^Attfill evmty, 

fonau^tbf B^aitf ia!:hnildMd*iMlal8ii«idayiiaad <iMy 
novesttldiibadt^ayaflDfih^ :)8tran^m>iwbidd'i^^ at tbia 
greaft fiatemal maga^ei and 'argue tliat^an efiCalUMf- 



^14$ asm MAP to mpm» 

Minft/iifii(!iP«tt|titoy^ttsil» iQtt! ate rpsHeidb^^misk. huie 
Mzpey^bg) <m the lEncl&i iilifliifx^iktypitbiM'gA^.ito^ peie^ 
JEiUJkiei^ I ift>ok)'pftrtlciil«t jiiBtts jtot^pfeMe iaftd (Mmiiah 
Idbtiie !«to4ngMrt, I dud Mwhto '«lte|rniMoAubuk iiIq &xb 
couirf^ry^: 5 Itex <^ ^^^oeMi ^Mky, «! • ^ : pkMsi^' bi^ft ; ^ad 

thftti poe^ M^liMitr J'tiiDiight Ma£»> TWkitig) itoi'<^^y 

loBifym ii tbi9 laii4< hVoW^mi tb^ti Mi«i4^pQetiw{ild cry 
iD«l ntbufilbiig" 4tid '' gb«rif4«a){' ^(.si^.wiwli • tlm be*- 
4Mrlac A6«; Jt' h«lt>ad .t^):fid}r«i:ti6ie im, iMd I. was 
wiUtog rto baar ihe JNipit^iidiiv^-^^Kad I f4^|ped^qu^f 
^roiMiiitiwy end €iimi\>itfip«tM^Mfe^<8itot|^ to ftdd to the 

aotoriely of Ae Mweum ^ .., , . . i ^, , . 

C^ V^akfitiM .WJiU be j^c^piiemb^tied J^ mwyri^s^^ in«ii 
vho ^m imitiMao9«tfind4^kiQfiiti^ 
leni.< Ho w»s ^toa^ArdifttJ^ Ma^^lQl: ^ea X iw»t 
pttrcbMed l}i^ <»sl9blieto9i^nfa ^«pd.,be^pra I introdnoed 

*Ifi« i!0ptw^ntel9i#l|s t wer« iM^aUyixgiwi ftsipllfNro: A 
mtuA tabjk wafv p}Med Jii abpiit^the /sf^ti^ id^ tbe etoge ; 
% ewt^n «9i|pl4n9 to 4;be floor covered >tbe :f»]»^ osd two 
4eiidi,pf 4h9. teUa ; .wider iMs t^U^ oi| 1^^ sb^ln^and 
bdokt* were r placed caps, bate, ooat^i wfgSiWduetacbes, 
enrld, leeaTftiis aiid isbirt eoUaca, and tidLaofftSvof ge&r for 
4iinmgi^ 4he "esppeemice of the uppek? poitum 0£ the 
peiemi. Dr« .YaLnffaie would oeat bteoMlf in a chair 
hebj^d tifte tabl6yinid addrdnlB^ bia * an&oee^. would 
i»talie hie uitebtioiL to Mpreaebt di&r«lft pedttliax>^diar- 
aelbera^ tttale And femalerilK^ludiBg the Ytiakem- tin 
peddlier ; 'Maiitha Twiat/' a nmidea lady ; ''«aia Slick, 



jT.^iti^'preeoki^dB audiorr ;<^^ Solbmon Jte1i!hi3s'^ii cl«»t)r 
old ba^hdlor^' trith*«^^ttg i^^eAcmtt-e^jit sbhool^ea^hei* 
widx ills refta^tory jiiipils^' witit meiiiT' anhev thkru6ie» ; 
and bt^ siinply! ^dkeddief iodulgenoe ^ 'O^iaiMtotoo^ #»r 
a few seconds het}^Qmji4»abiipitA^^^^ 
stoop: ddim 1)ehftBd>tbi»^liA>leikad '^dress^ «d«hlchli^ft«ter 
appropriately. K ..i.i I i^; « 

Tite DoMor iBrUnMlfi WM «/'Mofet'«<^6intf9C:^)bAfaibf&r. 

hk' aofiimo^ bliMilA lM «om^eA <rf-peMojft 4v%o 
would not appreciate his ** imitations." During 4M0* <if 
his ^QgagettmCLtd tbi» IJbctti»6 iUoia f&fkkmeMeii k^on- 
sisted of negro minstrelsy and Dr. Yalentiae'i imita^ 
troBs; iM'tkertniolBtfeU gara^tlie fetitird diiist 'batf of 
the eu te ftaimAentj theDwt^v WwM p«st MtiMlf^ at die 
entrance to the Museum to study the character of &e 
Ttntoft fgmk <Mt9iffp*a9aaae« He f allied 4hi(t he Was 
a great imid«r of 't^lnncter in tht^ tiray; Md M moM 
of my tisHinv wenf from the wtultr^y <tha jD^otof , lafter 
clMely.'paAsixEg ttaeit iisoeB, would dMide Ifcaf thi^y 
werv" not the kinA of i^noite who wt^uld a^pfedate 
his effoHS) and "tiiia' made • him «ittr^nil^y zMarvdus, 
WHen this Icfei was' oiiee fe hi^ he^d, it tbok obm|>lete 
po^eaaien of die poto Doctor, 'and ^vitoijlced^hifai Hi^ iato 
a iiefV0ui exdterttettt^^wliiell 4t ^v^aa^ <rf]fen ffediiftrl to 
behold. Every country-looking face wai«'li^4aggtf to 
the DiMAQfr/fbr'he bad af p^eot fa6Vri«r'4>r ««)iibitliig'to 
an una^preowttive auSJAnte; W*»a -•o-^^Awdi' toctted 
that he could ttand at the d6or no longer^ thfe dift^ted 
Dortor wotdd come mto my oMce aiid potir out his 
lameniatfons in'flii^'Wide : 

•* Th«e, l^araHiBt I ftevei* wW' sitt* a m^iA lot of 
cotmtrf hum^kifce 4tt tny Mfe. I hhan^t h^ able^ to gat a 



t . * 



♦ « I 



I •< 



' 1 1 . « I ■ 1 1 1 • « ' '. ' 1 i # * ' ,* ' , I . I > • . I I ' 



r 
I 



. ' 'j'if.-.' ,' •. ..It 



v» 



•^ . • J • t » i I • * i . ♦" i 

/I .H .1. .f. . » I . n\ • • »«» 



• » 1 »' 



I / 1 1 ' • 



t 



iijuti ■ n M/vfii 



' *. J » • 



>l. V 



»»f'. • • i i'li • III'* :{' iMi/'*' *^I. /fi .'/.III ly.'j'. ., ) 

' ' ' . . . f 



'w,; ;"M ! ;i, » Willi*.. .( 'i >(l Jiliij- ..-• \K f]\iU^^,^'^\.. 



r .'kj- /' 



•f. ,••!«» '»i • f' !'t[\i rri! 



■» '.ii/<|u ' 



/• 



» • • • I 









• . ' t 



;\ 






I < 



.1 • i 



I . • , 



il 



• , , • ' 



t. 



• • . « i 



. / 



i t 



• I 



t '• . 



.} 



t ' » 



• I • I • ll 



*' i 



ll. ' / (' . ■ »il / ' . . » 



' • If 



. - » 

*• J. J t< \»t'l » •' \' \ t »• »• «'• 

, • J I " * I . • I * C • kill.' ' 1 I I I ' ' • « 

I • ; 

' t •!.• i i'' Mill •.*{• i J\' ' » . J< 

'I ,'■ ttiim ■ 1!mi\'m . '■' ■', •/'..: ♦! V 

' '.•,'»■. ^ ' I M I . , t ' I / r 1 1 < I . M . i * . > * I i » ! • 1 1 1 1 ( . ' I ' • 

i • r • » ' • * III. I n ' . ' ; I J ) i I / « • f . • '. I . / n . ' / . 1 1 i »/. * ' J i i ^ 1 . 1 1 

•fit >fM ;j'i.. • y '' mJic! «| ■ h O' i^flK'M' ;■;-•>: '[i. ^ 

\ 



• » r ' • ♦ 1 4 1 < 



.u < inn... . ( 'i fil hoii ..; u. /mTijij/^-.j., . 

* » ll it '!• !.'■■ . '.'! 'iiM/n .ll' /.• »»'! . ) . '• 






« • I I 



i i 






'"j\ "t. ' '• 



' • I 



• ft 



i: 



. I ' y.. I. ' J 



' * 



, .1 < i 



1' 



146 THB BO AD TO BIGHBS. 

shoulders of the Yankee, and Sam Slick, junior, sings 
out a merry — 

" Ha ! ha ! why, folks, how de dew. Dam glad to 
see you, by hokey ; I came down here to have lots of 
fun, for you know I always believe we must laugh and 
grow fat." 

After five minutes of similar rollicking nonsense, 
down would bob the head again, and the cursing, 
swearing, tearing, and teeth-grating would commence, 
and continue till the next character appeared to the 
audience, bedecked with smiles and good-humor. 

On several occasions I got up '^Baby shows," at 
which I paid liberal prizes for the finest baby, the 
fattest baby, the handsomest twins, for triplets, and so 
on. I always gave several months' notice of these 
intended shows and limited the number of babies at 
each exhibition to one hundred. Long before the 
appointed time, the list would be full and I have known 
many a fond mother to weep bitterly because the time 
for application was closed and she could not have the 
opportunity to exhibit her beautiful baby. These shows 
were as popular as they were unique, and while they 
paid in a financial point of view, my chief object in 
getting them up was to set the newspapers to talking 
about me, thus giving another blast on the trumpet 
which I always tried to keep blowing for the Museum. 
Flower shows, dog shows, poultry shows and bird shows, 
were held at intervals in my establishment and in each 
instance the same end was attained as by the baby 
shows. I gave prizes in the shape of medals, m<mey 
and diplomas and the whole came back to me four-fold 
in the shape of advertising. 

There was great difiiculty, however, in awarding the 



THB ROAD TO KICHE8. 14T 

principal prize of f 100' at the baby * shows*. • fivery 
mother thoaght her own baby the brightest attd'b^t^ B£A 
confidendy expected the capital prize. 

For where was ever seen the mother * 

Wo«i4 i^Tfi ber bnWy for aAotber?. . 

Not foreseeing this when I first stepped into Ab 
expeotant eirole aiid anaottaced in a matter of 'fad way 
that a oommifetee of kdies had decided upon the baby 4( 
Mfs. So and 80 as^ entitled to tile leacKtig iniisei Iw9k 
ill^repned for the storm of mdignatton «1^ait •atodeon 
evei7 side* Ninety^nine diifappoitited^ and as-ttiey 
tfaoi^t, deeply injuv^d, motbisis made ^oMimoB * c»ise 
and prouoimced the successful little one the meanest, 
bonudsest baby in the lot, and roundly abused me and my 
ctHDsmittee for out" stupidity and partiality; ^ Very 
welU Issiies^!* said I in thei first instance, ** selecta eom- 
mittee of your own and 1 will giro another $100 pri«^ 
to the iMiby ydu diall pronounoe to 'be the best spebimeUi" 
Thi^^ww eiily dtxDWiag oil upon ftmie; the ninety-nine 
confedisrateQ: were t deadly enemies from the nioment^and 
no naw babies wete^ presented in ooinpetttion fbt the 
second, ^aew Thensof ter, I took good earn to send In 
a wi^btea^efioifc and did not attempt to annoanoe tke 
pEtiKB in person. 

Ai-the fiffst exkLbitiotA of the kh^, there /was a vagiie, 
yet very x^Urrent rumor, that in the haste of departori) 
from^^he Museum several young mcfdiers had- exchanged 
babies (&r the babies were nearly all of the same age 
aad^^wto^rgonesiillyi&essed alike) and did not discover 
tho/miitalBeitttlthey urived home and some such ooir- 
Teisation as this ocourred between husband and* wiifia : 

^^ Did our baby take, the prize ? " 

i^ No 1 &e daBliiig.>was cheated mrt of iL" 



148 THE BOAD TO BIOHJBB. 



>^ WelUwJfaQF. didu't )'4MibriDS'hometh».8fM^li)4by:y^ 
)easriedvtQ)tbe)Mu6eiiiii]." , - m..- t ^ .• 

I am glad to say«that I could not trace jthiA.cro/el 
rumor to an authiexitic source. 

In June 1843^ a herd of yearMng buffaloes was on 
exhftatiom'ia( 'fiestoni. I JMAghiidlie ]ot^ hrao^htifaem 
tor/Neir Jeoseyi) Urad (the vMe/4ourtefat,>lI,Qhp)mii.^i^ 
tteted4ihit'&igrjrfbobte)ibr( one chiy^^jaiDd; adMwtia^ Ibat^ a 
Jwnler i imi \wAwd iiriik h* . hwd af trnffsAotts n^ I. fwm 
ifftreMr'ncA'rto /ttetertM't ageiTrtrasLdithati Augufki^^filt 
thiire Jffould be a ^^ Giand.Buffolo Hnni:" on 4h« Hobe^ 
'kett' Tim MfimrscimnfaU poimns .tQ'i^ admltedifrpe'Of 

>>t:TJw upptHiAted d^itwas ^arm/>iind delightful, dnd^no 
)w& than twtotyfibur^thousiuftdqpwpieisrcsKd^diNiNrt^ 
JU^^rmitheferrjNbMta tot-tiajai^.tbe icboiingp.biteKeltod 
4o («eeiftha ^^€49Md'^Bttff^ Hunt"'- /TlwiliutiteDnras 
dimted'vaa ian< Ittdian4);afiid >miiiHiteQi;daiftMiTB6baciD^ he 
pxkioedded toiBhoufi hour.' the fwiU^faiiffaloiiB <«fi^>tered 
rmtb ra^laam,' htat> < mnfortunately' <ibe>^eirliiiigB' nvmiiU not 
Tikn tili tiHe^ctowd'igaTe a>gtie«t^sl)oat^)expfedffur0«tionoe 
«f riniBion «nd dilight>Q4»:thehtlriale8&.humb«ig.i)<'TfaK 
'sluDixbfltftrtBd; thtt ^^qimgJanimak'iii&tdia weak <gali(^: and 
the lasso was duly thrown over the head (of the^i largest 
oai£; The erotv^d roaai^' ifcdtdb iiuoghter, lintened t<^ my 
'balmuy^ * baadv which I also • ^misbed/'ift^ey ' nnd^ ^then 
ial«rted>£or.>'£lievr> Yoork^ tUtble •tinaming^'wlio wteuithe 
*a!rtlifm«f ihk tenastitin^ or ydatt was ite ott|eoti - o .• 
'liCr« Ni P. Willis^ then editor w<if the: ^Bb/fte^^ JmifiMd, 
-wrote 1 an astioie iUiistratiii||: the 'parfeodgfaodjahtdte with 
whidi&tlfaiiAiiieima'Bk pnbUd'iuibnut to a 'Cl^M ihumbug. 
He said that he went to^Hobokbn to witit^a the Biiffalc 
Hunt It >VaB nelurly fdur o'dook: when the boat left 



tM ibot (rf 'Bficrelfijr -StrtM, «bd' it' WM^.s* idftiiQljr 
crowd«id that mac&y persons i^eirei obHgfMl toi"flitatuj|>oii:th« 
taiHijgs tad Irald oh to <%t6 nwiilMg poaU. 't¥h<tii ihey 
reached the Hobbken-^Ute-ttboat eqttally -eiidw^^ <wt» 
coming out - of' <Che iilip. ' ' The ' pUds^Ageitt j«Mt> ' ttitivi&g 
criM iMt to: Wds« '"Wh^ i^ei^ to>iAittg tm«f,i «'K iOie 

tinc^'-ff*WW'^tbift'l)%^i||«llll((% -Tbtf: «Ver few«d' 4^1:" 
'Wffli^'II^Mea>!'tt^t 'p)iiBSlMig«y«i otf tbfr KMt ^Wi^ 'Ithtt 
fias^MfSy -^y^- fhrde' " «hef6h" ftv "th» afttlMr ^ •^tiite 
WnftWg*, «rliOeV«!rIie*ttJght!bi».'< '^'•'- >"" -" « ''• 

MMfilM^ p«b)]«^ heiA ^ttjbyM'a Itt^gli <lbti|«e^(»al dtt^s 
o»*fr •'ffife ' Hobsoteen ' » F^ee €h?tod 'Bitf alo Hunt^ 
ttitted'it tb he'tinfiOdtf^edi'lhtlt' fh^-')yrO{H!««toir tff'lhe 
AHietiiMii' Mtiiitfttiil tWaS :y^ijik!>fi8ibl«'fl» fhe' j«ke<-flras 
ils^-tH^lttffiVK^ huttt b^ af'^i^Oid^ JMi'Mftrsrdfitmblle 
titfkitibxrttt'^'^tosetdn. 'TI«><>b^eM wtis ttMotttpiislMl 
«tid alffiWijgti' adtte* p«6^ crkfd 'dut>^h'atnbt%/'> I bMd 
&dMa iofHii fitHoHet^'WhiVh' 1 %0 mdeb wtt)dted'alidl 
ifitif'^miReai^''Ai^^fgt Wi dtynt »<IltiMbtlg,'''it VffWt 

hnd*<Mitcfr'*Mlft«t <b«- (^bridlf a%«»e« ttiaM'ifiot'tOi'be 
nt^6«d<MEH«iMli)''-'I 'ttttgM to «id4;'tbAV' th« fMH;yi«iigiht 
fb<itisktid"'8ii«^ii(ifeS-^thd> «^utfl»' ffii*i-^rt«ceivtd ' for 
fen<ji"fifte«*>M^irh«rt I'tiMid'i^r 'th« chtim^ of the 
h^at^-to th^'bife 'd^y,' nlidr«<<tbiAh 4i«taMkkeMtH!it"tnei-f»r 
ttte''*Hft '^Sf "the buffMbrt <ttd! thti wtpewes ■ «f • Ae 
*<hiKit,^«Mf tti« Mi<^nM«» ^t«AMB8' «(df «nrti«kig «l the 
Mttt«thii^4ifa^'alMl$;fe9]aeed'to>vnrf c)«dit. '' - - 

W}A- tU^ "itMJlf obi^tf ^ thttt- i«v «dvertl0teg my 'Mct- 
<^aiHi -^l- -f t(MM^,' f^^' f906, .!«' €ilMiI«Mlti^Ohio/ a 
" Wbrflly-tedfsei^rfottria M'e^ibitK^ci-hl HtbOb «»f. It 
ti-as'ar if^]|"ftMH!ll',>- sioiKll >(ria^ h^e« 'f^itb no auutie, 



]0O ^Hi: fiOAB ix> ]^CH«a 

• 

atulrinot a?.pa|st»clQio£ ^ J^tir wk^s j;ailf-iriull»« hin .^mt^i# 
bad)! aiKi 1^ •wepre'-covef^dwitht th^eki 4^? Jbfu^.or 
wool,.whi«tx c!iurl04 ii^ to Jsoft aki^. * TJtua hor^^ wii» 
footed i& IndiaaBf imd wm ar reiimrkiU»l^fK^ <»f wytw:e» 
and oQftaialy a mry .ciiJFioa$ ^ looking ainmil. . 

wJuttl^tti^di d<hwith(Miii# bpt wk^ iybA,nn^vA),€m»e 

have ibe«iii»9<l ia ti^eaiiciwB.ftf ^ iA«ckgrrJ40|A«Mlw) 
imB in m^» th»*t"*V^<>%iHoriev"|Fa«rft¥hii^^ 
New York, and was wid^ily.iadvtejrtiB^.M # vMAim^ 
iiiitfk^U^«wQal tl^ ihad7b^W€^tmadi;by,itiia igfr^at 

The t^lfibikioa^ Aieb.witb. ronl)^ Moderate «(cotss:inv Kaw 
Yoik^joafd. ip i^ei;^(Ji[Q^fra prQ¥inc^l/tqwii9t mnl 
the c «h<Mi^ tVi^^Jid ^v«& £i^^ivflat in. .W9^iqgtanith»d it 
»4)^;. }»49€|A){qi} Ib^ eye9rt2(6al pf Qf^^po^i 'T)i(1^phib, Ji^^tUr 
tw,itheai^tyjadtediiS)ta|ke»(3e«iatw lli# 

fveiMf;tp-tke,6h<^WW-^aiid)thea.,«0.^s64nth^ f^TJeat f^NHwy 
ageitf ^r. pbtmniPg twef^-^f ^!0nU^ fSiovfi ,kim dfindw 
«' 6»la^^pwteftpei^". .JHai^entkpibAd bqeiftm«de|of,^is 
c»iffU8. anwMdb ia >8&y.tl6^teri«bA hud la^fi^ei^ irofntihi? 

6o»4M9^, (H9iio9e]^iiJohn.<^o^wmiwt,taii^r^^ 

WooUy ,Hoi];aeL.l^di npt.rbf^en q^tur^ ^ 3^J oi.l^Wr 

iatnt('a paa^^ Tb^ i^Siisfu^gtwa^ihaj^M^^n^^'f^i^^ 
^f^l({^f^pjf^tl»^Jajl^1^lMllt»T0£ JJwIli»»?j;>udt |iie 

ca»e jHra8od^WWed>^t Aft^' ra^few dayji.ipf fipacriinej;^ 
pflb]^ ^^(iqiG^yi «o Oomp^ toW^ . «irt*i^t, idK«!Ptip^ fpd 
the old horse ;>^c|us(^ f^WtM^ta j:i^ii;e,t9t..pKiYf^);p4i^* 
}tt!f<^ct» ti^ ^i)aL)b^t^X\i hawever^ MT^f^lF %tt^ed. 
WJi3(?n>U)Wa9igwQral}y.k^a^wn^^^ qC the 

jiim^a^aA MufenKpa ..TT^ ^iw tftp. o^n^r qf,[t^e ^^mnis 
*'iW«oUy; Hiwie,".ft.!cikUf»d jy^t mwQ.4(ilh ^i^o^t mp 



^Crafi< BOAD 070. ffiCHBa 15(1 

they, ^woakl ,give quuret torse^ tbe ^ pd'O^ietoc cli the M» 
sdiim .tiutfi iD^vkw thereulke GoUeetioa ^ aQtiotfttieSi 
As for my Bweuiadrettifiing.the ^^ WooUy Hoar«a>" as 
having he^Ok omptmad by iFzeiBoat'si esfdanng* pacty , of » 
coMm ^ tbe- «imo{moeai0nt 'iieililMr addedf.to nor49ok 
£rom 4b0 iateiMt tdf Ibe ^is^ibiiicai ( ibU(> itf aAevtod f piijb^ 
lie. oMeaAiWf ^dra^rWfl8/tbe«tOiflQr<(feftta^ tfcii^' shotr 

'k ivillJbc^aMn 4ibattffeiQr»xw«h<^^tbo>6i|C^ 
atte9d«i;iii{r^iOia«y) fi^lWifilipifAB^rsbip -ofvtbe^ 
icon l^lMVum ^ t1fp|9!^ due . ^Mfi^evtmngf > w4 1 mpffciaHy 
toruuf ,ftd4{ BMi^Nl4«l «>f ^ advMtjgiilig^ ^ ' AliWLyft > rtiftniaif 
tbaft^ bad oanoottiefr nvprtbi ^hawiiig amd <i9ot(ii ^M^ugi^ 
aiid€i|bffaitqd)''4pg pbtfi^p'^^At t^tMllw^fiirefQeat0radm^ 
siDn, 'flhttdren Jlalf* piio^r-trpiJ.^txidJQd -waysf^totarf^ 
pcibl|e»atte8la9ii; iQiiititrtiiei, to^ make ptople-^iiUtf aifd 
w6tidev;im iib«rt)%>ti(>(l«|; ^tb^.«9idd:kiio|^).tbatv^ 

loiMk *Tbe|f^f)Mldv^6mr ^wbrafirailrQad w s^MHb^ 
untU 4h6y faltw^4bedit<w ttieioront^ fj?amiIo9irartc^N«lw 
Ymk^ «(pf «>uiae« ^tbey weteMKiULaodi ba^Mbtit fiml 
idea0^:O0*««ili«t^(ut "The' fMly^ ccfk^^ed lS]:ig& <ifd 
neUe^^t^p^aasto* of^ihfe tnttatoted^ sAvager afi'<v4^(M 
8emd! wifyfbeiiitifiil-s^tiaMrjB) ^th>)tn^o orthacto ifitHi* 
esting " papooses." They lived and lodged iixiii4aiigf 
rodwti mdnU^Ax^^lioMM ^^nUtitiitlflS^ aii(V coakodtftkeir 
owd(iVkfln*£dB^itt^lh6i:t'*o«^nfwa)»fn 3fbey^i9»v^>tbeiD9ia^ 

daneM'-i^ ftbe^ ^Ui^ la 4be^ Leotiufa H^hml fifithrl^lMt 
vigor and elttimsiasto^Iinnob ft>ilih«» g^ti^fitttiOQi 6f'^4^ 
anditttffar- tBottlJifeae'^ild Ifidmla aedmad i0 odmidar 
th0itrda«^ fM IftaHt^a ' HeMe iwbanithi^ gave a^w^ 



Wir IWAc#, vi« -w^* dawgeroti^ fbr toy pferfie«, 
-^iMiep* 'their Ittitotfger to* hrterpretef, to be dn the 
«tag(»,'ftrr the-woment t*iey had flttlshed 'th%ir*' ii^ttr 
4ancev <lhey begati to >leaf|i attd pe^lr'abMA behittA tKe 
. Been^n in sefaMh of tklMtts'for tb^' tohmhetwki^ vtod 
walpifDg. kniveg'^ ''I<fidi$^,^i4Mt* ''iil' 'th^s^' ff«^^ 
«uiqieiite'tlvey might i9tfdke^tt da^* at the "d^cbf^tftftt* ot 
thoi< andiewe^ .r9#e*» had' 'a'ftigtt^ iSfyp^i^ ^^aced 

between them and the savages* Mk^lliie^frobt -of' fly&'Btage. 
1 liUt^lliSf ihild bMni^'tl^ek 'hi* <^ pro- 

poflid adbLoiige ^ pf^fhmmM^fyft ttve^'Wedt fotlemittg, 
tyy*' intcodtti^g:' firtw daii0^.|'.AMtfng<!> 'these ^was 
liiiidflkllaa 'Wading Danoe/i' At thkt'tinttf Lprinted btit 
one 'Mt^of postals (targe tbill9)< per w^k, so tbttt wfaatr 
6nmi7> wa« aimottiiMd/'fdt ^ Monday ; wtto' repeated every 
iStofii and etenteg'^during^' that' y^k. «' ^Bttftee »the 
jW«ddii% iBaMe mM aff ^ iM^n^y ttfteMton^'r^vm^ 
inibMiedf 'tbat'Inms ^W provide i» lai^c^ «iMr fed . woollen 
blanket, at a cost of ten dollars, for the bridegroom 
t& preteiit^ tb ittie^ifiither «f the bridei' I ^derai the 
pmtihoiM to' ^be linad^pbot tv»''cOiifiddeNBly taken 
ttbocki whed I wai informed tibatil nitst'-bave 'another 
lieW blantiet^ fur tlv^ e^etring, jfnaemiMrta'«a8 ilShe s^age 
iM Ladian €hief, fat1i«ir-in4dw 4e rtinel lAidbgroom, 
Woiildrtiot conwot to •faifir rdBiighter)i> betngi 'approached 
trilirt tlteiiWQddkig!:I>ani»'«iite8difUe))faflfi W blanket 

: ti]/\dMb8itook4o 0Kpl«inrtothe ekiefv thnrotigta Ibe inter- 
pnler, 'that 'tfeisr was oaIy/a'^'/ffiaiDe'«belfeve^''flreddmg; 
iMtthe oM satvage abmggbd bie ahoidders, and-gave such 
a^teiYific^^'Ugh'l-" tbM I waa glad - to * niake my peace 
by > ordering toother blankei As we ^affd > two: perform- 
tenaee per day, hmm oa* 4{ pcfdket f 120 ^fMf ^twelve 
" wedding blankets," that week. 



»fi noAsy Tiv BJDOHm 1&^ 



Ou04fl*iimi\)eA^lUi^^qlaMatB JuubediDOffaxoiitoJiedliii 
the Museum. She had been a great favorite with manijr! 
ladtm^t^tunong wham.Iicaii espeoiliitljiQ: iMme Mibj Q. -M. 
Saivyevf wifii of* the Jlexj . £)n {T;^ Ji Bokv^^nu i DotJitiaBK! 
was bmjed^aa A^ bmdbiiof aSyivan Wniei, jdXSisoiiiiloQft 
Ceoietetyt wiM^x&^a^itmall/siirtluiieat^ttectedi^Iq^ ihea^ 
firieudSf doAlgoatctt ^bw laA; rtst^g»pkce . i) . :< . v v.. 

aud desired to get back agnate ^tbnr /mBBtcto 9iiiib^ 
Thtt ^fiUbar aqd the 4)elrotdi0d af> DD-biiinaMr ott)ked 
yaiious dishes of food^andi^plactedihanklufstttthejitocf 
of tiie'Mofleum, ^her6.tliey..bsiiev^dilfe : sfdriti of ( their 
lepairtadLi^0ad>«ii|ia'idaiI)r iaat ka Bupj^l-afafl^tiieitf 
dishes j^Bi^^-miewtd^ amy .monmig. daii^ •tfaB.atoj tS 
the Indians at[ the Musttttir . 

It was aometiam vetjr aanaaing: to haai^the: itenariit 
of strangers who^comB^to nsit my Jteseanu . Qub nilm^ 
nooA a piam^maidaDJady from FortlaBd^^Mnne, ^walked 
into JDB^ pddrate offioB^ where. I was ixwlkf :engaged in 
writing, and taking a seat on the sofa she asked :. . 

'' Is this.2lr. Bamom^ ''. 

" It is," I.jreplied.: 

'' Is tUs Mn P. T« Bamufii^ the proptidoi of the 
Museum]'! she 'Sfiked... . 

^' The same," was aiy jmswer. 

'^\yfay^.xea(Uy,.Mjr. Bainum," she contiinxedv ♦*you 
look much like other common fcdka, after ail." 

I JtemtokedthAt I pvesumedX dM ; bat I £ouU not help 
it, and X.hoped'sbe was Aot disappointed at myappeu- 
aace*. . 

" Oh, no," she said ; " I suppose I have no right te 
be dis^paii^ed, but. I have -wad and faeasd.iso much 
about4[fi^ MAyom Hnseaas tiiiat I^was qpifiM pffepased 
to be astonlBhed." 



IS4 ^raS BOA2> TO JUCHSa 

^' I^ hate," ske replied ; " I caaae in hnmediately a&er 
bveakfaBt ; ' I have been hero ^ver 6iD£6) and, I can.qay I 
tbink with tke Queen of Sheha, titat ^ the half had aot 
heeb told imeJ ' But, iMsi Baaum^'' ithaicontwiiedy ^' I hft^e 
long felt a desim /te^eQijoot i triaied.to.iAttetk4 wl^iit 
you-laptiiBred oiLitoinpeiamM. Hk IV>¥tlaad|tbut J( lMt4 a 



" . . , I 



s^eie coid -end could obtigOfQufe') • ;^ ^i 

^00 yMiiike mty cbUeoiMa ds)i1frell:asiijmi^thte oaa 
iD'the^£oitoft.iOyisuieiii^l'' I^aihad.) > <: i« . .. .. 

• rf^iDteit ih^.! 'Mi:J Bbauq," fiitideha^ ."^I; neter v^eat 
tD^ atty iMnseam forfore, note to dny filaceoffimliseiBi^iit 
ov pufelhiJ eyfertHifciiiiflnt, excepting! our tmh^ol /exhlbi«» 
tions ; and I have sometimestMrt-tbat iheyteTflniiuflly be 
wicked; for « some pbUhi' ^of < die diaiqgasff Booned imro- 
loBd ; biie I have heard > bo? mach^of' your ^ sieral dittaa * 
iind'die.gmai.gdod you aie doi^^for <ihe adaing geaesa^ 
tiod^ th9t' I 49M>nght I faiott ^eo^ie herd aB4 W^ fur 
myself."- -j - ^ .• - : .«'•• .. * i..^ •' .,.l!♦^. 

" We represent the pathetic btory of * GtarioMeaXem- 
pie ' in the Lecture Room to-day," I remprkidj with an 
inwaird ehockle aft thd fecoliaiutieB of my^ lingular i visi- 
tor, who, although she was nearly £fty year^iof age> 
had probably never been* in an aadience: ef i a k^andred 
persons^ nnldSB it might he at a^sckooLQidhiitntiQn, or in 
Sunday schbol^ or in church* ' 

^^Ihdeed'l I am quits fhfniliar with the Mi history of 
Miss Temple, and I think I can derive gieat consolation 
from witnessing the representation of tho touchiag 
story." ' • . 

At thisi moment the geng sounded 4o aiiiMU&c^ the 
openiQgtofiAttt Lecture Boom, and the Q}:<iwd patsM on 



THE ROAD TO RICHES. 



155 



in hasrte to secure seats. My spinster visitor sprang to 
her feet and anxiously inquired : 

" Are the services about to commence 1 " 

"Yes," I replied, ^^ tl^e . congrejation is now going 
up.** 

She maroKeffAlbng^iifith tfte ^o^d tts^deAurely as if 
she waa going to a fuaeraL After she, was seated, I 
watched her, ttnd in thi* course <itf th^ t^lafV I noticed 
that she was iieveral times so moch <overoome' m te be 
moved' fb tears, ' TSKe was Very miich 'affected, and wBen 
the '* services " were over, without seeking another in- 
terrieW with me, she went silently and teaxfuUy away. 

One- day, twtr city boys who ha* thoroughly explored 
the wondexH of the Museum, cm their way out passed 
the open door of my private office, and seeing me sitting 
there, one of thei^ expl^iined to l^s companion; 

"There! That's iMr. Bftmum." » . 

** No ! is it 1 *! as^ced the other, and then with his mindr 
fuU oi the glories of the rstuffi^d gander-ski^s, and other 
wealth which had b^en displayed to his jwondering eyofi^ 
in th^ establishment, he summed up his views of the 
vastness and value oil the^ whole epllecldoin, and its fortu-f 
nate proprietor in a- sii^Ie seijLten^ce i 

" Well, he's an awful jiicl^ old cuss„ qin't he 1 " 

Those boys evidentily pok. ^ striictly fina^eifi^l view of 
the establishment. ^ . , 



I • 



» i 



i 

j ,■.;*•'" ! i' ■ 'f'/'t ' ♦ ■ I ♦ • « • • 

'•••• • •'•■•• oh:-apt:6'R jc.'" ' ' '' " 



?.. ,^;:•4«om^»f^^QqK9Sr^m.9PBo^^|A^iQ».... .., •„ 



EB MKBMAID*— BlfYINQ OUT MY RIVAL — BU^NINO OPPOSITION TO HY8E|<F — 

CtENERAl. ^6^ TrfUMB I^ NfeW YORK — RE-ENG AOEME NT — AN APT PUPIL — 

FIELD — fl^A^INq^ FpR LIV»RPO0«« — -^HB GOOD SHtP " Y0|]^E9BIRB ". — »Y 
• ' If ARTY— *ESCORT TO'SANDy'. HOOK— THE VOYAGE— »A TOBACCO TRICBf— A 

, BEGGAR — If ADAUE CELESTE — CHEAP DWAlfcF^^tWQ-P^iprY 8HQWS — BXHS- 

' ttitiOF 09 GttvtkA iok •THuiail in ih^iAkj^yL-^-vmBTHfL^Ui imjAfhmr 

vox ZfOXDOK. . ^ ' . ;,",'•. 

The -presidonf fcid airectors df the "New York 
Museum Company " not only failed to ouythe American 
Mngeiim as they con^dently expected to do, bat, after 
my newspaper squib war and 'my^urcbase of the 
Museum, they found it utterly impossible to sell their 
stock. By soihe arrangement, the particulars 6f which 
I do not remember, if, indeed, I eVet cared to know 
them, Mr. Peale was conducting Peale's Museurai which 
he claimed was a more ^* scientific " establishment' than 
mine, and he pretended to ^appeal to a hfgher class of 
patrons. Mesmerism was one of his scientific attrac- 
tions, and he had a subject upon whom he operated at 
times with the greatest seeming success, and fairly 
astonished his audiences. But there were times when 
the subject was wholly unimpressible and then those 
who had paid their money to see the woman put into 
the mesmeric state cried out " humbug," and the reputa* 
tion of the establishment serjiously su£fered. 



It d^tPiftiwd <Qppv( me '.to «ipeii^a'idy«d^ii0Mneilo^ per- 
formance, and accordingly I engaged abi^igbt li)tte>^ri 
who was excei<li]faglyM90<iptnMe»ibO'fiirdi^i&(^sciie 
ences as I coul J *itidiloet. ' iTh«t'ldj><8he'telll:D«d lier 
leeste'tUoim^taiy/aftd ^nili^id tiadf ap^aretitlj^^'pUt lier 
to ileapi iHtb « &# )^s«toiciid((«lo<ld[^tobind U^r, iilse 
se^niMB M hei diiiyi 'Asn^«e4"''as:i 'diesisre^!;' lai^M 
her hands asr I willed ; fell from her chair to tlie'^flbcnE^; 
aBd^if^ I pwt ^canAy^ or 'Itotoieo^into 'lay > tiioKtfh, ih4 Was 
Msf ^Mi^tBd lOVcdM^ftsUMb tgftie iMV«r kAeA- iik ^Oe 
reiilnb ^ai^bhrmandcBi i Stvang^ ttf ^'sayV * betters ' ih 
mesimtfisln^isBd td<twitii6W h^f |^rfadhi6MM;^« 'MAl Ifl^ 
gr9ali0M>|ile^it|iB J^ ^do^e^ th^br^ctt ^sitiVe |ito^ 
that tfaete ^V(a0 sMtethfaig lit id^^mi^iiinf, ^aiMl'^ttiey 
appknded tremeBdMiBly^*^ up to h te^taln pbinflL ' ' ^ i 

That pai»t ww r^aciied, Idren leating tlie girl 
" aslMp,^^ I xadled tip soioe &tie in the aHdicnce, p^omid- 
tng to pot faonr ''Ua the sdiue state ^' within fiVe miniites, 
or fbr^feit £1^ dollars. Of eonree, all tny ^' passes^' 
woidd mt ^>irt Anyirnxk in the tnesmeric^ £*ate; at th^^ 
eud.of three miatitesrlte^w^s^as wide awake as ever. 

"^ever midd,'' I ^oatd say^ lookiag at my watcih; 
^ I Ikave two miBatefr mbre^ and meatitime) fci show that 
a petBcm m this stiite k utterly idsensible to p^h, I pro- 
pose to cut off one of the fingers of tiie little givl who is 
6tiU asleep." I woajd then take oiit my knife and feel 
of the edge, and when I turned around to the girl whom 
I left on the chair die fajad fled behind the scenes to the 
intense amfasvment of 'tiie greater part of the audience 
and to tiie amazement of the mesmerists who were 
present* 

" Why ! Where's my little girl V I asked with feigned 
astonishment 



\Xip0 A^iOTwrn BucasBEmih esssiauijATsoK. - 






c&tting off fingers." ,. ^ ■. . • 

/^PfiisoitrsQiihe^.k^Miiill tbftttimo.'^.;. II) i su '. i^. . 
X^uftp^*^ SO;;. aD^ m]ri4^iKr jig, I lirniwiwiithit^ y»i 
«A)V)iil4. be.Ain tbi^.0fliae;«t^'.a^ the «Ddi^ %Ql):aclill- 
,, I kflpt.viip,itii^.jpedpTm(uw^*fOT^ 

.flBtoJbliibff^t ,.^fter Pe^, '.' Yaokee;'.'. HUL^TnArrtiwlr 
. tilMs ff^twafom^qA fA t tl^t, Mmmim^ (but dnr. a . dittte twkile 

/«^cfA,jthftii«(tl^iiM* pnc« ito^ OM^ skiUiD9»i*trtia thalf 
pnce liiluchal^ixai^.ita -cluuiu2tea^ oodiMitii «& 

''cheap aB4:w^ty9r*-^and bp faegvi/a Miicras> oziiialry 
with. 0^7 Mufiemxi. ; Hi^ aMaiftiraliwcts :«6ret buifrksqiies 
aQ4 Qfwcatjiirei^.of whateii^ciioyeLtieal waa i eshjihitiBg' ; 
thus,, ifrhei^ . I fk^y^v^t^ ^^ able. C€iii{>anyao£:yocaliafcfl, 
vH^UiHi^QWA.aiiithe Ocpheieui Famiiy; Benneltt woiaiinMd 
the /' OrphaxL. Family^ "..my Fiejee MenaaicLi he. • offset 
Yf^th a . figure wade . i of ar monlie}! and \ ieadfieb Jomed 
toge^er and caUc4 th6.>^F.lldg^QelJiCenD«li'^ (Dhese 
things, i9?efttqd)y9Qin0>lauglitec> at jovf dexpttDoe^tlMit they 
i^ao aer W lo< admrtKa my Muspum. < . i. 
! . Whexi .|tbe« novelty ^of • khtfi) oppoaitioii d^edr^^^ay, 
,^a»eUidid.a decidedly loaiag. buaintes.. 1 1 BsedtOftend 
a^maii^w^tli4«a,.$hiUmg. to Mifii..plaoe: effetyfldgfafrtatul I 
knew Qxactlyihofff ;iim(Ai he mm idoiBgittBdriifhakivfoare 
^.xeccdptsr' The holidains wemeoaoBgiandimi^iit tide 
him oyer a day or two, but he was at the Teryibottxaooa 
)m4 X 8ai4 to hinii one >(lay ; i .: 

"Bennett, if you can keep open one tweak m after 
New Year's I will give you a hundred dollars." 



HemB^BtynUff ^effinrt to vwin >th6 mnneyi, anff tfven 
w^tt to 1^ landloid and offerod* bim the entirfe 
receipto for aiweek- i£ he 'tiTOold toniy tlet' kitA 'Stay 
there; (but hie iiinMdd>.tiot do iO^ ondithe dof after -New 
YetK^B,' itmairf^S^ 1/94^1 BeanMt shiii^ up «hQpv ttftV'- 
mig loM his' 'kjat ' do^ar < and ei«n dhiliD^ to' ^«ectiM 
the inli^sbitieii]pftc|iipm I »oflfered iiiiq/ .>..-/ t >[ ; 

The eolimHatiiectidii ifeUianto 1^^ theUandt- 

lord &«iatrMmgea.4)f.mityia]ld I pstvicteU^ ptktf<Aiiised 
it}*fiwi#tf^OOftiiaBh] hire«fe^the)buMittg^-aiid :8^ 
eiiga90di(Beuiett^as:tayiageAtii* We ran tki^^ni^tBd 
oppositiojl) fwna^iongitimis and <abtise«tt etch btb^^ter-^ 
riUy ^M if^dblte4 IM raui ^reiiy lamubiiig mhitti aoi<ir6 
Hud fterformeBna failed td malot ielim9^ vritii) one- of ^ud 
aadaiettt ib ih».otbevj baitryrngMfitotii end to the otbear 
the pvioeil^s^ '^mainUkigi <to ipf y tfoopatx eagagemtot^ 
We iihuiB used to hdar^eattraox^ioaryatl^rkis bbotit each 
oUm^i^ literal tormsj'' ^imt h^tmeea^^ihk' tWo w^ men* 
sfQedi toiiseafnr&^uih^t^cliison^ Mi^vfemauitii^ abMabeift 
the rates at which their seryices/ tterOifrehllyMiperlhi 
>VhUethe8e<i^d)ile^weKe Itkos itmniag firoaa ene^mUn- 
ag0i» ta tfae^eAtr j «ttp)fosiI^^ tWe wcile irivab^ Beinstt ^tdid 
to Bte*<0Dii^ahvptk*>'j )"-•'-< > i >iii t. t 

MfYoHanft iKtn^ Itfaeiaitpeioiof^sliettii? iretiMtadftd 
cut eaich ^other^ batwd* enlytMibiahat comeaibefttreen." 

I Ba&t^myfopfi^itiiGbiloBg'eiiodgh'to beaftimyse it 
ansuviffed' cfvery i^wtfpwsi hawtyem4 > in 'viwoikenng' pnb-r 
lie MKtflAi t iu 4o f my i diil «iana i» * aad iwaa an adnralitage ) tQ 
preveMiiig etbsirsifrDni) atarliligi a fgemciiiiieiidppoflBticnu 
At* tihe end:. of. sizMwaath^ itbe^wfaelt eatabfahmtot^ 
imdndiiig liheid|ileiididt gallery of 'Amerioalat povttftiis, ^ras 
remored tO! the AtneHcatt Mtiseum and I tidnaiSatel;^* 
idTertiBed«tiia great !eard 'of a ^^ Dotible httraetifwi > ' and 
" Two Museums in One," without extra charge. 



(iSb Jkxwiws»^»neQBawmh . s^souiiAflriox. 



If* 



A MmeiimriMmpar tofamuily ' 'dc^ 
lusgfiiji j«poii;iclQu&tis]r>i|)ieo|4e; wbo.ltusiill tb^t cit^ Jvitb 
ai.iRoith|( ctiifio9ii9^)td>to0^/the(bQttellfM49f lithe 1^ 'As 
liiAistipftn^ ftiflitamsUlicc bnteitaiiaMatfiiL ooimeciadii 
^wkll j^dipiin0aiiiitfa,.'tl vftt (Atmi tkaViIifimist. adapt 
nor- «tage r|)o:;t1^e nfmitt g>f tetf icQt»try^'duiiofDeff& 
While I was ^^po»bi^totm\:iiem^i99vp^ I 

:«m 09tfsraiiadilridria6«k(mieUi>^di to 
IkibirioiiMywttMe^nii^ b£rm7^'milo»'yBPMUli•r^ tjteit 
tot. inpteaftipptiidf dtjr tikfUkeit/wtJlA^ 'itcstiiaQMiiate 
t» ' ieftfsu|^ 7them» > M tbift peiiod,-: iti nsim - cuMswwry 
tTi rt^ktate; w^ty ) i»li6iAffimb]ft . di«miis houii tbe. fltegp* 
Xhings iwdw «aid. and done and pbrmifiMl^ Aeatwt 
timt Telaenrhihsr. would ka^er beeb . pBonounoiKd . iw^y 
i(Hx|m>pdr. * The ptthlicLaeemed t^^MiMii AeM^duAgs^ 
and itifi ak ftxiioiir in^ ppliticiil ^oaoom.^/ t]nk.4;he de^iaod 
oiiiiat 'Ungulate ibe . mippiff^ But I datetauAed^.lt ^he 
gfaotti tbati kt tAifedmBand be :whAtit\ m^tsk ^ Museum 
daraitmtiD. m tBrt Mnm e n l t . shindd be'Hf xwptienablb >ptt 
the aaore of mondtty. 

1 -incM jureatfy . meiitkmed aoaie bf /flie-kiimfldiate 
tefiuna. 1 made in thv abivaa- nf U>e -itBgeu I vest 
farther, and, at the risk of some peemdar^'aaoafioe, 
iTdwdtriwtd what was oo«BK>a enimghian.olher theAtres, 
ewn tise moat ^^ reapactahie/' and waa genendly: haown 
aa the ^^ third tier/' iNaor waa.a.bar peamitted;;mi my 
piemiaes. Tm became, I. had no power to prevent my 
patroBU inm, {piag out bet««B& the aete nidigotting 
liqim jf' they okoae io/de ao, and I ganre diedca, as 
is done in other tfaeatrea^ and sametyt iny eity custamem 
atailed tbeniseires of the oppoxtinaiiy to gd :ai:^: £ar 
drinka and netnm again* Practicfl^y, then^ it waa miK^ 
the saaoie aa if I had kept a bar in the Muaeam^ and so 



AKwrtffER strccfe^sim. sr*ctrt,AiWir. 16 i 

reasr6ta io ApprdkeM thitt' sich*a ctWirife'vmuft^rolB'iii^ 
of the patrotiage 6f a colisiid[ei^bW"cr8l«^' oif '^lay-gcid^isl 
but I 'rigidly adhered to the new rule, atirf WK^I may 
haV© lost ill Tnoney, I tu'ore than gained ■in'tilhe '^ekt^ 
.iecotum -which chatiact^Hadd ttiy'dudieticei ' "' ' ' ' '" 
Thfe Mtrieiitii becaine a'manik'\^ith nit; dnd'I ihaflS 
every«hing"p(K8lbW atibS^Meiit'fb «.' ■Ori"th4 "^''b^ 
clectlofas, I'iVjtt ' "^ttlMiiatis Wdnld ■ adk ' hi« ' fck- ^^6 A '•! 
^vas •gbfeg'td''Vote,' driit' itt^^ answer iiirai-liftfl^'' WiiM^ 
" I-vote ftn' ih6 AmeWcair ■ISftrsetfti.*' ='Iti''fkiit;'kt't!i^ 
time,! ^dted'tfeiry -Httlei al^ouii'- j/6mifes', aikd'al'^i-^ai 
(leal aborft ihy business: ' maiwbil^ ■tlie ' Mtlrs^ute 
prospered' -wVhiderftdlJr, iand ■^Veryihitig ' r^aft^trifrtM 
or engiaged'ln-kefemed at tfie 0tits6t an'issUfedf-^uii^ 

The giants whom I exhibited ^ftdm' 'KW^' 16'tith^ 
were '-sdWay*' Htei-aMy gifeit' ' fedttoei in ^ ^tdiilUh- 
ment, krift 4!l6y orft*ntime8 = A«"otaed"-'ttrA^,''aii vfdf'A^rtif 
patroffs, food fof tnudh athiii^eiit as W^H WWtfad^i 
The Qddker'gifcn«5'Haleb, was qiiftea wag= 1« ' hi^ .ia^l' 
He went on«? to see'ttie' -teW bbbse-'df-W ifctiiAHft? 
ance %hi* fi«i saddettl;^ 'becotee ¥ich,-" btrt •' Whi) ' •tf^S i^ 
Tory igtebiaat than; When he came bitfcW he'de*4fcflBfe* 
the' wonderir tff ttie*inaiision' arid Md ^ehat' thi^ ^jfrtitiff 
l)roprietor HUtw^'- Km' dvetytHn^ "frciHiJ -basMfent 4b' 
attic; parioTS,bea^i'6bnl8vdihingiy!ibniVaiid,"'^ai4 Hafes, 
'• what he called life ' study *-i-'ttieamh*;'f'Stitij[)6se;'tfe^' 
place where he intends to study hU s^eTHhg-boblc!*'''' ''■''• 

I hftdat'brie time twofamoiisniehi tbd IV6nicH''^laht, 
M. Bihia, a very 'slim main, arid tbe' AfeWiiri ^aM'/ 
ColottBl"G6shen. ' These men gene¥felly got bn- t6g6^¥ 
very Wei\, thotij^, of 6ourse, each' was" jealdus of the- 

u 8» 



162 AfifOTHEB SUCGESSFUIi SPECITIiATIOK. 

Qiber, and of the attention the rival veceived, or the 
notice ha attracted.. One day they quarrelled, and a 
lively interchange of compliments ensued, the Ara- 
hian calling the Frenchman a ^' Shanghai/' and receiving 
in return the epithet of " Nigger." From words both 
Mrere eager to proceed to blows, and both ran to my 
qoUection of arms, one seizing the club with which 
Captain Cook or any other man might have beea killed, 
i(f it were judiciously wielded) and the other laying hands 
on a sword of the terrific size which is supposed to haTe 
been conventional in the days of the Crusades. The 
prepavations for a deadly encounter, and the high words 
of the contending parties brought a doze^ of the 
Museum attaches to the spot, and these men threw 
themselves between the gigantic combatants. Hearing 
the disturbance, I ran from my private office to the 
^ueUing ground^ and said : 

. ( ^' Look here I This is all right ; if you want to"^ fight 
each otiier, maiming and perhaps kUling one or both of 
you, that is your affair ; but my interest lie^ here — you 
axe both under eAgagement to me, and if this duel ia to 
come off, I and the public have aright t# partici|»ate. 
It must be duly advertised, and must take plac^ oa the 
9tage of the Lecture Boom. No performance of yours 
"frould be a i^reater attraction, and if you kill each 
other, our engagement can end with your dueU" 

This proposition, made in .apparent earnest, so de- 
lighted the giants that they at once burst into a laugh, 
shook hands, and quarrelled ^no more. 

I now come to the details of one of the most interest- 
ing, as well as successful, of all the show enterprises in 
which I have engaged — one which not only taxed all 
my ingenuity and industry, but which gave unqualified 



ANOTHEB EDGCSSSFUL SPEOUIiATIOK. iQJ 

delight' to thousands of people on two continents and' 
put enormons sums of money into many pockets beside^ 
my owBh. 

la November^ 1842, 1 was in Albany on business, and 
as the Hudson River was frozen over, I tetumed to 
New York by the Housatonic Railroad, stopping one 
night afk Bridgeport, Connecticut, with my brother, 
Philo R Bamnm, who at that tiriie kept the Franklin 
HoteL I had heard of a remarkably small ehild iti' 
Bridgeport, and, at my request, my brother brought Mm 
to the hotel. He was not two feet high- ; he weighed 
less than sixteen pounds, and waj» (h$ smallest child T 
ever saw that could walk alome ; but he vfag a ^rfectljf 
formed, brighlneyed little fellow, with light hair and 
ruddy dieeks and he enjoyed the best ^f h^al^h. He wa^ 
exceedingly bashful, but after some eotucing he was 
induced to talk with me, and He told me that ho Was the 
son of Sherwiood R Strstton, and that his owb name 
was Chsnries & fitratton* After seenoig him and talking 
with faim, I at dnoe det^mnned: to secus^ his ' sQtvioes 
from his parents andtoxexhibSt him 2n public; ' 

But as he was only five years pf age, to^ellubit hink 
as a ^* dwarf" faiight pioroke the inquiry-^' How do you 
know he iis a^ dwarf?" ^Som0 lifcebty! lii^ht be taken 
with die ' &ot8, bdt . even with [ thik lioeo^e, I iHt that 
the ventuire liras caoij. An experiment^ and I engaged 
him for foar weeks at three dollars a Week, with all 
traveiUng and boarding charges for himself and his mother 
at my expense. They came to New York, Thanks- 
giving day, December 8, 1842,, and Mrs. Stratton was 
greatly surprised to see her son announced on my 
Museum bills as ** General Toni Thumb." 

I took th* Ifr^test* pams to edueate aiid train my- 



I6i ANOTH£B aXTCGBSaFUL SJ^SCXJUlTIOT^* 

'diminutive prodigy; devoting many hours to the tfcit by» 
day ax(d by nigUt, and I was very Buoceesfiidy for he 
was an apt pupil with a great deal of native talent^ 'and 
a keen sense' of the ludicrous. . Hft Imade ripid progress 
in preparing himself for such performances as I wifehc?d 
him to, undertake a^d 'he became very imuch attached to 
his teacher, .,!•,»; . 

Whe^the fQMrteeekfr expired, I re-engaged him fot 
QUe yeflr ^t seven [dollars a week, ^+ith a gratliily of fifty 
doUars at th^.edd of the engugementi aiid th^ privilegb 
of Exhibiting .him' anywhere in the' United »8tate«i in 
Tf^hich eveslt-bis p^rojfits Were to accomp&xiy himf and 
I'^W^B to pay all .tilavelling eJtpeilsBs. *Hfe speedily 
IHi:^!]^^ a public ia^vorite^ bind, Itmg before -the Sj^ear* was 
outf I itolulrij^'jljy- increiised his;.vireekl3f isalary to twenfty- 
fiv€^ di^Uars^^and h^. fairly enEted U. Sometitoes I 
o^hibitsd him:foqr::sbVe9:al:i^eeks in snco^ssion * at tSte 
M\iseun9ii9' and when' I wished ' fti Introduce other 
novelties' I. sent him to 'different toierns add citied, 
acfoompanied by my fiSend, Mr.. Fordyce Hitohcoick, 
and the fame' c)ft Genet aj: 'Tom ThmxA soon ispread 
thrdughlojlt the .oQuntry. ; * ' . . - - ' ■ 

: Tw<) yeiM had. now 'ela|)8ed. siiibei I btmght' the 
Mudeum an(l:Ii had sUn^ since '])aid for 4lie^ entire 
estdblithm^nt from! the t pfdfits ; I h^ bottgfit <nit :!my^ 
dnly rivaU I was' free .frem^ debt, &Dd had ahandsomc 
surphisin th^ /trQasury ; The busine* had lo'tig oeased 
to be an experiitient ; it -was aiK established success and 
was in ;such perfect' running order, that it could safely 
be committed to the management of tmat worthy and tried 
agents. 

Accordingly, looking^ for % ' new field for m§^ individ^ 
ual e^pits^ I. egfy^iffi^ intf> an agreenleiit loir General 



ANOTHBB SUCCBSSFITL SPECULATION. 165 

Tom Thumb's services for another year, at fifty dollars a 

week and all expenses, with the privilege of exhibiting 

him in Europe. I proposed to test the curiosity of men 

and women on the other side of the Atlantic. Much 

as I hoped for success, in my most sanguine moods, t 

could not anticipate Ihe half of what was in store for 

me ; I did not foresee nor dream that I was shortly to 

be bi^aght in close contact with kings, queens, lords 

and illustrious commoners, and that such association, 

by means' of my exhibition, would afterwards introduce 

me to the great public and the public's money, which 

was to fiU my coffers. Or, if I saw some such future, 

it was dreandly, dimly, and with half-opened eyes^, 

as the man saw the '^ trees walking." 

After arranging my business afiaira for ^a long absence ^ 
and making every preparation for an extended foreigti 
tour, on Thursday, January 18, 1844, 1 went on board 
the new and fine saiUng ship « Yorkshire," Captain DJ 
G. Bailey, bound for Liverpool. Our party included 
Greneral Tom Thumbt his parents, his tutor, and Profes- 
sor Guillaudeu, the French naturalist. Vf6 were acconi^ 
panied by several personal friends, and the City Brasid 
Band kindly Tolunteered to escort us to Sandy Hook. 

My name has been so long associated with mirthful 
incidents that I presume many persons do not suppose 
I am sosceptible of sorrowful, or even sentimental enio^ 
tiona ; but when the bell of the steamer that towed our' 
ship down the bay announced the hour of separatidn, 
and then followed the hastily-spoken words of farewell, 
and the parting grasp of friendly hands, I confess that 
I was very much in the '* melting mood," and when the 
bsmd played ^ Home, Sweet Home^** I was moved to 
teank 



^1;^ ANOTHBB SUCCESSFUL SFECUJLATIOX 

J .AToy^gp to Liverppol ifi now aa old, fatoaiUw^ otoicy, 
^aod: J^bstajuiL ixovp enterii^ into details, though I h^v^? 
Abun4wt imterial resp^ctii^ my own e^p^riei^i^^ o( 
jpj rfirst sea- voyage in the .first two of a series of f>ne 
^undxed letters which I wrote in Europe w correspoia* 
dcmt of the New York Atlas. But some of the iujcickat^ 
;^d •^Ye^ltur^^ pf my voyage dn the '^Yorkshire''. W€ 
;if;9^h traosq^bing ii^ thes^e pe^s of my* persoiQ4l his* 

,,., OpjC^sioj^J^I falms ^nd ^yeipe winds pr^^a^ted our 
ji^9ge.rt();^ilietei9Pf4aya, b^.a.better; ship and a » more 
gp^ipp^t9Pjl| ^^ppiu pevepr sailed. I was entirely esempt 
fy9p;^ sfa-3ipkn?Ba,' apd /eiijoyed |;b« voyiige vei.7 much* 
Good fellowship previaii^d • aiaoqig • the; pn^^QOg^itii jthe 
tj^e.pas^d rapi^y, land; wo had a good deal cf . fan on 

Ifpar^t : . , , . : •— , ■ J : .. . .. .• 

l J Sqr^ftl , of ;;h[e ipasfengpr^ wexe. Pngli^h »ierch«ats 
fjr pm Canada ftnd one of the number^ wh^ reckoued 
jiiw^e^f :" A» ^^ V' ai^d oftp» hinjted that he -wae too 
'cute foi? aiiy Yankee, bpastpd w pl^ch pf J^i» fchgtewd.- 
ne§s, that a Yaokee friend of miijio coiif(»deral;ed witU 
p3ie|o^st|it 1 1 thought of an old trick a^d . artaaged 
with; mj friend ^o.^trjj it on, the hoa^tfld JohW Bull* 
^qping o]iit of my ptaterroojaa^ witl^ m,y l^and fao my fece, 
wd^ ^parpfttjy in great pau^,I asked <my' fellhw paasexif^ 
g^j^ what Wt?§: good for .the tooth-ache . My ffieod ^md 
99inff derate r^pommended, heating tobacf^o, and holding 
i^^my feco, I liherpfore borrowed 4 little tobacco, 
and putting ijt in a paper of a peculiar oolor> placed it 
pn the stove tp. wann^ I then retired for a few 
minujte^^ ,di|King whi?h tJ^ioa tl^o Yankee prgrposed play- 
i^ p. tx^ci 9n,7nf b^ emfltyu^ the tpbaoeoi a^d filling 
the paper with ashes, which our smart Englisb|iiLai| 



tiion^t wbnld be a Yety £ne joke^ and he himself 
made* the substitution, pnttiRg ashes into the paper and' 
throwing the tobacco into the fire. 

I 8oon reappeared and gravely pleased the paper to 
my face to the great anuisemeint of the paissei^ets and 
walked up and down the cabin as if I was suffering 
terribly. At the further end of the cabin I slyly ea>' 
changed' the paper for ano&er in my pocket of the^ 
same color and contahnng tobacco and then walked back 
again a picture of misery. Wherdupbn, the Merry 
Englishman cried out : ' 

*^ Mr. Bamom, what have yon got in! that paper 1 " 

" Tobacco," I replied. 

^ What iviU yoQ bet it Ib tobacco? " said the :EngIish- 
nran« •' 

^ Oh, don't bother me,^' staid I ; ^^ my tooth ^pains me 
sadly ; I know it iB tobacco, for I put it there myself.'' 

^ m bet you a dozen of ohampnghe that it is net 
tobacco,'' said the Englishiii&n. 

*^ Nonsense/* I replied, /^ I will not bet^ foi>it would 
not he' fair; I know it is tobacco.*" < /. 

^ rU bdt ^ou fifty doUata it iA not," «aid i John BuU^ 
and he counted ten soveceignts upon the tajble. , . 

'< FU not bet the money ,'^ I jreitlied, for I tell you :! 
jbioifi it 16 ti^eca ; I placed it there myanlf /' i 

"You dare tietbdtj"heiiwjoihfedrf,'- • -- I . . 

At laat^ ihfeDely to>aoo<tenitik>db,te huid; I bet d doeen pf 
champagnb^ The EdglishiHaa £duLrly jiufaiped' vn&{ 
delight, and rbate'd-cmt'r . . ' 

"Open the paper! bpenthe paper ! ** 

The passengers, crowded round the table in great glee 
to see me open the paper, for all but the Yaiikee 
thou^t I was taken in. I quietly opened the paper, 
and remarked : 



XSS ASXyJMER BUOCESBFOTi SPHCUIiATION. 

^ ! ^^fFhferc, 1 told you it wofc tobacco -^hAw foolid^It yoa 
iifiexe to rsuppdse it ivas act ^^^ &>r, w I told you, 'I pot 
it there myself." • ' 

The pas^ngers, iriy confederate -exjcepted, "were 
amazed >aiid the Englishiiian was 'abtolutelT'astoufided* 
It ' was • the- biter . bittea^ But he . told I the 9te vracd ti> 
bxing ' the i chaihpagne, and . tumiiigi > 'to my tontederBte 
irUt) had' ido effectually^ aidfiifited in 'f^*'9el}ing '' him^Iie 
ptonoimc^d the affair '^ a bonteinptible Yankee. trick/' 
It iviAa '«e!veral' days' before he: ftecov^ered his good 
humor, but he joined at last with' the ' rest of us in 
laughingiat the joke ^ and we heard no. more abo^t his 
extraordinary shrewdness. * . « " 

Oki ailr attivnl^at'Liyerpck)!; quitet accord' ^adiasrsem- 
bled at the dock to see Tom Thumb, for it had been 
preyiousiyiMatDlioimced 'that, he*' would' anit^e in the 
^' Ydrksfaire/'* but his niother managed lb smuggle 'Kim 
ashore .tmlixft^oed^ £ipiri she roavried' hinof^as if he was 
an infant, in her arms. I'We^ ii^einl! to^tfab-'WateBldo 
Hotei^ and, aft^< krt< exdilledf dihnidr, walked csut to take 
a look at the town. While'I^waSi viewifa^ the 'Neddtn:! 
sliibiiiinietit^a Venerabte lookiiigj if^ell-dressed^ dld> ^ekitle- 
man voluntdej?€ki t6 estf^^s^itt'tb mo'the ^diffefrentdeVleGB 
dnd«insUri\)lianli.'^ illpokbd.ttpmrihmi: c(b>d disintbrested 
and attentive^faiianiof (m^tisIwM(1P^its:aDxiobd to tesieia 
stranger and to shov^)'M9><;9urtesy ^vibdtt<9dien^Lgavtf hina 
a<paDtio^ bdwlof tbaivtikslhal^^flfiiiHmed ttimt Ish^ab lites- 
paBBed''oq''hi'§ kindness^ he jiQt dutdie' handtpf njuibe^- 
gar and said that he would be thamidful fori/ony^atppixi- 
aeration* I saw fit to k^taW XxpxH^ liim>fi3Frhirf ^trouble. I 
was derteiniy idstdnisbeds and I thrust' ^ siiilliBg ifnto diis 
band ahd walked rlipidly away^ . •' n »jo m j . 

Ip><tbeMevleniag«'of thejeakne iday^ 4 )taU,- rliw^ipcued. 



AITOTflEB aXTCOtSSFtTL SPECULATION. \S$ 

man came to the hotel and ititroduced himself to me - as 
a brother Yankee, who wonld be happy in pointing out 
the many wondere in Liverpool that a stranger would 
be pleased to see. 

I asked him how long he had been in livetpool, and 
be replied, " Nearly a week." I declined his proffered 
services abruptly, remarking that if he had been there 

■ 

only a Week, I probably knew as much about England 
as he did. 

" Oh," said he, " you are mistaken. I have been in 
England before, though never till recently in Liver- 
pool." 

" What part of England 1 " I inquired. 

" Opposite Niagara Falls," he replied ; " I spent 
sevenil days there with the British soldiers." 

I Itoghed in his face, and reminded him that England 
did not lie opposite Niagara Falls. The impudent 
fellow was eonfused for a moment, and then triumph- 
antly fexclaimed : ' ■ 

*• I did n't mean England. I know what couhtry 
it is as w6ll as ydu do." 

♦'Well, wtoat country is it?" I asked, qttite assured 
that he did ri6t know. ..:..' 

*' Great BtitMn, of toxif^e,"' hfe re^Hed.' ^ ^ 

ifisneedleSs'toaddthM fhe'fcdndl* of his company 
as a guide in Liverpool #as^d^Hti^, and tie Went 
off apparently) (n ntiis beeausfe Ms abilities wei^fe not 
apptfecfeited: . • 1 ' ;' 

Later in' the exiling; the? ^bprietoV of a cheap wax- 
works '^mw; «tthi:e€f»hft' pencil adtnissioA,' tailed upon 
me. He bad h^artf^^'the afriVaJ of thfe great American 
curiosity, and he sei'sfed *he' edrliest opportunity to 
make the Geneifal And myrolf the magni-ficent' offer of 



t^ ^l)f^ r^- weifk . if; w^ 'Fotild join ' oonseiv^ 4o . hw 

^P^.^Vm^ .tbip}^^ thaM^wrfe J«»ii9t be Jitarally a;t a " low 
figure" in England, and my prospeoto w^TO gloomy 
m4p^ ..^, w«8. a r^tcmgeir ia^ the landfMtiiy lettears. of 
WM:fl4w^iQ».ih^4 Wti been delivered ; boycnd my wrii 
UU\^ qir)clf, li ha^ vpt W^^s^t fijiendly! few* nor heard 
a ,f;^mi^ai?,Ypijce,! J ^w^ji .^^bl^e/' UooaaslcHi ateipst ia 
despair. Next morning, there came a ray of .ennshiae 
iif ljljl^>^9]y;^ngno^,:^;.: . .^ ; . ^ ^ r 

. T • I ■ » I ' I • * 

"MwlaineCBtlErfrH; presents ncr coinplimenfs to Mr. Bamura, and bogs to say 
that hcT private box is quite at his 'service, any night, for himself and frieml^ ' ' 

" Theatre Boyal,\«pjUpffif«>^^ifa#er' - ; -'I 'l • * ' ■ '' • 

This polH^.infvijUti/>n*:wfs lihaok^aUy. ^oQpted, and 
we wfiqt,tQith^,;t^ep,tiie.rthajt: eyeiniBg.:, Que party*, lin- 
clud^ftg . Ifhe. Qenerpl, yfhfi, was partly congealed bjr hi& 
tutcffi>ifio3Jj^.ofi9upi<?4,,^le^^^ t?QXi and> ii> /khe.boJc 
adjoining sat an English lady and gep^BaAu wbdse^ 

appj?w?nw; An%a^ Tesfl?i?tobiHfyi' ^ inJiel}igWC« f "fid 
wealth. The Generals interest^jixir tbe^jptfrforBftasfce^ 

at(3f^St^,t;^^Vri^tej^ti<>n;5a^5d.th^jJ^dy jewifritert t^nne : 

''What an intelligent-looking cljijl^/B^?^ h^ve!' t£(6 

appears to take^flp^..an^|iB^r^fl^iia'ith!^ rt -; » 

Thi^as^^ei^fi^l,]^;:^^ of,.,.v I. - 

Vl^i<a^dJi:[ri((^^.»ft(4aMii^i iry^Qy:,h^'Wffp[;;flte 
announcements of our visit and were greatl|^?£^ti^ed 
at A» Wt^flv?Q:wrvwi<fe-<^cP«fmjTtp.?9f^y»'» -aSiey aft mice 
advisp4 Wfi V^, llil^^ nwtcp^^plim^t^rji'^iwl urgebt :iimn»- 
ner tq^^^tfikf ..tbe^.GeQeiqa} jto M^*clMrt€tf , ' - wheof* they 
3:^i4eiJ,jft^]im^ .m?| t^at..^ twJiibitiqri an, that^|)^nce 
woujd M . JbigiUry ir^muneiiativef < I thanked itry liew 



;r^t rMmix\ (Wjfu^l \ and .<0t)toiirag0idexitv ^d 
ventured to a^k; tk^xsk yfi»t\ ^ce tNy' woniild ^rectommeisd 
me to cb^ge; fpr. i^jimisaiaq.. . • .= »^ 

" Xbp Geojerdl ia ^o. deeidedly s^ . ourioslty," aaid' Ihe 
lady, *^ that I thmk yoja mighjt put it aa/ hJgh.W! tup^ 
pence ! " (two^fex^^^^) ( * .f ' 

She wfts, J^p,w(?v^,^pr9D[^Btly.ii^jtqn:^pte4. by. hear Umt 
baudi who yfB^' fwi4?Htly the .eppnpmj^t.of -the jfomily ? 
" 1. am wrq. you, wouJ4 ?o.t wcceed ^at th^t ^pHce/' isaid^ 
he ; ^' you should put admission at one j^t^Y,^ *fw th»fc 
is the usual price for seeing- giants and dwarfs in 
England." 

This was worse than the ten dollars a week offer of 
the wax-works proprietor, but I promptly answered 
" Never shall the price be less than one shilling ster- 
ling and some of the nobility and gentry of England 
will yet pay gold to see General Tom Thumb." 

My letters of introduction speedily brought me into 
friendly relations . with many excellent families and I 
was induced to hire a hall and present the General to 
the public, for a short season, in Liverpool. I had 
intended to proceed directly to London and begin 
operations at " head-quarters," that is, in Buckingham 
Palace, if possible; but I had been advised that the 
royal family was in mourning for the death of Prince 
Albert's father, and would not permit 0ie approach of 
any entertainments. 

Meanwhile confidential letters from London informed 
me that Mr. Maddox, Manager of Princess's Theatre, 
was coming down to vntness my exhibition, with a 
view to making an engagement. He came privately, 
but I was fully informed as to his presence and object. 
A friend pointed him out to me in the hall, and when 



172 



AKOTHBB StTOCBSSFUL fiFBCTTIiATION. 



I stepped up to him, and called him by name, he 
was ^' taken all aback," and avowed his purpose in 
visiting Liverpool. An interview resulted in an engage- 
ment of the General for three nights at Princess's 
Theatre. I was unwilling to contract "for a longer 
period, and even this short engagement, though on lib- 
eral terms, was acceded to only as a means of adver- 
tisement. So soon, therefore, as I could bring my short, 
but highly successful season in Liverpool to a close, we 
went to LondoiL 



« I 



I 5 



» ( I . I 



I 

I > 



I Ml 



'I 



I « 



t/ 



> ♦ 

f 

I 



' i 



i I 



M* Ji 



• • T , • 1 ■ / ' » 



CHAPTER XL 

GENBRAI. TOM TltttTMB DT ENGLAITD. ' 

■ I 

ABRIYAI. Hr XiOXDOir— THE OSNBBAL'S DQBUT QT THB PBIXCESS'S THBikTR* 

— BtroBJvouft strocBM— inr HAXdtoK at th^ west end— daily levees 

FOB THE NOBILITT AXD OBTfTRT^BON. EDWARD STBtmrr— -HI? IBVBR" 
KST IN THE OEKERAL — VISIT TO THE BARONESS ROTHSCHILD — OPENINQ 
Df EOYPtlAN HALL, MOCADILLY — MR. CHARLES MURRAY, MASTER OP THE 
qrEEN'S HOrSBHQLD— AT BUCXIN&HAH PALACE BY OOMMAKD OP XBB 
MAJESTY — A BOV.Ui RECEPTION — THE FAVORABLE IMPRESSION MADE BY 
IBB GBlTBBAt— -AMVBIMO IMCIDBNTS OF THE VTSn* -^ B AGtCINO OCT — FIGHT 
WITH A POODLE — COURT JOURNAL NOTICE — 8ECX>ND VISIT TO THE QUEEN 

— THE FinNOE or WALES AND PRINCESS ROYAL — THE QUEEN OF THE 
RBIiQlAIfa — THIRB VISIT TO BDCKDfGMAM PALAOB-^XIIKl LBOTOLD, OF 
BELGIUM —.ASSURED SUCCESS — T^E BRITISH PUBLIC EXCITED — EGYPTIAN 
HALL CROWDED — QUEEN DOWAGER ADELAIDE -- THE GENERAL*6 WATCK 

— JFAPOLBOi^r AND THE DUKB OF WBLLXir0TO|l -*pi9CQfQUIsteD FSOENDa. 

Immediately after our arrival in London, the General 
came out at the Princess's Tlieaire, and made so decided 
a " hit " that it was difficult to decide who was best 
pleased, the spectators, the manager, or myself. The 
spectators were delighted because ti^ey could not well 
help it; the manager was satisfied because he had 
coined mdn^y by the engagement; tod I was greatly 
pleased because I iL&^ tad ia' ■visible guaranty of success 
in Londcfe, I was dtfer^d fat higher tefins'for a re-en- 
gagefxient, but my^ifurpios^ fiad beeii already answered ; 
the news T^as spread everywhere that (jfeneral Tom 
Thumb, an unparalleled: ctiridsity, Wks In Ithe city ; and. 
it only remained for me to bring liim ^before the public, 
on my own account and in my own time and way. 

I took a futuished mansioii in GraJFton Street, 'Boiid 
Street, West End, in th^ very centre of the most fash- 

G 



174 GENBBAIi TOM THUMB IN ENGLAND. 

ionable locality. The house had previously been occu- 
pied for several years by Lord Talbot, and Lord 
Brougham and half a dozen families of the aristocracy 
and many of the gentry were my neighbors . From this 
magnificent mansion, I sent letters of invitation tq the 
editors and seveiifeKof the 'ndbiiify, to visit the General. 
Most of them called, and were highly gratified. The 
word of approval was indeed so passed around in hifjli 
circles, that uninvited parties drove to my door id created 
carriages, and were not admitted. 

This procedure, tliough in some measure a stroke of 
policy, was neither singtilar tior hazardous, under the 
circumstances. I had not yet announced a public exhi- 
bition, a!nd as a private America;! gentleman, it became 
me to maintain the dignity of my position. I therefore 

instructed ray liveried servant to deny admission to see 
my^* wani," exfCepting to pi^sOns who brought cards of 
invitation. He 4id it in^ a proper manner, and no pffence 
co^ld be taken, though I was always particular to §end 
an invitation irftmecUat^Jy to such as liad not. l^een 

During ptir first TRree^, in. Lojadon, tlie'^op. E^vvai;d 
Evefett,,the AmeffiQftii. i^ii^iatp:):, t^ yiflipiff^ I ,]?,ad ^pttp§. 

(Um^putiy^ ;^!^g|^,,r^,^p^d;,9(^u^jifaa,', We. difted. 
with hipijt^e fte.xt,4y»/by,:jii^vi^al^ ^qd hi^,.f^\fi 
loaded t^,y9,ipg,yln;i?noaw.wf^,lir?se^^ .J([r*,:)Sw¥§|t. 
kinj^y proipis^d tp us? jafluewce at the .I?alaji?^ in pej«oat>; 
with ?i vjtew 1i9 ,^avii)g Tppt Thupi,1|» jip3itr9^i«:ed tfi .Ue^, 
Majesty ^eep. .yictpria.^ . , , 

A feVy^yenings aftpi^^avds .^he Baroi\e«# . Rothschild 
sent l^ei: catpage for^s, Serjp^sixjjk i^;^^obi^ aU-qc- 
tiire uji Piccadjlljr, ?urwunde4 l^y , a higbi v^U, throught 



QJENKRAL TOM TH;VJMC& IN EjEfaifA^BO. 1.75 

the gate of which our pa^riag^ wa^ dii^w, '9!a.d. bitonght 
up iu.frqut ojf the, rpaiu. entpaiaQe. H^rfe we weue 
received by hf^lf a dopen ^^I'vaute, and ^^ere liusfhered up 
the broad flight of marble staii-8,.to the drawing-room, 
where we met tl^e Baro^ie^s aud a pa^ty of tweitty ojr 
more ladies aiulgeutleipep. In thi& aumptuoue mauaion 
of the richest banl^er in the wH)idd, we spetxt abou;t two 
hour^, Apd whp2;B we tooji. otjir: leayie a wfeU-fiUcid {mrse 
was quietly slipped into. my hai^d. Thie golden shoWer 
bad beguu tofaUnand ithatf itiwa^iUO diie$im.wafi .mani- 
feat fiom the ifaifj; that, .very stiorily afterwardsv a visit 
to the . mai^iop ; . pf Mr^ l)rjywtnptid» another eminent 
banker, came t9 1 the Bai^e gblddncondusimsi. > 

I noT^ pflgagp^ : the '>: Egyptfam HalU" in Pitacadilly, 
and thp ^mi^unij^n^eiit ^ my uniquei" exhibition waa 
proiuptly Aiiawered biy ar]aia& of vieitcMm^ in which titie 
wealth aiad faishioa. : of Loixdw. verb, liberally jreprei- 
sented^ 1 made th^se ^r^x^gement^ beomset I had little 
hope of being. $oop bijongbt to <^6. iQveeil's : presehoe^ 
(for the reasoA befcn^ la^^f^tipnedf) !but Mr.. Everett'^ 
gcueroas inftueflce secured in.y object I breakfasted 
at hia h^use one pier9i^g;> b|y inyitatio&,4n:compaj)Ly with 
Mr. Charjea Murrfty?, aa ^utj^w, of ^ceditaibte repUt^, whq 
hel4 t\^\Q^M of. J^asktep of th^ Queqa'^ H^ij^kciiold. In 
the eowsft! * tf cp^Te3^sati.on, Mn. iMui?ray , ii>quired 
as to fliyfjjlans, wd I .iufo;-iaf^ed him. tfe»t \ itttended 
going ta the Continent, shortly, : (tjiougji I sbouid . b^ 
glad: to. remain if the General - ciouXd have.au. inter-^ 
view With the Queen — adding that such an event 
would be of gre^t consequence to^me, 

Mr. Murx»y ki^dly oflfered his. good, offices ia the 
case^. . aqd,ithe. J^/ext* dfry: pqq;,pf tfe^ Jife Gviarda, d 
talii iio)l?|e4PQkiBg fpdl^,: bpdpcfc^ as bflcw»ie rbi* sta-^ 



1*1/1} CKBNEBAIi TOM THUMB IK ENGLAIO). 

don, brought me a note, conveying the Queen's iuvita^ 
tion to General Tom Thumb and his guardian, Mr; Bar- 
num, to appear at Buckingham Palace on an evening 
specified. Special instructions were the same day orally 
giverf me by Mr. Murray, by Her Majesty's command, 
to suiFer the General to appear before her, as he would 
appear anywhere else, without any training in th6 use 
of the titles of royalty, as the Queen desired io see him 
ut naturally and without restraint 

Determined to make the most of the occasion, I put 
a plaoajrd on the door of the Egyptian Hall : ** Qoeed 
this evening, General Tom Thumb being at Buckings 
ham Palace by command of Her Majesty!" 

On arriving at the Palace, the Lord tb Waiting put 
me ^^ under drill " as to the manner and form in which 
I should conduct myself in the presence of royalty. I 
waa to answer all questions by Her Majesty through 
him, and in no event to speak directly to the Queeu. 
In leaving the royal presence- 1 was to •^ bacic out," 
keeping my face always towards Her Majesty, and the 
illustrious lord kindly gave me a specimen of that sout 
of backward locomotion. How fieir I profited by his 
instructions and example, will presently appear^ 

We were conducted throngh a long eovridor to a 
broad fiight of marble steps, which led to the Queen's 
magnificent picture gallery, where Her Mtjesty and 
Prince Albert, the Duchess of Kent, and twenty or 
thirty of the nobility were awaiting our arrival. They 
were standing at the farther end of the room when the 
doors were thrown open, and the General walked in, 
looking like a wax doll gifted with the power of 
locomotion. Surprise and pleasure were depicted on 
the oonntenances of the royal dbrde at beholdibg this 



Q£N£BAl4 TOM SHVJMEB IK WXOLAJSID. Ij^ 

remarkable specimen of humanity no mnoh smaller 
than they had evidently espeoted to find him« 

The General advanced with a firm step, and as he 
came ivithin hailing dist^uace made a very ^acef ol bow, 
and exclaimed, *^ Good evening, Ladies and Gentle^ 
men ! " 

A horst of langhter foUowed this salutation. The 
Qne^Q th^n took him .by the hand, led: him about the 
gallery, and asked him many questions^ the answers to 
whieh kept the party in an uninterrupted strain of 
merriment. The' Geheral familiarly mformed the 
Queen that her |ticture gallery was '^v first-rate," and 
told her he should like, to see the Prince of Wales. 
Tht Qlieenr replied that the Brinoe had retired to rest, 
but the V he f»houid see* hatm on some future' occasion. 
The General tbeil <gave his songs, dancesi^ and imita- 
tion^, aod afters conversaticm. with Erinde Albert and 
all<|ve9eiit| wMcih edntimuedfor morb than an hour, we 
were permittfed to depart. > 

JBefo^e deecrilnng the processtand incidents of '* hackl- 
ing dnt," I 'mti0t acknowledge' how saxUy I brcKke ^through 
the counsel of the Lovd* in Waiting. While ;:Friinoe 
Albert and -otfaets. were engbged with* the General, the 
Queen WMgsAhtting inforioaAbn (from me. iin lisgard to 
his hiBtorj^iete. Tworor fhdret Kjueationfi were put and 
answered through the iKroceto ^indkatad iH; my.drilL It 
was a« ronnd^itbont^wSay of doiaiig * business not at all to 
my 'likings and I siippose the Lord in Waiting was 
serio^ly shocked, if not outraged, when I entered 
directly into conversation* with> Her Majesty* She, 
however, seemed not disposed to check my boldness, 
for she immediaMly sipeke > directly (tiK me in obtaining 
the ]]|fcrmitti<)A wUch sbe cK»ttgh.tJ • I felt entirely ali 

12 



1^ GSXHBkAlJ 'SOU VHinCD'tK l^^fLAIfr). 

ea^e ia her presence, andt ccmld fnot att34d'co!tttms^ 
her sensible adid- amiable inaiitier^ with th^ i^tlffiiess and 
formalhy of upstavt geatitity at home or 'abroad! " 

The Qoeeia was modeslly "tttired in plain bkc'k, and 
wore no oruaioeats. Indeed, «arrouiided a^ 6he ^vas by 
ladies arrayed in the highest style of magnificence, their 
di'Osses. sparkling with diami6iids,''8he was the k^ per- 
wm whom « dtiia%er wduld' have "pointed 'oat* in thht 
oirdfeas'^beOueetL' of England, r- ■ i .: 

• The • LoM ia iWaituig was- perhaps BfkilUfled toward 
met when: he aaw/mccifoUowing 'his^ ilhtBtriou^ * etattlple 
inii^etiring froih the royal piiesesoe. * He wds 1a)ebudtom<^ 
te thtf pitoceBK, atid tb^reforenKras abld to keep somewhat 
ahead* (oir rather iabaek)' of me,' ^blit bv^^ ITstepped ^thet 
fast fov the* otheh: member ofrtU retirii% pairty. We bad a 
confiadefcable-^iBtshce^tmyeltrn'thi^t lonjsf ^aileryBefbt^ 
reaiehing : the door', • and' whenever the ^ Qenertd iSMfnd he 
wasie6ingigroumi,he<tnvn^d-around and vka afew eiKps, 
then resumed the position of " baokiiig dufcj'^'^rti'en tutn^d 
aimdd tand ran;' 'and-- so* codtiotted "to- ahetiikte 
Im onetbods of ^^ttingotb tbe< doori,)UiM"thb ^H^ry 
fkiidiy ran|^ with thennetMrnentl^of itl:^ ^toy^l iispe^^drs. 
It JwasToeiily^ ode of tfad'iinhert seen^s i eiter k$tw ; '^uhh 
nm^^innderr(ihftroiroaiA9tinif(»8;iw(a8 a&'bffeilcei$»fl6imtly' 
heinous tto exeite«the' Jiqdign'ttlioif >oif ^the Quibeil^d 'fkvciriMi 
p6odI^<lbg{ and' hetireat^-his dispka^Bt^ %'b£iHdt% 
so ahaijply as -to^ stxvrtle' tte ^Gdneral' fitom 'his 'pl'bpriety. 
He, however^ recovered idimediarfiely, dnd with his little 
cane >comilienced'an 'attack on ^tfae poodle, and a fibnny 
fight ensned) which • ttoeWed 'and increased- the nlerri- 
ment of the loyal party. • 

Thi* wasj near lite dooriof •*«*. ' We» had fecasfcely 
pas99d'iiite >tite {aiitefbomn, wbeA' «tii0 cf th^^ CMeii^A 



OBK&RAI^ TOM 'DH.UMB IN ESSfGiUlcNiPk A^JP 

attendants, caaae/tovuttwith 4b0 ezppewedi hofie .otf* Hfw 
>Ia|e9|y tbat fhe rGreaeral . bad «Ut9tained}Q0-4Mot»ge^r« 
to wbicLi tha Lord ini Waiting playfully addedi that in 
case of injury to .so concwiied a petsona^^ h^. should 
fear a declamlion o£ war by. the United Stote^ I . • . , 

The cQurtfifiies .of /the Ealaoe wem.not yet ejchsuistj^d* 
fox we we«p<^ao0i»a4ito.an apartjwnt iftj.wJ^ipbjjffifrQ*t»- 
m^nts. had been provided tfqp ua^ W^ jdidj am{dQ Juptijc^ 
to the viandsr, though my mind was rather lookipg JQt<x 
the futjiim/ ^than . ^efi^^s^g ;the i presbQt^. X w^ ^anjsJK^us 
th?*,tbe:,*f.Caut-tc J(«ui}niyi)"lpf' ^ftw-w^uiftg >dayi ah^^d 
contain tMcer th)an,am0rfe jiiu^auiuelatitfu t« Xh^ G^ms- 
alV interview jwifhi . tbft . <Uuji€»bi .ftud^ qn/inqwyy ^ 
l^suruied ^iflib&geQtiQiikan; \tho. b^dl^b^rgis pf tM^ fea- 
ture in. the daily .pa^r«, wua : jthen iu.th«, Pft^aoe.. . Hq 
wa»s0ttt.f/ii:iby tny /sbUdHtatioo^ eb^A juromptly . aeoeded 
to my request for such a notit^e /a9 ;would. attrtiot aUen^ 
tion. He.eicea ^eutfoodslykkfiired m^ to. give, him an 
ootUne «f Avhatl soughtv^dJ Wtts.pleaaed to see after- 
wards, that he had inserted my notice verbatknd * 

Tfaia ndtictr:^; m^: iftsil: to the . Qneen wondeifttlly 
inoiBaised'theiattFictioitiofi-my'^hibitidii aaid odmpelled 
me t6 cbtaioia immreJcomBibdioiM' hall for my eodiibition^ 
I acoQidibgiyt rsnifited 4» 'the* Ifirger rdom . in the .same 
buifalHig^ fbrtsome >ti»e'previoufily'OqcHpisd>by tmr eQfmi-> 
tiyman, Mr. Catlin, for his great Gallery of Pocttaita 
i^ AiamimvL Indinfas-and Indian. Codtiositiesi, all of 
which :]»ioained. as( an adotnment. 

On' OUT seooad visit to the Queen^ we were received 
in what is called the '^ Yellow Drawing-Room," a mag- 
nificent ^artment, ^urpassiag in splendor and gorgeoos'- 
ness anything of the kind I had ever flcen« It is on the 
north Side ^f the gallery* and is entered Irotti that 



180 g:bnbral tom thxtmb nr bnglakd. 

apBrtment It was Imng with drapery «f ridi yellow 
satin damasks the couches,' sofas and'chaira beiiig eov^ 
ered with the same material. The* vases^ urns and 
ornaments were all of mbdern patterns, atid the most 
exquisite workmanship. The room was panelled in gold, 
and the heavy cornices beautifully carved and gilt. 
The tables^ pianos, etc., were mounted witii gold, inlaid 
with pearl of various hues, and of. the most elegaut 
designs. 

We were ushered into this gorgeous drawing^roooi 
before the Queen atnd royal circle hfeui left the dihEng- 
room, and, ad they approached, the Genei*al bowed 
respectfully, and remarked to Her Majesty ^' that he had 
seen her before," adding, '^ I think this is a prettier room 
than the pioture gallery ; that chandelier is very fine.^' 

The Queen smilingly took him by the hand, and said 
she hoped he was very well. . ^ • 

^' Yes, ma'am ," he replied, ^^ I am first rate." 

*' General," continued the Queens ^* this is the Pniioe 
of Wales/' 

^^ How are you, Prince f" said the. Grenerol, shaking 
him by the hand ; ' and then standing beside the Priaee, 
he remarked, ^' the Fnnoe is taller U&aii I am, hot i feel 
as big as anybody "*-^ upon, which he strutted, up and 
down the room as proud as a peacock, amid shewts of 
laughter from air present 

The Queen then introduced the Princess BoyaL, and 
the General immediately led her to his el^fant little 
sofa, which we took with us, and with much politeness 
sat himself down beside her. Then, rising from his 
seat, he went through his various performances, and the 
Queen handed him an elegant and costly* somronir, 
which had been expressly made for him by her order -^- 



GENKBAIi TOM THUMB IN ENGLAND. . 181 

£6r which, he told her,. ^^ he wa0 yexy much ol^tiged, 
and wp.uld keep it as, long as he lived." The ^^ue^n of 
the Belgians, (daughter of Lpuis Philippe) was present 
on this occasion. She asked the General where he was 
going when he left London ] 

" To Paris," he replied. 

" Whom do you expect to see there 1 " sh.e continued. 

Of course all expected he would answer, ^'the Kiii^ 
of the French," but the little fellow replied : 

'^ I shall aee Monsieur GuiUnudeu in Paria." 

The two Queens looked inquiringly to me, and when 
I informed them that M. Guillaudeu was my French 
naturalist, who had preceded me to Paris, they laughed 
most heartily. 

On our third visit to Buckingham Palace, Leopold, 
King of the Belgians, was also present. He was 
highly pleased, and asked a multitude of questions. 
Queen Victoria desired the General to sing a song, aud 
asked him what song he preferred to sing. 

" Yankee Doodle," was the prompt reply. 

This answer was as unexpected to me aa it was 
to the royal party. When the mernment it oceasiooed 
somewhat suhsided, the Queen good-humoredly re- 
marked,/* That is a very pretty song. General. Sing it 
if you pl^i8e«" The General complied, and. soon after- 
wards we retired. I ought to add, that after each ot 
our three viaits. to Buckingham Palace, a very handsome 
sum was sent to me, of course by the Queen's com- 
mand. This, however, was the smallest part of the 
advantage derived from these interviews, as will be 
at once apparent to all who consider the force o£ Court 
example in England. 

The British public were now fairly excited. Not 



il82 GENERAL t63r TnmrB IN ENGLAND. 

t0-liwe^'«6feti /Gr^bnerdl "torn Ttiiiiib Atas ' ^ ^ecidecily 
trtrfaJshiotiJlble, and'ftb'm Match* SfOtli tinlil J'ufy 26th;'<He 
levees of the Mttle 'Gteneral at Egyptian H^ll were' con- 
tinually crowded, the receipts averagfing during the 
whole period about fiye hiliidred * ddlW^' per day, and 
sometimes goin^ considerably h^Vcmd ^ that suhx; At 
fti^'ftoWdnaWe houi;, hcti^^yen 'fifty' And 'iMy carriages 
^'die !ft6Bility liave bfce'n'coaiited at6ifie**time"slarim^ 
in front of biii''^xhibIti(in;rbonfife itt^'l^lcfcadiiiy. ^ •' * 

Portraits of th6 Ktfle'<9en\2[rc^r\!<^eir^'''piib!lsti^^^ in all 
th# fii^Wrial jSaJJers^ <f£ th^ 'tJnie. ''¥olkds^^d'qWdi^^^ 
wei^' iiatHfe* after "Wm,' ntid '«ong^'Wei*fe'8tiri^' in his 
prtikfei' He whs ^i vlhhdit ct)tl^aWt'^fe^in0' for the 
London Punchy which served up the (Jeneral and 
myi^lf da ^aitttily that^f do ^dbtibi; a1dd6d' Vastly to* our 

rcmpts; •' • .' ' ' 

» Beside his trhree'-ptiblic peffdrmances per day, 'the 
little'Generaa Jtftettd<5?d ftorh ttiree to fout private parties 
per %veek, for which we iVere^paid ^ight to tdti gilin'^as 
each. Frcqitelitly^ xtt' wiottM vi^it tWo' piartifi^ in the 
sattie <6vettiiig; attd 'thie ^miatld m that line was ^tich 
gv^Vetthun'th^ supply.' TheQui^en Boti^agct'-Ad^k^de 
requested 'thfe Oenei^arfr 'Attendance 'at Maiflborddgh 
Mouse on* afternboai. ^ He went in hi^ court dfess;fc6tr- 
sisdug of u » litthly - embroidered' • brtfwb si^k:-vel^2et* ' fe'oat 
and short bi-eeches, while? featiii vest! with fettc^-cbl6t*ed 
embroidery, trhite silk btockiogs and •putftps, wig, big- 
wig," cocked hat, and a dresjj sWord. 

" Why, General,'' said the Queen. Dowager, ** I think 
you lodk very smart to-day." 

*< I' gtte^s r do,'* said the General complacently. 

A large party of the nobility were present. The old 
Duke of Cambridge offered the' little General a pinch of 



6BKB&AL TOM THUMB IN ENGLAND. 183 

snaff, which he declined. The General sang his songs, 
performed his dances, and cracked his jokes, to the great 
amusement and delight of the distinguished circle of 
visitors. 

^^ Dear little General," said the kind-hearted Queen, 
taking him upon her lap, ^^ I see you have got no watcb. 
Will you permit me to present you with a watch and 
chain ? " 

" I would like them very much," replied the General, 
his eyes glistening with joy as he spoke. 

" I will have them made expressly for you," responded 
the Queen Dowager; and at the same moment she 
called a friend and desired him to see that the proper * 
order was executed. A few weeks thereafter we were 
called agam to Marlborough House. A number of the 
children of the nobility were present, as well as some 
of their parents. After passing a few compliments with 
the Greneral, Que^i Adelaide presented him with a 
beautiful little gold watch, placing the chain axound his 
neck with her own hands. The little fellow was 
delighted, and scarcely knew how sufficiently to express 
his thanks. The good Queen gave him some excellent 
advice in regard to hk morals, which he strictly prom- 
ised to obey. 

After giving his performances, we withdrew from the 
royal presence, and the elegant little watch presented 
by the hands of Her Majesty the Queen Dowager was 
not only duly heralded, but was also placed upon a 
pedestal in the hall of exhibition, together with the 
presents from Queen Victoria, and covered with a 
glass vase. These presents, to which were soon added 
an elegant gold snuff-box mounted with turquoise, pre- 
sented by his Grace the Duke of Devonshire, and many 



184 GENERAL TOM THUMB IN ENGLAND. 

other costly gifts of the nobiUty and gentry, added 
greatly to the attractions of the exhibition. The l>uke 
of Wellington called frequently to see the little 
General at his public levees. The first time he called, 
the General was personating Napoleon Bonaparte, 
marching up and down the platform, and apparently 
taking snuff in deep meditation. He was dressed in 
the welUknown uniform of the Emperor. I introduced 
him to the ^* Iron Duke," who inquirediid subject of 
his meditations. ^^I was thinking of the loss of the 
battle of Waterloo," was the little General's immediate 
reply. This, display of wit was chronicled throt^hout 
the country, and was of itself worth thousands of pounds 
to the exhibition. 

While we were in London the Emperor Nicholas, of 
Russia, visited Queen Victoria, and I saw him on sev- 
eral public occasions. I was present at the grand 
review of troops in Windsor Park in honor of and 
before the Emperor of Russia and the Kiag of Saxony. 

General Tom Thumb had visited the King of Saxony 
and also Ibrahim Pacha who was then in London. At 
the different parties, we attended> we m?t, in the course 
of the season, nearly all of the nobility. I dp not 
believe that a single nobleman in England f^led to see 
General Tom Thumb at his own house, at the houBe of 
a fttend, or at the public levees at Egyptian Hall. The 
General was a decided pet with some of the first per- 
sonages in the land, among whom may be metitioned 
Sir Robert and Lady Peel, the Duke and Duchess of 
Buckingham, Duke of Bedford, Duke of Devonshire, 
Count d'Orsay, Lady Blessington, Daniel O'CJonnell, 
Lord Adolphus Fitzclarence, Lord Chesterfield, Mr. and 
Mrs. Joshua Bates, of the firm of Baring Brothers & 



GENEBAL TOM THUMB IN ENGLAND. 185 

Co., and many other persons of distinction. We had 
the free entree to all the theatres^ public gardens, and 
places of entertainment, and frequently met the princi- 
pal artists, editors, poets, and authors of the country. 
Albert Smith was a particular friend of mine. He wrote 
a play for the General entitled " Hop o' my Thumb," 
which was presented with great success at the Lyceum 
Theatre, London, and in several of the provincial 
theatres. Our visit in London and tour through the 
proyinces were enormously successful, and after a 
brilliant season in Great Britain I made preparations 
to take the General to Pans- 



' » ll « 



I « I 



CHAPTEE :^. 

' • • or PRAKCE.' 

QOZNG QVEU TO A&BANpE PRELIMINARIES — PREVIOFS VISIT TO PABIS — ROBEBT 
dcmi^ttr— WilDBR^^CrLllBCRlKlCAL TOTS'— tttl: ACTOiCATO]!r UlTtKtL'W&rr^^ 
Tf-i^qV pOUiJlCAULT— TA:^0NKA';'UJUL CURIOeHTI^» — HOVJ cow ^RO.TmBHT> -^ 
THE GENERAL AND PARTY IN PARIS — FIRST VISIT TO KING LOUIS PHILIPPE — 
A SPLENDID PRESENT — DIPLOMACY -^I -ASK A'FAYOB-AND OET nr<— -Z^ONQ 
CHAMPS— THE GENERAL'S EQUIPAGE — THE FINEST ADVERTISEMENT EVER 
KNOWN — ALL PARIS IN A FUROR — OPENING OF THE LEVEES — "TOMPOUGE " 
EVERYWHERE — THE GENERAL AS AN ACTOR — " PETIT POUCET" — SECOND 
AND THIRD VISITS AT THE TUILERIES — INVITATION TO ST. CLOUD — TUB 
GENERAL PERSONATING NAPOLEON BONAPARTE — ST. DENIS — THE INVALIDES 
— RSONIER — ANECDOTE OF FRANKLIN — LEAVING PARIS — TOUR THROUGH 
FRANCE — DEPARTURE FOR BRUSSELS. 

Before taking the little General and party to Paris, 
I went over alone to arrange the preliminaries for our 
campaign in that city. Paris was not altogether a 
strange place to me. Months before, when I had suc- 
cessfully established my exhibition in London, I ran 
over to Paris to see what I could pick up in the way of 
curiosities for my Museum in New York, for during my 
whole sojourn abroad, and amid all the excitements of 
my new career, I never forgot the interests of my many 
and generous patrons at home. The occasion which 
first called me to France was the " quinquennial exposi- 
tion" in Paris. At that time, there was an assemblagre, 
every five years, of inventors and manufacturers who 
exhibited specimens of their skill, especially in articles 
of curious and ingenious mechanism, and I went from 
London mainly to attend this exposition. 



IN PRAIjfOE. 187 

Tkere I met and became well acquainted with !Robert 
Houdin, the celebrated conjurer. He was a thatch- 
maker by trade, but very soon displayed a wonderful 
ability and ingenuity which he devoted with so much 
assiduity to the construction of a complicated machine, 
that he lost all mental power for a considerable period. 
When he recovered, he employed himself with great 
success in the manufacture of mechanical toys and 
automata which attracted much attention, and afterwards 
he visited Great Britain and other countries, giving a 
series of juggling exhibitions which were famous 
throughout Europe. 

At this quinquennial exposition which I attended, he 
received U gold medal for his Automata, and the best 
figure which he had on exhibition I purchased at a good 
round price. It was an automaton writer and artist, a 
most ingenious little figure, which sat at a table, and 
readily answered with the pencil certain questions. 
For instance: if asked for an emblem of fidelity, the 
figure instantly drew a correct picture of a handsome 
dog ; the emblem of love was shown in an exquisite 
drawing of a little Cupid; the automaton would also 
answer many questions in writing. I carried this curi- 
ous figure to London and exhibited it for some time in 
the ^yal Adelaide Gallery, and then sent it across the 
Atlantic to the American Museum. 

During my very brief visit to Paris, Houdin was giv- 
ing evening performances in the Palais Roy ale, in leger- 
demain, and P was frequently present by invitation. 
Houdin also took pains to introduce me to other in- 
ventors of moving figures which I purchased freely, 
and made a prominent feature in my Museum attrac- 
tions. I managed, too, during my short stay, to see 



188 IN •FRANCE. 

something of tlie surface of the finest city hi the 
world. 

And now, going to Paris the second time, I was Tery 
fortunate in making the acquaintance of Mr. Dion 
Boucicault, who was then temporarily sojourning in 
that city, and who at once kindly volunteered to advise 
and assist me in regard to numerous matters of impor- 
tance relating to the approaching visit of the General. 
He spent a day with me in the search for suitable 
accommodations for my company, and by giving me the 
benefit of his experience, he saved me much trouble 
and expense. I have never forgotten the courtesy 
extended to me by this gentleman. 

I stopped at the Hotel Bedford, and securing an 
interpreter, began to make my arrangements. The first 
difficulty in the way was the government tax for exhibit- 
ing natural curiosities, which was no less than one- 
fourth of the gross receipts, while theatres paid only 
eleven per cent. This tax was appropriated to the 
benefit of the city hospitals. Now, I knew from my 
experience in London, that my receipts would be so 
large as to make twenty-five i)er cent of them a far 
more serious tax than I thought I ought to pay to the 
French government, even for the benefit of the admi- 
rable hospitals of Paris. Accordingly, I went to the 
license bureau and had an interview with the chief. I 
told him I was anxious to bring a " dwarf" to Paris, but 
that the percentage to be paid for a license was so large 
as to deter me from bringing him ; but letting the usual 
rule go, what should I give him in advance for a two 
months' license? 

" My dear sir," he answered, " you had better not 
come at all ; these things never draw, and you will do 



IN FRAKGB. 189 

nothing, or so little that the percentage need not trouble 
you." 

T expressed my willingness to try the experiment and 
ofibred one thousand francs in advance for a license. 
The chief would not consent and I then offered two 
thou^nd francs. This opened his eyes to a chance for 
a speculation and he jumped at my offer ; he would do 
it on his own account, he said, and pay the amount of 
one-quarter of my receipts to the hospitfds ; he was 
perfectly safe in making such a contract, he drought, 
for he had 15,000 francs in bank. 

But I declined to arrange this with him individually, 
so he called his associates together and presented the 
matter in such a way that the board took my offer on 
behalf of the government. I paid down the 2,000 
francs and received a good, strong contract and license. 
The chief wfte quite elated and hunded me the license 
with the remark : 

" Now we have made an agreement, and if you do not 
exhibit, or if your dwarf dies during the two months 
you shall not get back your money/' 

" All right," thought I ; " if yon are satisfied I am 
6ure I have every reason to be so/' I then hired at a 
large rent, the Salle Musard, Rue Vivienne, in a central 
and fashionable quarter close by the boulevards, aiid 
engaged an interpreter, ticket-seller, and a small but 
oxcellent orchestra. In fact, I made the most complete 
uiTangements, even to starting the preliminary paiu- 
gmphs in the Paris papers ; and after calling on the 
Honorable William Hufus King, the United States Min- 
ister at the Court of France — who assured me that 
after'my success in lx)ndon there would be no-difficulty 
whntever in ' my presentation to King Louis Philippe 
jind family — I returned to En<2:laii;l, 



190 IN BTJANOB. 

I went bdek to FQm> ynih Genetnl Tom Thiunb bw\ 
party some time before I intend^ed to b.egm my exhibi- 
tions, and on the yery day after my 4U*rival I receivod ii 
special command to appear at the Taileries on the fol- 
lowing Sunday evening. It will be remembered thaX 
Louis Philippe's daughter, tbe wife of King Leopold, 
of BelgiuDd, had seen the G^peml at Buck^ingham 
Fakoe-^a £juctr that had been duly chronioled in the 
French as Well aa English papers, and I have no doubt 
that sblQ had privately expr^sed her. graiificc^tion ^at eee- 
ing him. With this advantage, and 'with tbe prestige 
of our reoeptionfi by Queen Victoria. aild Prinze Albert, 
we went to the Tuileries with full confidence that our 
visit and reception would be entirely satisfactory. 

At the appointod hour the General and I, arrayed in 
the conveational court costume, were ushered into a 
grand saloon of the palace wheiie we were introduced 
to the King, the Queen, Princess Adelaide, the Duchess 
d'Orleansandher son the Count de Paris, Prince de 
Joinville, Duke and Duchess de Nemours, the Duchess 
d'Aumale, and a dozen or more distinguished persons, 
among whom was the ^editor of the offibcial Journal des 
Dehais. The court circle entered into conversion with 
us without jrefitraiut^ and were greatly delighted with 
the Uttle General. King Iiouis Philippe was mimite in 
his inquiries about my country and talked freely about 
his experiences whe» he wandered as. an exile in 
America. He playfully alluded to the time wh^en he 
earned his living as a tutor, and said he had roughed it 
generally and had even slept in Indian wigfwams* Gen- 
eral Tom Thumb then went tlirough with his various 
perfornwtnces to tlie manifest pleasure of all who were 
p^-^tit, and at the dose the King. presented to- him a 



IN FBANOK 191 

• 

large emerald brooch set with diamonds. The General 
expressed his gratitude, and the King, turning to me, 
said : " yoii may put it on the General, if you please," 
which I did, to the evident gratification of the King as 
well as the General. 

King Louis Philippe was so condescending and courte- 
ous that I felt quite at home in the royal presence, and 
ventured upon a bit of diplomacy; The Longchamps 
celebration was coming — a day once devoted to relig- 
ious ceremony, but now conspicuous for the display of 
court and fashionable equipages in the Champs Elysees 
and the Bois de Boulogne, and as the King was familr 
iarly conversing with me, I ventured to say that I had 
hurried over to Paris to take part in the Longchamps dis- 
play and I asked him if the General's carriage could 
not be permitted to appear in the avenue reserved for 
the court and the diplomatic corps, representing that 
the General's small but elegant establishment, with its 
ponies and little coachman and footman, would be in 
danger of damage in the general thilong unless the 
special privilege I asked was accorded. 

The King smilingly turned to one of the officers of 
his household and after conversing vrtth him for a few 
moments he said to me : 

*' Call on the Prefect of Police to-morrow afternoon 
and you will find a permit ready for you." 

Our visit occupied two hours, and when we went 
away the General was loaded with fine presents. The 
next morning all the newspapers noticed the visit, and 
the Journal des Debats gave a minute account of the 
interview and of the General's performances, taking 
occasion to say, in speaking of the character parts, that 
'• there was one costume which the General wisely kept 



192 IN FRANCE. 

at the bottom of his box.** That costume, however, — 
the uniform of Bonaparte — was once exhibited, by 
particular request, as will be seen anon. 

Longchamps day arrived, and among the many 
splendid equipsiges on the grand avenue, none attracted 
more attention than the superb little carriage with four 
ponies and liveried and powdered coachman and foot- 
man, belonging to the General, and conspicuous in the 
line of carriages containing the Ambassadors to the 
Court of France. Thousands upon thousands rent the 
air with cheers for " General Tom Pouce.'' There 
never was such an advertisement ; the journals next 
day made elaborate notices of the " turnout," and there- 
after whenever the General's carriage appeared on the 
boulevards, as it did daily, the people flocked to the 
doors of the cafes and shops to see it pass. 

Thus, before I opened the exhibition all Paris knew 
that General Tom Thumb was in the city. The French 
are exceedingly impressible ; and what in London is only 
excitement, in Paris becomes ftiror. TTtider this pre^ure, 
with the prestige of my first visit to th6 Tuileries and the 
numberless paragraphs in the papers, I opened my doors 
to an eager throng. The 61ite of the city came to the 
exhibition ; the first day's receipts were 5,5b0 Franc??, 
which would have been doubled if I could have tnado 
room for more patrons. There were afternoon nnd 
evening performances and from that day secured scats 
at an extra price were eri9:vred in advance for the entire 
two months. The season was tnore than a success, it 
was a triumph. 

It seemed, too, as if the whole city was advertising 
me. The papers were profuse in their praises of the 
Genei'dl and his performances. Figaro^ the Punch of 



IK VKAJSCK 193 

Paris, gaye a picture of an immense mastiff miming 
away inth Hke General's carriage and horses in his 
mouth. Statuettes of '^ Tom Fouce " appeared in all 
the windows, in plaster, Parian, sugar and chocolate ; 
songs were written about him and his lithograph was 
seen everywhere. A fine cafe on one of the boulevards 
took the name of " Tom Pouoe " and displayed over the 
door a life-size statue of the General. In Paris, as in 
Londoui several eminent painters expressed their desire 
to paint his portrait, but the General's engagements 
were so pressiag that he found little time to sit to artists. 
All the leading actors and actresses came to the Gen- 
eral's levees and petted him and made him many pre- 
sents* Meanwhile^ the daily receipts continued to swell, 
and I was compelled to take a cab to carry my bag of 
silver home at night 

The official; who had compromised with me for a two 
months' license at 2,000 francs, was amazed as well as 
annoyed at the success of my " dwarf." He came, or 
sent a man, to the levees to take account of the receipts 
and every additional thousand francs gave him an addi- 
tional twinge. He seriously appealed to me to give him 
more money, but when I reminded him of the excellent 
bargain he supposed he was making, especially when 
he added the conditional clause that I should forfeit the 
2,000 i^ncs if I did not exhibit or if the General died, he 
smiled faintly and said something about a ^^ Yankee 
trick." I asked him if he would renew our agreement 
for two months more on the same terms ; and he shrug- 
ged bis shoulders and said : 

" No, Monsieur Bamum ; you will pay me twenty- 
five per cent of your receipts when the two months of 
our contract expires." 



194 IN FRAKCE. 

But I did not ; for I ^a|>pealed io the anthoiities, 
claiming that I should pay only the ordinary theatrical 
tax, since the General's exhibition consisted chiefly of 
character imitations in various costumes, and he was 
more attractive as an actor than as a natural curiosity. 
My view of the case was decided to be coitect, atfd 
thereafter, in Paris and thronghoiit France, with few 
exceptions, I paid only the eleven per cent theatrical tax. 

Indeed, in Paris, the General made a great hit as aa 
actor and was elected a member of the French Dra- 
matic Society. Besides holding his levies, he appeared 
every night at the Vaudeville Theatre in a Frelich play, 
entitled " Petit Ponce t," and written expressly for him, 
and he afterwards repeated the part with great success in 
other cities. The demands upon our time were inces- 
sant. We were invited everywhere to dinners and 
entertaiiim!entd, and as many i)f these were undemtood 
to be private performances of the General, we' were 
most liberally a!enmnerated therefor. M. Galignani 
invited us to a soiree* and introduced us to sorad of the 
most prominent personages, including artists, actors 
and editorsy in Paris. The General was frequently 
engaged at a large price to show himself for a quarter 
of an hoar at some fancy or charitable fair, and mnch 
n^oney was made in this way. *0n Sundays, he was 
emplowd at one or another of the great gardens in 
the outskirts^ aud thus was seen by thDusanda^ of 
workiifg people who could not attend his levees. All 
classes became acquainted with *^ Tom Poaoe." 

We wex'e commanded to appear twice more at the 
Tuileries, and we were also invited to the palace oh the 
King's birthday to 'witness; tlie display of fireworks in 
honor of the unuiversaiy. Our fourth and lastvtsit'to 



IN PRAKCB. 196 

the royal family was by special invitation at St. Cloud. 
On each occasion we met nearly the same persons, but 
the Tisit to St Cloud was by far the most interesting of 
our interviews. On this one occasion, and by the 
special request of the King, the General personated 
Napoleon Bonaparte in full costume. Louis Philippe 
had heard of the General in this character, and particu- 
larly desired to see him ; but the affair was quite " on 
the sly," and no mention was made of it in the papers, 
particularly in the Journal des Debats, which thought, 
no doubt, that costume was still " at the bottom of the 
General's box." We remained an hour, and at parting, 
each of the royal company gave the General a splendid 
present, almost smothered him with kisses, wished him 
a safe journey through France, and a long and happy 
life. After bidding them adieu, we retired to another 
portion of the palace to make a change of the General's 
costume, and to partake of some refreshments which 
were prepared for us. Half an hour afterwards, as we 
were about leaving the palace, we went through a hall 
leading to the front door, and in doing so passed the 
sitting«-room in which the royal family were spending 
the evening. The door was open, and some of them 
happening to espy the General, called out for him to 
come in and shake hands with them . once more. We 
entered the apartment, and there found the ladies sitting 
around a square table, each provided with two candles, 
and every one of them, including the Queen, was en* 
S^ged in working at embroidery, while a young lady 
was reading aloud for their edification. I am sorry to 
say, I believe this is a sight seldom seen in families of 
the aristocracy on either side of the water. At the 
church fairs in Paris, I had frequently seen pieces of 



196 IN FBANOB. 

m 

embtOQde?y for sale, which were kbeUed as* havix^ been 
presented and worked by the Duchess d'Orleans, Prin- 
cess Adelaide, Duchess de Nemours, and other titled 
ladies. 

We also ykited, by invitation, the Napoleon School 
for young ladies, established by the First Napoleon, at 
St. Denis, five miles north of Paris, and the General 
greatly delighted the old pensioners at the Invalides by 
calling upon them, and shaking many of them by the 
hand. If the General could have been permitted to 
present to these surviv<Mi9 of Waterloo his representa- 
tion of their chief and Emperor, he would have arofoaed 
their enthusiasm as well as admiration. 

On the Fourth of July, 1844, 1 was in Grenelle^ out- 
side the barriers of Paris, when I remembered that I 
had the address of Monsieur Eegnier; an eminent 
mechanician, who lived in the vicinity » Wishing to 
purchase a variety of instruments such as he manufac- 
tured, I called at his residence. He received me very 
politely, and I soon was deeply interested in this intelli- 
gent and learned man. He was a member of many 
scientific institutions, was ^^ Chevalier of the Legion of 
Hcmor," etc. 

While he waa busy in making out my bill, I was 
taking a cursory view of the various plates, drawings, 
etc., which adorned his walls, when my eyes fell <mi a 
portrait which was familiar to me. I was certain that I 
could not be mistaken, and on approaching nearer it proved 
to be, as I expected, the engraved portrait of Benjamin 
Franklin. It was placed in a glazed frame, and on the 
outside of the glass were arranged thirteen stars made of 
metal, forming a half circle round his head. 

'* Ah ! " I exclaimed, " I see you have here a portrait 
of my fellow-countryman, Dr. Franklin. " 



IK 7BAN0£. }97 

'* YeS)" repMed M. Kegnier, ^^ Hud he was a greafc and 
an excellent man. When he was in Paris in '96, he 
was honored and respected by all who knew him, and 
by none more so than by the scientific portion of the 
comisamty. At that time, Dn Franklin was invited by 
the Presideiit of the Society of Emulation to decide upon 
the merits of rarious works df art submitted for inspec- 
tion, and he awarded my falser, for a complicated lock, 
the prize of a gold medal. 

'' While my father was with him at his hotel, a young 
Quaker called upon the Doctor. He was a total 
straogar to Franklin, but at once proceeded to inform 
him that he had come to Paris on business, had unfortu- 
nately' lost all his money, and wished to borrow six 
hundred francs to enable him to return to his family in 
Philadelphia. Franklin inquired his family name, and 
upon hearing it immediately counted out the money, 
l^^ve the young stranger some excellent advice, and bade 
him adieu. My^ father was struck by the generosity of 
Dr. Franklin, and as soon as the young man had 
departed, he told the Doctor that he was astonished to 
sec him so free with his money to a stranger ; that 
])eople did not- do business in that way in Paris ; and 
wlmt he considered very careless was, that Franklin 
took no receipt, not even a scratch of a pen from the 
young man. Franklin replied that he always felt a duty 
and pleasure inirelieving his fellow-men, and especially 
in this case, as he knew the family, and they were 
honest and worthy persons. My father, himself a gen- 
erous man," continued M. Regnier, "was affected 
nearly to tears, and begged the Doctor to present 
him with his portrait. He did so, and this is it. My 
father* has** been dead some years. He bequeathed the 



198 IK FRANCE. 

portrait to me^ and there is not money enoagh in Paris 
to buy it" 

I need not say that I was delighted with this redtal. 
I remarked to M. Regnier that he should double the 
number of stars, as we now (in 1844) had twenty<*8iz 
States instead of thirteen, the original number. 

'* I am aware of that," he replied ; " but I do not like 
to touch the work which was left by my father. I hold 
it sacred ; and," added he, '^ I suppose you are not 
aware of the uses we make of these stars t " Assuring 
him in the negative — '^ Those stars," said he, ** are made 
of steel) and on the night of every anniversary oi Amer- 
ican Independence (which is this night), it was -always 
the practice of my father, and will idways be mine, to 
collect our family and children together, darken the 
room, and by means of electricity, these stars, which are 
connected, are lighted up, and the portrait illuminated 
by electricity, Frankliji's favorite science — • thus form- 
ing a halo of glory about his head, and doing honor to 
the name of a man whose fame should be perpetuated 
to eternity." 

In continuing the conversation, I found that tiiis good 
old gentleman was perfectly acquainted with the history 
of America,' and he spoke feelingly of what he believed 
to be the high and proud destiny of our republic. He 
insisted on my remaining to supper, and witnessing his 
electrical illumination. Need I say that I accepted the 
invitation ] Could an American refuse 1 

We partook of a substantial supper, upon which the 
good old gentleman invoked the blessing of our Father 
in Heaven, and at the conclusion he returned hearty 
thanks. At nine o'clock the children and family of M. 
Itegnicr and his son-in-law were called in, the Mom vpas 



nfr FBANOB. 199 

darkened, iiie electrical battery was charged, and the 
wire touched to one of the outer stars. The whole thir- 
teen became instantly bright as fire, and a beautiful 
effecsi; was produced. What more simple and yet beau- 
tiful and appropriate manner could be chosen to honor 
the memwy of Franklin ? And what an extraordinary 
coincidence it was that I, a total stranger in Paris, should 
meet such a singular man as M. Regnier at all, and more 
especially on that day of days, the anniversary of our 
Independence ! At ten o'clock I took my leave of this 
worthy family, but not till we had all joined in the fol- 
lowing toast proposed by M. Eegnier : 

^^ Washington, Franklin, and Lafayette — heroes, 
phiIoso|^iers, patriots, and honest men: May their 
names stand brightest on the list of earthly glory, when, 
in afier ages, this whole world shall be one universal 
repobUc, and every individual under Heaven shall 
acknowledge tiie truth that man is capable of self-gov- 
ernment." 

It will not be considered surprising that I should feel 
at home with Monsieur Uegnier. Both the day and the 
man conspired to excite and gratify my patriotism ; and 
the presence of Franklin, my love of my native land. 

During my stay in Paris, a Russian Prince, who had 
been living in great splendor in that city, suddenly died, 
and his household and personal effects were sold at 
auction. I attended the sale for several days in succes- 
sion, buying many articles of vertu, and, among others, 
a magnificent gold tea-set, and a silver dining-service, 
imd many rare specimens of Sevres china. These arti- 
cles bore the initials of the family name of the Prince, 
and his own, " P. T.," thus damaging the articles, sd that 
tbe Oliver and gold were sold for their weight value 



jf\ 



200 11^ FRANGB. 

only- I bought them, and adding " B/' to the ** P. T./' 
had a very fine table service, still in my passeBsion, and 
bearing my own initials^ " P. T. B." 

While dining one day with my friend, Dr. Brewster, 
in Pwis, all the company present were in raptures over 
some very fine ^' Lafitte " wine on the table, and the 
usual exclamations, *' delicious ! " and " fruity I " were 
heard on all sides. When I went to the south of 
France, the Doctor gave me a letter of introduction to 
Lafitte's agent, Mr. Good, at Bordeaux, and I was shown 
through the extensive cellars of the establishment* The 
agent talked learnedly, almost affectionately, about the 
choice and exclusive vineyards of the establishment, and 
how the stones in the ground retained the warmth de- 
rived from the sun during the day throughout tiie night, 
thus mellowing and maturing the grapes, and resalting 
in the production of a peculiar wine which was posftiUe 
to no other plot of ground in the entire grape c(»intry. 

I afterwards learned, however, that this exclusive 
establishment bought up the entire wine product of blithe 
vineyards in the region round about — it was like the cele- 
brated " Cabana " cigars in Havana, One day a friend 
was dining with me in Bordeaux and I called for a bottle 
of '* Lafitte," which, purchased on the very ground of its 
manufacture, was of course genuine and delidously 
" fruity." It was very old wine of some famous year, 
and the bottle as brought up from the bin was covered 
with cobwebs and dust. But while we were sipping the 
wine and exclaiming " froity " at proper intervals, I hap- 
pened to take out my knife and quite inadvertently cut 
off a bit of the label. The next day when my friend 
was again dining with me I called for another botfle of 
the peculiar Lafitte which had so delighted us yesterday. 



* m FBAJNTGS. 201 

It came eobwebbed axxd dost-coyered and was duly dis- 
cosaed and pronounced * delidously ^' fruity." But hor- 
rors ! all at once, something caught my attention and I 
exclaimed : 

'^ Do you see that cut label ? That is the very bottle 
which held the rare old wine of yesterday ; there is the 
' ear*mark ' which I left with my knife on the bottle " — 
and I summoned the landlord and thus addressed him : 
" What do you mean, you scoundrel, by putting your 
infernal vin ordinaire into old bottles, and passing it off 
upon us as genuine ^ Lafitte ]' " 

He protested that such a thing was impossible ; we 
were at the very fountain head of the wine, and no one 
would dare to attempt such a fraud, especially upon 
experienced wine-tasters like ourselves. But I showed 
him my careless but remembered mark on the bottle, 
and proved by* my friend that we had the same bottle 
for our vmie of the day before. This was shown so con- 
clusively and emphatically that the landlord finally 
confessed his fraud, and said that though he had sold 
thousands of bottles of so-called '^ Lafitte " to his guests, 
he never had two dozen bottles of the genuine article 
in his possession in his life ! 

Every one who has been in the wine district knows 
that the wine is trodden from the grapes by the bare 
feet of the peasants, and while I was there, desiring a 
new experience, I myself trod out a half barrel or so 
with my own naked feet, dancing vigorously the while 
to the sound of a fiddle. 

In spite of the extraordinary attention and unbounded 
petting the little General received at the hands of 
all classes, he was in no sense a " spoiled child," but 
stained throughout that natural simplicity of character 



202 IS FBANCB. ' 

and demeasior which added so much to the charm of 
his exhibitions. He was literally the pet of Paris, and 
after a protracted and most profitable season we started 
on a tour through France. The little General's small 
Shetland ponies and miniature carriage would be sure 
to arouse the enthusiasm of the " Provincials," so I de- 
termined to take them along with us. We went first to 
Rouen, and from thence to Toulon, visiting all the inter- 
mediate towns, including Orleans, Nantes, Brest, Bor- 
deaux,. — where I witnessed a review by the Dukes de 
Nemours and d'Aumale, of 20,000 soldiers who were 
encamped near the city. From Bordeaux we went to 
Toulouse, Montpellier, Nismes, Marseilles, and many 
other less important places, holding levees for a longer 
or shorter time. While at Nantes, Bordeaux and Mar- 
seilles the Geneial also appeared in the theatres in his 
French part of '' Petit Poucet." 

Very soon after leaving Paris for our tour through 
France, I found that there were many places where it 
would be impossible to proceed otherwise than by post. 
General Tom Thumb's party numbered twelve persons, 
and tiiese, with aU their luggage, four little ponies, and 
a small carriage, must be transported investing vehicles 
of some description. I therefore resolved that as post- 
ing in France was as cheap, and more independent than 
any other method of travel, a purchase of posting 
vehicles should be made for the sole use of the renowned 
General Tom Thumb and suite. One vehicle, however 
large, would have been insufficient for the whole com- 
pany and "effects," and, moreover, would have been 
against the regulations. These regulations required 
that each person should pay for the use of one horse, 
whether using it or not, and I therefore made the fol- 



IN FRANCE. 203 

lowing {^rnuogeiipLents : I purohased a ppi^obanfie to cany 
six persons, to be drfiw^ ,1^ six horses ; ^ yehicla on 
springs,, with se^tfi) for fpur persons^ .and room for the 
General's fpur ponies and carriage, to.l>6.d3:awn by four 
.horses; and lastly, a third vehicle for conveyi^^g the 
baggage of the company, including the elegant little 
hon^e i^nd furniture s^t on the stage ip. the General's 
performances of ^' Petit Foucet" at the theatres, the 
whole drayr^ by two hprses. ^ 

With such a retinue the General "cut quite a swell" 
in journeying through thp cpuntry, travelling, indeed, 
in grander style than a.. Field Marshy would have 
thou^t of doing in poatii^g thrpugh France. All this 
folly and expense, the uninitiated would say, of employ- 
ing twelve horses and tjivelve persons, to say nothing of 
the QeQeral's foui; ponies, m exhibiting $ person weigh- 
ing only fifteen pounds! ^ut when this retinue passed 
along the roads^ and specially whon it came into a 
town^ peoi>le paturally and eagerly i&fttiired what great 
personage w^. on jxis travels, B,r^ when,. told that it 
was ** thQ qdebrated Generisl Tom ThmnJ^ .«nd suite," 
everybody desired to go and.^e hi^u^ It was thus the 
best advertising we could havi$ had, a^d wa^ re^Uy, m 
many places, our cheapest. ^nd in aofftp places, our only 
mode of getting from p<Hnt to , pQiffit where our exhibi- 
tions we|i9 4o he giveiv 

I During> mpst of thQ toui; I wa,^ a week o;r f^o ahead <^ 
the cismpany, makjing arrftngem^nts for th^ forthcoviing 
exhibitions, and doing my en^ir^ business without the 
aid of an interpreter, for t soop, ** picked up" French 
enough to get a|i<^ very ^^l indeed. I .did not forget 
that Franklin learned; to. speak friencji wheahe^ was sev* 
enty years of age, and I did not consider myself too old 

10* 



204 ET FRATTCE. 

to learn, what, indeed, I was obliged to learn in the 
intereste of my bnsiness; As for the little Gteneral, who 
was accompanied by a precfeptor and translatoi:, he very 
soon began to give his entire speaking pciforinances in 
Frendh, and his jnece '* Petit Poiicet" was spoken as if 
he werfe "a native. ' . » 

In fact, I 8o6n became the GeneraFs want courier^ 
though hot doing the divdieb of nxx- dvant courier to an 
ordinary exhibition, since these duties generally <;(msiBt 
in largely phffing the " coming man** and expected show, 
to endeavottag to create a p»Hic appette and « 
exdite curiosity. - My daties^were quite different; after 

engaging the largest theatre br saloon to be found in the 

# - • • 

town, I put out a simple placard, announcing that the 
General would appear on^Uch a day. Thereafter, my 
whole energies were directed, apparently, to keeping 
the people quiet ; I begged them not to get - excited ; I 
assured them through the piiblie journals, thai every 
opportunity should be Afforded to permit every; person to 
see " the distinguished little GeiiefaU who had delighted 
the principal monapchs ov Europe, and more than a mil- 
lion df their subjects,^ and^hat if one- exhibition in the 
largest audienfco toom In the town would not suffice; two 
or even three w.buld be gvfen. 

This was done quietly, and yet, 4s an advertisement, 
effectively, for, strange as it may l^eetoi peopled, who 
were told to keep quiet, Would get terribly excited^ and 
when the General arrived and opened his exhibitions^ 
excitement would be at fever heat, the levees would be 
thronged, and the treasiury filled ! 
' Numerous were the wojd battles I had with mayots, 
managers of theatres, directors of hospitals, and ofhers, 
^ktive to what I considered —ja^ly, I think — the out- 



l 



IN FRANCE. '2b5 

ragebu^ imposStion Which tti^ Hws petuAMetfitt th^T^y 
of taies vipbn " exhibidohs." '' Thiis'thie'laws l^equired, 
for the sake of charity, tweirty-five per cent of niy gross 
receipts for the hospitals; while to ^nconitigd a local 
theatre, or theatres, which might suffer from an outside 
show, twenty pet ceiit tnbre Diiist be given to tfie" local 
managera. * ' ' ' . 

Of course this law was nearly a deadl^tclr r^for; to 
have taken forty-five per cent of my gross receipW at 
every exhibition would soon have driven iiie fr6m the 
provinces, so the hospitals were generally content with 
ten per cent, and five or ten francs a day satisfied th e 
manager of a provincial theatre. ' But at 'Bordeaux the 
manager of the theatre wished to engage thfe General 
to appeal: in his estabKshmentf and as 5f declined his 
offer, he threatened to debar me from exhibiting any- 
where in town, by demandingfor himsfelf the filH twenty 
percent the law allowed, besides mdrfcingth^ directors 
of the hospitals to compel mq to pay thfeni* twnty-five 
per cent more. '. '.'*;.. • ^ ; ' '^' '- ' • 

. Here wai a'dllemmal I iriust yield and take'lialf I 
thou^t myself entitled tA anS peftnft the Cfenefartb' play 
for the manager, or submit to legal extortion, orifbrego 
my exhibitions. I bfered'^the iharfirfger stx^^'^r* ddn^ of^ 
my receipts and he Ym^kd} it infel ^ 'Stalked' "With' the 

t/ff'f * 4 X 

liospital directors and'ttiey tBld tb^'^At sd'ihi manager 
favored "ttetoj' tfiey' ftik bbiM' i6'' stm'Mij ^Miift." I 
znnokticS Mb'p\ihUcjbilfnAi ^ii^We&^k^^^ioxild . 
not appear in Bordeaux on account ofttte * dtirJidiry' ana 

ttrtortitfk^ de^itidi w m m^kii^"''Aiim^¥ m \he 

bospftaT- viHebtblk. ' TO^'^jieoiJW' lalltfei iM tlf^'^#'efi 
deibukcedl'lbiiti lUyiiagetakidTttiyttiir^^etokliiea to'fitih 
iyte ill flito t^liiilnk.'1:diA l}iMm-^ek to .'ifirfve 



306 IN EKAKCB. 

in twa days aod I was id: a decided scrape* IRie mayor 
interceded for me, but to no avail ; the manager had 
determined to enforce an almost obsolete law unless I 
wouid permit the Gfeneral to. play in his theatre every 
night My Yankee " dander " was up and J^ declared 
thA* I would e:2^hibit the Qener^l gratia rather than sub- 
mit to the demand. Whereupon, the ' manager only 
laughed at me^ the more ta think how - snugly he had 
got mp, , . 

Now it ]btap^ned that, once t^n a time^ Bordeaux, 
like moat citiesi was a little vi)lage,,and thq little village 
of ViiMrennes ' lay one mile east of it* Bordeaux had 
grown and stretched itself and thickly settled &r 
beyond Vincennes, bringing the latter nearly Ja the 
centre of Bordeaux ; yet^ strapge to iiay^ Vincennes 
maintaiHediits own identity, and had its own Mayor and 
municipal^ rights quite independent of Bordeaux. U 
could scarcely believe my informant who told me this, 
but I speedily sought out the Mayor t)f Vincennes, 
found such a personage, and cautiously inqtiired if there 
was 'a theatre et a hospital within his limits ? He 
assured me there was not I told him my story, and 
asked : 

" If I o|)en an exhibition within your limits vill there 
be any percentages to, pay from my receipts ? " 

" Not a sou," replied the Mayor. i 

" Will you give me a writing to that effect 1" 
" With the greatest pleasure," replied the Mayor, and 
he did so at once. 

i put this precious paper in my pocket, and in a few 
moments I ]^red the largest dancing saloon in the place, 
a room capable of holding over 2,000 people. I then 
announced, especially to the delighted citizens of Bor- 



IN PEANCE. 207 

deaux, that the General would open his exhibitions in 
Vincennes, which he soon did to an overflowing house. 
For thirteen days we exhibited to houses averaging 
more than 3,000 francs per day, and for ten days more 
at largely increa8ed-receiptfl,^ott)ne a6u of which went 
for taxes or percentages. The manager and directors, 
theatre and hospital, got nothing, instead of the fair 
allowance I would willingly have. giv.0» them.. Oh, 
yes! they got 80fmeAing,-^'th«t is, -a lesson, ••^ not to 
attempt to offset Trench Shylockiism, ^gwist Taakee 

shrewdness. 

• • — » 

We were in the South of Fsance >in the vintage 
season.. Nothing can sirirpass the richness of the 
country ^at that - time of the year. We travelled for 
many miles where the eye could see nothing but 
vineyards loa^ded with luscious grapea an4 groves of 
olive trees in full bearing. It is literally a country of 
wine and oil. Our remunerative and gratifpng round 
of mingled pleasure and profit^ brought us at last to 
liUe, capital of the departaaeni of Nord, 'an4 :^te^ 
miles from the Belgian frontier, aad from tbeude we pro- 
ceeded to Brussels. 



« « 



I 



■' ' ' ' ; " 1 . J » t ' ' I ' I f ', ' ' 'f I ( ' 'it,* / 1 • 

/ , . CHAPTER XIU. 

IK BELGTtJM. 

* • • • V 



f • » f 



• . « 



SHOWMAN-^ " d6PT fttn» " — O^NEROTTB i)I8tRIBtJ^I0N ' OF MEDALS — 1»RINC'e 
AKD ]^ QITEBN -;- THE QS^ERAL'S «»WEL8ST0f<BN 7- TBB THIEF CAUGHT-^ 

'inc^OTERr • or iftas ¥R<***BTV^'i'HiB' mil* oir ' ViihrEiitoo 4-TnitAcriy» 

XX>U8LT MtTLTIPIJED BBUCS — CAPTAIK TIPPITIWITCHET OF Tyi» q9 K ^ fi ; 'jyf jm 
FUSILEBBS — Air. ACCIDENT -pGBTTINa BACK TO BRUSSELS IN A CART 

nmktrdK' UvMrnlxA^tSdma* Air * motfiBiTttn^— f#o ^oMts mf n 



THE 



.^Hr^ON TOE. BO/kD~THS CX^STOW. OF XH^ CQUNZRZ— Jk STRICT ^ . GO jjT^ 
STBUCTIONIst — STRATTON 8 HEAD SHaVeD — ** BB!umMAOEM " " RELf CS"-^ 

'Hoir iTlifr'.'lRS p/anted 'At vAifftRtoo— WBix i»toixB' iUxfUMAsa .i»am 

MADE OFr-F.^M BRUSSELS TO LONDON. 

In crossing the border frbm France itlto BelgitiiA^ 
Proffeasor ' Pirite, our inlerpretfer • ari^ Gfeneratl Tbth 
Thuiiib's preceptor, dJscoveted th^t ' he had left hu 
passport behind him— ^at'Lilfe, at' Marseilles, or else- 
where in Fikncfe, hb couM' not tell where,'forit was'a 
long ^ffiiie «tAee he haA^een called upon to pfeseilfc ft. 
I was much annoyed and indignantly toW him thkt he 
" would never make a good showman, because a good 
showman never forgot anything." I could see that my 
allusion to him as a " showman " was by no means 
pleasant, which leads me to recount the circumstances 
under which I was first brought in contact with the 
Professor. 

He was really a "Professor" and tekcher of English 
in one of the best educational establishments in Paris. 
Very soon after opening my exhibitions in that city,, I 
saw the necessity of having a translator who was quali-. 
fied to act as a medium between the General and the 



IK B£LGJU>L 209 

h^bly cnltivftted audiences that daily favored us. at our 
levees. I had beguu with a not' over-cultivated inter- 
preter, who, when the Geueral personated Cupid, for 
instance, would cry out " Coopeed/' to which some one 
would'be sure to respbid " Stoopeed,** to the axmoyance 
of myself and the amusement of the audience. I 
accordingly detenmhed to procure the bfjst interpreter 
I cotdd 6hd and I was directedi to call upoft Professor 
Finte. I saw him and briefly stated what I wanted, 
in what capacity T proposed to employ him, and what 
salary I would pay hint. He was highly indignant and 
informed tae .that he was ^' no showman,^' and had no 
desire to leatn or engage in^the BusinesSh: 

" But, my dear sir," said I, J* it is' not as a'showman 
that I wish* to employ your valuable services, but as a 
preceptor to my young and interesting ward. General 
Tom Thumb, whom I desire to have instructed in the 
French language and in other accomplishments you are 
so competent* to impart At the same. time, X should 
expect that you would be willing tp accoinpnny.my ward 
and your pupil and attend \m public )eas:hlbitiou^ for the 
purpose of tiranslatijag, as may be .necessary, tothejculti- 
vated people of your x>wa clasj who are the principal 
patrons of our eutertainments.** • . . , , 

This seemed to put an entirely new face upon the 
matter, especially as I had offered the Professor a salary 
five times larger, probably, than he was then receiving. 
So he rapidly revolved the subject in his mind and said : 

" Ah ! while I could not possibly accept a situation 
as a showman, 1 should be most happy to accept the 
terms and the position as preceptor to your ward." 

He was engaged, and at once entered upon his duties, 
aot only as preceptor to the General, but as the efficient 



210 ^K BBL6IUK. 

and always excellent interpreter at our exhibitions, and 
wherever w« ' nmkidft his s^n^eer <m thb wtiti. As he 
had lost his pas»poirt, when wc^ came to Coorti-ai on the 
Belgian frontier/I managed tb procure a ^emit for him 
which enabled him to proceed With the ptirty. THii was 
but the beginning of ^ difficulties,' for I had all our pro^ 
ertf, iaduding the ♦ GeneraPs pcnii'es and eqtripag«, to 
pass through the €iisWttlthbnse, ^d among other Miingb 
there was k Ifcu^e box of* mcd^^ .with a likeness of thb 
General on ode -side and of' Queen Victoria and FMnce 
Albert* on'.tte Oth^r side, whichi'weiB' sold ih large 
numbers, as sonvenirs at ovtr ekhibitiond. They were 
struck off at a considerable expense in'£nglaiid;'and 
commanded a reacfy sale. ' ' . ' ' 

The Castom*>house officers were informed, howerer, 
that these medals were' mere advertising cards, as they 
really were, of our exhibitiond, t and ' I begged their 
acceptance of as many as tliey pleased to pot in their 
pockets. They wi^re beautiful medals, atid a few dozen 
were speedily distributed among the delighted officials, 
who forthwith passed our '8how4)ills, lithogiaphs and 
other property with very little trouble. They wanted, 
howeveif, to charge a duty upon the GeneraFs ponies 
and carriage, but when I produced a document showing 
that the French government had admitted them 'duty- 
free, they did thi saiti6. This superb establishment led 
these officials^ to think he must be a very^ distinguished 
man, and they asked ' what rank he held in his owd 
country. 

*^ He is Prince Charles Stratton, of the Dukedom of 
Bridgeport, in the Kingdom of Connecticut,'' said Sher* 
man. ' . ♦ * 

Whereupon they ' all reverently raised their hats when 



XK BBLGITTlf. IHl 



the Gener^ entertd ^ itci: Sditfi bf^efi^M^iken 
who hud Been l!be distribtitic^ df ft6dftl9'^il!6^' tli^ 
Custom-house officers cam^ tb me and he^ge^ idiniilbt 
*' souvexrirs " of their distiiiguished pfateeitefeir, - Arid' I 
gaye (he medah rery freely, till: the appHcatrofis heii^tte' 
^so persistent as tb threaten a;66ribns pecnnia^ lostf. 
At last I handed ottt a fmal dozen in cine paekage*, and 
said : << Thete, that' is tltt last of them i- the Msl &re k 
the hox, and beyond m^ reaehi"" • ' ^ '^ .'» j ;;i w .o.. i 

All'thk while PJtoS^6r Phtte'w&d^blEtA^t^^ 
remark t6>him:ti)ont the lo^ '^f his ^[Mt^pok^; i^' WcIrA 
"showman" rtekled, and hEe aBkfed Wet .>-'.' 

"Mr. Bamuni, do you consider Ae tt showinahl- *^ 

I laughingly replied, ** Why,! cbnsid^ yott^^ the <tfrf- 
nent Professor Pint6y preceptor tio iGfenttralTom Thiimb^; 
but, after all, we are all shi^wmenJ' 

Finding himself so classed' \«itti the reit of 'us, he 
Tenturedta inquire « #h(it Wire th^ qnsliifictttit^n^ t)f k 
good showwail,'* to- which I re^lifed*: * ' i: ' 

^' He must have a decided taste for catering ^fbr the 
publk ; prominent p^c^pMve fkeal€ed ; tact ; * a thorough 
knowledge of human ^dturie ; grebt snatity ; itnd plenty 

of * soft soap.' *' ' <. ./..<»: I 

* 'Soft sup 1 '' exclaimed the interested Kttftssbr;** what 
is 'soft sup*"' ' . . . 1 « 

. I explained, as best I cbuld, how the Kteral ineanit^ ttf 

• • • • J 

the words had coma to jcaAvey the idea of gettiriginto the 
good graces of people tond pleasing those with Whom 
we lire brought in contiict. Pmte laughed, and iS he 
thought of ^e generous medal diatribution, an idea 
struck him : 

''I think (hose railway officials must have very diW:Jr 
hands — you are compelled to use so much * soft sup.'" 



fii^ m BELGIUM. 



Brusa^ la Peiis in miniature and is one of the* inost 
charming cities I ever, \7sited. We found elegant quar- 
ters, and the daj after our arrival by command we vis- 
ited King Leopold and the Queen at their palace. The 
King and Queen had already seen the General in Lon- 
don, but they wished to present him to their children and 
to the distinguished persons whom we found assembled. 
After i most agreeable hour we came away -^the Gen- 
eral, as usual, receiving many fine presents; 

The foUowing day^ I opened the exhibition in a heau- 
tifujl ha^,;whiGh on that day cmdon^every afternoon and 
evening while we remained there, was crowded by thrtmgs 
of the first people in the city. On the second or third 
day, in the midst of the ediibition, I suddenly misled 
the case containing the valuable presents the General 
had received from kings, queens, noblemen and gen- 
tlemen, and instsfntly gave the alarm ; some thief had 
intruded for the express purpose of stealing these jew- 
els, and, in the crowd, had been entirely suocessftil in 
his object 

The police were notified, and I offered 2,000 fifancs 
reward for the recovery of the property. A day or two 
afterwards a man went into a jeweller's shop and offered 
for sale, amii^ngf other things, a gold. snuff-box, mounted 
with turquoises, and presented by the Duke of Devon- 
Bhke to the General. The je^ellei', seeing the Gen- 
eral's initials on the box, sharply questioned the man, 
who became alarmed and Tan out of the shop. An 
alarm -was raised, and the man wag caught. He made 
a clean breast of it, and in the course of a few hours the 
entire property was returned, to the great delight of the 
Generaf and myself. Wherever we exliibited after- 
wards, no ms^tt^r hpw respectable the audience, the case 
of presents wa9 alwavs carefully watched. 



JN BSLQITJM. 213 

While I waa m Brussels I could 4o no less, than visit 
the battle-field of Waterloo , and I, proposed that our 
party should be copiposed of Professor Pinte, Mr. Strat- 
tou, father of General Tom Thumb, Mr, H. G, SUerniai;, 
and myself., Gohig sight^seeing was a new sensation to 
Stratton, and as it was necessary to start by four o'clock 
in the n^orning, in order to accomplish the distance 
(sixteen miles) and xetum in time for ojir afternoon 
performance, he demurred. . . , , 

'^ I do nt want to get. up before daylight 1^4 gQ off on 
a JQ^mey for the ^ake of s^eijpg a daroed old field of 
whe^t," said Stratton. . ^ , . 

** Sher>vood, dq try to be like somebody* once in your 
life, and go," said his wife. 

The appeal was irresistible, and he consented. . We 
engaged a coach, and horses the night previous, and 
started punctually at the hour appointed. We stopped at 
the neat little ^huroh in^the village of. Waterloo^ for the 
purpose of examining the tablets erected to the memory 
of some of the English \vh.<> fell in the contest. Thence 
we passed Jto the house in which the leg ofLord.Uxbridge 
(Marquis of i^ngl^sey) was, jaipputated* A n/eat little 
monument in the garden de$ignaj;es the 8p9t where the 
shattered member had been interred* I|i the hous^ is 
shown a part qf the. boot which is said to have once 
covered the unlucKy l^g* The visitor feels it but con- 
sidera^ to han<^ & frax^c or two to the female ^Yho exhib- 
its the monument and limb^ I did so, and Stratton, 
tho]i)gh he felt that he had not received the worth of 
his money, still did not like to be considered penurious, 
60 he handed over a piece of silver coin tp the attend- 
ant. I e^i^pressed a desire to have a small piece of the 
boot to exhibit in my Mijseum ; the lady cut off, without 



214 1^ BBLGMXTH 

hesitatioii, a dip three inelies long by one id ^niSGL I 
handed her a ooupl* riioie francs, and Sbratton de^rin^, 
as he said, to <^ show a piece of the boot in old Bridgd- 
port," received a aimilai^ filip, and paid a similar amotint. 
I could not help thinking that ifthef lady was thus Hbe- 
ral in' dispensing pieces of the " identical boot ** to - all 
visitoril, this toiMt' ha:if^ been about l&e nihetyume 
thouiandth boot ihat had been cut as the *^ Siihdn pnte '' 
since 1816. 

With t^ oonsoling reflection fhat the female- par- 
chased all tbe*east-off boots in Brussels and' its yibimty, 
and rejoicing that somebody was mating a trifle out of 
tba( accident. ^besides the inventor of the celebrated 
*^ Anglesey leg/' we passed on towards the batSe-fleld, 
lying abdut a mile distant. 

Arriving at Mont Saint Jean, a qtltorter of a m9e from 
the grpnnd, we ^^^m bQdet by some eighteen or twenty 
persons, who oSered Itieir sefvices as guides, to indicate 
the most important localities. Each applicant profei»ed 
to know the exaoi - spot Where every • man had • been 
placed who had taken part in the battle, and eadi, of 
course, claimed- to har^ been engage in Ithat Bangui- 
nary contest^ c^thougfa itliad occurred thirty yefars before, 
and some of these felloive were only, it seemed, ifrom 
twenty-^ve tcl iwenty^eight years 4Df age I We accepted 
an old man, who, at first declared that he was Willed in 
the battle, but perceiving our looks of Incredulity, -can* 
sented to tnodify his stattement eo far As to assert that he 
was horribly wounded, and lay upon the ground three 
days befoi!e receiving assistance. 

Onoe upon the ground, our guide, with much gravity, 
pointed out the place where the Duke of Wellington 
took his station during a great part of the ft^tion i ttiQ 



IN BELGIUM, 215 

IocaI;iy irhert the reserve of the 'British afmy wsis (Sta- 
tioned r Hie Bi^ot where Napoleon placed his faVdtlte 
guard ; the little mound on which was erected a tempo- 
rary observatory for his use during the battle ; the por- 
tion of the field at which felucher eritered with the 
ProScan itrmy; the precise location of tiiS StiotcH 
Greys; tire s^ where fetl Sir Alexandeir Gordon, 
Lieut. Ot>l. Cdnnnijg, and tnany others of celebrity. - 1 
asked him if he could tell me where CJaptain Tippiti- 
wichfeti of Ae Connecticut Ftisileers, was killed. " Oui, 
Monsieur/' he replied, with perfect confidence, for he 
felt 'bound to know, or to pretend to know, every par^ 
tieoiar; Ho then proceeded* to point out exactly the 
spot where my unfortunate Connecticut friend had 
breathed his last. After indicating the locations where 
some twenty more fictitious friends from Coney Island, 
New Jersey, Gape Cod and Saratoga Springs, had given 
up tbe j^ost, we handed him his tommtssion and de- 
clined to give him fiirthe^ trouble. Stratton grumbled 
at the imposition as he handed out a couple of francs 
for the information received. 

Upon qu^ng the ^attte-field we were accosted by a 
do^en persons 'of both sexes with baskets on their arms 
or bags in their hands,' containing relics of the battle 
for sate. These consisted of a great variety of imple- 
ments of watr, pistols, ballets, etc., besides brass "French 
eagles, buttons, etc. I purchased a number of them for 
the Museum, and Stratfon was equally liberal in obtain- 
ing a supply for his friends in " Old Bridgeport." We 
also purchased maps of the battle-'ground, pictures of 
the triumphal mound surmounted by the colossal Belgic 
Lioil in bronze, etc., etc. These frequent and renewed 
taxations annoyed Stratton very much, and as he handpd 



216 ^ BKIiOIUM. 

put a five fnmc pieee.fbr a '^ complete guide-book,'' h^ 
remarked, that '* he guessed die battle of Waterk)o had 
cost a darned sight more since it was fought than it did 
before I " 

But his misfortunes did not terminate here. When 
we had proceeded four or five miles upon our road home, 
crash went the carriage. We alighted, and found that 
the axle-tree was broken. It was now a guartjer past 
one o'clock. Ti^e little General's exhibitiosL was adver- 
tised to commeuce in Brussels at two o'clock, ai\d could 
not take place without us. We were unable to wa|k 
the distance in double the time at our disposaJi, and as 
no carriage was to be got in that part of the country, I 
concluded to take the matter easy, and forego all idea of 
exhibiting before evening. Stratton^ however, cx^uld not 
bear the thought of losing the chance of taking in si^ 
or eight hundred francs, and he determined to jtake 
matters in hand, in order, if possible^ to .get our parigr 
into Brussels in time to save the afternoon exhibi* 
tion. ^ He hastened to a farm-house, accompanied, by 
the interprefer. Professor Pinte, Sherman atid myself 
leisurely briiiging up the rear- Stratton asked the old 
farmer if he had a parriage. He ha4 not *^£[ave 
you no vehicle 1 " he inquired. 

" Yes, I have that vehicle," he replied, pointing to an 
old cart filled with manure, and standing in his biam* 
yard. 

" Thunder ! is that all the conveyance you have got? " 
asked Stratton. Being assured that it was, Stratton 
concluded that it was better to ride in a manure cart 
than not get to Brussels in time. 

" What will you ask to drive us to Brussels in three- 
quarters of an hourl " demanded Stratton. 



IN BELGIITM. 217 

" It is impossible," replied the fanner ; *' I should 
want two hours lor my horee to do it in.^ 

''ISnt ours is a very pressing case, and if we are not 
there in time we lose more than 'five hundred francs," 
said Stratton. 

The old farmer pricked up his ears at this, and agreed 
to get us to Brussels in an hour, for eighty francs. 
Stratton tried to hea^ him down, but it was of no use. 

" Oh, go it, Stratton," said Sherman ; ** eighty francs 
you know is only sixteen dollars, and you will prbbably 
save a hundred by it, for I eipect a full house at our 
afteraoon exhibition to-day/* " 

" Btit 1 have already spent about ten dollars for non- 
sense,'* said Stratton, " and we shall have to pay for the 
broken carriage besides/' 

" But what can you do better ? '* chimed in Professor 
Pinte. 

" It is an outrageous extortion to charge sixteen dol- 
lars for an old horse and cart to go ten miles. Why, in old 
Bridgeport I could get it done for three dollars," replied 
Stratton, in a tone of Vexation. 

" It is the custom of the country," said Professor Pinte, 
" and we must submit to it/* 

By the way, this was a favorite expression of the 
Professor's. Whenever we were imposed upon, or fek 
that we were not used right, Pinte would always 
endeavor to smoothnt over by informing us it was " the 
custom of the country." 

" Well, it's a thundering mean custom, any how," said 
Stratton, " and I wont stand such an imposition." 

"But what shall we dol" earnestly inquired Mr. 
Pinte. *' It may be a high price, but it is better to pay 
that than to lose our afternoon performance and five or 
six hundred francs." 



2 IS IN BELGIUM. 

This .appeal to the pocket touched Strattpn's feelings ; 
so submitting to the extortion, he, replied to our inter- 
preter^ "Well,, tell the old robber to dump his dung-cart 
as soon as possible, or we shall lose half an hour in 
parting." 

The cart was " dumped " and a large, lazy-looking 
Flemish horse was attached to it with a rope harness. 
Some boards were .laid , across the cart for seat^, the 
party tumbled into the rustic vehicle^ a rod-haired . boy, 
son of. the: ,old farmer^ mounted the horse, and Stsatton 
gave ordi^ .to '^get along." . " W^t ,a moment," said 
the farmer, "you have not jmid me. yet/' , "JL'll pay 
your boy when wip get to Sj^issfsls, -prpvided .he- gets 
there-3vithin .the hour," replied Stratton, . 

" Oh; hfe is sure to get there in an- hour,'' said the 
farmery " but I can't let. him go unless you pay in 
advance." The minutes were flying rapidly, the antici- 
pated loss of the day exhibition of General Tom Thumb 
flitted before his eyes, and .Stratton, in very desperation, 
thrust, his hand into his pocket and drew forth sixteen 
flve-franc pieces, which he dropped, one .at ^ time, into 
the hand of the farmer, and then called out to the r boy, 
" There now, do try to see if you can go. ahead." 

J'he boy did ^Q ^^lead, but it was with.s.u£h a snail's 
pace ihat it would haare puzzled a man of tolerable .e5'e- 
sight to have determined whether the horse was moving 
or standing still* , To make it stilly more interesting, it 
commenced raining furiously. As we had left Brussels 
in a coach, and the morning had promised us a pleasant 
day, we had omitted our umbrellas. We were soon 
soaked to the skin. .We " grinned and bore it " awhile 
without grumbling. At length gtratton, who was almost 
too angry to speak, desired Mr. Pinte to ask the red- 



IN BELGIUM. 219 

haired boy if he expected tp, y^alk his horse all > the way 
to Brussels. n, . 

" Certainly,'' xeplied the boy; /' he is too big and fat 
to do auy thing but w^lk. :We never' trot himi" 

S|xatton wa3 terTnlLed.as he thought of the loss of the 
day exhibit^QD ; ^nd he cursed the boy, the; cart, the 
rain, the luck, and even the -battle of Waterloo, .itself. 
But it Was all of no use, the horse would notxun,, bi;t 
the raiu 4i4 m dqw^ our backs.- , v ► 

At tfipro o'clopki the* time. ^ppfjnted for our. exhibition, 
we were yet. sQQierSe^n; miles, from Bxtussels;. The 
hQr3e walked slowly and ^philosophioally through th^ 
pitiless storm, the ateat^ nuy'eatically rising from the old 
maaure'Cart, to. the no small disturbai^ce of our unfortu- 
nate olfactories. *' It will take ttvo hours to get to 
Brussels at this^ rate^" growled Stratton. " Oh, no," 
replied the boy, *" it will only take about two hours from 
the time we started." • 

" But your father agreed to get us there in an hour," 
answered Stratton, . / . . 

"I know it," responded t^e boy, "but he knew it 
would, take more, than ^wjo," 

^' rU sue \\\XCL for damage, by thunder," said $tratton. 

"Oh, there would benojuse in thai,", chimed in Mr. 
Pinte, " for you cpuldget ^o satisfaction in this country i" 

^' Buj; I. shall lo^e .ipore than a hundred, dollars by 
being two hours instead of one,',' said Stratton. 

" They, care notliing about that ; all they care for is 
your eighty francs," remarked Pinte. 

" But they have lied aud swindled me," replied Strata- 
ton. . 

'' Oh, you ^ust njQt mind thats it is. the custom of the 
country." . , . ...... 



220 USr BELGIUM. 

Stratton gare "the country,** and its ** customs," 
another cursing. 

All things will finally have an end, and our party did 
at length actually arrive in Brussels, cart and all, in 
precisely two hours and a half from the time we left the 
farmer's house. Of course we were too late to exhibit 
the little General. Hundreds of visitors tad gone away 
disappointed. 

With feelings of utter desperation, Stratton started 
for a barber's shop. He had a fine, black, bushy head 
of hair, of whibh he was a little proud, and everf morn- 
ing he submitted it to the curIing*tongs of the barber. 
His hair had not been cut for several weeks, and after 
being shaved, he desired the barber to trim his flowing 
locks a little. The barber clipped off the ends of the 
hair, and asked Stratton if that was sufficient. ** No," 
he replied, ** I want it trimmed a little shorter ; cut away, 
and I will tell you when to stop." 

Stratton had risen from bed at an unusual hour, and 
after having passed through the troubles and excitements 
of the unlucky morning, he began to feel a little drowsy. 
This feeling was augmented by the soothing sensations 
of the tonsorial process, and while the barber quietly 
pursued his avocation, Stratton as quietly fell asleep. 
The barber went entirely over his head, cutting off a 
couple of inches of hair with every dip of his isdbsors. 
He then rested for a moment; expecting his customer 
would tell him that it was suffidetit ; but the unconscious 
Stratton uttered not a word, and the barber, thinking he 
had not cut the hair close enough, went over the head 
again. Again did he wait for an answer, Jittle thinking 
that his patron was asleep. Bemembering that Strat- 
ton had told him to '' cut away, and he would tell him 



m BELGIUM. 221 

when to stop,** th^ innocent barber went over the head 
the third time, cutting the hair nearly as close as if he 
had shaved it with a razor ! Having finished ^ he again 
waited for orders from his customer, but he uttered not 
a word. The barber was surprised, and that surprise 
was increased when he heard a. noi$e which. seei;(ied very 
like a snore coming from the nasal organ of his uncon- 
scious victim. 

The poor barber saw the error that he had committed, 
and in dismay, as if by mistake, he hit Stratton on the 
side of the head with his scissors, and woke him. He 
started to his feet, looked in the glass, and to his utter 
horror saw that he was unfit to appear in public with- 
out a wig ! He swore like a trooper, but he could net 
swear the hair back on to his head, and putting on his . 
hat, which dropped loosely over his eyes, he started for 
the hotel. His despair and indignation were so great 
that it was some time before he could give utterance to 
words, of explanation. His fbelings were not allayed 
by the deafening burst of laughter which ensued. . He 
said it was the first time that h& ever went a sight-see- 
ing, and he guessed it would be the last I 

SeveJral months subsequent to our visit to Waterloo, I 
was in Birmingham, and there made the acquaintance 
of a firm who manufiEtctured to order^ and sent to Water- 
loo, barrels of ** relics " every year. At Waterloo these 
'^ relics "* ate planted, and in due time dug up, and sold 
at large prices as precious remembrances of the great 
brittle. Our Waterloo purchases looked rather cheap 
after this discovery. 

While we were in Brussels, Mrs. Stratton, the mother 
of the General, tasted some sausages which she declared 
the best things she had eaten in France or Belgium ; in 
I 



222 i^ BET^iuk. 

fact*, she sai^'" she ha5 ' found/ little f tat '\vas fit fo eat 
iii this country, foreyery thing wds so* Frenchified and 
covered in gravy, she dared not eat it ; but there was 
something that tasted natural about these sausages ; she 
had never eaten* any as good, even in America.*' She 
sent to the landlady to inquire the name of them, for 
she meant to biiy some to take along with her. The 
answer came that they were called " saucisse de Lyon, " 
(Lyons' sausages,) and straightway Mrs. Stratton went 
out and purchased half a dozen pounds, Mr. Sherman 
soon came io, and, on learning wl^at she had in her 
package, he remarked : ** Mrs. Stratton, do you know 
what Lyons sausages are made of T'^ 

" No,^"8he replied ; "hut I know thai they are first- 
rate 1 '^ ' * . 

" Well," replied Sherman, ^* they may }^e good, but 
they are made from donkeys ! '* which is said to Ije the 
fact. Mrs.' Stratton said 'she was not tp be fooled so 
easily — that she knew better, "and tlia,t^ she should' stick 
to the sausages. • . . « 

Presently Trofessor* Knfe entered the room. " Mr. 
Pinte," said Sherman, "you are a Frenchinan, and 
know every 'thing atiout edibles': pray tell. me what 
Lyons sausages, are made of. 

"Of asses, replied the moTiensiye professor. 

]tfrs.' Stratton 'seized tKe package^ tliC; street Avindow 
was open, ana, in less than a minute, a lar^e brn^dle 
(tog;was tearing.' the' ^'Xyon's salvages '* trmmplij^ntly 
away. , , 

There were many other amusing iijcidei;its duiang.pur 
brief stay at Brussels, but I have no .space to. record 
them. After a very pleasant and successful jve^k, we 
returnea to London. 



CHAPTER XIV. • - 

I 

IN engiIand again. 

• • f 

ijEvnn or botttuv hall-- Dy i>i MiJ H »Hfn> stxccBfls — otkkb BiroAGKinami 

— "UFEf A BALLOOir"— PHOVnrcIAL TOUB— fBAVSLUNQ BY POSV-^QOIKO 
TO AmSRIOA — A. T. STEWABT — SAXUEL ROGERS — AX EXTRA TRAIK— Al< 
A8TOKISRED RAJLWAT SUPERINTENDEMT— IJBFT BEHOTD AlTD LOCKJBD tTP—' 

0rK|>ATft iH i<oia>a]f--BVftonM and pleasure— -albert SMriH — a pat 

WITB HIM AT WARWICK — STRATFORD ON AVON — A POETICAL BARBER — 
WAJftWlCK CAfiVKLB-^OLti OlTr'B TRAPS— OBVRB 90 VUZ TBX LOT--tBRBAV 
TO BUBfyr THE 9H0W — ALBERT SHXTH AS A SHOWMAN — LRARKINO THE BUSI- 

insas FBoaf sARNtna — the WARWict: races — rival ' bwarts — hant fac- 

TUREP aXANTESSBS — THE HAPPr FAMILY f- THE ROAD, FROM. WARWICK TO 
COVENTRY — PBBFINO TOM;— THE YANKEE OO-AHEAD PRINCIPLE — ALBERT 
smith's AOCO0HT OF A DAY WITH BABNtTM. 

In London the General again opened his levees in 
Egyptiua Hall with UQdiibin^shed suQcess. . His un- 
bounded popularity on th^ Continent and hid .r0Geptions 
by King Loms Philippe, of France, and King Leopold, 
of Belgiunt, had added greatly^ to .his preistig^ and fame. 
Thosei who had seen him when )he was in London 
months before came to see hiqi ag^in,^nd new yisjitors 
crowded by thousands to the. GeUeral's, levees,. 

Besides giving tl^ese daily eptertainments,ihe.G^i:^ral 
appeared occa^ioAally fbr aq hpur, dudng the intprmisr 
sions, at some place in the suburbs ; and for 9, Iqpg time 
he app^red every diyat the St^rrey Zoological Gardens, 
under, the direction .of the proprietor, i»y, , particular 
friend Mr. W* Tyler.. .Thiei plfice Qi^bsequpntly h??apiQ 
celebrated, for.its.grpat music.hall) in. whiQh Sp\irgqon, 
the aepsationaV I preacher, ifitiit fittain^d.his ^notorietyr 
The place was always crowded, and when the General 



224 IN ENGLAND AGAIN. 

had gone througli with his performances on the little 
stage, in order that all might see him he was pnt into a 
balloon which, secured by ropes, was then passed around 
the ground just above the people's heads. Some forty 
men managed the ropes and prevented the balloon from 
rising ; but, one day, a sudden gust of wi^d took the bal- 
loon fairly out of (he hands of half the men who had 
hold of the ropes, white others were lifted from the 
ground, and had not an alaxm been instantly given which 
called at least two htitidi-ed to the rescue the little Gen- 
eral would have been lost. 

In addition to other engagements, the General fte- 
quemtly performed in Douglases Standard Theatre, in the 
city, in the play " Hop o' my Tliumb,'V which was written 
fyr him by my*friend, Albert Smith, whom I met soon 
after my first arrival in London and with whom I became 
very intimate. After my arrival in Paris, seeing the 
decided success of "Petit Fttucet,'* it occurred to mfe that 
I should wabt such a play- wke^ I retuj^ed tb England 
and the United States. So I wrote to Mr. Albert Smith, 
inviting him to make me a visitin Pai^s^intcntiiiigto'hBVe 
him see this pUy and^il^ertifanslate 'or^adapt it, or 
write a n^ owe in English. He^ came and stayed with 
me a week, visiting the Vaudetille Theatre to 8€^ '^ Petit 
Poucet" neai'ly every night, and we compare^ note$ and 
settled upon a plaft for *^ Hop o* my Thttiftb." He went 
baok to London and wrote the play and it was very pop- 
ular indeed. 

During out stay of three months, at this time, in 
EgyptiaQiHaU, we made occasional exeuii^dns and gave 
exhlMtioos at Brighton, Bath, Cheltenham, Leamihgton 
and other - watering places and fashionable resorts. 
It was at fhe^ h^igM of the' season id these {liiaces, 



IN £KGIiAl(D A€^Am. 235 

proportiotu • * • - - ... > 

In Octoller, 1844; I made 'thy firftt Iretttirn' visit to the 
United States, kaving General Tom Thumb in England, 
in the hands of an acoompUsbed and faithful agent, who 
continued 4iie exhibitions during my ^bsenee. One of 
the pnncipal reasons for rivy x^ui^ at thfs time,. Was my 
anxiety to renew theiJdtisoum ^btillding^ leaae, altlkough 
my. first ieose of five jre|ars;h^'Still:-6hFe07eetis^lMig^r to 
ruB. I toidJI^ OAuBted . that if he^itoulil fi6t retiet^ my 
lease <mi the same tereiiis, for dt kd^t'>l9v«'y#akJiA«i^v 1 
would . immediately jiut: vn^ 1 a xiew < buiUlings' tenloVe my 
Museum* dose . his: . tioildang - dui^ing the { laift Tear' of • my 
lease» iind c&rer it.&knn^top ki bottom with pl^aiidfi; 
stating where my JCtev Museoib Was t^ b^^foutt^. * Fbtld- 
iDg an^aitaageimezitt liwbnt toMf/A. Ti SV^^f t, whd 
had jntipoidhased; t^ WaslkiitgtjDd Hali-'ptii^ity^ at 
the. Goctes of Bteadwqy audi Chambet^ St»e^;4fi(etidi¥i^ 
to e]3ratUiitor8/(9i:tbe>siteya&d*pto{>€i^edif6(j<^^ iti 

buildiag^fa to lake ihe .loweri 4lMt i6( ^^^ b&# s^tore 'lor 
his. faiwattssf afidil lo xmrt bx\(L eOMUpy kl^ ^xppet -series 
for my Museum. He said im '9mdldigi¥&>tiie) s^ atn^'^^^r iti 
the ctmitse of. a 9eek;:>> Medlinrliitlev M!^. Ol^sMfd guve 
me thq- additioDali ;gve yekrb iBKse i' a^k^, atad^ 1^ so noti-^ 
lied Mr; Stewaiit. . Seeing the kited ^ building Oiat Mr: 
Stewact Greeted oil hiid lote, I do not know if he seHotrsiy 
cixtQrtainQd.Tiiy>pTopoisitionto join him in the efiterprise ; 
but he was .by no means the great merchant then he after->> 
wards became, and neither of us* then thought; ptK^bably, 
of Oxe gigantic enterprises we were subsequently to 
undertake^ and the. .great things we w^re to accomplish. 
Uaring. compittted inytbnsinesB Mrafagemebter in New 
York, I returned ta.i&i^laiid with my mie and datt^gh- 

15 !!♦ 



^ra, wd'^ h\f^ 4k t^oi«se in Lmd^n^, My house twasi tbe 
scene of constant hospitality which I extended :toi my 
numerous / firiQiidf isk reterck for the tnaay attentions 
shpw<n to f me« It aeem^d then^ ^ i£ I : had. more ) and 
stronger friends in Lomdon t^u in New York* I had 
met smd had been iafcroduced to ^^ almost everybody who 
was apybodj," Ai^d wxfmg /them, ally aome of the best 
jiopabeoan^ tomp.mUQh moM.than mere aoquainteaces. 
,, An^^^^h? diati|igtii9ht)di. people when Imetilwas 
iutrp^uf^tl;^ (h^.poet^biaQkdr, Siaadifil JRogipm; I saw 
fiii^j ^ , a 4MWedr fiai^ty (it the vjls^idence' of thei American 
Miiust»i;^:jtl^t;JQi[>ili3mbbi:£^ Bv^rett^i Thb* old 
h^^r VAs vefy i^^blei, bkitcaatafnrinaTSingr jind all the 
applianoesi that, unbdunded -wealth .could • bring, atiU 
k^pt the lifp in him and he managed, not only to- oon- 
tja^e to gi]9^ hlB.Awn celebrated . hireakfa^to) bnt to go 
o^t irequ^l^tlf , t^ ^njoy . Ihe ^os^ality -> 6£ i o^^drsa^ As 
W ^ie|^igJ#gfA tQdiooi^rvX stepped.Bdidi^^aoi Huat' Mr. 
it;og|9ip w^ ,W£K^it€itfefipg along leadiing> cm thertom of 
a fri^^t ^i^d.gp in Jb^re^ me, when Mn Bdgenxsaid .* 

^' Pass ifi^iMff^^^ptiimiipft^a in; I tlimfrs cuawdtr it 
an honqr tQ,£pUow a4/.A«eyitfatii/'i i. .i.a » i^'.^i^ i^ 

Whep par ii^xe^ «*mtbsl'eng»tgemeiit: at -Sgyptiati 
Hall had expiredv I airrangi^d far a pixitraoted: piOTin* 
cial tour through Great Britain^ I had ^made aiflykig 
visit to Scotland before we went to. SaiiB)4^msnniy to 
procure the beautiful Swt(d% ccistum^) dagigpens^^ etc, 
which we^ carefully made for the General atl^uburgh, 
and to teach the General the Scotch dances, with a hit 
of the Scotch dialect, «whii^ added, so much to the inter- 
est of. his e;xh]^itipna in Paris and elsewhere. My 
8ec9nd visit to S^tjiudd, foi: the pvorpdse of gtrmgexhi'^ 
bUions, extended as fait <ta Abet^MOi^ 



\ 



to stbibst eretj city^^ovito, and 'Weii tillage if imp^yrt^ 
ance. We trai*^lftd by post' rimuh of ttite* time-^ttiftt 
is, r hod a' suitabk ^ft*ria^ irfaBi' for m^' party, ^d a 
van which conteyed the Geiiwal'd carriage, ponies, and 
such other *^ pfOpeiHy " aft tfUs needed foir onir levees, *— 
and we never had the slightest diffietdty* iii fifi^il)^ good 
post horses at every station where we wanted* them. 
lHw Blode of traveHlT^^ Vai^'^dtf dftly vei*y contfo*table 
and indepeiid^t;4)dt'%enal]3^ud'tO'^Mt'm^ Of 
the Way places, off «cfni ^*e ^rfefet Kite* df'tratfe!,*and'Ih 
such places we gave some of cmr'thb^ i^Uc<i^dsfdl' e^hi" 
bitioitt. Wfe Ws« ti^ «ie- iiailw&y lines 'frefely,leat4ng 
our eaHiages^ait'^n;f stUtidn; teitd takihg "fhem up again 
when we tetume*. ' * * •*- 

I ^remember- otfee maSiilg' in *x1a:a6rdinafy effbW to 
reaoli' A brttncb^ii* statfon, wheife' I' tiieant to. leave my 
te^n* and tike^ the rtSl for Rttgby i I hatf k tihie-tablfe, 
and knew -a* wBathtotrreiafetly I'^cohiiW Mt the train; 
bnt'taftrtttnatdly^l^c* a5tl« to'^Wy tjawiage brdke, and «8 
an hAtar was test in rep^irftig it; • I ' lost ^acfljr an hoUr 
in reaching the statSMiv -The ^ih^atf Ibngbeen gone, 
an* I ^nst fteMh-Ttugbyi whdi^ w- liad ^ advertised a 
petfcrttriknce: Il&tohned arottnd tilll'fdund the fenpet- 
intendent, and told him ^^ I must instantly ha^e bn extira 
tramtoXu^by." * 

<*Es(tittHrfain!^' skid he, With suirprise and a half 
sneer, " extra tAihl '* Why ydii c*ttt't haiTe an eitra train 
to Bngfby for less ihan silty pouttdfe.^ 

** Irithatfell?^ ladked^ *' Well', getnp your traiiiimme* 
diately and here fet!»e your di^tty p6nnds. • What in the 
world aiftf «ixfy 'bbiiMs'tb' me, whe!ii I iAeih to g6 to 
Ita^byiOrebe^i*^^,^fiAlafiuityl'^ » ^ 



puzzled to. Hqq^ wba|:,dji^^ngui8he4 person ^rUf/'tbougljyt 
he must bie 4^^wg mtk some p^iace, , av». ajt rk^as^, a 
duke — was wjJliog ^ giv^.^p. iq^ch , mquey to; ^ve a 
few hours <xf time, and he besitatiug^ly «^ked whom he 
lV»d,theliw>fl^oj:iof;Bervipg^.. . .:!..,■ 

.. ".Qep«i5a;yo4Tbu»i».".. , • • . - - 

, ^^xewsJieA ^ughy m,fm^ ^ . gwe fm pei#wma«?i% 

90VBr^ % eKp?9s^ »?f .OHV; e^Mf *i ^ftia .*n^ .ieft, % . Iwm^ 
8on)eipai«i?Lfpj:p;F<?#t..», ,,,, . ,. . , , .,,,;., . .., 

Y^hfln we were, pi, ;Qx%d, , j» ;^;¥e» , 91: p^re ejjf , the 

8tuden^,pa»ift:V> the,icqnphj^sift^^^ti^j)8(th^j(*^afi^ 

little fellow,, the admission, fee to h^, fpt^^w^QPti^ 

should -lie.pa^',ii;i f^ Sfl^l^^,i^in4ttf,njM^ift?iy„„.,iljey 

acfiordijagly,p^yi4^lth<BW§plyfi^,\fMt,|ftcthiJ?g[fti %nd» a» 
each m^n, enlierqdt in^tfad;pf ,^apdjng,;in,^pi41|ji|g.foj! 
his ticket,, h)?i 1^4.49wf(;^i?^Tfjgilft^ #^tlwmJ|J^. 
90upting.of tjiese jwvajl -^iW w»8;affl-efl[t.-^|ig9j(«ff«e.,tp 
Mr. Sti»t>»n, the . , <x?n.9|:a,r* , ,f^fhpr»! : whp ^wf» t : il??l«»t 
scjUer, aj^idiafteiT <wmi^M ^W9'or tjjp^.h&nfjp^id^j-ypi^^ed j* 
<ibq ,dd^]r whiab. ,Tira?,pi^Xff^ing, .% , ;«p:Qff d,,.9f t^^ifis^ an<l 

^/0i?spei:,j»n4criQd.,wt:,, .. \ • mum i- •, ..' ;.,-.•;■. • ., 
«< Blast your quarter pennies! I am .npt ..goj^g,. to 
Q02ait{h9ml you cbap^wbo.b^ven't bigg^, mpp^y. can 
<^udc your copppi; v*to,my . l^it^ ^d walk( i^"' . 

At Cambridge, some 9f the ,uiideE-|;raduart»^ preite^e.d 
to take offence, .beqauseonr cbeokrt|iker< wp^ld not 
permit tbj?i)%'to sfw)^in^t^e.e^bibi^P li^ ^4; ^'>ne.<?f 

1^mmi»?jagqdjtoiny^Tft bwM^ qflafl-4^1»>fih«94ff^ W}ih 
a challenge from the stud/Bfi^ ^ tl^ cbeci^rb^^nc^, .whp ^^ 



V 



Btttehie ifltMt fight ^diid kf fe^nWfe^^ffte'next 'thdrtifeg, 
«fd w hfe eic perte* t6 b^- ftftot, he ^tifffered the greatest 
mental agony. Abotitmidftight J However, after he had 
been sufficiently sceLred, I brought? him the gratifying 
intelligence that I had fincceeded ill' Bettling the dispute. 
His gratitude at the relief thus afforded, kneW ho bounds. 
Mr. Stratton wa& a ^enuiil^ Yankee, and tharohghly 
Cdnverimiii ivith th^ Yatfkefe vefliacntlar, \fhich h6 used 
ftei^ly;^ In exhfeitihg the Oeneral, I 6ften said to 
visHoM, tbM toil ThntftVs pftiffentS' aiad the test bf the 
fettilly were persbii^ of the ttrdtoafry size, and that the 
gesfttiemmf ttho^Ketsfddd' iti ^the tidkcft-oiike Mras thie (3ten- 
eMTs'fitthei-l 'Thi» katfe ^oo* Sti*^t<OB[ an oliiject of no 
littlfe cdrtbidty, ttfld' h^ VL |)efetered with all sbtts of 
qnmtiioM i 'Oti loneoecaisiiia in cUd ^dowalgef said to him : 
••'Ate you re^ly the^thef ef (jtbttetAi Tom Thumb?" 
♦• Wafal," *ej)fiea fetrdtton; ■•* I <iavi4^lo support him }^ 
%& ierntsiye^ method of answeritigis c6mmon enotrgh 
in New England', but thcf Kferttl dowager had her doubts, 
antf l^tbmptly irejoined i • ' ' '' 

'••I rtrttter think he supitottflyoii!^' • ' 
Iif toy jouitteyings ^ thrcmgh Eiiglaiia, I alWarys «ri#d 
to get ht^k fO'LoiidbnfSfatuI'dfty' night, so as to {mS* 
Stifl^y W!th my fknilty, b^ U) ti^e^i tS»^ fifiends whohi 
we Inldt^d to dfcWf With ds oii^the o^-'dajrin th6 week 
When I cotAd be at! homer. ^ The railway ffticifities are so 
eiiftelleAt in 'Englatid; thftt, no matter -ho W far I might 
be from Loiiftoii, I could ^6n^rall^ * reach thiat city by 
Stitid^ mornfttg, and yetfdfy a fufl week's work in ^ the 
prdyiiices. This, horweter; neci^sitated travel Saturday 
i6ight, and while I trafvelled Itaust sJee|>. Sleeping cars 
weW, ted, I *eM4*v«, stiB fete •a!ilttfi(6wn in thai? country; 
but I travelled so much, and was, by ttiW tiiiie, so weff 



.230 Itf £KOI«AHB AGAIK. 

kno;v7U'to ^ gu^s^osL ti^e^leMmgr }|M9,)t|i«( Ifoould 

'' coach •' to myHelit and aby m0tho4 iot obtoim^g n good 
night 6 ^eepv wi^$ to< lay the Bes^tnoa^bicMls o):]ktb<» fioor 
of the oar, thuai with- my Uaaki^ to eotver tnes oaakitig a 
tolerable l»e4» ... ,:i . . t^ - ?. . .; 

On os^0 of Hihese Saturday mght ^xcuwiwa^- X lay ^wn 
on ^1} I e^eip^oiia^d ©oi^ch^/witti 'theieXrpo?ta<»o»!»4rf 
ayriyfflg ftt • tiondqo, lalf r. jjye ofl'clopjf ; mi /t^Q^ toojndiagt 
Whw I awofc^ t^r o«?r waer 6t«A<^iiprg ^il^ a»di tW *s«tB 
iifii^ we^ o^p ia,the.:hpiWVfrtiSo.[t'Cbi»lfittg ire«iwwe; J vwy 
mHC)i')mbJrii4 'ti«% «^ WQA4^rli4g[^J^y'th^'^ajtfir4^rii<>t 
goQa, fbt^^Mt X gqit 1 1119^94 w^o^jkiQ^otiri^f tik^^wtndr^vT'V 
aiid,»to my :uWe)?/amawfiw*t^ J ,fo<jfldi my ,Qa^ Ih^feedf up 
iu a y£^*(|» (6Aifi^Ha40d f^ ^^^igbiieiMMSo w^pypigfft^mtm 
ii4)0 8oe[qtqd. tq ^ve cbatgor^^ tl^Q. PDdtt)«^3i Ir d^.oted 
ta hipi 'to 6(H»Q^ BH^ let nie -out .oC the <w^r*Wi^ ^as 
also locked* It iwtantlyr flft$h>^ M^a9 my ^i^ tlH^ at 
thiU i&tfitMWi i^:§v^i^4 ^^mig n0*pweoR:jsittiogi^n/ih0 

seats in the car, and concluding tlMt'it'w^i^i^piptytl^lid 
detached it from the* braiut^^od'^^iivi^h^'ll 9fffwt4 -the 
yajr4^ 7^ *as^P^b|&4^ ina^wbdia Iidi^^ Iny 

ass].»t^9ce,.ii;^Fmad. ^^e^thA(;>I ww^ pi^liy ^^es^from 
j:^»4^ii,.aftdtth?ft %\j^vf ^<*M j^^ fWP^hef/ twi* tft 

the.^ty,f^il).:eFfi(^ipg^. .ItiW^vf^W^P^'cUwif^ W(J4 w»$.to 
hav^: h^m' Iwiwe .at,/6Y^. ., , 'J\ raijsfjdr 4 grea* MW» scpd ^oh^r 
inan4?dia^ myrT^g^tWe^Fa^tcfinf Jp fc^i|y me^f^tl^oii^ 
don, to iB^ft.'the :fr^^(^ whqn^. i^ wa^* $01rimp<Hr^|it/.Ii 
should see^Xhat d^y, .. A^had t^fMuijlt) hoi^evfff,<til),ei^&ing) 
andlrAmve^ k^v^^^&t^^&wu pjr.^ighto'clpqk, longaftec 
my fdei^had goqi»,itha^gh A^ tbo greiiiilf i gmtjbgiciidiQii^ 
of.i^y.jM]^J^w}»Or)(bmB^#^ flw*at 



Jk mvai > not ifae ^appoied thai* dttring^ nty prottaotcUi 
aitaiy) abfitad I ctitfiiiodi.myis^ whdily' to ibttvxieias oi: 
limited my citole o£ ^bsetv-adotii wil2i argoldteip oram ^o 
be anre^. I evat Imd^^ anfiya to buBineuf ' but i. Had id^o 
two eyes for observation and these were busily emi^^d 
in leisure hours* I made-tbe most, of my eppeitiniiities 
aisd .sftw, kutri^dly^ it> is traev> nsotiy dverythimgi ^orth 
seeiiij^ IB thei various placws whyabt 1 1 vkiteid. ^ ' Ail Eat ope 
was -a.gseiatcuariQsityt^hop taimetod I wiUiagt/^ paid 
myifoeiiey fovitUfiishoWi' .' > --^ '. 

Wbite) wki London^ my- fiAeid Albert JS^th,! a jolly 
cmopmpikr SB welliss a)l^ltty.€^ld teilsibib autbocf piotti^ 
iseditbat wheix I'jrfeaobidd;Birini]igfaam[hei wnM eeme 
imdjAptndaiday >with.me i» '^:8igfa4>8eeing^' ineluding a 
yivife i^ >tbe »boif se iai: m\ncbi 8halkes^eare> itas imh. * 

^Bidf^otQmowm^in thesiatumn lof l&yrvmy friend 
Smith isnd-m^iself 1x>sik Idhus- Wx*eeat of aa English i»ait» 
coach, and were soon whirling at. the laMi of. t#ebro 
milesi«nihonr.o¥tr.itfaie maghificent road : leading. from 
Birmingham to Stratford^ The distsiBee' is thirty miles; 
Atf jaiittleiiriBsgle foar ntiljes' ffom -Biraifoid, we (bond 
that the fame of the bard of Avon haditeati^tedtfatts 
far^r for Insi witimA ; Sf signi.oter^a /misefkble bavbchr's 
shopii^SSbaJbw^ ve . haiD'dressing -^la/gabd shave fori la 
peAQy«r r. :iii Awtentyi Mntitesimdre v^reivvsitesetdoitn at 
thet dftor. oi^ibe 'Bed Hoxse Hotel, ia^ Stratford. The 
QOi^ftaiaii! «iind iguaard were: eaoh paid half a 'Ctte^wa b» 
thovpenjaisilcajr .' > <i . ' t.^ ' >-('-' •j.- 

While I»reak£M(b w^sjprepaiiag, we called foir a giaidei- 
book t0( tl^e, toma; and i the - wailter brought, in a- boodc// 
sayings (hafewe sbenU find in it litis ibeet deseri^tioii 
enUmt #A theihiifthUid burial ipbuse/ofrfibik^fcpear^ 
was not 1^ littlstprouditi) findittDS/Vohimte to heno.otbeki 



• 

tbimjihef Sfkeiiciii-Bdok '^ tof loctr ;itlii8trioiife>rcGAintifyiban, 
Wa6hii%i0fa i£rviii|^; '/and' in 'glandtng ovisr^'lm hutno!^- 
otB dfiflcsriptibdir.cf diiGr'plai5e,<I disci^eiied^ttesit be'h$id 
eM{)^ed' dt tthe same liotel • whexe we • twete th^ot ' awditi- 
Ixig tireaJfifaR3t« . •. r i . *< 

: . Aitcc e^EaMninkig the Shakes^ea^ wtiS oik 

tb« toiQiiai : dttd the . chxKrch:^ in which iil^tiiart i« mcfrttil 
of; thel gyeatlpteivrfealisviWe'exde^ed a-poBttCtaaiB0>f^ 
W4f wi^Xbitli. M(WJiiie» tl^ei hor^ iwere^ faaxnessingf; 
a stage-coach stopped at the hotieiv'aiid two geiMtamm 
allghted^r^iiOae tniliLsUatei sM6iblo«looUii]^ mail r 'the 
Qtheri svoriikldle^iidni tfbp. < 1^8^ fortney ^as^ miM*tftfd 
ttiiAi^fiiifitmigr ioifhja itaiahnem; bAiei latteifi wae alt^tidk^ 
firittmiib iseiisQ:>Qr ^iB^amBg*-^ iii> ifaiit^ 'a re^uldr i Ot»il4M 
Chattoihul r ( Her^vi^eniky ibad »ai higdk epiittda- of' hicn^ 
i^^0nAnrv^ai»i^tetalni!lBd^ihatlisllilvjrti^ beanng' shMld 
underatajldt lihafe lie J i wa»'W soiHebody .< • ^Pi^sliMil jf the 
udateglentfoinaAitoid: ^a. :iil ^ r > .: . •' '^.u .<.'"•.•< 

'^'tlS^vrttid^itbiavisiiStmtfosd*. L6t*«Mr«go<andiipee "ibe 
bcniserwhereShakesptare wsis bdrxL^' :- • * >..* - mi 
. :.'' Whor tha deirUds iShakes^are ^'' . askefli the tenable 
yoiipg^^ genthnnhm; .n * I»':--i ■•' i »-'.:'•.- ii 

lOtyr po9trbhaue.wasiat«^theilooff ; iwei«apafl intotit^ 
wd tvHBzsei.eff^ckdiQBg-^^'^ niee.youQjVF vofan^' tb>eixjfl(y ta 
li^itito i)hjs'birth^biiee^flna0dha^^ hf fikncl 

■ 

iMf^r hi&aoB JxeordL . ilStki [ dutadoei id iW«ani^ki w Ifoui^ 
taeaiVftlfiB.ii Wa tiieqt xtoi thei^stte^ iqilid) oppiioaclnig» 
the door of the Great Hall, were inforBt^^tfjr a; wM^ 
dsBfisedi' pGl'tieirl;tbat the:- £iiirb . of- .Wa»wiak ahdifatf ly 
weGre! absent,' audi that he was permitted to show tbe 
apaXpento tevdsitolrs, Hei iatrodoeed as. sUcoeaiively 
ihto .the A": Bad . tBiavv«ig^|looni«"' '1 The OcUftp DtaMvnlgv 



^^LeAf Waarwick's Bottdetf,"* **TIie GoMi*a8S^ Room,^ 
« Tto Chapel," md ** The Qreit' Dining-Hootn."* A» 
we passed cmtof Uie^ Oasttef^ the polite porter tonehed 
his head (he of course had no baft oti it) in H bCyle whteh 
spoke plainer than wonis, "-Half a crown each, if you 
please, gentiemen/' We responded to the call, and 
wefe-thenpbced in charge of another guide, ivho took 
us to the top of " Guy's Toiler," at the^ bbtWm of which 
he toudred his hat s( shiUing^s' worth; and'^lacing our- 
selres'ln' charge of a third comdudtor; ah old nian ct^ 
seventy, we proceeded to the Greenhouse to see the 
Warwick Vase--*- each guide anhotincing at the end of 
his short to^if-: " Gefartenteh, T ^o no faWJier" iand 
indicating that the bill for his services • was to ' be paid: 
llie old gentleman mounted a ifosti^m at the side of the 
vase, and comineffced a set speech ■ Whfch we began to 
fear was interminable ; so tossing him the Usual fee, we 
left him in the middle of his oration. • 

l^aasing through the *portfef'S !ck%e oil our Way orit', 
under the impression that we had seen all that Was iiifef<- 
esting, <he old pwter infbkned u^'^thit the lAost crfrious 
things connected with file Cdstle were to* be seen in hid 
lodge; Peeling ft^ bitt iJditi,' wfe bade him prodace his 
relics, and he showed us a lot -df truiaipdry,^i;i^hich, he 
gmMf rattkm^ us, b&lbnged- 1& tfa»t hero of' antiqtiity , 
Guy, Ewt o# Waiwick: AtrioAg thefee ward his s^drd; 
8h»id^ kelntet^te^^ABt-phite, w^lkl«fg^stalff atid tilthaig- 
pele; each of '^nmidou^ si^er — ^^th^* h^rse atmor neiiri^ 
largfs eHovigh ftir an elephdnt) a W^e pM wlti^cih Wo^ld 
hoM seventy gfldldns, dalied ^•GUys' Pbtridge-Pot," hfe 
flesh4brk, the size of k fanner's bay^fork, his lady's 
stimips^ the lib ^ a inastodon whi^h the pottei^ 'pre- 
tended ^T>eiorige« to «ie great «I>iTl ObW," which; 



9^ J¥^im9hi^P^Ai^vif^ 

wd aft;0r doing mjqiyite man^y |)er8(M^ tv^^alfli* bfitfce 

c I tfdd t\^^, ql4 pprter I hei waa i ftnt;kli9d i toi giTiatn cqpidil 
fqy hamg pftQQeptFs^f^.ff^^ije J^ifp tha^ I .bjii ever hcfow 
heMd( m so ciqmJI '^, ft^Qo^pa^^ Jifl^ ^m^fA^ Wf^ ^ .«;yi4€i9^ 
Mt gratified bjr th(^ comp.Uwfwt. : ii • ; .: ;!f / .1 

mari^Upim ^tQWs^ so oft?©, t\i^ \ yofn -fe^Uw^ , f tbfipi jyi^^7 



• > 



" Almost! " replied, thq pwtw, .ivi^UA.gJCUiiA>f^WiA«£w 
♦ip» thfit BihpwQdrb©.*wap " up. . to* rfUftuflF," a,94 ^ hfi4„ poeally 

for .the eqtice lot of t)iQ&e trs^ps V |»l wig^ ^k^q^ for niy 
MiiseuTn[ip.AiUi^ripaf.'f ^>.:- - ♦ .,-. . .! '. -■^-tt-.* : . rr -- 

"No money woirfd- Jwy:.tb^«e.| TftJ^afekfrfefetflpria^ 
p»€)meip^tos rcf . ^ JbyqgjQwe .s^fe,", rrcip)i^> . tt^ ^qji^ r .ppoter 

c^e4 £9^ i9Qy,Jklwe49H »Pithc^ 4|fifiv|C«tq#o^^ «^.th^» 
Wd ayoid *^e, wcewtj ^f, comipetbei^ a»rt «^|thai.>f« 
Ill.tjuta^,upj^<MWfebow;'V,: , r i..//(.i'* oil I'ur >• ' 

*Alb|e£t &^i^ )/M«bfd)TiRWOd^)»t§]^ At^fV-MWaf^MPAl^ 
m«tof;.tke {iQi:t?ar,?f4b^nkJt(WadQ,tb»#i)n^ 

flgri^RDy 9m^u§<4i^.M«0hy»ant«if|eicw4^^ J^)km% 

$mitj| bfmme a Quace«ful sbLOwowftrWAii^^ fl^l]ti^mg 

diacbver that ha hud iotr«)du<^[ thia mHQta^fii^w^ ftlltp 
hifii lectiiKe,,of. ccHur$e» «hmg»ng t^ af«|ie9ri»nj^4«|l(}ky. 
Be.ofibw.coi»f0f89d libatrhe/ d^m^ed )»s. ^i^sgrrifif^fi.idw 
of becoming a Bhoimnan fi^jOkia my talk; al^Ajuit t)w^bi|Mn^«s 



'Th« ««'WM#i«fe rtcbs^' #ere eotaihg off ttat day, 
yriiMvL half' a utile of 'the vilk^, iAd} \t6 tfaetefere went 
dovm attd 8pe*t' an Hottj^ • Mth IM touHitudfc ' There 
was Tery little excifemeftt rfegiwrdilig the tacess arid W6 
donelbded td' take a tdUr through "the ♦n)eimy shows," 
the vans of wloek Hnetf 6ti6'sidfe 6f ihh course f6r the 
diMalQce ^f 6 qtiartei**rf a mfle. CWr Applying to enter 
one van, which had a large pictorial sign of gtantesdes, 
white negrt), Albino girls, le^hied pig, big snakes, etc., 
the keeper exclaimed : • ' ■ 

•* Coiiie, Mister, ybu is 'Ae tn^n Whtit hii-ed' Saftdall, 
the giant, for "Merika, arid, you «hoWs Tom Thunib ; now 
can yon think of paying less than sixpence fbr going in 

The app^Al WW ' itrerfstible ; .s6; sdtirfyfilig h\k 
d6B]^n^; we ent^M. TJ^on cdmihg ddt, a i^hole bevy 
of showmen frofm thSeit and Aeighbdring vans surtotlnded 
me, and: began clescantilfg on the trierits and demerits of 
General Tdm Thtmiti. ' . ■ 

« Oh,'^ says ott», *^I Ithows itt^o dwatft what i^ l/etier 
ten tito^ttTcfm! 'Thumb:"- ' '' 

** Yes,'' aiyff antrther, **tliere*s no use to ttJk aboiit 
Tom Thumb while Melia Fatten is above the groaiid.^' 

" Now, I've sedn T6m lliuinb,*' addled a third, '^ and 
heUkMeWAe siqmdb-, but the only ^vaiitag^ heV got is 
he tAti't^il sb^Wcil. He chatfd like a man; but I caii 
learti Bick 'BfHft tt Hra months, fi^o that 'he cad chaff 
Tom 'Owtttb crazy;*^ ^ ' ^^ 

"Never mhid,^' added; a fourth, " TVd got a chap 
training what you noUe on you knoivs, What^ll beat all 
the « thumbs ' bn yout grafxplers.'* 



has got the name, and you all know the nam^!p^ e^Ffa^T/ 
thiag. • Torn Tlvwb ^o^^'t'^^ever- ?Ji|9fi6»i-Wfen m'tny 
yau, 'loog.«i4« of/S^ 49ze»4?fa'rf^*J':kIVl^,i^:^bis:•Y6tl- 
k^e Ijittd u't baml^fozled oMrQ^i^aH^TrT G4?d-bl0fi8.Jlf^p-— 
h;.gpt|ti^g hiI^ afpre har j^^a^^^ 

" Ye?, yes>— tii»t> tbe. ticket," ^xciakn^ [dDPtbei: ; 
'' our Que^ p^tiwi^s. every thifg :f^ceig&i a^ yat. sb^ 
would at visit my twiutifuV>f ^x^wofka tO'SOfVcr the Qfown* 

of Hifiiglwxdi" . - ' *: .: ' ' r ■ '-/• .. . ; 

/^.Your beautiful- wa3f:-wbrics-| '] thfly ?Lll,<i^xclaiw^y 
with a hearty laugh. - . v 

""'Yecfe ap.d wko s^^ys they hfiiBt.b^auttful^^ "retorted 
tjjq oUxer; ^^'itbey ;wAj^,made by.tl;^.,heBrt.Hit^^'4iMtist* 
ipjthis cpuiif;ry," , ;- ' .^ v. r. • :• • 

" They was made by Jim Caul, and showed alb over 
th^ cottutiy Xwentsf years ago^" rejokw^ f#Offeflr ; A' apd 
artep tiiat tbey^^iiye.yeara»in;pa\f»4» <4<i MpB, Wig* 
gJja's.cftUar, covered with, mojuid aad^diiftt/** .; , 

* * W^lli thftt!a a goqd 'uiit th^t ift- 1 " r^pjie^ tb^i pr-^rier- 

tor of the beautiful wax-works^ with .ai^ok*^ ^sdaia- 

. I. jBad^ ^ mave .Jio ,,4:P{)^Jt, \^fu pne .of ,th(^'«liead 

showmen exclaimed, " Come, J^ister^ ;dp ai'^ W shi^bby; 

Cf^ri you .think of ^ing. ^w^thout ^siwdiag tr^^ all 

round r' '. v .• . - M . ■• '' .,' ;/ . • • 

!. " Wlf^ ;8ho}jl^,I.^)tan4 ,ti;eM?",Jp8}^i{d^ ,1 . '• 7 

\^ ". 'CQiU^^ 't.aiu't. ^veiy ^^ .ya^»caa njiQetf#«c^.»^y<Wdy 

Ipt p^ jjftjlj' b^ptiier-sbt>w «ijB^"^pli^ . ^f^. W;i*^ W^^' 

I'l^a^dqd.qpt;a,m'Qwn,and,l|^fVU^|ftt^^ IfW^k 

to the '^ foreign wagabonds what wovrld .b4wtK^l>^^beir 
Qupen with inferior dwarfs^ poa^qssing oaa adv^ixtagc 
c|Ypr .(bei 'jpat5[v^ ', hif^t th^„ power of. pbe^ffingv - 

While in the showmen's yaus .seeking for aqq^i^^^^^''^'^ 



tOtjnX JhftMi|WQi iur Amexica, I wasfiteuok' witii 4h^: Ml 
aq^pe»nnoti>of .a.ooupieipf :femal09irhbieshibited as ^1^ 
*\QmAdiafltrgiaiLtefise8» each seven i&et in ^beight/' Sub^ 
p^Oting^ ffaot a cheat ma kidden under theiif ixdfashion* 
^lydbmg diSess^ .wiuol) . iqacbed to the floor and thu^ 
rend/^f^d t^i^ii^t.uumiblVf I utteaipted tp solve tbe^ 
wtjifletyihy \JitimV^js^i<>fitlQXitWf)M the eupeirflootiscove]^ 
ingt .T}iQ:.?t^«BBi«g .yftl»gy iftdy^ n^ velishing: wch 
liberties from a stranger, laid mei&itup6n the floor with^ 
a blow frofi^liep. I^awAy bw^^ I ^tbs oftmy feet agam in 
t(^era]b)jr WWk typ^^Jbut^^iot until J had disoovered thatr 
^hertpqd uj^qn a p^dflstol jatleast eighteen inches high^^ 
We.jfetuj^^^ itp ith^ JioteU t9ok a. poe^chaise, and^ 
droTp thjrqmgli^.^ci^edlf the biogt lovely eopnlry I ever 
beheld. Siq^ie ^tekji^.that tQtart I have heaipd that tw#: 
gentleqiefti o^ce . sg^e .^ he t , .eaphi that . he eould name 
thet most delig)it£^t diiye in.£ng}aAd: Many pemons^ 
ysefef -pitaex^ fi^^ ibj^ X^o jg^i^&f^^u vfx^t^ separate 
slips of pfirfier the^^c^pjp w^^p^ hc! mo9ik adoiied. , One 
g^dtl^m^ WflP^j ^' Thfltijoafl i^m Wapwiok -to: Coven- 
^yi"l^.9!^.'lttd;Fn!it Odveatiry' 

to Warwick," .vm-.o ) n : .» j .'^ ■ '' : • 

In less than an hour we were set down at the outer 
walls of Kenilworth Castle, which Scott has greatly 
aided to immortalize in his celebrated novel of that 
name. This once noble and magnificent castle is now a 
stupendous ruin, which has been so often described 
that I think it unnecessary to say anything about it 
hexe. We spent half an hour in examining the inter- 
esti|]^ ruins^ and then proceeded by post-chaise to Cov- 
entry, a distance of six or eight miles. Here we 
remained four hours, during which time we visited 
Su Mary's Hall, which has attracted the notice of many 



a&tiq«iilriQ«^ ' We dao took QUI own ''peep*'' at the 
eSigydf the. eelcbkrated "^P^dping. Tom,"^ ofbr which 
we visited maiefldiibilioiL called the ** Happy Family/' 
coQsiBtia^- of about two kaadred burd& and? aaitnalH 
of oppoeita itakutea ani piopefUitiea, aU> Ixmg ia 
kaemony to^etikeir ift Otoe icag^ Thi» ecdiibitioik W^ so 
semarkai^le that I boagbt it Itud hited -the proprietor to 
aOQwnpany it to NewYorkrttiiditJtieeame au attractive 
feature in my Mjiis^iun. ' • > . 

We took, the cms the teiale etenittg for* i^iMiiaghatn, 
wb^e we arrireA at tea o 'clofd^; Albert SimCfa remark- 
ixig) that berer before in hls^ life held ; he ^ aMoMpllshed 
8{^day's jourikey on the* Yanktde godhead prkiciple. He 
afterAitetrdg rpubtiiheii te' idhaptet itt 'iekO^'i Maga- 
aine\ entitled 'f A.2>ay iwith • BaM[i«mi^^ ih Whi6h he said 
WO' acdebnplish^d H>U8i«ie8B Wil& Meh tkpidilry, that 
when he otteiaptM tA Writfe '</at tike- aeeouhtk of the 
day, h? foiiiid>the<ai4idfe^i2]^ so cbdtfii^ iIa hi« ibram 
Oat he oa»ib>:*eaf loeaKia^ '"Fbepi% Tdm'' ill the 
honse of Shdtedtpeeurd' while Gtty^ of ^^tsrkitk W&utd 
stidk his head 4bb¥td( th^- i^uufis of ILMJ^^dMb, afid the 

• . • 

Warwick Vase appeared in Coventry. . . .* , f i 

, ' , - , . ,. *'., ^ * 'ill /• .•;i*-" ) 1 'iiMf " .'/I . • i 
;, .1; \\ i Vwfl i'" i.*j<' ».■>•) ''•ili i'» ''^ !'• iJi.li.'. ui J 

[, : : . »'» ij .; > c. ' jj ' i;i '' J il 'lii »' ,fl j: 'J •.)i' 
,] • . ' . ' 'ill • 'I-. /I ' ' -• M' ^- ^■' • •■•' U -Mj, I; .» 
. ' • •••.•:„ J .1 / i : i«- ■ j !■».]-• •• .*•- • 



' A I ^ : 1/ / . I'l 



•i V. ('IV 



J.. .^ . . ',.>:i .t •jf! fir fM/^'I 'M ' I' ' ■{ ■ '» *'■ 'J" '' ''' 



1 ♦ 



,' ^^Tumi w lAwusBidA^ ^i .: • ;■:- '"' » 



■nffl WG&ARD OF ntlS -irofrfH— A itnOLlSR UfeATEX AT «I3 OWN TRICKS— SECOND 

auDKiNs 'tiibeate>'s to put me in ikons— 'views wrr.ii. i^egajip to^pecj3, 

— A WICKED WOMAN — TBE 81MPSONR IN EUKOPE— "KE^rtN^ISCENCES OP TRAVEL 
— SAlfCH ^1>/ SA^' } -*-Tf A| Tp^.S^;^.f -T^ [UN^fllll^t^AL LAmVAOB *^ feOAST 

DurK — Hxow IN Ar(;csr — tales of travelleus — .81]«pson not to re 
TAK Eif,uff mbtiAJa^tmMii t nkuttiftU M w^tEkc/ mI^l ^im' ^^^camen' cbMiif 

FROM,— THREE YKA^Sj IN EUiy»PJ|J -7ISTAW WJ?f^lJO^^ :>1If«i^ppj— ;^|«:tOR 
' IT. ' W. ■ RHEV'«T^.it — IIEnAv SUMNKR — '(JlSORGE SAND — LORENZO RRAPBB — 

CEORGB D^ 4>^NAiW"^r<VP |*ACirl P9li-t>ieKAM()lK'bii)^ttitLlN^bANf»:ty lo'i!^^ 

NELL — END Oi> OUR TOUR— DEPARTURE- FOR Am^lilCuLr-iAUfi^^^i^i'^^^ 

WmiiiB TtwRi^atiAbfardfedn, iri*8wtl6tfd,*I itief Ailder- 

e»Vs exJwtttmiotwbiBftol cldsi^^ 8ft«^4ay''ii{^ht;^ha' 
Andejraou Wasftoiopeii iti tbQ'B«XAb»hctflr^'Mdnd^'^'tetf^^ 
ing. t Qe^QaiM lDrioikr>e3d!#otito)iali(if tft^Cl]!^ dbs^ W^' 
went >ta, t^ih'tttelr togettten^td^ gp< ttt>li«ele ^ ^t^ppi^h' ' ' 'A^i> 
suppf Ti^W^-rw^H^j; haitiitgil 6omB ^ (fan^<ilii(l joft:^i§' 46^tbie)*; 
whop It 9t]fHrred^ito>ii^Hdfirffmtto>iiiti4^u^'to^ sev-' 

" Wi«ignl<^ltbb;:Nartfi/^bti tlifet gttftffe ltitef*:^kitig liie 
about my tricks and my forthcoming exhibition. 'He 
keptt)^<i}j^M per0iafentAjn&ati6(nfi6<bf^>M^ Mi^nds ^ho 
were preaeHifc, declared that: Attd(er«oil w^ ^' too' niuch 
for . m^" t w4) meadwhiiey fresh ' iutt^duoti^nfi to stran- ' 
gers. who «iisie >in».ihad mdUie' tfie pr^y getierally* 



240 BBTUBK TO AMEKIOJl 

known in that circle as the " Wizard of the North," 
who was to astonish the town in the following week. I 
accepted the situation at last, and said : 

"Well, gentlemen, as I perform here for the first 
time, on Monday evening, I like to be liberal, and I 
should be very happy \fi give orders of admission to 
those of you who will attend my exhibition." 

The applications for <»rders were quite general, and 
I had written thirty or forty, when Anderson, who saw 
that I was in a fair way of filling his house with " dead- 
heads," cried out — r 

" Hold on ! " I am the * Wizard of the North/ TU 
stand the orders already given, but not another one/' 

Our friends, including the *' Wizard " himself, began 
to think that I had rather the best of the joke. 

During our three years' stay abroad, I made a second 
hasty visit to America, leaving the General in England 
in the hands of my ag^ts* I took passage from Liver- 
pool on board a Cun^d steaaner, commanded by Captain 
Judkins. One of my fellow passengers was the efele- 
brated divine, Robiert Baird. I had known him- as-tbi^ 
author of an oetoyo volume, ** BeUgion in America " ; 
and while that work had impa^essed me as exhibiting^ 
great ability' and ^ .outspoken honesty 6f purpose, it 
had also given me the. notion that its author must bd 
very rigid find intple^ant.aa a. Mctaxian. 8tiH I 'was 
happy tomal^e his a^uiintence o&^oftrdthe^MiMttAfaip, 
and soon rjogard^d with favor the. VenetaUe Presbyterian 
divine. . i ■ 

Dr. Baird Ijbad been ibr Dome lime a fldssibnafy in 
Sweden. He was now paying a visit to his native land. 
I found him a shrewd, wdl-informed^ Chri^an geritle- 
man, and I took much pleasure in hearing him con- 



' 



BBIMmK TO ABtlEKIGA. '24 1 

yejf^ iQn^ >!iiigfat * it war Btoiming 'fufiottsly. '-' The 
iwayj^^ii ]x4liBg'14gbt,' ttSbided'a sight of awful grandeur, 
to wiUie^ whiQh H urns, tempted to pilt oh a pedrjacket, 
g^-.upoD the d$ck,aild bah* myself to' the dide of the 
sbijK Aft^r J had been, there nearly an hou*, wrapt itx 
meditafeioQ mid Mronder, not nnmixed with aWe, Dr. 
Baird came up in. the daricness, feeling his way can- 
tioustly alpBg the deck; As lie came where I was, I 
lj^i|ed^Q3^r wd he ttlted what I: was doing so long up 
there- 

^' Xis^iog to the ptieaohingv Doetor,'^- 1 *replie() ; ^' and 
I think it ^a^^eVeft yours, although I* have never had 
the pleasure of hearing you/' 

*:'.j4t ! "jih^ i^plifld, ^^none of. us can {) reach like this. 
How humble and insigriificatrt we' all' feel in the pres- 
ence of such a. di^pldy of the Almighty pbweil ^ and how 
grateful we should :be to: fbraember that -infinite love 
guide? tina p^vyer." • ^ • » ' 

Th^ ^mid^y foUomngy divine service was ■ held as 
u^u4\ in th^ lavgetfifter cabin. Of i^ours^ it was the 
Efifpeopal form of t^osshipy The captaik conducted the 
services, assisted by the clerk m& the ship's siirgeon. 
A ,09^011 7 PJT ^iKMO'tifTthe ^Ibrs,' shaved,* washed, and 
neatly cdfofldodi. .went marched into the cabin by the 
m^t^ kjVk^ fif) the < passengers wei:^ al^ present. 

Those who haiire witnessed thisr ^ei-rice, as conducted 
by Cfk^takMijJu^^nsy nedd not be r^mind^d that he does 
it much as he performs his duties oti deck./ He speaks 
OS one having ttuthority ; and a listener could hardly 
help ^i^aling that there would be some danger of a 
*' row " if the petitions (made as a sort of command)^ 

Afit;^rn^umri'»ksd;Dr. Baitrd i^ he Wo^M be wiH-^ 

16 



242 RBTURN TO AMBRTdA. 

^8 to prw^Dh to the passengers In the forward oaMn. 
He ist^id h$ Would cheerfvlly do e^ if it AVM de^red; I 
meutioiiei^ it to th^ passengers, and' there i;?as a gen- 
erallyreitpreased wish among them that' he shonid 
preach. I went into the forward oabm, and requested 
the steward to aJrrange the chairs atid tables propeify 
£^r religious ^nrlce. He replied that I tnttst first get 
the oaptain's consent Of 6ours^5 1 tboilght this was a 
^^eve ntatter eif fomn^; .sd I went to the liapt^'s Office, 
and said : . 

^'C^l^in, :tlte passeAgers ^desdi^ 16 <ha;^ Dh !J3aird 
ppndnct K» roligiouk service, in ths for#Md tahih: I 
suppose there is no objectibn*". • " « . ^ 

^i" D0old«^y M^hece is,T' replied ti»e ctilptain, ' gi^y ; 
«an^4twiUti«ft bbporaritted.'' .' . •■ '' •' '" " 

'' Why notr' I flaked, in astdnishhtetit. 

'''Itisi i^^nsti'the rides of; th^ stiipi^' ' ' ' 

"What! to have religious serviceison'btfardT''' ' ' 

"There h^ve .beett religibu8.B0rr4ees oflee 4^ayi ind 
that is en<}ugh^ If ithe paaiengerS 6<r^&d fSbihW^iH is 
good enough) l0t them ^b withoats"^ ^as' the i«itt^te{ii'i» 
hasty ftud iLustere. *eptyL . i . t 1 * - .^iv 

" C^^in," I:reipli»d,>fdb yoo pr^ud tt> litiyijWtt'WiA 
not a^wj^jrespiQctafele and wdl-tmawn^'dli»rgymib to 
offer a pfay^t^ivibold Mligious scarf ioeb dtt iHitffd^yoar 
ship .9if tk^ ireqHQSt of yinir passengers ? '•' ' 

'\T^^^ §ir, is; ex^edy Hviuut J say* Si^ ftow, let me 
hear,np mprejtbofttitfc" ..'.j. -. ;• u .: 

By t|bi|s time ^ dozcift pa^engevs weretsroit^ng smMmd 
his doQT, an4 e^ippressis^g. their sarpris)^ $t hJIS -e^duct. 
I wxis indignsM^ti wd used^hacp faunguage.' - • -^ 

" Well," said I, " this is the mwb eontempitible thing 
leverl^ea^.oj^ wiS^ pM of the owxkers of a public 



HKTirsK TO AMsaiaiL 243 

pttsaeBger slidp. Their. meaonesB otight to be published 

far and wide." 

'^ You had better ' ahrat up,' " said Captain Judkihs, 
with great sternness* 

" I will not > shut up,' " I replied; "for this thing is 
perfectly outrageous* In that out-of-the-way forward 
cabin, you allow, on week days, gambling, swearingi, 
smokmg and singing, till late at night ; and yet on Sun* 
day you bare the ioBpudence to deny the privilege of a 
prayeivnseetiG^ eodduoted by a gray^haired and respected 
minister of the gospel. It is simply infamous ! " 

Captaia Judkiu^ turacid red in the face ; and» no doubt 
feeling ^ that he was ^^ monarch of all he surveyed," 
exclaimed, in a loud vQice : 

'' If you repeat soeh language, I will, put you iii 



irons." 



i& 



Do it, if you dare," sa^ It feeling my indignation 
rising rapidly. " I da* and d^fj^ yon to put your finger 
on me. I would like to sail into New York Harbor in 
handcuffs, on boa^d a Brilfishi sbipy jfbr the teiiTihle criine 
of asking that rdigims. worship niay be petniitted on 
board. So you koay tiry at as soto' as you please:; and^ 
when we get to. Nft* York, I'll show you a.toMch of 
Yankee ideas of religious intoieraaee.'- 

The captain made no reply ; and, At the request of 
friends, I walked to aitother part of the^ship. I told 
the Doctor bow the matter stood, and then, laughingly, 
said- to him: . 

^' Doctor, it mny be ds^ngerous for you to tell of this 
incident when you get on shore ; for It would be a pretty 
strong draught upon the credulity of maay of my country** 
men if they were told that my zeal tor hear an Orthodox 
minister preach was so gr^t thait it came^ near getting 



2M4 axrr^ric^ TO ahisrica: 



fawl iiltDi €roti<bry ^nfifieweut; * Sub »I lim not "pm^oidicdd, 
and I like fair play." ' 'i '^ i . • 

. i-Thei ioldiB^ictbrf ireplie^i? ^fl^ellvyoti htare'indt Tost 
much; and, if the rules of this ship^-Meil^o'^striil^tits I 
Buppbad we Imufit' submit;" ' I '.■ ■ ' ' - ' i ' 

The captain :dii9id>iii}«el£ ihl^d^ ho fixrthear intercDume for 
five or- sixi: days: ;i:nQt(a^ til a^^few h^utts' lDi^Or€i tour 
armal • in vNeiv YoiikiJ r t.fioinig.'ifit diimev,ii»e Beat this 
chtan]i|{igha> |boltIer.toi» ine,/Hnd;:adBedj!Hla't<f:drink my 
haalth^'^atnth^ Bonie^'tDnexi^itig it^ ^iaop^d-iiiy ill 
feeling iiiottMibeiOayiipdadiidte. iliw« itbt »fh(^tf, tl& I 
^in iiiDWi af teetDtaMr ;i : «d: Haoci^ tod j the ^^r6^€\^^ tfvlce, 
aid //I . regret! that il itiaM;- add I^'^adMedJ^jvtt'^my 
wrath in a bottle of Heidsick-^'a pbW^eyc^ttil^le^ Which 
i hope iicrrpr ' favrelpea'fc • W^i haw "fr^q^tttly^mfet t^nce, 
and always with friendly greetings ; but I have ever'f^lt 
tfaatliisitnanneors weore uniiebeBAaiily (k>a^^. a^d^bfifehsive 
ia:catrysDg tmt Hm'arbitrar^^iaai^i^ big()ted [ikiU*^ ol^/tbe 
stieamah]^ cbmj^anyj '''- ^ :..!;• - •- •>.:a-^;;ir*//' i . • ': • 

i.Though.Xrbate^ iieVk<Uciki9^ A^flti^ io{)intUbij, or 
hesite1)edin)^xhibit<d0d4ad'pf^f«mtt]c^1i)fJi%^ 
diffioreaA ireUgioaiB eteedsv PiiaVeyi^fev^r bd«fii(80^€ectktiati 
'as to iHi^hidJlhat^an^odei of^th^ d«nmnidati<ftid>te With- 
out any truth, or .©xirta ifoi< Tio^gowA^piifpbBoi On Ae 
eontraiy, I hold that isveiy ftdtb'has^someti^hat^ truth ; 
taai that^fadi 'Mtt^in its way^^ 4oes a H^e^k ^t^Hieb per- 
haps iip:'oheiidfnbe^otber'«el^:can db d(^<itdi I was 
strongly confirmed in this general belief • iiy^ affi -im- 
porotnptuf nlttBtaiioe :of Gt: iBeit^d, ditii^* oiae' of bur 
oonversatioils,: ^whiith, ^niter the citoums^tfOiis^ was iK>t 

alittleainnsingtasJitJ^ciettflU d^al of 

iotiight jiitoihiffiisbPliatmte/Hiltiiib ircdl 'hvt&wit'^tiiiit'the 

eld S^DctaniwsMitj^r^' HgiA :ifi i^i^tb^ofogi^at Vie^^ ^ tod 



HBTUBN TO AMBRIGA. '^45 

VI Iiia'CBrecr newr spired ^ther the Mckbodisis^ or- tiiie 
peofde of tifB so-called Jiberal o|)iDiona* Doj&ng (tmi 
passage across the Atlaatie, we vecy ttatuFoUy had> con- 
sidefabl&4ikdagiin reg^td to opinions iriikb. divided iw, 
though m a thoroughly good-nat^d ^wb^. .At> ioBt I 
reoidled th& owse of a womaii} somewhat noted among 
her nsJghfacH'a ior comseikesa of speech^ ioiclttdiddg pro- 
fanity, making her altogether such a person as > needed 
the tefinkig' ioflueiise ixf seUgiouid tifeudiBigi i ' Desctibing 
the yvjp impidipiaihg 'Conditibn of ) this Wommvi^^d : 

''Well,' I*)oelor, of yb4i;cah dd. aa'ythhlg witbfiyonr 
creed to impHXYe thut woman; I; should he/ g^ad to -see 
you undertake the job." 

I wasi.at once sfanick wkh ihe business aiir in.which 
he ooastdeited thetetfigBneies.of whjatwas.ilndouhtedlyfk 
hard ioaaei .It was. clear that he had dropped the 
character of the sectarian, and was takinj^ -a. common- 
sense, view of fthe problem. The 'problem t was. soon 
solved, and he xepised : r .. ./ 

^^Mv^ Bdirnum^ it is of. no use foc.yoit,! with: your 
opiKiQma,.t9' attempt to dDenyAiingifiir thataort of a poi^ 
son^t and'it iaeqnaUy useless for iiie,'wflfh iny viewsv to 
attempt it ^estheii But, if yoU ccmid rcontarire' a /way .to 
BOt some tfiary^ rousiag .Methodist to work/^upon. her, 
why, be is jast.the man to do it V" 

There, wecea number, of pretty wild, yonngnuetn among 
our pasaMtgeuSfiand on seyeral ooeasions they tned their 
wits vpoa Dr. iBaird. But he was a man of steirling 
ooouwn; jsense* and with, thst, ¥ery. qaidk at repartee ; 
and tbey never made ariytU^ out ^£ him,r On bne 
occasiottvsat: dtfio^r, th^y Wieire in great gloei and4. for a 
'' kijknlithfljp feMihim- their dhampitgiifi: bottle io diink 
a glass of wine with them. They> of tomBOi.jBisppoeGNi 



r34b itSTUBN TO AMBBSCA. 

he "mis ft'teetetelervas, iildeed^ I beikne iieiraa^; faiit 
tdien- the waiter: haii4ed him thehdttie^ he qtiietdy pcpfired 
-a spoonful or two into hk glass, aiid, graoefoily bowing 
to the yedng gentlemen, placed it to^ his^ lips, hot not 
tasting it. Of cduise^ they could Bay:nothiiig. 
,■ £arly one morning, ^several ofi these, yotiths came 
uppn deck, wxd^ . meqting the Doctor^ thete, none , aS* them 
'ekclaimed :- • - ,t. . • . ^i .. ..» 

. ^^Itisvtoldaa hell this i^dmi]:lg,lain'fc 1114: ]]N^ 
. ^I^aiafl^labls taisiiiiteitiieicaDoct hcngbt io£' tfae'ther- 
tiioinei&Fia..that Joeatiiy,''' said/he,: gi^arviftly s'l '''bait ^ am 
airaid jsoiu will iknow ail. about it' Bome tiske, tf.you 
are not carefuL" . . 

. .The laiigh wnsr decidedly against the ydung nsdan; 
^btttone. <af.:his..eomptanitm8,.whQ: tibou^ht oonsidecably 
of hdmfeifv seraoied an^dous to take np:iihe cndgelvand 

he lemarhed:. . • ^ . ^ 

; ^^ Dr. ' ' Bxtrd,^ yqur .btothec > cleYgj'mati are . making a 
great ado in New York about the!stabe of icijiike . there ; 
and; they hme got ta ameiling^committee, . whd goi about 
an4 smell :oat .all ^thy- peaces (tiiei)e^pcndmpdr<bii)be^ to 
<the pobKcc > Indeed, "theyt do say >diat sereraL^ of. the clergy, 
and some layhmn ofi Uie)ATthuar Tappamstnpeiiliaffe jgot 
a book ip^ which tbey^have !w^itteadown<^aAlist of'^aU the 
bad houses in New York.' * f should JiAwt.tel see. that 
book. . Hs:! .ha<l:I wonddviif tiiey ha^seMsiiy/got^^ 

*^'I do n^t know how; that is,'' implied jtector Bfdid ; 
^^btit,'' casting his eyes faealnedwaid, ^^I cifd ass^se^ou 
there is a bookanr which ^1 duch places arejDecontedy as 
well as the names of those who occupy lor tisit^ihem*; 
and -in due time it will be typened-to publudjgaz0i'^i i' 

Thet 5roiing> jmam dgohed eoWed^ ddd ^e^rtwdiu^ 
hand t(> Doctor Balfd, /said: .m ^-h// ...i// u. >4,t 



EETtTRN TO AMERICA. 247 

" Sir, I confess I have made too light of a serions 
matter. I sincerely beg your pardon, if I have offended 
you." 

** You have not offfended me," said the Doctor, with 
a benignant smile ; " but I am rejoiced to perceive that 
you have offended your own sense of propriety and 
moraKty. I trust you will not forget it.** 

This was the last attempt on board that ship to try a 
lance With Doctor Baird. 

Several years later, when I was engaged in the Jenny 
Lind enterprise, Doctor Baird called upon me. Having 
been so long a missionary in Sweden, the native land of 
the great songstress, he had a special desire to make her 
acquaintance and listen to her singing. I introduced 
him to her, and gave him the entree to her concerts. He 
improved the opportunity, and he also made firequent 
calls upon her. She became much interested in him. 
Indeed, on several occasions she contributed liberally to 
the charitable institutions he had recommended to her 
favorable notice. 

During my residence in London I made the acquaint- 
ance of an American, whom I will call Simpson, and 
his wife. They had originally been poor,' and accus- 
tomed to pretty low society. Their opportunities for 
education had been limited, and they were what we 
should term vulgar, ignorant, common people. But by 
a turn of Fortune's wheel they became suddenly rich, 
and like some other fools who know nothing of their 
own country, they must rush to make the tour of 
Europe. 

Mr. Simpson was an ignorant, good-natured fellow, 
fond ■ of sporting large amounts of jewelry ; was very 
social with Englishmen ; always bragging of our " glo- 

12* 



24S (RETXJBN TO AMERICA, 

rioM countjcy '* ; and wa^. particularly given tOt boasting 
that he was once poor and now he was rich. Whcn- 
ever 'he met Americans he was delighted, and insisted 
on the privilege of '^staiidkig treats" ,t.Q all around, 
familiarly slapping on the baek^ and tiip^tin^ a^ an old 
chum, any American gentlemaxsL, hqwever refined, whom 
he might come in contact with. 

Mrs. Simpson was a coarse woman, yet always study* 
ing politeness, and particularly the proper pronuncia- 
tion of words. She was, eitrer trying to appear r^oed ; 
«Bd «he prided herself upon uuderatandipg aU the mle« 
of etiquette and fashion. She was continually purcha^ 
ing new dresses and fis^hionahle articles of apparel. 
She loaded herself down witl;i diamonds and tawdry 
jewelry, and would frequently appear in the streets 
with six or eight different dresses in a day. But, 
strange to say » with all her pride and vanity with Regard 
to heing considered^ the perfection of refinement, she 
had an awful hahit of using profane language ! She 
really seemed to think this an evidence (^^pod breed- 
ing. Perhaps she thought i^ sl luxury wjiich riqh ,peo- 
pie were entitled to enjpy. This peculiarity occasiou- 
ally led to most ludic:^ipns scenes* 

The Simpsons were from New Ei^land; and ii^ their 
conversation they had the nasal Yankee twang, aqd the 
peculiar pronunciatioa of the illiterate class of the: New 
England- people. 

Those who have heard John E. Owens, in," Solon 
Shingle," are aware that preserved fruits axe ix^ New 
England called *' sauce," by the vulgar pronounced 
" sass." But when Mrs* Simpson heard the word in 
Englandr pronounced sauce, she was very anxious that 
John, her husband, should adopt the new pronuncda- 



BBTUKN TO AMBRICA^ 249 

tion. He tried hard to learn, but would frequently 
forget himself aad say " sass." Mrs. Simpson would 
lo8€r her patience on such occasions, and reprove her 
husband sharply. Indeed, if he escaped without to^ 
cemug some profane epithet from the i lips of his 
would-be fashionable wife, it Was a M^oaAeii 

Oa one occasion I happened to n&eet them at dinner 
with an English family in: Ixmdon, to whbm I had, in 
the way of business, iiitrodtteed thetn afe^ weeks pre-> 
Yioudy. We hdd scarcely taken our seats at* the tabid 
before Silnpdon happened U> discover a di^h of s^eet-. 
merits at thfe further comer of the table. Ttrming to 
the serrant he-said: 

" Please pass me that sass." 

Mrs. Simpson's ey^s -flashed indigirnnHy, and she 
angrily exdaimed, almost in a screim : . ' 

" Say sauce ; don't say * sass.' I'd rather hear yotr 
say h — ^l,a d — d sight !" 

That our English hostess was amazed and shocked it' 
is needless to say, although she preserved her equa- 
nimity better than could be expected. As for myself, 
I confess I could not refrain from laughing, which, of 
course, served only to increase the wrath of Mrs. 
Simpson. 

Fourteen years subsequent to this event, I called on 
this English lady in company with an American friend. 
In the course of conrersation, I happened to ask* her if 
she remembered about Mrs. Simpson's " sass." ' ^e 
took from a drawer her memoranduih bookv and shftNved 
us the above exprdssion verbatim, which, she said, she* 
wrote down the same day it was uttered ; ahd she added' 
she had iiever been able to think of it since wltiiout 
laughing. 



1250 RETURN TO AMERICA. 

I met Simpson and his wife at a hotel in Marseilles, 
France, in the summer of 1845. Mrs, Simpson jsaid 
she and Simpson had almost determined not to go to 
France at all when they " heard it was necessary to 
hire an interpreter to tell what folks said/' Said she, 
" I told Simpson I did n't want to go among a set of 
folks who were such cussed fools they couldn't speak 
English! But of course we must go to .France just 
for the speech of the people when we get home, so 
here we are. For my part,'* she continued, " I speak 
English to these Frenchmen anyhow, and if they can't 
understand me they can go without understandihg. 
The other morning, I told the waiter my tea was too 
sweet. I found afterwards that too sweet (toute de 
suite) was French for * very quick. ' " 

" ' Oui, madame,' he replied, ' oui, oui, que ypulez 
vous 1 ' (what will you have 1) " 

" ' Too sweet, too sweet,' I repeated, ' too sweet, too 
sweet.* Then I pointed to my tea, and said again, 
*Too sweet, d — ^n your stupid head, can't you under- 
stand too sweet 1 ' The fool jumped around like a lien 
with her head cut off, and kept saying, ' Oui, oui, 
madame, too sweet, qu'est ceque c'est % (What is it 1^ * 
Finally an English gentleman asked me what was the 
matter, and when I told him, he explained by telling 
nie that too sweet (toute de suite) in French meant 
quick, very quick, and that was what made the stupid 
waiter jump around so." 

" But d — ^n the French waiters," she continued, " I 
have got quit of them finally, for I have found out a 
language we both understand. 

" The same day my tea was too sweet, Simpson was 
out at dinner time ; and I went to the table alone. I 



EETURN TO AMERICA. 251 

called for soup, and the sap-headB brought me some 

sort of preserves. I then called for fish, and the fools 

p _ 

could not understand me. Then I said, * Bring me 
some chicken/ and d: — n 'em, they danced about in 
a quandary .till I thought I should starve to death. But 
finally I thought of roast duck. I am dreadfully fond 
of duck, and I knew they always had stuffed ducks 
at dinner time. So I called to the waiter ojxce more, 
and pointed to my plate and said, ^ quack, quack, quack, 
now do you Understand V and the fool began to laugh, 
and said, * Oui, madame,' oui, oui/ and off he ran, and 
soon brought me the nicest piece of duck you ever saw. 
So now every day at dinner, I say ' quack, quack,' and 
I always get some first-rate duck." 

I congratulated her on having discovered a universal 
language. 

The saine day, 1 met a young Englishman in the 
hotel, who had been travelling in Spain. During our 
conversation we were summoned to dinner. At the 
table d'hote, Simpson happened to be seated exactly 
opposite us. As we continued our conversation, Simp- 
son heard it, and his attention was particularly arrested 
— it being something of a novelty to meet a stranger in 
these parts, who spoke our native tongue. The Eng- 
lish gentleman mentioned that he ascended the Pyrenees 
the week previous. 

" I should like to have been with you,*' I remarked, 
*^ but I am almost too fat and lazy to climb high moun- 
tains. I suppose you found it pretty hard work." 

"Yes, we had to rough it some; we encountered 
considerable snow," he replied. 

^ Snow ! " exclaimed Simpson, in astonishment 

The Englishman looked with surprise at this inter* 



253 BBTUBN TO AMERICA. 

raptioa^ for he did not knpw Simpson, uor had he ever 
heard him speak before. However, he quietly replied, 
\^ Yes^ sir, enow/' 

" Not by ad d eight, you didn't," replied Simp- 
son, emphatically* ^^ That wont go down.- Snow in 
August wont do. I have seen snow myself in Conhec* 
ticut, the' last a( September, hut it wont do in August, 
by a thundering sight." > 

The JBnglishman sprang to his feet, but I hit him a 
nuidge, and said, '' It is -all right. Excuse me; let me 
introduce my friend, Mr. Si^ipson, from America. He 
has travelled .some, and it is pretty hard to take him in 
with big stories." 

He comprehended the matter instsmtly and sat down. 

•* Yes, sir," remarked ^mpson, " I have heard travel- 
lers before, but August is a leetle too early for snow." 

''But su^qpose I should say it was not this year's 
snowt" said the Englishman, who was ready now to 
carry on the joke. 

f« Worse and worse," exclaimed Simpson, with a tri- 
uinphant laugh ; *' if it would not melt in August, when 
in thundeir 'would it melt I You might as w6ll say it 
would lay all the year round." 

^ I give it up," said the Eng^hmcm, ^^ you are too 
sharp lor toe.'^ • ' 

Simpson was delighted, and took special pains for 
seteral days tor inform the interpreters in the neighbor- 
ing hotels and billiard saloons, that he had *' took 
down" em impudent John Bull, who, had tried to stuff 
him with the idea that he had seen snow in August. 

I met the Simpsons afterwards in Brussels, and the 
head of the family^ who had heard nothing but French 
spoken, outside of his own circle, for a long time, caUed 



RETURN TO AMERICA. 253 

me in great glee to the door, to see and hear some 
Dutchmen, Ivho were conversing togethar in the street. 

" There ! " exclaimed Simpson, " those fellows are 
Dutchmen ; I kno'^ by their talk." 

" Very well/' said I/" how far do you suppose those 
Dutchmen are from their native place?" 

" Why,** replied Simpson, « I suppbse they came from 
Western Pcmisylvfinia ,• that's where I have always seen 



em. 



With the exception of the brief time passed in mak- 
ing t^o short visits t^ America, I had now passed three 
years with Greneral Tom Thumb in Great Britain and 
on the Continent. The entire period had been a season 
of unbroken pleasure and profit I had immensely 
enlarged my business experiences and had made money 
and many friends. Among those to whom I am 
indebted for special courtesies while I was abroad are 
Dr. C. S. Brewster, whose prosperous professional 
career in Russia and France is well known, and Henry 
Sumner, Esq., who occupied a high position in the 
social and literary circles of Paris and who introduced 
me to George Sand and to many other distinguished 
persons. To both these gentlemen, as well as to Mr. 
John NinuQO, an English gentleman connected with 
GaliffnanTs Messenger^ Mr. Lorenzo Draper, the Ameri- 
can Consul, and Mr. Dion Boucicault, I was largely 
indebted for attention. In London, two gentlemen 
especially merit my warm acknowledgments for many 
valuable favors. I refer to the late Thomas Brettell, 
publisher, Haymarket; and Mr. R. Fillingham, Jr., 
Fenchurch Street. I was also indebted to Mr. G. P. 
Putnam, at that time a London publisher, for much 
useful information. 



254 RETURN TO AMERICA. 

We had visited nearly every city and town in France 
and Belgium, all the principal places in England and 
Scotland, besides going to Belfast and Dublin, in Ireland. 
I had several times met Daniel O'Connell in private 
life and in the Irish capital I heard him make an 
eloquent and powerful public Repeal speech in Con- 
ciliation Hall. In Dubhn, after exhibiting a week in 
Botunda Hall, our receipts on the last day were £261, 
or $1,305, and the General also received £50, or 
$250, for playing the same evening at the Theatre 
Koyal. Thus closing a truly triumj^ant tour, we set 
sail for New York, arriving in February 1847« 



CHAPTER XVI. 

AT HOME. 

RKSKWnrO THS X^BASII OP THB MU8BT7X BUtLDIKO — TOM TOXJKB IK AMBRICA-- 
TOim TRBOUGB THE COlrfTTRY — JOintNE V TO CrSA — BABNVM A CUBI08ITT 
— RAISIKO TUBX£ Y8 — CBASINO tO BB A TRAVRLLINO BHOWMAJf — BBTUBN TO 
BBtDOKPOBT — ADVANTAQES AND CAPABILITIES OP THAT CITT — 8BABCH FOR A 
Hon — THE FINDDIO — BUILDINO AND COMPLETION OF IRANT8TAN — OBAND 
HOUSK-WABMINO — BITYINO THE BALTIMOIIE MUSEUM — OPENING THB PHIL- 
AIXBLFBtA MUSEUM — CATERING FOR QUAKERS — THE TEMPERANCE PLEDGE 
AT THE THEATRE — PCRCHASINa PEALE's PHILADELPHIA COLLECTION — MY 
AGRICCLTURAL AND ABBORICULTURAL DOINGS — ** CBRSY BLEW '* CHICKENS 

— HOW I SOLD MY POTATOES — HOW I BOUGHT OTHER PEOPLE'S POTATOES 

— CUTTINC OFT GRAFTS — MY DEEB PARK — MY OAMB-KEEPEB — FRANK 
LESLIE — PLEASURES OF HOME. 

One of my maia objects in returning home at this 
time, was to obtain a longer lease of the premises occu- 
pied by the American Museum. My lease had still three 
years to run, but Mr. Olmsted, the proprietor of the 
building, was dead, and I was anxious to make provision 
in time for the perpetuity of my establishment, for I 
meant to make the Museum a permanent institution in 
the city, and if I conld not renew my lease, I intended 
to build an appropriate edifice on Broadway. I finally 
succeeded, however, in getting the lease of the entire 
building, covering fifty-six feet by one hundred, for 
twenty-five years, at an annual rent of $10,000 and the 
ordinary taxes and assessments. I had already hired in 
addition the upper stories of three adjoining buildings. 
My Museum receipts were more in one day, than thej 
formerly were in an entire week, and the establishment 



256 AT HOME. 

had become so popular that it was thronged at all hours, 
from early morning to closing time at night. 

On my return, I promptly made use of General Tom 
Thumb's European reputation. He immediately ap- 
peared in the American Museum, and for four weeks 
drew such crowds of visitors as had never been seen 
there before. He dftcrw^rds spent a' month in Bridge- 
port, with his kindred. To prevent being annoyed by 
the curious, who would be sure to throng the houses of 
his relatives, he exhibited two days at Bridgeport The 
receipts, amounting to several hundred dollars, were 
presented to the Bridgeport Charitable Society. The 
Bridgeporters were much delighted to see their old 
friend, "little Charlie," again. They little thought, 
when they saw hipa playing about the streets a few- 
years previously, that he was destined to create such a 
sensation among the crowned heads of the old world ; 
and now, returning with his European teputation, he 
was, of course, a great curiosity to his former acquaint- 
ances, as well as to the public. generally. His Bridge- 
port friends found that he had not increased in size dur- 
ing the four and a half years of his absence, but they 
discovered that he had become sharp and witty, 
*' abounding in foreign airs and native graces " ; in fact, 
that he was quite unlike the little, diffident country fel- 
low whom they had formerly known. 

" We never thought Charlie much of a phenomenon 
when he lived among us," said one of the first citizens 
of the pl^ce, ** but now that he has become * Barnum- 
ized,' Jie is a rare curiosity." 

Bujt t|iere*was really no mystery about it ; the whole 
change made by training and travel, had appeared to 
me by degrees, and it came to the citizens of Bridgeport 



AT HOME. 257 

middenly. The terms upon which I first engaged the 
lad showed that I had no over-sanguine expectations of 
his success tts a " spe(;ulation." Whc^n I saw, however, 
that he was wonderfully popular, I took the greatest 
pains to engraft upon his native talent all the instruction 
he was capable ef receiving. He was an apt pupil, and 
I provided for hitn the best of teachers. Travel and 
attrition with so many people in so many lands did the 
rest The Oeneiral left America three years before, a 
diffident, utKulth^ated' little boy ; he came baek tin edu- 
cated, aemmpii^hed little man. He had seen much, 
and had pwiited much. He went abroad poor, and he 
eam6 home rich. 

'On> Janim^ 1^ 1845, my engagement with the 
€reB»al at a ialAty ceased, and we made a new 
arrangement by which we were equal paiiners, the 
Gieneral, or* his father for him, taking one-half of 
the proffits. A reservation, however, was made of the 
fijBt four weeks after dur arrival in New York, during 
which he was to exhibit at my Museum for two 
hundred dollars. When we returned to America, the 
General's fodier had acquired a handsome fortune, and 
settling a large sum upon the little General personally, 
he ^aoed the balance at interest, secured by bond 
and mortgage, excepting- thirty thousand dollars, with 
wbidh he purchased land near the city limits of Bridge- 
port» and erected a large and substantial mansion, 
where he resided till the day of his death, and 
in which his only two daughters were married, one 
in 1850, the other in 1858. His only son, besides the 
General, was boin in 1851. All the family, except 
*• little Charlie," are of the usual size. 

After spending a month in visiting his friends, it was 

17 



258 AT HOME. 

determined that the General and his parents shotdd 
travel through the United States. I agreed to aecom* 
pany them, with occasional interyak of rest at hom^, 
for one year, sharing the profits equally, as in England. 
We proceeded to Washington city> where the General 
held his levees in April, lb47, visiting President Fdlk 
and lady at the White House -^ theiu^e - to Bidi- 
mond» returning to Baltimore and Philadelphia. ' ' Our 
receipts in Philadelphia in twelve d^y% were $5,594.91. 
The tour for the entire year realized about tfaesariw 
average. • The expenses were from twenty^five dollars 
to thirty dollars per day. From Philadelphia we went 
to Boston, Lowell, and Providence. Our receipts <m 
one day in the latter city were f 976.97. We then 
visited New Bedford, Fall River, Salem» Worcester, 
Springfield, Albany, Troy, Niagara Falls, Bnfiiedo, and 
intermediate places, and in returning to New Ydrfc - 'we 
stopped at the principal towns on the Hudson River. 
After this we visited New Haven, Hartford, Portlantd, 
Me., and intermediate towns» 

I was surprised to find that, during my long absence 
abroad,! had become almost as much of a cotiosity to my 
patrons as I was to the spinster 'from Maine who ditce 
came to see me and to attend the " services " iti rny 
Lecture Room. If I slK^wed myself about the Mfis^um 
or wherever else I. was known, I found eyes peMin^ 
and fingers pointing at me, and could frequently over- 
hear the remark, " There's Bemum." On one occasioti 
soon after my return, I was sitting in the ticket-offiee 
reading a newspaper. A man came bnd purchased a 
ticket of admission. '* Is Mr. Barnum in the Musenm ?" 
he asked. The ticket-seller, pointing to me, answered, 
^' This is Mr. Barnum." Supposing the gentleman had 



AT HOME. 259 

business with me, I looked up from the paper. ♦' Is 
this >Mr, Bamum I " he asked " It is," I replied. He 
stared at me for a* moment, and then, throwing down 
his tioket, exclaimed, '^ It's ail right ; I have got the 
worth' of my money " ; and away he . went, without 
goiog into the Museum at all ! 

In l^oTember^ 1S47» we started for Havana, taking 
the steamer from New York to Charleston, where the 
Genaral exhibited, as well as at Columbia, Augusta, 
Savannah, Milledgeville^ Macon, Columbus, Montgom- 
ery^ Mobile and New Orleans. At this latter city we 
reouaned three weeks, including Christmas and New 
Year's* We arrived in Havana by the schooner Adams 
Gray, in January, 1848, and were introduced to the Cap- 
tain^General and the Spanish nobility. We remained a 
month in Havana and Matanzas, the General proving 
an immense favorite. In Havana he was the especial 
pet of Count Santovaniai In Matanzas we were very 
much indebted to the kindness of a princely American 
merchant, Mr. Brinckerhoff. Mr. J. S. Thrasher, the 
American patriot and gentleman, was also of great assist- 
ance to us, and placed me under deep obligations. 

The hotels in Havana are not good. An American 
who is accustomed to substantial living, finds it difficult 
to get ewugh to eat. We stopped at the Washington 
House, which at that time was ^^ first-rate bad." It was 
filtliy, and kept by a woman who was drunk most of 
the time* Several Americans boarded there who were 
regolar gormandizers. One of them, seeing a live tur- 
key on a New Orleans vessel, purchased and presented 
it to the landlady. It was a small one, and when it 
was carved, there was not enough of it to " go round." 
An American, (a large sixrfooter and a tremendous 



260 AT HOME. 

eater,) who resided on a sugar plantation near Havana, 
happened to sit near the carver, and 6e^ing an Aifter- 
ican turkey so n^ar him, and feeling that it was a rare 
dish for that latitude, kept helping himself, so that 
when the curving was finished, he hUd eaten about one 
half of the turkey. Unfortunately the man who bought 
it was sitting at the further end of the table, and tlid 
not gfet a tfeste of the co^etfed bird. He "^as indig- 
nant, especially against the 'innocent gorhiatidiier from 
the sugar plantation, who, of cdtirfee, was nBt acquainted 
with the histofy of the trtrkey. When they arbfi^ from 
the table, th6' planter sni)acked tisr lips, and patting 
his stomach, remarkefd, **Thatwds a glorious ttirkey. 
I have not tasted one befot4 these two yeaErs. I am tery 
fond of them, and when I 'go bacTc to my plantation I 
mean to commend^ Raising turkeys.'" 

"If you don't raise one beforie you leave town, you'll 
be a dead man," 'sdicl the disappointed poultry* pur- 
chaser. . 

Frdm Havana wfe we6t to New Orieahs, where we 
remained Several' days; and frotti l^ew Orleans we pro- 
ceeded to St. iJouis, stopping at the principal town^ on 
the Mississippi river, and returning in^^ Louisville;' Cin- 
cinnati, and Pittsburgh. We reached thd' latter city 
early in Mayi 1^48^. Fi-dm* tliis point' it Wte agieed 
between Mr. Strattoft and myself, that 1 ^hoiild go 
home and henceforth travel no triors with th^ little Gen- 
eral; 1 had cbmpetent agents who coirftt'exhibit him 
without my personal assistance, aiid I prlfferrdfl to 
Relinquish tt p'ortioti of the profits, yathei' than 'coil'tinue 
to be k travelling showman. I had now been a strnfr- 
gler frdm home most of the time for thirteen yt'crfs, and 
I cannot describe the feelings of gratititde with which I 



AT HOME. 261 

reflected, that having by the most arduous toil and depri- 
vations succeeded, in securing a satisfactory . Compe- 
tence, I should henceforth spend my days in the bosom 
of my family. I was fully determined that no pecu- 
niary temptation should again induce me to forego the , 
enjoyments to be secured dnly in the circle of home. I 
reached my residence in 'Bridgeport, Connecticut, in the 
latter part of May, rejoiced to find my family and frifends 
in gobd health, and delighted to find myself once more 
at home. 

My new home, which was then nearly ready for occu- 
pancy, was the well-known Iranlstan. More than two 
years had been employed in building this' beautiful 
residence. In 1846, finding that fortune was con- 
tinuing to favor me, I began to look' forward eagerly to 
the time when I could withdraw frohi the whirlpool of 
business excitement and settle down pei'manently with 
my family, to pass the remainder of my days in compar- 
ative rest. 

I wished to reside within a few hours of New York, 
I had never seen more delightful locations than there 
are npon the borders of Long Island Sound, between 
New Rochelle, New York, and New Haven, Connecti- 
cut; and my attention was therefore turned in that 
direction. Bridgeport seemed to be about the proper 
distance from the great metropolis. It is pleasantly sit- 
uated at the terminus of two railroads, which trav- 
erse the fertile -valleys of the Naugatuck and Hou- 
satonic rivers. The New York and New HaVen Railroad 
runs through the cityi and there is also daily steamboat 
communication with New York. The enterprise which 
characterized the city, seemed to mark it as destined to 
become the first in the State in size and opulence ; and 



262 AT HOME. 

» 

I was not long in deciding, with the concurrence of my 
wife, to. fix our future residence in that vicinity. 

I accordingly purchased seventeen acres of land, less 
than a mile west of the city, and fronting with a good 
view upon the Sound. Although nominally in Bridge- 
port, my property was really in Fairfield, a few rods 
west of the Bridgeport line. In deciding upon the kind 
of house to be erected, I determined, first and foremost, 
to consult convenience and comfort. I cared little for 
style, and my wife cared still less ; but as we meant to 
have a good house> it might as well, at the same time, 
be unique. In this, I confess, I *had " an eye to 
business," for I thought that a pile of buildings of a 
novel order might indirectly serve as an advertisement 
of my Museum. 

In visiting Brighton, in England, I had been greatly 
pleased with the Pavilion erected by George IV. It 
was the only specimen of Oriental architecture in 
England, and the style -had not been introduced into 
America. I concluded to adopt it, and engaged a Lon- 
don architect to furnish me a set of drawings after the 
general plan of the Pavilion, differing sufficiently to be 
adapted to the spot of ground selected for my home- 
stead. On my second return visit to the United States, 
I brought these drawings with me and engaged a com- 
petent architect and builder, giving him instructions to 
proceed with the work, not " by the job " but " by the 
day,*' and to spare neither time nor expense in erecting 
a comfortable, convenient, and tasteful residence. The 
work was thus begun and continued while I was still 
abroad, and during the time when I was making my 
tour with^ General Tom Thumb through the United 
States and Cuba. New and magnificent avenues wire 



AT HOME. 263 

^finoi in q^^ vicinity of my property. The building 
Piogreased slowly, but surely and substantially. Ele- 
?ant and appropriate furniture was made expressly for 
^^'^^y room in the house. I erected expensive water 
^orka to supply the premises. The stables, conserva- 
tones and out-buildings were perfect in their kind. 
-ITiere was a profusiou of frees set out on the grounds, 
lue whole was built and established literally "regard- 
less of expense," for I had no desire even to ascertain 
"le entire cost. All I cared to know was that it suited 
^^? and that would have been a small consideration 
^nth me if it had not also suited my family. 

The whole was finally completed to my satisfaction. 
% famfly removed into the premises, and, on the four- 
teenth of November, 1848, nearly one thousand invited 
?^sts, including the poor and the rich, helped us in the 
old-fashioned custom of '.' house-warming." 

men the name - Iranistan " was announced, a wag- 
gish I^ew York editor syllabled it, I-ran-i-stan, and gave 
^ the interpretation, that " I ran a long time before I 
could Stan'.! " Literally, however, the name dignifies, 
"Eastern Country Place," or, more poetically, "Ori- 
ental Villa." 

The plot of ground upon which Iranistan was erected, 
was at the date of my purchase, in March 1846, a bare 
field. But I transplanted many hundreds of fruit and 
forest trees, some of the latter of very large growth 
^vhen they were moved, and thus in a few years my 
premises were adorned with what, in the ordinary pro- 
cess of growth, would have required a whole generation. 
I have never waited for my trees to grow, if money 
would transplant them of nearly full growth at the start. 
The years 184& and 1849 were mainly spent with 



264 AT HOME. 

my &mily, though I went every week to New York to 
look after the Interests of the _ American Museum. 
While I was in Europe, in 1845, my agent, Mr. Fordyce 
Hitchcock, had bought out for me the Baltimore 
Museum, a fully-supplied establishment, in full opera- 
tion, and I placed it under the charge of my uncle, 
Alanson Taylor. He died in 1846, and I then sold 
the Baltimore Museum to the " Orphean Family,'* by 
whom it was subsequently transferred to Mr. John E. 
Ow^nS)' the celebrated comedian. After my return 
from Europe, I opened, in 1849, a Museum in Dr. 
Swain's £ne building, at the corner of Chestnut and 
Seventh streets, in Philadelphia. 

This was in all respects a first-class establishment. 
It was elegantly fitted up, and contained, among other 
things, a dozen fine large paintings, such as " The Del- 
uge," " Cain, and his Family," and other similar subjects 
which I had ordered copied, when I was in Paris,' from 
paintings in the gallery of the Louvre. There was also 
a complete and valuable collection of curiosities and I 
sent from New York, from time to time, my transient 
novelties in the way of giants, dwarfs, fat boys, animals 
and other attractions.^ There was a lecture room and 
stage for dramatic entertainments ; but I was catering 
for a Quaker population, and was careful to intix>duce 
or permit nothing which could possibly be objectionable. 
While tiie Museum contained such wax- works as " Ine 
Temperate Family," "The Intemperate Family,*' and 
Mnf. Pelby's representation of " The Last Supper,"* the 
theatre presented *'The Drunkard"" and other moral 
dramas. The most respectable people in the city patron- 
ized the Museum and attended the theatre. "The 
Drunkard *' was exceedingly well played and it made a 



AT HOME. 265 

great ioxpression. There was a temperance pledge in 
the box-ofl5.ce, which was signed by thousands during 
the run of the piece. Almost every hour during the 
day and evening, women could be seen bringing their 
husbands to the Museum to sign the pledg^^ 

I stayed in Philadelphia long enough to identify my- 
self with this Museum and to successfully start the 
enterprise and then left it in the hands of different 
managers who profitably conducted it till 1851, when, 
finding that it occupied too much of my time and attention, 
I sold it to Mr. Clapp Spooner for |40,000. At the end 
of that year, the building and contents were destroyed 
by fire. The loss was a serious one to Philadelphia, 
and the people were very desirous that Mr. Spooner 
should rebuild the establishment ; but a highly profitap 
ble business connection with the Adams Express Com- 
pany prevented him from doing so. 

While my Philadelphia Museum was in full opera- 
tion, Peale's Museum ran me a sti'Ong opposition at the 
Masonic Hall. That enterprise proved disastrous, and 
I purchased the collection at sheriff's sale, for five or 
six thousand dollars, on joint account of my friend 
\loses Eimball and myself. The curiosities were 
:?qually divided, one-half going to his Boston Museum 
md the other half to ray American Museum in New 
York. 

In 1848 I was elected President of the Fairfield 
Lounty Agricultiiral Society in Connecticut. Although 
aot practically a farmer, I had purchased about one 
iiundred acres of land in the vicinity of my residence, 
ind felt and still feel a deep interest in the cause of 
agriculture. I had begun by importing some blood 
>tock for Iranistan, and, as I was at one time attacked 



266 AT HOME. 

by the " hen fever " I erected several splendid ponltry- 
houses on my grounds. These were built for me by 
a carpenter who wrote an application for a situation, 
sending me a frightfully mis-spelled letter, in which he 
said that he^was '* youste " to hard work, I thought if 
his work was as strong as his spelling, he was the man 
I wanted, and I employed him. When the time came 
to prepare for our agricultural fair in the fall, he 
made a series of gorgeous cages in which to exhibit my 
shanghaes, bantams, and other fancy fowls. I went 
out to see them before they were sent away, and was 
horrified to find that he had marked the cages in his 
own peculiar style, describing my " Jersey Blues," for 
instance, in startling capitals as ^^ Gersy Blows." I 
called for a jack-plane to remove every mark on the 
cages and told the astonished carpenter that he might 
do anything in the world for me, except to spelL 

In 1849 it was determined by the- Society that I 
should deliver the annual address. I begged to be ex- 
cused on the ground of incompetency, but my excuses 
were of no avail, and as I could not instruct my auditors 
in farming, I gave them the benefit of several mistakes 
which I had committed. Among, other things, I told 
them that in the fall of 1848 my head gardener reported 
that I had fifty bushels of potatoes to spare. I there- 
upon directed him to barrel them up and ship them to 
New York for sale. He did so, and received two dol- 
lars per barrel, or aboijt sixty-seven cents per bushel. 
But, unfortunately, after the potatoes had been shipped, 
I found that my gardener had selected all the largest for 
market, and left my family nothing but " small potatoes " 
to live on during the winter. But the worst is still to 
come. My potatoes were all gone before March, and I 



AT HOMB. 267 

was obliged to buj^ during the spxiag, over fifty bushels 
of potatoes, at $1.25 per bushel I I alsQ related my first 
experiment in the arboricultu^-al lin^, when I cut from 
two thrifty rows of young chi&rry-rtr^ es My quantity; of 
what. I supposed to. b# ", suckers," or "sprouts," and 
was thereafter iuforn^ed by my gardeuer.that I had cut 
off all his grafts I 

A friend of mine, Mr* J^mies. P.. JohnsK^u, lired in a 
fine house a quarter pf a wile west of Iraniatan, and as 
1 owned several ^res of l^pd at the corner of two streets 
direcUjf ^joining his homesteads I surrounded the ground 
with high pickets, t^yid introducing a number of Bocky 
Mountain elk, reindeer, and American deer, I converted 
it into a deer p^rjL Strangers passing by would natu- 
rally suppose that it belonged to Johnson's estate, and 
to render the illusion more complete, ^his son-in-law, 
Mr. S* H. Walesj.of the Scieij^ific. American^ placed a 
isign in the, park, fionting on the street, and reading: 

♦* All persons ahe forbid trespassing on these 

GROUNDS, OB DfSTUR^lNG THE DEER. J. I>. JoHNSON." 

I " acknowledged the cor»," and was much pleased 
wiih liie joke. Johnson, wfts: delighted, and bragged 
considerably of hayi^ig got. ahead of :l^aniam, and the 
sign remained undisturbed for several days. It happened 
at length that a party of friends came to visit him feom 
yew York, aiiriYiag in thB evening. Johnson told them 
he had got a c$^>it^ joke on Baiiium; he would not ex-^ 
plain, but said they should siee it. for themselves the next 
inorniog^ Bright And i early he led them into the street, 
nnd'Ofiter cOBdocting them a proper distancOv wheeled 
them around in front of the sign. To his dismay he 
discovered that I had added directly imder his name the 



268 AT HOME. 

words, '^ Game-keeper to P. T. Barwunr His friends, 
as soon as they understood the joke, enjoyed it mightily, 
bnt it was said that neighbor Johnson laughed out of 
^^ the wrong side of his mouth." 

Thereafter, Mr. Johnson was known among his 
friends and acquaintances as *^ Bamum*s game-keeper." 
Sometime afterwards when I was President of the 
Fequonnock Bank, it was my custom every year to give 
a grand dinner at Iranistan to the directors, and in 
making preparatioius I used to send to certain friends 
in the West for prairie chickens and otha: game. On 
one occasion a large box, marked ^'P. T. Bamum, 
Bridgeport ; Game," was lying in the express office, when 
Johnscm seeing it, and espying the word ^' game," said : 

'' Look here ! I am ' Bamum's game-keeper,' and I'll 
take charge of this box." 

. And " take charge " of it he did, carrying it home 
and notifying me that it was in his possession, and that 
as he was my game.-keeper he would " keep " this, 
unless I sent him an order for a new hat He knew 
very well that I would give fifty dollars rather than be 
deprived of the box, and as he also threatened to give 
a game dinner at his own house, I speedily sent the 
order for the hat, acknowledged the good joke, and my 
own guests enjoyed the double '* game." 

During the year 1848, Mr. Frank Leslie, since so 
widely known as the publisher of several illustrated 
journals, came to me with letters of introduction from 
London, and I employed him to get up for me an illus- 
trated catalogue of my Museum. This he did in s 
splendid manner, and hundreds of thousands of copies 
were sold and distributed far and near, thus adding 
greatly to the renown of the establishment 



AT HOME. 269 

I count these two years — 1848 and 1849 — among 
the happiest of my life. I had enough to do in the 
management of my business, and yet I seemed to have 
plenty of leisure hours to pass with my family and 
friends in my beautiful home of Iranistan. 

13* K . 



> i « ' 



, . ' V > • 1 I ' ll 



1 •♦ - I 

. . '. ' ..I '• • w< 



t 
f , 
t* I - ... J . • 

, '• ' ' ' ' \ 

It # -»i 






CHAPTER XVn. 

THE JENNY UKD ENTEBPBISE. 

GRAND BCHBKE— 00K0BS88 OF ALL KATIOXS — A BOLD A2n> BRTLLTATTT JSKTER- 
PBIBK^THX JSMNT LIKD SKOAOKMKKT — MY AOBNT IS BTTBOPB«-HI9 
IKST&UCnOVB — COBBBSPONDKNCB WITH MIBB LIND — BSNKDIGT AKD BSL- 
LEm — JOSHUA BATB8 — CHEVALIER WYCKOFF — THE CONTBACT SIGNED — 
MY BXCEPTION OF THE HEWS — THE ENTIRE BX7M OP MONEY FOR THE 
BNQAGEMENT BENT TO LONDON — MY FIRST LIND LETTER TO THE PUBLIC — 
A POOR PORTRAIT — MUSICAL NOTES IN WALL STREET — A FRIEND IN 



Many of my most fortunate enterprises have fairly 
startled me by the magnitude of their success. . When 
my sanguine hopes predicted a steady flow of fortune, 
I have been inundated ; when I calculated upon mak- 
ing a curious public pay me liberally for a meritorious 
article, I have often found the same public eager to 
deluge me with compensation.. Yet, I never believed 
in mere luck and I always pitied the simpleton who 
relies on luck for his success. Luck is in no sense the 
foundation of my fortune; from the beginning of my 
career I planned and worked for my success. To be 
sure, my schemes often amazed me with the affluence 
of their results, and, arriving at the very best, I some- 
times ** builded better than '* I " knew/' 

For a long time I had been incubating a plan for an 
extraordinary exhibition which I was sure would be a 
success and would excite universal attention and com- 
mendation in America and abroad. This was nothing 



THE JENNY LIND ENTEBPRISB. 271 

less than ^ " Congress of Kations " — an assemblage of 
repr^B^ntatiyes of all {he nations that could be reached 
by l^Qid ox 9ea. I meant to secure a man and woman, 
as perfect as could be procured, from every accessible 
people, civilized and barbarous, on the face of the 
globe. I had actually contracted with an agent to go 
to Europe. to make arrangements to secure " specimens '* 
for such a show. - £vea now, I can conceive of no 
exhibition which would be more interesting and which 
would appeal more generally .to all classes of patrons.^ 
As it was, and while positively preparing for such a 
congressi) it occurred to me that another gi'eat enterprise 
could be undertaken at less risk, with far less real 
trouble, and with more remunerative results. 

And now I come to apeak of an undertaking which 
my worst enemy will admit was bold in its conception, 
complete in its developaient, and astounding an its suc- 
cess.* It. was an enterprise never' before or since 
equalled in managerial annals. As I recall it now, I 
almost tremble at the seieming temerity of (iie attempt. 
That I am proud of it I freely confess. ' It placed me 
before the world ma new light; it gained me niany 
warm £riends in new circles ; it was in itself a fortune 
to me *-— I risked much but I made mpre. 

It was in October 1849, that I conceived the idea of 
bringing Jenny Lind to tins country. 1 had never heard 
her sing, inasmuch as she arrived in London a few weeks 
after I left tiiat dty: with General Tom Thumb, Her 
reputation, howevet, .Was . sufficient for me. « I usually 
jump at conclus&ins^ and almost invariably find that my 
first imnressiona ^q correct. It struck me, wheii I first 
thought of thi» ipeeolatiDn, that if properly maoagecl it 
must prove iumentely profitable, provided I could 



272 THE JENKY LTKD ENTERPBISB. 

engage' the " Swedish Nightingale " on any tenx» within 
the range of reason. As it was a^eat undertaking, I 
considered the matter seriously for sereral days, ind all 
my " cipherings " and calculations gave but one result 
— immense success. 

Beflecting that very much would depend upon the 
maimer in which she should be brought before the 
public, I saw that my task would be* an exceedingly 
arduous one. It was possible, I knew, that ciroum- 
stances might occur which would make the enterprise 
disastrous. *^ The public " is a very strange animal; and 
aldiough a good knowledge of human nature will gen- 
c^rally lead a caterer of amusements to hit the people, 
^hey are fickle, and ofttimes penrerse. A slight misstep 
?n the management of a public entertainment, frequently 
^wrecks the most promising enterprise. * But- I hltd 
marked the '' divine Jenny '' as a sure card, and to 
8ecure the ptize I began to cast about for a cotnpetent 
ngent 

I found in Mr. John Hall Wilton, an Englishman 
who had visited. this country with theSax-^Hom Plajers, 
4he best man whom I knew for that purpose. A few 
minutes sufficed to make the arrangement with hiiiv, by 
which I was to pay but little more thasi his e3q)eBse9 if 
he failed in his mission, but by which also he- was to^ be 
paid a large sum if he soceisfeded in 'bringing Jetuny 
Lind to our shores, on any terms > within a Kberal 
Schedule which I set forth to him .in wiritingi 

On the 6th of November, 184fl, I furnished Wilton 
with the necessary documents, .inoiflBdrng a letter of 
general instructions whidi he was at* liberty -to esshibit 
to Jenny I/ind and to any other mfwiMl aoKiables.^hom 
he thought p(roper» and a private^Ietten^ containing hints 



IKS JENNY LIND ENTERPRISE. 273 

and miggesAoaa not embodied in the former. ' I also 
gave bim letters' of introduction to my bankers, Messrs. 
Baring Brothers & Co., of London, as well as to many 
friends in England and France. 

The sum of all my instructions, public and private, 
to Wilton amounted to this : He was to engage her on 
shares, if possible; I, however^ authorized him to 
engage her at any rate, not exceeding one thousand 
dollars a night» for any number- of nights up to one 
humfbrod and fifty, with all her expenses, including 
servants, carriages, aeoveiary, etc.) besides also engaging 
such mnsical assistants, not exceeding threo in number, 
as she should select, let the terms be what they might. 
If necessary, I should {^ace the entke amount of money 
named in the engagement in the hands of London 
bankers before she sailed. Wilton's compensation was 
arranged on a kind of sliding scale, to be governed by 
the terms which he made for me -^ so that the farther 
he kept below my utmost limits, the better he should be 
paid for making the engagements. He proceeded to 
Londem, and opened a correspondence with Mids Lind, 
who was iiien an the Continent. He learned from the 
tenor of* her letters, that if she could be induced to 
visifc An^ca* at nJL, she must be accompanied by 
Mr. J^ns Benedict, the accomplisbed composer, piafiist, 
and musical director, and abo she was impressed with 
the belief that Signer Belletti, the fine baritone, would 
be of essential service. Wilton therefore at once called 
up(Hi Mr. Benedict and also Signer Belletti, who were 
both then in London, and in numerous interviews was 
enablad to learn the terms on which they woidd bonsent 
to engage to visit this, country with Miss Lind. Having 
obtaijied tixt infoormation desired, he proceeded to 



274 ^H£ JENNY LINP SNTEBPBKIS. 

Lubeck, in Germany, to s^k an iQtenriew wiAb- Mias 
Lind herself. Upon arriving at rfaer hotel, he Bent ira 
card, requesting her to specify, an hour lor wa interview. 
She named the following morning, and he was 'punotnal 
to the appointment 

In the course of the first convet«ation, she frankly 
told him that during the time occupied by their co]> 
respondence, she had written to Ariends in Lomlott, 
including -my friend Mr. Joshua. Bates, • t^ '^ the ^ house 
of \^aring Brothers, and had informedh^salf respeeli- 
ing my character, capacity, and responflibiUty, whicfa^she 
assured him were ^uite satisfaotory* She xnforined 
him^ . however, that at that time there wbre -fimr per- 
sons anxious to negotiate with later iortah Ameiioan tour. 
Oxve of these gendemen was a well'Jmown opera man^ 
ager in London; another, a theatrical manager in Man- 
chester ; a third) a.musical composer and conducforofithe 
orchestra of Her Me^esty's Opera in Lozsdon ; and the 
fourth, Chevalier Wyokoff; a person whi^ had ^ondveted 
a successful speculation aotAe years previously by visits 
ing America in charge of the celebrated danseuee, 
Fanny ElMer. , Several of ihiese partiesrhad called upon 
her personally,' and Wyckbff uponvhearing my name, 
attempted to deter her from liialdiig any enga^eolcfnt 
with me, by assurh^ her<^at I was amtt^ slyA¥(^an, 
and that, for the sake of ntiaking money 'by- t^ie' Spec- 
ulation, I would Qlot sisruple^ ^ tid put her into a box 
apd exhibit her throUg^ tK^' country at twent^-fiVe 
cents a head. 

This, she confessed, .somewhat alanined her, and she 
wrote to Mr. Bates on the subject. He entirely 'dis- 
abused her mind, by assuring her that he knew me 
personally, and that % treating witii me «lke WM not 



THE JSKNT LIND ENTERPKESE. 275 

dealing with an ^'adventurer" who might make her 
remmieiation depend entirely upon the success of the 
enterprise, but I was able to carry out ail my engage- 
ments, let them prove never so unprofitable, and she 
could place the fullest reliance upon my honor and 
integrity. 

^*^Now," said she to Mr* Wilton, "I am perfectly 
satisfied on that point, for I know the world pretty well, 
and am aware how far jealousy tod ' envy will some- 
times carry persons; and as those who are trying to 
treat with me are aU anxious that I should participate 
in the profits or losses of the enterprise, i much pre* 
fer treating with you, since your principal is willing to 
assume aU the responsifoility, and take the entire man- 
agement and chances cf the result upon himself." 

Several interviews ensued, during which she learned 
from Wilton that he had settled with Messrs. Benedict 
and Belletti, in regard to the amount of their salaries, 
provided the engagement was concluded, and in the 
course of a week, Mr. Wilton and Miss Lind had 
arranged- the terms and conditions on which she was 
ready to o6nclude the negotiations. As these terms 
were within the limits 'fixed in my private letter of 
instructions, the following agreement was duly drawn in 
triptieate, and s^ed by herself and Wilton, at Lubeck, 
January ^9 1850; and the signatures of Messrs. Bene- 
dict and Belletti were 'affixed in London a few days 
afterwards: 

MeaioBiJn>0X of an agreement entered into this ninth day of January, in tho 
ytar of onr X^ord one thousand .eight hundred and fifty, hetwcen John Hall 
Wflhm, nn agent for PimrEAS T. Babnum, of New York, in the United States of 
North America^ of the one parti and Mademoiselle JisHtrt Lna>, Vocalist, of 
r>toukhobn in Sweden, of the other part, wherein the aaid Jenny Lind doth agree: 

1st To sing for the said.Fhineas T. Bamum in one 
hundred and* fifty concerts, including oratorios, within 



1 
213 T^OS JENKY LEND ENTERPMBE. 

(if poesible) one year, or eighteen months from the date 
of her arrival in the City of New York — the said con- 
certs to be given in the United States of North America 
and Havana. She,, the said Jenny Lind, having fall 
control as to the number of nights or concerts in each 
week, and the number of pieces in which she will «ng 
in each concert, to be regulsifed conditionally with her 
health and safety of voice, but. the former never less 
than, one or two, nor theJbbCter less than four; bat in no 
case to appear in operas. 

2d. In consideration of said services, the saidr John 
H^ Wilton, a0 agent for the said-Phineas T>. JBamum, 
of New York, agrees to ftimish the said Jenny Lind 
with a servant as waiting*maid, and a male servant to 
and for the sole seivice lof her nnd her party ; to paythe 
travelling and hotel expanses of a friend to accompany 
heraa a:companipn; to pay also ai secretary to superin^ 
tend hpir fin^ncc^ ; to pay all her and Jier. party's traFsl- 
ling eixp^ses fxpm Europe^ and daring the tour in Uie 
United States of North America and Havana ; to p^y 
all hotel expenses for board and lodging during the 
same period ; to place at her disposal in each city a car- 
riage SAd l^o^TBes with th^ii* necessary! attendant^ and to 
give her ipr addition j the sum of two Jrandred pounds 
sterling,; or ope thofmand dollars; for .each concert .or 
oratorio in which. the sfdd. Jenny iLind shall sing. . 

3d. And .the said John Hall Wilton, as agent for the 
said Phineas T. Bamum, doth further agree to give Ae 
said Jenny Lind the most satisfactory security and assur- 
ance for the full amount of her engagement, which shall 
be placed in the hands of Messrs. Baring Brothers, of 
London, previous to the departure and subject to the 
order of the said Jenny Lind, with its interest due on 



THE JENNY LIND ENTERPRISE. 277 

its ctirrent reduction, by her services in the concerts or 
oratorios. 

4th. And the said John Hall Wilton, on the part of 
the said Riineas T. Bamum, further agrees, that should 
the said Fhhieas T. Bamum, after seventy-five concerts, 
have realized so much as shall, after paying all current 
expenses, liave returned to him all the sums disbursed, 
either as deposits at interest, for securities of salaries, 
preliminary outlay, or' moneys in any vray expended 
consequent on this engagement, and in addition, hav6 
gained a clear- profit of at least fifteen thousand pounds 
stealing, then the said Phineas T. Bamum will give the 
said Jenny Lind, in addition to the former sum of one 
thoosand dollars CUrrenit money of the United States of 
North America, nightly, one fifth part off the profits 
arising from the remaining seventy-five concerts or ora- 
torios, after deducting every expense current and 
appertaining thereto ; or the said Jenny Lind agrees to 
try with the said Phineas T. Barniim fifty concerts or 
oratorios on the aforesaid and first-named terms, and if 
then found to full short of th^ expectations of the said 
Phineas T. Bamum, then thef said Jenny Lind agrees to 
reoi^;ani2e this agreement, on terms quoted in his first 
proposal, as set forth in the annexed copy of his letter ; 
bat'^dnld such be found tinn^essary, then the engage- 
ment coiktinnes up to seventy-five concerts or oratorios, 
at the end of which, should the aforesaid profit of fifteen 
thourand pounds* sterling havie not been realized, then 
the ei^agement shall continue eis at first — the sums 
heiiein, after expenses for Julius Benedict and Giovanni 
Belletti, to remain unaltered except for advancement. 

5th. And the said John Hall Wilton, agent for the 
said Phineas T. Barnum, at the request of the said 



278 THE JBNNY UND ENTBBPRiWB. 

Jenny Lind, agrees to pay to Jnlina Beaedii^ty of Jm^ 
don, to accompany the said Jenny Lind as musioaltdir 
rector, pianist, and superintendentiof the muai^ai d^ut- 
ment, also' to assist the said Jenny Lind in one hundred 
and fifty concerts or oratorios, to be giveii in the -Uoited 
States of North America and Havana, the «um of five 
thousand pounds (£5,000) sterling, to be saitisfafetocily 
secured to him with Messrs. Baring BrofchMs, ef Li«- 
don, previous to his departure from -Burope ; • and tthe 
said John Hall Wilton ^^rees further, for the said Phin- 
eas T. Bamum, to pay all his travelling -eispeiiaes fcom 
Europe, together with his hotel and travelling expenses 
during the time occupied in giving the aforesaid one 
hundred and fifty concerts or oratorios —he, theeaid 
Julius Benedict, ta superintend the organixatioa of ora- 
torios, if required. !. . 

6th. And the said John Hall Wiltoi), at the request, 
selection, and for the' aid of the said Jenny Li^ agfees 
to pay to Giovanni Belletti, baritone *vooalist» 'to accom- 
pany the said Jenny lind durmg hei? tour aad ki. one 
hundred and fifty concerts or oratorioe m the United 
States of North America and Havana, and in coxqam> 
tion with the aforesaid Julius Bei^diet^ the^-^and-of two 
thousand five hundred pound/i (£2,500) steriingi to-be 
satisfactorily secured to him previous to hk rdefNKisture 
from Europe, in addition to all his liotel a4»d tMvelliog 
expenses. 

7th. And it is further agreed that the said Jenny 
Lind shall be at full liberty to sing at any time ^she mdy 
think fit for charitable institutions or purposed indepen- 
dent of the engagement with the. said Phineas T. 
Barnum, she, the said Jenny Lind, consulting with the 
said Phineas T. Barnum with k view to mutually agcee* 



7HB JBMKY LIKD KKTBRPSIBlfi. 279 

ing as to the time and its propriety, it being understood 
that in no case shall the first or second concert in any 
city selected for the tour be for such purpose, or where- 
ever it shall appear against the interests of the said 
Phiaecte T. Bamum. 

8th. It is farther agreed that should the said Jenny 
Lind by any act of God be incapacitated to fulfil the 
entire engagement before mentioned, that an equal pro- 
portion of the terms agreed upon shall be given to tixe 
said Jenny lind, Julius Benedict, and Giovanni Bellptti, 
for services rendered to that time. 

9th. It is further agreed and understood, that the said 
Phineas T. Bamum shall pay every expense appertaining 
to the concerts or oratcmos before mentioned, excepting 
those for charitable 'purposes, and that aU accounts shall 
be settied and rendered by all parties weekly. 

10th J And the. said Jenny Lind further agrees that 
she will not engage to sing for ai^ other person during 
the progress of this said engagement with the said 
Phineas T. Bamnm, of New York, for one hundred and 
fifty concerts or oratorios, excepting for .charitable 
purposes as before mentioned ; and all travelling to be 
first and best class. 

In witness hereof to the within written memorandum 

r 

of agreement we set hereunto our hand and seal. 

[L. S.] John Hall Wilton, Agent for PHineas T. 

Barnum, of New York, U. S. 
[L. S.] Jenny Lind. 

(X. S.] Julius Benedict. 

[L. S.] Giovanni Belletti. 

In the presence of C. ' Achilling, Consul of His 
Majesty the King of Sweden and Norway. 



280 ' THE Jl&NKY JjI»D EyTBggBTg^. 

Extract from a Letter oMref^ed to J^hnllan WiUon 2^ 
Phineas T. BABNUM,^n(;? referred, to in ^aragroffh No. 
4 of the annexed agreement. 

New York, November 6, 1849. 
Mr J. Hall Wilton : 

Sib : — In reply to jour proposal to attempt a nego- 
tiation with Mile. Jenny Lind to visit the "United States 
professionally, I profiose to enter into an arrangement 
with her ta the following feffect: I will engage to pay 
all her expenses from Europe, provide for and pay for 
one principal tenor and one J)ianist, their salaries 
not exceeding ' together one hundred and fifty dollars 
pef night; to st^pport for her a carriage, two servants, 
and a friend to accompany her ail'd superintend her 
finances. I will furthermore pay all knd every expense 
appertaining to her appearance bdfor6 the public, and 
give 'her half of the gross receiptis arising, from 
concerts bir Operas. I will engage to traveWith her 
personally and attend to the arrangenierits, provided she 
will undertake to give riot less t3iaii' eighty noi* more 
than one' hundred atfd fifty concerts, 'or nights' perform- 

ances. 

Phineas T. Barnttm^ 






I certify, th^e abwQ.to.be a true exti:^ct |rom ti^9 .letter. 
,. . . J H. WiMON- 

I wks al m;^ IJlliiseum in Philadelphia when Wilton 
arrived in New York, February 19, 1850. He imme- 
diately telegraphed to me, in, thq cipher' we had agifeed 
upon, that he had signed an engagement with Jenny 
Lind, by which she was to commence her concerts in 
A]9[^erica in the following September. I waa somewhat 



THE JBNNY LIND EJBTTBRPRISB. 281 

Starred by tMa sudden annoimcemeut ; and feeling that 
the tiafe to dapse before her sitrival was s6 long that it 
would be policy to keep the engagement private for a 
few months, I immediately telegraphed him not to men- 
tion it to any person, and that I would meet him the 
next day in New York. 

When we reflect how thoroughly Jenny Lind, her 
musical powers, her character, and wonderful successest,- 
were subsequently known by aU clashes in this country 
as well as throughout tl^e civilized worlds it is difficult 
to realise tha^ at the time thiS' engagement was made, 
she was coiapar£vtively. unknown on this Ade the wat^. 
We can hardly predit the fact, tiiat millions of persons 
in America had never heard of her, that other millions 
had merely read her name, but had no distinct idea of 
who or what.i^he was. Only a small portion of the 
public were really aware of her gireat musical triumphs 
in the Old World, $2id this ipebrtion was confined almost 
entirely to musical people, trayellj^rs who had visited 
the Old Wgrld, smd tbye' conductors of the press. 

The next morning I started foa: New York. ■ On arriv'- 
ing at Frincejton we met theNew York cars, and purchas>^ 
ing the mpming papers, I was. surprised to find in them 
a full account of my engagement with Jenny Lind. 
However, . this ffsf^^motofe aifnouxheeineixt . rould not be 
iiecalk4fȤli(i I pujb Utip best fwe dn ;the matter* Anxijous 
to learn )iq^ this commuuioatioln w<)uld strike the pub* 
lie mind, I infomsked the ^condiietor^ Whom I well knew, 
that I had rmade an engagement' with Jenny Lind, and 

that she would surely visit this country in the following 
August 

''Jenny Lindl la she a dancer?" asked the con- 
ductor.. 



383 ™ES JBNKY lilKD ENTEBPHIBS. 

lonfermed^him who and what she was, but .his ques* 
tion had chilled me as if his words were ice/ Beally, 
thought!, if, this is all that a man in the Ga|)acit7'of a 
railroad conductor between Philadelphia and New York 
knows of . the greatest songstress in the world, I am not 
sure that six months will be too long a time for me to 
occupy .in enlightening the public in regard to her 
merits. 

I had an interview with Wilton, and learned from 
him that, in accordance with the agreement, it would be 
requisite for me to place the entire amount stipulated^ 
f 187,500, in the hands of the London bankehi. I at 
once . resolved to ratify the agreement, and immediately 
sent the njecessary documents to Miss Lind and Messrs. 
Benedict and Belletti. 

I then began to prepare, the public mind, through the 
newspapers, for the reception of the ^eat songstress. 
How leffeotually tiiis was done, is still within the remem- 
brance of the Amerioan public. As a sample of the 
manner in which. I^accomplished my purpose, I present 
the, following extract from my first letter, which ap- 
peared in the New York^papers of February 32, 1850 : 

^' Periiaps I. may not make any money by this enter- 
priser but I assure you that- if I knew I should not 
make . a farthing, profit^ I would raltfy the engage^ 
mentt so anxious am I that the United ^States eihould 
be visited by a lady whose vocal powers htiv6 never 
been, approached by any other human being, and 
whose character is charity, simplicity, and goodness 
personified. 

" Miss Lind has great anxiety to visit America. She 
speaks of this country and its institutions ia the highest 
terms of praise. In her engagement with me (whicli 



THE JSlf NY LIKD ENTBBFBIS8. 283 

inciadffl Havana), she expressly reserves the right to 
gire eharitaUe ooncects whenever she thinks- proper. 

"^ Since her dSfnti in Englaind, she has given to the 
poor from her own private purse more than* the whole 
amount which I have engaged to pay her, and > the pro- 
ceeds of concerts for charitable purposes in Great Brit^ 
ain, where she has snng gratuitously, have realized more 
than ten times that amount" 

The people soon begun to talk about Jenny Lind, and 
I was particularly anxious to obtain a good portrait 
of her. Fortunately, a fine opportunity occurred. One 
day, while I was sitting in the of&ce of the Museum, 
a foragner approached me with a small package under 
bis arm. He informed me in broken English that 
he was a Swede, and said he was an artist, who had 
just anived firom Stockholm, where Jenny lind had 
kindly given him a number of sittings, and he now 
had mih hitn the portrait of her which he had painted 
upon copper. He nnwrh^ped • the- package^ and 
showed 'me. a beantiful picture: .of the. iSwedish Night* 
ingale, inclosed in^ fan. elegant gilt fcame^ about ifoarteeii 
by twenty inches. It ivas.just the thing I. wanted ; 
the price' was fifty, ddllars, and I ptnrchased it at once. 
Upon showing it to an artiste friend ;tbe same day^ he 
quietly • assured me that it. was a cheap lithograph 
pasted oci^ a tin faac^, neatly varnished, and made to 
appear lUie a fine oil painting; Tiie intrinsic value 
of the picture did not exceed thirty-seven and one 
half cents! 

After getting togetlter all my available funds for the 
purpose of transmitting them to London in the shape 
of United States bonds, I fonnd a considerable sum still 
lacking to make up the • amount I had some second 



284 THE JEXrSY LIND EKTERPRlSB. 

nrfortgages which were perfectly good, but I could not 
negotiate them in Wall Street.* Nbthing would Answer 
there short of first mortgages on New York or Brook- 
lyn city property. 

I went to the president of the bank where I had 
done all my business for eight years. I offered him, ns 
security for a load, my second mortgages, and as an 
additional inducement, I proposed. to make over to him 
my contract with Jenny Liud, with a written guanuity 
that he should appoint a receiver, who, at my expense, 
should take charge of all the receipts over and above 
three thousand dollars per night, and appropriate them 
towards the payment of my loan. He laughed in my 
face, and said : *' Mr. Barnum, it is generally believed in 
Wall Street, that your engagement with Jenny Lind 
will iruin you. I do not think you will ever receive 
so much as three thoustod dollars at a single concert.'' 
I was indignant at his Want of appreciation, and 
answered him; that I would not at that moment take 
f 150,000 for my contract ; nor Would I. I found, 
upon further inquiry, that it was useless in Wall Street 
to offer the "Nightingale" in exchange for Goldfinches. 
I finally was introduced to Mr^ John L. Aapitiwall, of 
the firm of Messrs. Howland & Aspinwall, and he gave 
me a letter of credit from his firm on Barinyg^ Brothers, 
for alaige sum 'on ksallateirial ^ecuritiis, whicb* a 'spirit 
of genuine (respect* for mf ira^tef prise induced him to 

accept • . . ': : . 

After disposing of several pieces of pr6pterty for 
cash. I footed up! the various amounts, and still disco v- 
ered myself five thousand dollars shoit. I felt that 
it was indeed ^^the last feather that breaks tlie camefs 
back.'' Happening casually to state my desperate case 



TSE JENNY UND ENTERPBISB. 



285 



to the Rev. Abel C. Thomas, of Philadelphia, for many 
years a friend of mine, he promptly placed the requisite 
amount at my disposal. I gladly accepted his proffered 
friendship, and felt that he had removed a mountain- 
weight from my shoulders. 



CHAPTER XVni. 

< 

THE NIGHTINGALE IN NEW YOBK. 

futai. cokoebts in Liverpool — depabtubb for America — abbival off 
8tatex i8lain> — my first uttbrvibw with jennt ldtb — the tbbmbk- 
dous thbono at the wharf — triumphal arches — "welcome to amebr 

ICA" — EXCITEMENT IN THE CITT — BEBBNADE AT THB IBVDTO HOUSE — THE 
PRIZE ODE ~ BAYARD TAYLOR THE PBIZBMAN — " BABNUM'S PABNASSU8 " — 
"BARNUMOPSIS" t-FIBST CONCEBT in castle GABDEN — A NEW AOBEEMENT 
— BECEPTION OF JENNY LIND — UNBOUNDED ENTHUSIASM — BABNX7M CALLED 
OUT— JULIUS BENEDICT — THE SUCCESS OF THE ENTEBPBISE ESTABLISHED — 
TWO QBAND CHABTTY CONCEBTS IN NEW YOBK— DATE OF THE FIBST BBGULAB 
CONGBBT. 

After the engagement with Miss Lind was oonsam- 
mated, she declined several liberal offers to sing in 
London, but, at my solicitation, gave two concerts in 
Liverpool, on the eve of her departure for America. 
My object in making this request was, to add the Sclat 
of that side to the excitement on this side of the Atlan- 
tic, which was already nearly up to fever heat. 

The first of the two Liverpool concerts was given the 
night previous to the departure of the Saturday steamer 
for America. My agent had procured the services of a 
musical critic from London, who finished his account of 
this concert at half past one o'clock the following morn- 
ing, and at two o'clock my agent was overseeing its 
insertion in a Liverpool morning paper, numbers of 
which he forwarded to me by the steamer of the same 
day. The republication of the criticism in the Ameri- 
can papers, including an account of the enthusiasn 
which attended ^nd followed this concert, — her trans* 
Atlanti J, — had the desired effect. 



THJS KIQHTINOAIiB IN NBW YOBK. 287 

On Wednesday mconung, August 21 y 1850, Jexmy 
Lind and Messrs. Benedict and Belletti, set sail from 
Liverpool in the steamship Atlantic, in which I had 
long before engaged the necessary accommodations, and 
on board of which I had shipped a piano for their use. 
They were accompanied by my agent, Mr. Wilton, and 
also by Miss Ahmansen ai^d Mr. Max Hjortzberg, cous- 
ins of Miss Lind, the latter being her Secretary ; also by 
her two servajols, and the valet of Messrs. Benedict and 
Belletti. 

It was expected that the steamer would arriTe on 
Sunday, September 1, but, determined to meet the song* 
stress on her airival whenever it might be, I went to 
Staten Island on Saturday, and slept at the hospitable 
residence cf my friend, Dr. A. Sidney Doane, who was 
at that time the Health Officer gI the Port^f New York. 
A few minutes before twelve o'clock, on Sunday morn- 
ing, the Atlantic hove in sight, and immediately after^ 
wards, through the kindness of my friend Doane, I was 
on boaid the ship, and had taken Jenny Lind by the 
hand. 

After a few moments' conversation, she asked me 
when and where I had heard her sing. 

** I never had the pleasure of seeing you before in my 
life,'' I replied 

'^ How is il possible Hmt you dared risk so much 
money on a person whom yoa never heard sing ? " she 
asked in surprise. 

'' I risked Jit on your reputation, which in musical 
matters I would much rather trust than my own judg- 
ment," I replied. 

I may as well state, that although I relied promi* 
lently upon Jeony Lind's reputation as a gseat musical 



388 THE NIGHTINGALE IN NEW YORK, 

artiste J I also -took ^ largely into toy eBtimat43 of her 
success with all idlassdsof the American public, her 
character for extraofdihafry beheTolence and gbnewsity. 
Without this peculiarity in her disposition, 1 never 
would have dared make the engagement whicfa I did, 
as 1 felt sure, .that there were multitudes of indiriduals 
in America who would be* prompted to attend he^ con- 
ceirts by this feeling albne.: • ' * ' ■ 

Thousands of persbiiB >cbveyed thb ship^fig'atidtndrs, 
and othey thousands had congregated on the wharf at 
Canal Streeti to see her: The wildest enthusiasm pre- 
vailed as the steamer approached Ihe dock. ^ISo; gfreat 
was the rush 6n:ti slodp nearthe^sieainer's bferth, that 
one man, in his zeal tb obtain a good vie w^ ae^detttally 
tumbled overbdard. amid the^ ahouts 'Of those hiear 
him; Miss lind witnessed this incident, and was *much 
alarmed.. He was, however; soon rescued, after takitig to 
himself a cold; duck instead of. securing a view cif the 
Nightingale. * A' bmver of green trees, decorated With 
beautiful flags, was discovered on the wharf, together 
with two triumphal arches, on one of which wa^ in- 
scribed^ "Welcome, Jenny Lind!" The *€eeottditvas 
surmounted by the -American eagle^ and bore' the inserip- 
tion," Welcome' to America!'' ' These dfecoratioas were 
not produced by magic, and I do not know diat' j[ ec^ rea- 
sonably find £mU! with thos^ who Suspected I- had ^i&and 
in their erection. My prirate carriage was m "waiting, and 
Jenny Lind was escorted to it by Captain W^sfc* The 
itest of thJB inusical party entered the ijarriage, and 
mounting the box at- the dliver's side; I directed him tr 
the Irving House. I took that seat as a iegitimat* 
advertisement, and my presence on the outside' of th^ 
caririage aided those who filled the 'windows and side 



THE NIGHTIKOALE IN NEW YORK. 289 

walks along the whole route, in coming to the conclu- 
sion that Jenny Lind had arrived. 

A reference to the journals of that day will show, that 
never before had there bean such enthusiasm in the City 
of New York, or indeed in America. Within ten min 
ntes after our arrival at the Irving House, not less than 
twenty thousand persons had congregated- around the 
entrance in Broadway, nor was the number diminished 
before nine o'clock in the evening. At her request, I 
dined with her that afternoon, and when, according to 
European custom, she prepared to pledge me in a glass 
of wine, she was somewhat surprised at my saying, 
" Miss Lind, I do not think you can ask any other favor 
on earth which I would not gladly grant ; but I am a 
teetotaler, and must beg to be permitted to drink your 
health and happiness in a glass of cold water." 

At twelve o'clock tl^p.t night, she was serenaded by 
the New York Musical Fund Society, numberii^, on 
that occasion, two hundred musicians. They were 
escorted to the Irving House by about three hundred 
fuemen, ijl their red shirts, bearing torches. There was 
a far greater throng in the streets than there was even 
during the day. The calls for Jenny Lind were so 
vehement that I led her through a virindew to the 
halcony. The loud cheers from the crowds lasted for 
several minutes, before the serenade was permitted to 
proceed again. 

I have given^the merest sketch of but a portion of the 
incidents of Jenny Lind's first day in America. For 
weeks afterwards t}ie excitement was unabated. Her 
roony were thronged by visitors, including the magnates 
of the land in both Church and State. The carriages 
of the wealthiest citizens could be seen in front of her 

19 



290 THE NIGHTINGALB IN NEW YORK. 

hotel at nearly all hours of the day, and it wns witb 
some difficulty that I pi'evented the ** fashionables ^* from 
monopolizing her altogether, and thus; as I believed, 
sadly marring my infterests Uy cutting her off from the 
warm sympathies she had awakened among the masses. 
Presents of all sorts were showered upon her. Milli- 
ners, mantua-makers, ftnd shopkeepers vied With each 
other in calling her attention to their wares, of which 
they sent het many valuable specimens, delighted if, in 
return, they could receive her autograph 'ackhbwledg- 
ment. Songs, quadrilles and polkas were dedicated to 
her, and poets sung in her praise. We had Jenny Lind 
gloves, Jenny Lind bonnets, Jenny Lind liding hats, 
Jenny Lind shawls, mantillas, robes, chairs, sofas, pi- 
anos—in fact, every thing was Jenny Lind. Her 
movements were constantly watched, and the moment 
lier carnage appeared at the door, it wa6 surrounded by 
multitudes, eager to catch a glimpse of the Swedish 
Nightingale. • * ^ « 

In looking over my." scrap-books** of extracts from 
the New York papers of that day, in which ill accessi- 
ble details concerning her were duly chronicled, it seems 
almost ' incredible* that such a degree of enthusiasm 
should ha*te Existed. An abstract of the "Mayings and 
doings "in regard to the Jenny Lind manid for the first 
ten- day a after het Arrival, appeared in the Londori' Ttmes 
of Sept. 23, 1850, and although it was an ironical *^ show- 
ing up'* of the American enthusiasm, fiUibg sJBveral col- 
umns, it was nevertheless a faithftd condensation of facts 
which at this late day seem even to myself more like a 
dreafti than reality; ^ 

Before her arrival 1 had offered ^00' for a prize ode, 
" Greeting to America," to be sung by Jenny Liild at 



THE 2«OHTINGALE IN. NBW YOBK. * J9J 

he? firp^cOTcert. ^Seyei?aJ htindred " poems'" werbi:fleat 
in from all parts of the United Sit^teft and th© Cauiidab. 
The duties of the Prize Committee, in reading these 
effusions and making choice of the one most worthy the 
prize, were truly arduous. The " oflFerings," with per- 
haps a dozen jexceptions^ were the merest dogfgerel trash. 
The prize wa§ awa^rded to Bayard Taylor for, the follow- 
ing ode: . • . . 

OBBm^INO^ !FO AWSmCA. " 

WOBXM BY BAYAftD X AYU>B ^ IfUjBIiQ jp^ JIU#IU« BSyKDICT. 

I OBEBT with a full heart the Laud of the West, 
Whose Bapuer of Stars o'er a world jfl miroUed;^ 

Whose cmijire o'ershadows Atlantic's wide breast, 
Aud ox)cn.s to sunset its gateway of gold! 

The laud of the mountain^ the Und^ oi the lake^^ 
And rivers that roll in magnificent tide — 

Where the aouls of the mightiy €rom ^l^faber awake, 
' And hallow. the soil for whose freiMlo^n thej[ di^Vj 

Thou Cradle, of Ettxiurel tbbug]^ wide ,Vift tb« fiMyqi 

That severs the land of my fathers and thee, 
I hear, from thy bosom, tlie wekioiue of home, > 

For Song bae a home in the hearts <»f the Free| 
And loi^g OB thy ^aterp shall gJeau^ in the «t|ni : , 

And long «^ thy. )>eroea lamember the^ scar^, / 
Be the hands of thy children united as one, 

And Peace «had. her Ugbt'on tby.Bannoi: of St^oi! 

This award, although it gavie general satltfaction, yet 
was met with disfavor \>y several disappointed poets, 
who, notwit^istandi'ng the ddcisioii of the^ committee, 
persisted in believing and deeiaHring their own produc-* 
tions to be the best This state of feeling was doubt- 
less, in part, the ^eatrse which led to'Uhe publication, 
about this time, of . cv .witty paiei^let . eatjitled "Bar- 
num's Parnassus ;' 'bdng Confidentii^l Dtedbsures of the 
Prize CommitteaTon the Jenay.iLiad mmgi'^i . 

It gave soti(^ '^capital ti^s % Vt^ltfh' 1!tite dbt«jnittee, the 
enthusiastic pabhc, tke NigiittiigaleyiBaAd myself, were 

14* 



292 THE KIOHXIKGALB IN NEW YQBK. 

nrandly ridiculed. The following is a fmr specimen 
£tom the work in question : 

BAKNUMOFSia 

A BSCITATXVS. 

Whxk io the oommon rest tluit cxowtsB hit da^ 

DiiBty and worn the tired pedestrian goes, 
Whftt Vgfat is tliat whose wide o'erlookins: blase 

A sudden glory on his pathway throws? 

'Tis not tfiB setting son, whose dxooping lid 
Closed on the weary world at half-past six; 
^ *TiB not the rising moon, whose rays are hid 

Behind the city's sombre piles of bricks. 

It is the Dmmmond Light, that from the top 
Of Bamnm's massive pHe, sky-mingling there, 

Darts its quick gleam o*er every shadowed shop, 
AJad gilds Byoadway with unaooustohied glare. 

There o'er the sordid gloom, whos^ deep'nfug tracks 

Furrow tile city's brow, the front of ages, 
Thy loftier light descends on cabs and hacks, 

And cm t#o do^n dUferent lines of stages f 

O twilight San, with thy Ihr darting ray. 

Thou art a type of him whose tireless hands 
Hung tfaee on high to guide the stranger's way, 

Where, tn its pride, his vast Museum stands. 

Him, who in searoh of wonders new and BtrtMgt, 
Grasps the wide skirts of Nature's msrstic robe 

Explores the circles of eternal (^tange, 
And the dark chambers of the central globe. 

He, from^tbe xeedy shones of fiibled J^fAe, 
Has brought, thick- ribbed and ancient as old iron, 

miat v«Aevikble bfliSBt ttM orooftdOto, 

And many a skin of many a &mous lion. 

€k> kMa thjftell in those oontlnQQiiB hims, 
Where strays the fond papa with son and daughter 

And 411 that chBtfms or startles or appals/ - 
Tbon skatt behold, and for a single quarter I 

Far fboin4lie Batoan dBasrtsjiow.wiliidTaMvu 
There l^uge oonstriotors ooU their scaly haokai 

There, cased ih giftss, malignaait and uathoni,^ 
Old nrardovort dam In saUenwM and wax. 



TffiE KICfHTlNGALfe IN NEW TOEK. 39S 



laroB^ br^ftddoth decked and sbofsking h^ 
And there the unwieldy Lambert si'ts and smiles, 
Intha m^Mtic plemtode of &t. 

Or fbr thy gayer honrs, the oraoigHnitang 
Or ape salates thee with his strange grimace, 

And in their shapes, stuffed as on earth they sprang, 
rChhie Individ^ being thoa canst trafii>( 

And joys the youth in life's green spring, who goes 
With the aweet babe and the gra^eadad nBrtt^ • 

To see thooe Ck>s]aoraiiup orba disolosa . . 

The varied beauties of the univezM. *^ 

4Uid last, not Ipa^h ^® marvaUoua Btbioj^ 
Changing his skin by preternatural skill, 

Whom every settteg aatt's>dianuit«lo9e 
I^eaves whiter than the last, and whitening QtOL 

All that of monstrous, scaly, strange and queer, 
Has oome from c^it the womb of earliest time. 

Thou haat, O Bamum, in thy keeping her^, 
Nor is this all — for triumphs more sublime 

Await thee yet I I, Jenny Ilind, who reigned 
Sublimely throned, the imperial queen of soug. 

Wooed by thy golden harmonies, have deigned 
CaptiT6 to join the heterogeneous tiirong. 



, ; 



by .an unfkltering trust in coin. 
Dealt from thy hand, O thou illustrious maU, 
Gladly I heard the summons come to Join 
Myself the innumerable caravan. 

Besides the foregoing^ this pamphlet contained eleven 
poems, most of which abounded in wit/ I have room 
for but a single stanza. The poet speaks of the vari- 
ous curiosities in the Museum, an4 representing; me . as 
still searching for further novelties, aiakes me addre^i^ 
the Swedish Nigjitiqgale aiJ follpws ; , , e^ 

••8o Jenny, eime alofigf ytni 're 5u#4 the eard'ibr ne. 
And quit t^ete Idjiga and 9pa9ila,i;9r <tfa0 oomitry «f tbe i^aa; 
They 'U weleome you with speeches,' and serenades, and rockists, 
And ytm wiiUonbh ihik.^»t>»,aaainill jsjilkeitetiwawtil . 
And if betw^n us bftli the public isn't sldnoedf - 
Wby, my name isn't Bornttm, iior your iiaine Jenny lind!** 



^41 THS NiaHTmGALE IK N£W YOBK. 

Various extracts fioia this brochure "were copied in 
the papers dallj^., and my agents scattered the work as 
widely as possible, thus efficiently aiding and advertis- 
ing my enterprise, aia^d serving to keep up ;^e public 
excitement. 

Among the many complimentairy pp.em$ ^ht in, was 
the following, by Mrs, L. H. Sigoubney, \yhich that 
distinguished ^writer-endpsed in a letter to. me, with the 
request that I should han^ it to Miss Lind ; 

THE SWEDISI^ SONGSTRESS AND HBB CHANTIES. 



Bi^EST must their vocation be' 
"Who, with tones of melody, 
Ghatm the discord and the strife 
And the railroad rush of lift| 
And with Orphean iiiagic more 
Souls inert to life and love. 
Bi^ there's one who doth inherit 
AJigel gift and angel i^pirit. 
Bidding tides of gladness flow 
4?hr6ugh the realms of want and wm; 
'Mid lone age and misery's lot, 
KindUs^g pleasures long forgot, 
Qeelpng minds oppressed with night, 
And on darkness shedding light. 
She the serajph's speech ooth know, 
She hath done their deeds helow: 
So, when o'er this misty strand 

i8ho4yilljdTO.tt^W^»hiiB4 ^ >: 
They will fbl4 her to thenr breiis^ . -^ 



j*.f 



\'^ ■\.A 



f 



/ 



1/ 



Jenny Lindas first cqncert was fixecLlto i^mfe* ofif at 
Castle Gariden, dh^Wediiesday eV)piiing,'80pterd^er'^lkh, 
and most of the tickets W^re sold at atidtidn on Che Sat- 
urday and Moi^y pravipni^s U> ^h^ .cojucevtr Jiohn N. 
Genin, tlii^, fatter, lai^ the fouhdaticmof Jus ,fcrtj^ne.by 
purchaaiii^{y420>£i^kitt€ket/)ati|ii25.i> iltlutt ^beenr^exten- 
sively reporfjed that'lSb:. Genin'and I are brothei*4n4aw, 



THE NIGHTIKGAMS IN KEW YORK. 295 

r 

but our only relations are those of business and fdend- 
ship. ' The propiiefors of the Garden saw fit to rilake 
the usUal chaise of one shilling to all person^ Ivho 
entered the premises, yet three thousand people were 
present at the auction. 0ne thoifsand tickets were sold 
on the first Aay for an aggregate stim of $10,141. 

On the Tuesday after her arrival I itifoi^med Miss Lind 
that I wished to make a slight alteratroh in oiir' agree- 
ment. ' •' What is it ? ** she asked hi surprise. 

" I am convinced," I replied, *' that our enterprise 
will be much more successful than either of us antici- 
pated. I wish, therefore, to stipulate that yoii shall 
receive not only fl,\)60 for eadh" coiicerl, besides all the 
expenses, as heretofoife agi^ef^d on, but after' taking 
15,500 per night for expenses' and my services, the 
balance shtfll be equally divided between us.'^ 

Jenny Idoked at me with astonishment .She coiild 
not comprehend my proposition. ' After I had repeated 
it, and she fully understood its import, she cordially 
grasped me by the hand, and exclaimed, ^^ Mr. Bamum, 
you are a gentleman of Honor: you are generpui^; it is 
JQst as Mr. Bates told me'; I will sing for y6u as long as 
you please; I will sing for ybu iti Ameriba— in Europe 
—anrfrhbre!" " 

Upon drawing the new contract which, wto to include 
this entirely voltoitary and liberal advance on my. part, 
beyond the terms of the original agreement, Mi^^ liinji's 
lawj^er; Ml:. JcJhn Jay, who was present solely to put in 
writing (he new arrangement between Miss Lind and 
myself, insisted ujpon intruding the suggestion that she 
should have the right to terminate the * engagement at 
the 'end of the sixtieth concert,. if she should choope to 
do so. Thitf ^roposiUdn Wa^ &6 ]^ersi6tetitly and annoy- 



2Q6 ^I^H^ NJBBTmGAXiE IN NEW TQBK. 

entertain it^ al th^ 6|Euue tim? offeriiog^; if &h^ (did $^^ to 
reifun^jtoDQ^ all flion^ys pai4 ,hw up .to thftt, tiiflue^ 
excepting tUe $1 >000 per poncert according to the. ong;i- 
nal ^rqpmeat. TJtiis w^s agreed .^o, and it wap.alsp 
arrange that.sl^^ might, terAxinat^: th^ ^Itg«ge7ne0t,iat 
%fop^-ti^p4sedi|i;qoijx?er^,:if shp. d/?w^.vpo^.ipaying 
XHUfj$25^9,0p jlfpr^thi^ Ipas.p^ the additioi^^l fifty nights* 

After this x^^yy.. Afxajogemeint . wasi completed, I naidt 
" IfpTV* Mi?a Lindi as yom are*, direetljf interested, you 
m^ufi^ h^y;e «m ^^pA tp as§i^,in,Uking imd leomsiti&g the 
ticket^,",; iff wh^ch phe r^pliedft ^* Oho) upj . Mrj Barbum; 
I l^a^p eyi^ry ^con^4pwei d^. you. and- 1 n^uist Mediae to vtfst 
upon jyoijir waje8tion^'^!,hut I conlan5^?d 
. rj'ljiej^er^aHpj^ ipy^elfyif »it can be* ai^e^d^i wbea I 
have associa^ jin the.aain^ i^t^rq^ts^ to he })llkcedi in & 
positio^, where I iffU9t ta^qufije the sojq rc^ppnaibillity. 
I never evten perxoitted an, actor to taj^ Rb^eM^irat my 
Mjai??un^, fti^lessjJIp,^ plaq^fl f,,tiakel}-taker ctf hifi emu nX 
the do(Mf.",-. .. (,,.. .,.;.^,-. ,,... / .• ., .. ' 

'^'Jius ujc^ejd^ Mi^3 I^i^d engaged. Mr, 3efpn-to act,.a^i 
her ticketrtejkpr^, auf^ ft%3r.;W|e ha^ q^f faptpipiiy «rs^ged 
the mai|tei:, Jay,.lq]L9]^i^ f.]\^ w^ole aflffUf^ ^ad t2)e iipapu- 
dence to come to me with a package of bUnH: ipriuted 
affidfivi^s^ ^"^hifih^ I}^ ^¥]?i94^ ^h^^ ^ ^Uould;41} >out > , from 
day to day ^, with, ^p ^e9eiptSfof..^a9h,.c;ow^rt,(^nd6weftt 
to their qor^-eptness before a mftgi^traite \ ,. . t . ; ■ •!». • 

I, told him that I, wpuljd 3ee: ]|;iiin on ithie ^jegt at- 
Miss Lind's ho^l that, 9fbeaio9jQi). and going thfore-a f^w 
moments before the appointed- ho.i;tr, I nfti^^edrthe cu> 
cumstances to Mr. Benedict and showed hil? an. affidavit 
which I had made that^ morning, <p the pffe^lt ft^^tJi. 
would never dif^ctly ^9^ i^dixQctly . take aijiy. a^'vantager 



!CHB KIGHnNOALK IN NEW TOBS. 297 

whatever of AGss Lind. This I had made oath to, for 
I thought if there was any swearing of that kind to be 
done I woxdd do it ^^ in a lump " rather than in detail. 
Mr. Benedict was very much opposed to it^ and arriving 
daring the interview, Jay was made to see the matter in 
such a light that he was thoroughly ashamed of his 
proposition, and, requesting that the affair might not be 
mentioned to Miss Lind, he begged me to destroy the 
affidavit I heard no metre about -swearing to our 
receipts. 

On Tuesday, September 10th, I informed Miss Lind 
that, judging by present appearances, her portion of the 
proceeds of the first concert would amount to $10,0004 
She inunediately resolved to devote every dollar of it to 
charity ; and, sending for Mayor WoodhuU, she acted 
under his and my advice in selecting the various institu* 
tions among which she wished the amount to be 
distributed. 

My arrangements of the concert room were very 
complete. The great parterre and gallery of Castle 
Garden were divided by imaginary lines into four com<» 
partments, each of which was designated by a lamp of 
a different color. The tickets were printed in colors 
corresponding with the location which the holders were 
to occupy, and one hundred ushers, with rosettes and 
bearing wands tipped with ribbons of the several hues> 
enabled every individual to find his or her seat without 
the slightest difficulty. Every seat was of eourse num- 
bered in color to correspond with the check, which each 
person retained after giving up an entrance ticket at the 
door. Thus, tickets, checks, lamps, rosettes, wands, and 
even the seat numbers were all in the, appropriate colors 
to designate the different departments. These arrange* 



298 T&E KIGlfTINGAiTS IK NEW YOKK*. 

menfe were duly 'adTer^sfedJand every particular ' was 
kho' prifi'ted upon eact ticket'.' In order to prevent 
conftidion, the doors were opened at five o'cToct, while 
fllfe concirt did not commence tfntil eight The conse- 
quence "waS, that although abbut fivfe thousand persons 
we're present at the first concert, their entrance was 
BtiarTced with as much ortler and quiet as was ever 
Witnessed in the assembling of a cbh^regation at church. 
Thfesfe p^ecaiitTotis' 'were observed ^V all the xibncerts 
given throughout the country under my administration, 
arid -the good order whict always pre\iriled* wa^* the 
&uhject'5f numberless encomiums from the^Jjublic and 
the press. ' ■ 

' lie' rJcfeption 6f 'Jeiiny Ltnd on'lier first appearance, 
In 'poirtt ot enthtn^iasm; was' probably^ never liefore 
eijualTed itf- the- %vorldl As* Mr. Benedict ledf *her 
* towatSs *thfeTobt-Rghts^, the entire audlcrifce rose to ftieir 
feet and welcomed her with three cheers, acfcompariied 
by the ' Waging ' 6f ttbusarids'df hats arid'haiidkerchicfs. 
Tlii* waf4 by ' fa^ the largest atidJence to which Jennv 
Hind hdd'fevei* sung. ISh'e wai evideiitty thnck agitated, 
but 'the brbbestra commenced^ arid before she had sungr 
a do2to* notes'bf "Casta T>ivaV''slite began fo recover 
her seJf'possessibn, ' and ' long ' ' beffire the \^d?wii was 
(Johclttded, fehe Vis as cdlm as if she* was in her "own 
draWing-rdom. ''ToWards the fasVjpOrti<id*df the'cefv^^ 
th6 aiidieike'\f^ite'sb'6timpletely can-ied ' aivay \)y;;iheir 
fe^litigs; tha« thfe tefafeiMer of the air was .hrmVtfed in 
^ perfect tttnpestrtf -j^cclariiaiibrir ' Enthusiasm had 'been 
wrought tb its* highest pitMi, btit the musical powers of 
Jeftny L'ind- ekceeded al! the brillfant anticipations 
whitJh' h&fl liieefn fdrtn^d;' aird h'ei' ttitympli' Ws'coiiipiete. 
At-tlte yoncfttybn tS^^flW''fconcert7critlf Lh'd was ioudly 



THE KiGHTINQAIiB IN NEW YORK. 299 

called for, and was obliged to appear three times before 
the audience could be satisfied. They then called 
vdciferonsly for " Barnum," and I reluctantly responded 
to their demand. 

On this first night, Mr. Julius Benedict firmly estab- 
lished with the American people his European repnta- 
tion, as a most accomplished conductor and 'musical 
composer; while Signor Belletti inspired an admiration 
which grew warmer and deeper in the miiids of the 
American people, to the end of his career in this 
county. 

It would seem as if the Jenny Lind mania had 
reached its culminating point before she appeared, and 
I confess that I feared the anticfipations of the public 
were too high to be realized, and hence that there 
would be a reaction after the first cdncert ; but I was 
happily disappointed. The transcendent musical genius 
of the Swedish Nightingale \fas' superior to all that 
fancy coultdt paint; and the furor did not attain its high- 
est point until ' she had been heard. The people were 
in ecstasies ; the powers of editorial acumen, t}'pes and 
ink, were inadequate to sound her jpi^aises. The Rubicon 
was passed* The successful issue of the Jenny Lind 
enterprise was established. I think there were u hun- 
dred men in New York, the day after her first concert, 
who would hare Willingly paSd me $200,000 for my 
contract. I received repeated offers for an eighth, a 
tenth, or a silcteenth, equivalent* 16 that price.. But 
mine had been the risk, and I was determined mine 
should be the triumph. So elated was I with my suc- 
cess, in spite of all obstacles and false prophets, that I 
do not think half a million of dollars would have tempted 
me to relinquish the enterprise. 



800 



XHB KieHTINGALE IN HBW TOBK. 



I7pOB settling the receipts of the fiiat coaoert, tliey 
wexe found to be somewhat lees than, I. anticipated* 
The .^ums bid at the auction salea, together with the 
tickets purchased at private sale, amounted to more 
than $20,000. It proved, bow^yer, that several of the 
tickets bid off at frpm $12 to $25 eacb) were not called 
for. In some instances, probably the zeal of the bidders 
cooled down when they came out fronn the nce^e of .ex-> 
citement) and onoe mwe breathed -the fresh' wa-breecse 
which caine sweeping Ap frpm " the Narr;0WQ," >vhile 
perhaps, in other instances, bids were made by .partiea 
who neve^ intended to txike the tickets* I ca^ ooly eay, 
once for all, that I was never privy to a falsa bid; and 
was- so parti(CuUir. n^n that point, that I wcHikl not^per* 
mit one of my employees to bid on, or purchase a ticket 
at auction, though reqmssted to dp fio. Ipr es{)eQial 
friends.. 

The ampunt of money received for ti/t^kets /ta thd first 

4 

concei:t was $17^^4:.05« As ^his Qiade tlisB lind's 
portion' too ^maU to refilize the $1 0,000^ wjii/oh h^dbeen 
announced as devoted to qharity, I* proposed to divide 
equally witl^ her th^' proceeds jo£ the first two oonicerts, 
and not count, them .at all in our regular ebgagexnent 
Accordioglyi the sepo^dr (onoert wa3 .giv^x SefHbmber 
13th, and the receipts, amountipg to^ $14/2(^9.03, \fere, 
like those of the fijrst concert, equally r divided. Our 
third copcert, but which, as between putselves, we 
called the '' first regular concert,'^ was gi^Gsi Tueadayt 
September 17, 185a . 



CHAPTER XTX. 

SXTCCESSFtrL MANAGEMENT. 

HXAl^irOBK JQSD HAin>-WO&K— *MAKAOINa PUBLIC OPDTIOir — CBBATmO A 
FUROB— THE NSW YORK HEBALD — JEKlHr LIKD'B EVIL ADVISEES — JOHV 
JAT— ^KISS X«DiI>'S CBAEITIBB — A P06R QIRL IN BOSTON— THE NICrHTiN«ALa 
AT XBANI8TAN — BUHfOB OF HEH MABUXAOE TO P. T. BABNUM--THE 8TOBT 
BABK> ON OUR " BNOAOEMBNT '* —WHAT IBANISTAN DIt>FORME — AVOIDINO 
OaoWBS — IN JPBILABBLPHIA AND BALTIXOBE — A BUBSTtTUTB YOB BOSS 
LIND — OUB OBCHBSTBA — PBESIDENT FILLMORE, CLAT, FOOTS, BENTON, 
8C0TT, CASS, AND WEBefTEB— VISIT TO MT. VBBNON— CHBI6TBCA8 PRSBSNT8 — 
'NBWVEAJi'a XTB — WE GO TO HAVANA -* PLATINO BAUi—FBBDBBIKA BBS- 
XBB— AHAPBY MONTH IN CUBA. 

No ONB can imaghie the amount of head-work and 
hand-work which I performed during the &st four 
weeks after Jenny Lind's arrival. AnticipatLog much 
of this, I had spent some time in August at the White 
Mountains to recruit my energies. Of course I had 
not been idle during the summer. I had put innumer- 
able means and appliances into operation for the fur- 
therance of my object, and little did the public see of 
the hand that indirectly pulled at their heart-strings, 
preparatory to a relaxation of their purse-strings ; and 
these means and appliances were continued and 
enlarged tiirougfaout the whole of that triumphal 
musical campaign. 

The first great assembly at Castle Grarden was not 
gathered by Jenny Lind's musical genius and powers 
alone. She was eflFectually introduced to the public 
before they had seen or heard her. She appeared 
in the presence of a JIU7 already excited to enthusiasm 



302 STJOCESSFXJL MANAaEMENT. 

in her behalf. She more than met their expectations, 
and all the means I had adopted to prepare the way 
were thus abundantly justified. 

As a manager, I worked by setting others to work. 
Biographies of the Swedish Nightingale were larflrely 
circulated ; " Foreign Correspondeitie glorified her 
talents and triumphs by narratives of hei benevolence ; 
and " printer's ink " was invoked in every possible 
form, to put and keep, Jenny Lind before the people. 
I am happy to say that the press generaity echoed 
the voice of her praise from first to last. I could fill 
many Volumes with printed extracts which are nearly 
all of a similar tenor to the following unbought, 
unsolicited editorial article, which appeared in "the 
New York Herald of Sept. 10, 1850 (the day 
(e&re the first concert giv6n by Misa Lind^in%e 

United Slates) : •- *• ' • '^ > 

< • » 

J'JaifNY Lom Axp the AnipucAir FfsorLE.— Wh{iJ;anclex|t«ioQiwQbiw»8 
he, dther in history or in fable, who offered lialf his kingdom (tiic pricfe dfhox tick- 
ditoaiid 4hoi9ftflefit0W'tii&8e ^ayvj-lbrthvinvBDiioit vf'tm origi|ial' q^Qittttoti, or 
the discovery of a fresh pleafure? That Hensatiyo — that pleai^re whichr royal 
pbw^r'hi tj^e^old ^rld-fiiiled ifco discoVer — has be<^n eallet) into cxi^ncc'lt't a \ena 
price) bjr;Mr^3ikr]u»a, apUdu repu^^Ucaoy'acid i$ ii«w abdit^o beetyajr*^ by^tho 
sovereigns of the new world. , . ' 

" J^imy'Iiitid, t^c most remarlt&'b'le ph^nomenciu In musical' art ti-htiA'tiaii far 
^^a l^t.<;enttpy fl^h^fl aerosji .ther horisou of. the pld trorld, ia now atfiong as, iMitl 
iriW maKe her ddlnlt to-morrow night to a house of nearly ten thousand listeners, 
ijifWing iji-proeefe^by «uqtiott, a ^um of *fbrl^ 4r itirfy Iho^aAO: dUUfMi * Per 
^c last ^n days our mnsical reporters have furnished pur rQi^era .witl^j^ every 
mAlK^r connected WifH her arrival in this metropolis, and tllie stiyps iuTopted hy^ifr. 
BarAun^fi) [Mtparmicm foi* ^r flist anpearont^. Tlif .prpofedtneB oi^y^Vnit^, 
consisting nf the sale of the remainder of the tickets, and the iu«tonif»hii^ the 
wonderful sensation produced at her first rehearsal on ttife i&vr pcfrsrtns, ^rTObs in 
n^Vis^cal, ar;, if(b^ yr^ fAr^\VM in the oogModi vUl bo ^IouimI elacMrheiyi |ii onr 
columns. 

' lirb<)bQC«r In etferyOUftg Uiat hak been saM by oiTr m^isioal reporter, lf^«eHb^ 
ing her extraordinary jjpniitf — hfir uniiTallcd combination of power aad art. 
Nothing has been exaggerated, not an iota. tThreo years ki*o, more or less,^ \re 
h^onl JfiQii{f jLind oir^nnT\y oocasions when fAk^ nftde the flrfct greft,« aentt&OtHi fn 
Euro])C, l)y her th'biU ;)t the London Oper* Houae. Thwi she wma great iii powtir 
-^inart— iwgenins; fiotv f he is greater in alL We »pi<ak tttfm experience an<l 



StJOCESSJWli MANAGEMENT. 303 

coD^ctkn.' llnBrslie ■■tiiiVrtud, and pteBsed, and fatciiuilbd the tfiousimds Hit 
thu British aristocracy; now shQ will fascinate, and please, and delight, aud almost 
nmke niid with musical excitement, the miUiotis of the American democracy. To- 
munow uiglKi Uiis new ams^tion -^ tiiifl ijctaah movement *<- this excitement e»»l- 
lln^' all former excitements — will be called into existence, when she pours out the 
notes ^ QuU XUtfO, and exhibits her astoiiisbing powers ^her tMnderfUl pecu- 
lictdties, that seem more vf hl^ven than of earth — -xnoFe of a voice firom eternity, 
tli.ui from the lips of a liuman being. . , 

" We ^eak dti^yerlf ^*- 9«tioii:dy — ealmly. The pa^lio exi>ectatioA !ias run rary 
high for the last week— higher than at any former period of our past )nusiciO* 
Himald. Bttt high as it has risen, the reality — the fact — the concert — the voicQ 
and power of Jemqjf liiad-^iriU far tuxpaee all past esrpcctKtion; Jenny Lind is » 
wonder, and a prod^gjr in song— and no mistake." 

As usual, ho Wev^t/tlio Herald very soon " took it all 
back " and roundly ^bui^ed Miss Lind and 'persistently 
attacked her manager. As usual, too, the public paid 
no attention to the Herald and doubled their patronage 
of the Jenny Lind concerts. 

Aft^ the first month the budness became thoroughly 
systematized, and by the help of such agents as my 
faithful treasurer, L. C. Stewart, and the indefatigable 
Le Grind Smitb, my pettonal labors were materially 
relieve*; IWflt from the first concert on the llth of Sep- 
tember, 1850, until the ninety-third concert on the 9th 
of June, I'SSl, a space of nine months, I did not know 
a waking'inoment that was entirely free firom anxiety. 

I could not hope to be exempted from trouble and 
perplexity ia managing afli enterprise which depended 
altogether on popular favor, and which involved great 
consequences to my«elf; but I did not expect the 
nnraerotts "petty annoyances which beset me, especially 
in the early period of the concerts. Miss Lind did not 
dream, nor did any one else, of the unparalleled enthu- 
siasm that would greet her; and the first immense 
assembly at Castle Garden somewhat prepared her, I 
suspect, to Ksten to evil advisers. . It would seem that 
the terms cf our revised contraet wer^ sufficiently liberal 



3(Ml SnGCB»9SFUIi MAKAOmaSMT. 

to her and sufficiently hazardous to myself, to justify the 
expectation of perfectly honorable treatment ; but certain 
envious intenneddl'ers appeared to think differently. 
^^ Do you not see, Miss Lind, that Mr. Bamum is coining 
money out of your genius t " said they ; of course she 
saw it, but the high-minded Swede despised and spumed 
the advisers who recommended her to repudiate her con- 
tract with me at all hazards, and take the enterprise 
into her own hands — possibly to put it into theirs. I, 
however, suffered much from the unreasonable interfer- 
ence of her lawyer, Mr. John Jay. Benedict and Belletd 
behaved like men, and Jenny afterwards expressed to 
me her regret that she had for a momeiit listened to the 
vexatious exactions of her legal counsellor. 

To show the difficulties with which I had to cxmttnd 
thus early in my enterprise, I copy a letter whidi I 
wrote, a little more than one month after Miss lind 
cQmmenced her engagen^ent with loe, to my friead Mr. 
Joshua Bates, of Messrs. Baring, Brath»l & Co., 
London: 

^KW YOBK, 09t 23» 1080. 
JOBECUA Basfsb ]&H). : 

Dear Sir, —I ta^ the libextQr to write jqu, a fewlii&M, merely to oay ISmt we 
are getting aloiig as well aa could reasonably be expected. In this^ country you 
are awace &at the rapid aocumiJatian of wealth ahrays creates mooh ^mrj, and 
envy soon augments, to malice. Such are the elements at worl^tv a Untited 
degree against myself, and although Miss Litid, l^nedict and myself have never, 
as yet, had the sUghOsst feel^gs between ue, to my knowledge, except thoee of 
friendship, yet I cannot well see how this can long continue in faoe of the 
fjAotthat, neairTy everyday, they allow persons (some moving in the first classes of 
sodety) to approach them, and apend hpors in traducing n^; ei«n her aiUomesr, 
Mr. ttohn Jay, has been so blind to her interests, as to ud in poisoning her mind 
againsf mie, hy poftring'iiito her ebrs the most silly twaddle, all of which amonnta 
to nothing and less than nothing --such as the regret thi^t X was a * showman,' 
exhibitor of Tom Thumb, etc., etc. 

Without the elements whidh I possess £&r business, as weQ^as my kno^rtedge 
of human nature, acquired in catering for the public, the result of her concerts 
hero would tiot have been peonniarily one fialf as much as at present— and sucb 
men as the Hon. Edward Bverett, G. G. Howlmul, and qfebers >^iU t^ yon that 
there is no charlatanism or lack of dignity in my management of these concerts. 
IknowiBS well asany pecsoft tilMI thetnestts of . Jsany hinA ikre!|he. htet* capital 



stjccessfuIa map^ajgembnx, 306 

' > rlt-pend upon to secure pnblic favor, and I Jiavc thus f^r acted on this know^- 
•-']?«. Eveiytliliiit wbit^ Shobey ahd iittentioti <;an procttte for ilieir comfort, they 
lii\p, and I am glad to know that tiiey are satisfied on this score. AU I fetu 19, 
I'l \{ these contiiinal hackbitinpfs, if listened to by her, will, by an4 by, produce ^ 
f<- ling of (listn^t or regret, ^hlch will lead to unpleasant results. • ' 

Tlu' fart i<(, her mind ought to be as free as air, and she herself as free. as » 
I'inl. ntid, being f»t/sfied of my probity and aljility, she should turn a deaf ear to 
n;i'.jiviott«a|idniAlevoleiit ottickS'dn me. } haye hoped that by thus briefly 
^r.iting t4> you the facts in the ca^>, you might be induced for her interests as wt»ll 
n^ mine to4rop a Une of advice to Mr. ^Benedict and another to 'Sir. Jay on this 
'<ijl>i(Lt. If lam, askii\g pr expecting too much, I prliy j>ou to not give it & 
th'>i!q:lit, fori feel mj'self fully able to carry through ipy rights alone, although I 
>ii<>akl deffloTB notiiiag so touch as to be obliged to do so iii'a feeling of unfriend- 
I'M-s^. X have risked much money on Uio issue of this spi'culation — it has 
[uu\^■i\ successful. I am full of perplexity and anxiety, and labor continually for 
>'i.\\ti.«, Mid 1 oatinoti aUuv -ignorauce or envy* to rob me of the fruits of my 
euterpruse. 

Sincerely and grateftiUy, yours, 

P. T. Bahkum. 

It is not my purpose to enter into full details of all 
of the Lincl concerts, tliough I have given elsewhere a 
ti mscript from the account books of my treasurer, pre-* 
outing a table of the place and- exact receipts of each 
concert. This will gyatify . curiosity, and, at the same 
tiriie indicate our route of. travel. Meanwhilcy I devote, 
a few pages to interesting incidents connected with Miae 
liud's visit to America. 

Jenny Lind's character for benevolence became so 

i{enerally known, that her door wag?, beset by persons- 

a king chayity, and she was in the jreceipt, while in the 

i lincipal cities, of numerous, letters, .^U oxl the same 

ubject Her secretary examined and responded favor-» 

bly to some of them. He undertook at first to answer 

iiemall, but finally abandoned that^qourse in despair^^ 

1 knew of many instances in which she gave sums of 

?noney to applicants, varying in amount from $20, $50, 

;'jOO, to $1,000, and in one instance she gave $5,000. to 

^ Swedish friend. 

One night, while giving a concert in Boston, a. girl 

20*" 



806 8TJ0CES8FUL MANAGEMENT. 

approached the ticket-office^ and laying down * $3 for a 
ticket, remarked, " There goes half a month's earning:?, 
but I am- determined to hear Jenny Lind." Miss Lind's 
secretary heard the remark^ and a few minutes after- 
wards coming into her room, he laughingly related the 
circumstance. *^ Would you know the girl again ? " 
asked Jenny, with an earnest look. .Upon receiving an 
affirmative reply, she instantly placed a $80 gold-piece 
in his hand, and said, " Poor girl ! give her that with my 
best compliments." He at once found the girl, who 
cried with joy when she received the gold-piece, and 
heard the kind words with which the gift was accompa- 
nied. • 

The night after Jenny's arrival in Boston, a display 
of fireworks was given in her honor, in front of the 
Revere House, after which followed a beautiful torch- 
light procession by the Germans of that city. 

On her return from Boston to New York, Jenny, hei 
companion, and Messrs. Benedict and Belletti, stopped 
at Iranistan, my residence in Bridgeport, where they 
remained until the following day. The morning after 
her arrival, she took my arm and proposed a promenade 
through the grounds. She seemed much pleased, and 
said, " I am astonished that you should have left such a 
beautiful place for the sake bf travelling through the 
country with me." 

^ The same day she told me in a playful mood, that she 
had heard a most (extraordinary report. " I have heard 
that you and I are about to be married," said she ; 
" now how could such an absurd report ever have origi- 
nated 1 " 

" Probably from the fact that yve arp ' engaged,' " 1 
replied. She enjoyed a joke, and laughed hecuttily. 



SUOOESSB'UL MA^^AGEMEPrP. 307 

« 

'^ Do^ymi ItBOw, Mr, BariuTO," said she, <* that if yoti 
had not built Iranistan, I should never have oome to 
America for you ? " 

I e;i(pmssed, my surprise,. and asked her to explain. 

'•I bad received several applications to visit the 
United. Statcjs,'^ she-continued,^* but I did not much like 
the appefirance of t^ applii^^mts; nbir. did I 'relish the 
idea of #ro9sing 3,000 . miles of ocean ; so I declined 
t^em all But the firat letter which Mr. Wilt6n> yout 
agentr addressed n^^ Was wtitten upon a sheet headed 
with ;bi beatdjful engraviiig bf Iranistan. It attracted 
my attention. . I said to myself, a gentleman who has 
beeh so successful in his huiihess as to be able to 
build aqd xeside in anieh a palace cannot be a mere 
' adyentoxer/ So I wrote to ydur agent, and €ohsented 
to aj3t interne w, wWdb I should have' declined; if I hafl 
not seen the picture of Iranistte!" 

" That, tben, fully pays m© for buflditig it," I replied ; 
'' for I intend and expect to m^ke "more by this <nusical 
enterprise than Ir4nisUu>€b^t me/' 

"I really hope so,V sfe0' replied ; ** but yoiu' must hot 
be too smgciiue, you kjiow, ^mazt' propbses but God dis- 
posesj!." .. .. . . ^ ■■ ♦; •• , ,• '. 

ienxkj land always desired to reach a place in which 
she T? ^ to sing, without feavii^ the^time of her arrival 
known, thus avoiding, ethe excitement . of prbmisduous 
crowds- As a manager, however, I knew that the inter- 
ests pf^tjbi^.ienterprise'dependedjio a great degree upon 
these ,. excitements. 'AUbough-it frequently seemed 
inconceivable 'to her how so many' thousands should 
have discpyeiped her secret and consequently gathered* 
togeth^ tfi,i;^eive t^, Irwasfiaot .so knuoh astonished, 
inasmjuc^ .a9. my. £^en(^ alwuys 'had mrly telegraphic 



308 StrOOESSFDli -ulais^a.&ewsst. 

intelKgence of (be time of her anticipated anival, and 
was not slow in comiiranicating the mformation to the 
public. 

On reaching Philadelphia, a large concourse of per- 
sons awaited the approach of the steamer which con- 
veyed her. With difficulty we pressed through the 
crowdj and Were followed by many thousa!nds to Jones's 
HoteL The street in front of the building was densely 
packed by the populace, and poor Jenny, wto was suf- 
fering from a severe headache, iretired to her apartments. 
I tried to induce the crowd* to disperse, bnt they declared 
they would not do so until Jenny Lind should appear 
on the balcony. I would not disturb her, and ktto^ng 
that the tumult might prove d!n sinnoyande to her, I 
placed her bonnet and shawl upon her companion, Ikiiss 
Ahhian&eri, and led her out on ttie balcony. ' She bdwed 
gracefully to the multitude, who gav6 her three hearty 
cheers and qtiietly dispersed. Miss Lind vfM so utterly 
averse to any thing like deception, that we never ven- 
tured to tell her the part which her bonnet and shawl 
had played in the absence of thelt ownet'. ' 

Jenny wad in the habit of attending chtirbh whenever 
she could do so without attracting notice. She always 
presferved heif nationality, also, by inquiHng otit and 
attending fi^tedirii chtirches wherever they could be 
found. She ^ve $1,000 to a Swedish churcfa ill Chi- 
cago. 

While in Boston, a poor Swedish girl, a ddAfestic in 
a family at Boxbury, called on Jenny. She detained 
h^r visitor several hours, talking about home, and bther 
matters, and in the evening took her in her carriage to 
the concert, gave her a seat, anA dent hei* back tb Hox- 
bury in a carriage, kt th6 close of the pMorihance^. I 



SUOCBSaFUIi MANAGSHEKT. 309 



hare no dovbt, the poor ourl eaxried with her substan- 
tial eiad«^«e8 of her cou^woaum'. bounty. 

My eldest daaghter, Caroline, and her friend, Mrg. 
Lyman, of Bridgeport, accompanied me on the tour 
from New York to Havana, and thence. home, via New 
Orleana and tlie Mississippi.. 

We,. were at Baltimore on the Sabbath, and my 
daughter, a^ cqmpanyiqg a frieAd, who resided in the 
city, to church, took a se^t with Ixex pi the choir, apd 
joined .^l the singing. A number of the congregation, 
who had seen Caroline witii me the day previous,, and 
supposed bj9r to be Jenny Lind, were yet laboring under 
the s^xne mistake, and it :was soon whispered through 
the church th^t Jenny land was in the choir ! The 
excitement was worked to its highest] *pitch when my 
daughter rpse a§ one of the musical g^roup. iEvery ear 
was on the ale^rt to .patch the first nptes of her voice, 
and when she sang, gbiAces of si^tisfaction passed through 
the as^m^bly. Caroline, quite. unconscious oi^ the atten- 
tion sbe attracted, continued to sing to the. end of th^ 
hymn. Not a note wai^. lost, upon the e^xs of the atten- 
tive congregation. "What an. exqn^ite, singer!" 
'^Ileavenjy sounds!" "I never heard the like!" and 
similar lexpressionsi were whispered, through the church. 

At,)i^, concli^ipn of the service?, jfxy daughter, and 
her friend found the. paj^sage way to. their . carriage 
blocked by a crowd who were anxious to obtain. a nearer 
view of th^ " Swedish. Nightimgiale,," and. many persons 
that afternoon bo^M^tet}) in good faith, that they had 
listened to the extraordinary singing of the great song- 
Btress. The pith of the joke is that we have nevei 
discoverad that my .daughter has any /extraordinary 
ckims M a, i^KM^alist* 



310 StrCCESSFUIi MANAGEMEKX 

Our orcliestra in !New Y6tiir cohsisted of sixty. When 
we started oh oui* soufliferh tour, we took Wifli ns per- 
manently as ITie orchestra, twelve of tfte'best mti^cians 
we could feelect, and in New Orleans augmented tlie 
force^to sixteen. We increased the iiitober to 'thirty- 
five, forty or fifty, as the case might' be, by cHriice of 
musicians residing where the concerts were giVen; On 
our return to New' York from Havarial, '^e enlarged the 
orchestra to on^ hundred performer^. 
'The tnoininsf ufter t)ur arrival iri Washington, Presi- 
dent Fillmore t-alle'd, and left fi'is card, Jenny biei% out 
When she returned aiid found the token (ifBis attention, 
she was in s6friethinof of a 'flurry. " Camtej'' saJd' she, 
" we must call 'on the President immfediatelyl ' ' 
'^"Whyio^rt'intjuired." ' ' 

" Because te has 'called on tne, and of coursfe tkat is 
equivalent tb a command fbt me tb go to his hoasfe." 

I assured her' that she mighf make her mind at e'Ase, for 
whatever might be the custom with crowned heads, our 
Presidents were hot wont io" c6'mmahd" the iiio'Wi'ments 
of strangers, htid that she woiild'be.quitfe in time ff she 
returned his caU'the next- day. She 'did so, "ahd was 
charmed with the unaffected bearing of the Pi-esident, 
and the warm kindhesses' expressed hy His a!miable wife 
and daughtei-', arid cbii^eilted'to spend the everdAg with 
them in confdrn'iity with their request. She Vs^as afccom- 
ptinm to tiie ^*WKife'H6use**'by Messrs^^feeli•^d^^^^ 
Bblletti and ' myself, and several 'happy hiiuA were 
s]ptot iti the privt^t'e cirfcle of thePresidl^nt'^ fUhrily. 

Mr. ^Benedict, who engaged in a long quieit fcbtiTersa 
tioh with Mr. Hllrhore, was highly '^l^fesed witK ' thr 
M^rViev^.' A foi-eighe'r, afc'ciis^bttied'to fcbitrt '^(^tlettc 
is generally surprised at the simplicity WBSdh'dikfactei' 



BUCCESSFUL MANAGEMENT. 311 

izes tb^e Chief Magistmte of this Unipii.., In 1853 I 
called oa the Prepidept with my friend the l&te Mr, JBret- 
tell, a(, Lon^pn, Tfho resided in 3t. Jame^ Pe^lace, and 
was quite a worshipper of the Queen,,, and an ardent 
admirj^r of all the dignities and ceremonies of royalty, 
lie expected something of the kind in visiting the Pres- 
ident of . the United States^ and was higl^y pleased Wjiith 

his disappointjiien;!;- . , 

B(^tU coqipprts }fi Washington were attended by the 
President ,wd bis fi?.mily, ^^ every nnepibGr Qf tj^q CJftbr 
ine^. I nji?tic§d^ ajlsfl, (aiftpng; t;hp andie^c^^ IJeiary . Cl^y^ 
Bentop, Fopt;;^, OasiS a^4;;G^Q^^4 ScottianduQ^ly.eyery 
member pf Cpngress, On the fpllowiijg mprning, MiflS 
Lind was called upop by Mr. .Weibslteri. Mf .. Cl^y, Qe^r 
eral Cass^^^d Co}pDel Benton, .^nd Ml partita Wf^e Qvir 
dently^gr^fied. I l^ad.intrpduced Mr. Webftter tp her 
in BogtQQ. Uppn hearing ,Q^e of. her ivild ^mountaia 
songs in New Yprk^^^nd. also iu.'Vl^i^fthington, M^i Wet>- 
^ter signified his apprq);al by rising, . dr^wipg himself 
up to .his. it|U heighjlu ^wd waHin^ »>. prpfquftd hpw. 
Jenny. Wfts 4!?ligUted by thifl. expve^^ipft pf proisfc -frpm 
the great statesman. When I first introduce. Mi^ 
Lind to Mu^ •'S^'eb^E, a* *bie Severe Hftuiie^ia.iBoston, 
i>he wfls . greatly Jmprei^^id /with hiSxH^nnere aj>4iJ<}onpei> 

sation, and after his departure, walked up atid!4^WJi tb^ 
rwin.ingreate3|piteineit>.«cclfftpiiagj "Aht Mr. Bar- 
num, that i^ ^ iftaft ; X Jawrenevei: before se^ni.pnobija 

manrV. ' i • . •. .. ' :••• 

We visited the Capitol while both Houses wBre • .in 
session, i Mjsa' Lind; tcirtk the^ arm of , Jlbit iC. F. Cleve- 
land, representotbefypfi Cpnn0cti<?util.a»d.'Wfls byhdm 
e^qoit^d t iijto; , VQjiiWS; pjula of '<the: ' Coital . .*6d; ; jthe 
grounds^ with all of which she wad mndh pleased* - 



812 . STTOOBSBFITL MAKA0E1CENT. 

While I was in Washington an odd Teminiscence 
of my old show-days in the South came back to me 
in a curious way. Some years before, in 1836, my 
travelling show company had stopped at a hotel in 
Jackson, Mississippi, and, as ^the hotise tvas crowded, 
soon after I went to bed five 6r six men came into 
the room with cards and a candle and asked perAiission, 
as there was no other place^ to sit down and play 
a quiet game of •' brag/' I consented oh (Condition 
ihat I might ^get u{^ atid partidpate, which iVas permit- 
ted and in^ very little white, as I knew nothiiig what* 
ev« of *he' game, I lost fifty dollars. Xlobd ** hands * 
and good fortune soon enabled me to win back my 
money ,< at which point one of the players who had 
been introduced to me as " Lawyer Foote " said : 
. '« Now the best thing you can do is to go back to 
bed; you don't know anything about the game, and 
Idliese fellows do, and they'Uskin you.'' 

I acted upon his advice. And now, years afterwards, 
when Senator Foote called upon Misb liind the story 
eame back tb me, and while I was talking with him 
I remarked *: 

^^ Fifteen years ago, when I was in die South, I became 
acquainted with a lawyer ' named Foot^, at' Jackson, 
MississippiJ' 

*^ It must have been me,'' «aid' l^e Senator, ^* I am the 
«i^y:< lawyer Foote^ of Jackson, Misdssippi."" ' 

" Oh ! no, it could not have been you," and 1 told 
him the story. . ! 

^ ^^ It was ihe/' he' whispered in my e'ar, and added, 
" I u9ed to gamble like h-^1 in those days." ' 
^ Dimi^ the tveek r was hivited with Mias'Lind and 
her immediate friends, to visit Mo^nt Vernon, with Col- 



SUCCKSSFUI. MANAaiCHEMT. 813 

onel Wwhington, tix^ thea proprietor, and Mr- Seaton, 
ex-Mayor of Washington, and Editor of the Intelligencer. 
Colonel Washington chai'tered a steamboat for the pur- 
pose. We were landed a short distance. from the tomb, 
which we first visited. Proceeding to the house, w"? 
were introduced to Mrs. Washington, and several other 
ladies. Mnch interest was manifested by Miss lind in 
examining the mementoes of the great man whose home 
it had been. A beautiful collation was spread out and 
arranged in fine taste. Before leayiog, Mrs. Washing- 
ton presented Jenny with a book from the library, with 
the name of Washington written by his own hand She 
was much overcome at receiving this present, called me 
aside, and expressed her desire to give ^cmiething in 
return. '^ I have nothing with me," she said, ^^ except- 
ing this watoh and chain, and I will give that if you 
think it will be acceptable." I knew the watch was 
very valuable, and told' h^r that so costly a present 
would not be expected, nor would it be proper. ^' The 
expense is nothing, compared to the vahie of that book/' 
she replied, with deep emotion ; ^^ but as the wateh was 
a present from a dear friend, perhaps I should not give 
it away." Jenny Lind, I am sure, never forgot the 
pleasurable emotions of that day; 

At Richmond, half an hoiir previous to her depoirture, 
hundred of youiiig ladies and ' gentLennen had crowded 
into the hall^. of the house.to secure a gUmpae pf her at 
partyig. I informed her that she would fii^ difficulty 
in passing out ^^How long is it before we n^ust 
start? " she asked. *,' Half m hour," I neplied. ^* Oh, 
I will clear the passages befoore that time," said she, with 
a smile ; whereupon she went into the ;upper liall, and 
informed the people that she wished to take the hands 



314 ancx3£88FUL manaoemeni". 

of every one .of diem, upon one conditioti, viz: they 
should pass by her in rotation, and as^ fast as they had 
shaken hainds, ppooeed down stairs, and not block up the 
passages. They joyfully consented to the arrangement, 
and in fifteen minutes the coui'se wajs clear. Poor Jenny 
had* shaken hands with every person in the crowd, Imd I 
presume she had a feeling remembranoe of the incident 
for an hour or two at least. She was waited on by 
many mbmbers of the Legislature^ while in Riehmond, 
tiaajfc body being in session whil e we Were there. 

The voyage from Wilmington to OharieMe^n. was an 
•exceedingly rough and perilous ouei We were about 
thirty^six hours in leaking the passage^ thia usual time 
being, seventeen; , There was really grea(t danger of oar 
steamer being swamped, tod .we wcrre all apprehensive 
that wei.ishould never teach the t Fort of Charleston 
alive. Some of the passengen^ were in^ great terror. 
Jenny Lind exhibited < more ealmn^ss Oipon this occasion 
than any oUier person^ the/ crew excepted. We arrived 
safely M la^t, and I was grieved to learii that for twelve 
hours the losfi of the steamer- had been considered cer- 
taisBi, and had leven be^ ^umounced by telegraph in the 
Nbrthj^fUicitiee. • ■ • •* 

We remained at Charleston about ten days, to take 
the steamer H]babeUa"Qn>ber regular ti*ip' to Havana. 
Jenny, had bettsi'thl^otigU^M wiseh e^dte^enfe at the 
North,^ that she deterimned' to havii quiet hete, and 
therefekte 'declinfed'receivitig ^ariy daik.-- This disap- 
pointed 'many ladies and- g^ntleni^il. One ybmig lady, 
.the daughtbr^f ' a weallthy plantel' near<A.ug^6ta, was so 
determined •nipon ^faeeiolg ^r in .private; (bat ehe paid 
one ctf;<the $ervants to ttUowher^^to ^put'oU'a ea^ and 
wbitb apron^' Itnd oftti^ in the trhy^j^^^ 1 



SUCCESSPITL MANAGEMENT. 315 

afterwards told Miss Lind of the joke, and suggested 
that after such an evidence of admiration, she should 
receive a call from the young ^ady. 

" It is not admiration — it is only curiosity," replied 
Jenny, " and I wiU not encourage such folly." 

Christmas was at hand, and Jenny Lind determined to 
honor it in the way she had often done in Sweden. She 
had a beautiful Christmas tree privately prepared, and 
from its boughs depended a variety of presents for mem- 
bers of the company. These gifts were encased in 
paper, with the names of the recipients written on each. 

Afler spending a pleasant evening in her drawing- 
room, she invited us into the parlor, where the " sur- 
prise ** awaited us. Each person commenced opening 
the packages bearing his or her address, and although 
every individual had one or more pretty presents, she 
had prepared a joke for each. Mr. Benedict, for 
instance, took off wrapper after wrapper from one of 
his packages, which at first was as large as his head, 
but after having removed some forty coverings of paper, 
it was reduced to a size smaller than his hand, and the 
removal of the last envelope exposed to view a piece 
of cayendish tobacco. One of my presents, choicely 
wrapped in a dozen coverings, was a jolly young Bac- 
chus in Parian marble, intended as a pleasant hit at my 
temperance principles ! 

The night before New Yearns day was spent in her 
apartment with great hilarity. Enlivened by music, 
singing, dancing and story-telling, the hours glided 
swiflly away. Miss Lind asked me if I would dance 
with her. I told her my education had been neglected 
in that line, and that I liad never danced in my life. 
'* That is all the better," said she ; " now dance with 



316 STTGOESaFUIi MAKAOSIKENT. 

me in. a ootOlion. I am tsme you can do it.'*' She 
waB a beauty dancer, and I neyex saw her laogh more 
heartily than she did at my awkwardness. She said 
she would give me the credit of being the poorest 
dancer she e?er saw ! 

About a quarter b?fore fewelTe, Jepny suddenly 
checked Mr. Burke, — formerly celebra^ as the musi- 
cal prodigy, "Master Burke/* — who was playing on 
the piano, by saying, *' Pray Jiet us haye quiet ; do you 
see, in fifteen n^inutes more, this year will be gone for- 
eyer ! " 

She immediately took a seat» and rested her head up- 
on her hand in silence* We all sat down, and for a 
quarter of an hour the most profound quiet reigned in 
the apartment The remainder of the scene I transcribe 
from a description written the next day by Mrs. Lyman, 
who was present on the 6ccasion : 

^^ The clock of a neighboring church struck the knell 
of the dying year. All were silent -^ each heart was 
left to its own communings, and the bowed head and 
tearful eye told that mtemory was busy with the Fast. It 
was a brief moment, but thoughts and feelings were 
crowded into it, which render it one never to be forgot- 
ten. A moment more — the last stroke of the clock 
had fallen upon the ear — the last faint vibration ceased ; 
another ' period of time had passed forever away — a 
new one had dawned, in which each felt that they were 
to live and act. This thought recalled them to a fiill 
consciousness of the present, and all arose and quietly, 
but cordially, presented to each other the kind wishes 
of the season. As the lovely hostess pressed the hand^ 
of her guests, it was evident that she, too, had wept, — 
she, the gifted, the admired, the almost idolized one 



AucojBsaFU^ Ki^yAflmnaCT. 317 

Had she, too, i^ouse. for .toar?! ► Wlnepfe wa?e they ? — 
from the overfloiyii:^ of a ^^riKteful heart, £roiu tender 
aasoci^tioQSt pc fffom f i^ remraibranGes 1 None knew, 
none cou)4 i¥&k9 t^PDgh they aw^k^e^d 4eep aaad pecu- 
liar aympathy* A^ ^^^ ^^^ heartt .a^ >}east, arose the 
prayc];, that ^hen ^e^.di^of time Abool^ xMrk the last 
hoar of her earthly e^dst^iicei, ^e d|oi4d greet its ap- 
proach with joy and not with: gri^f -r- that ta her soul 
spiritTToices Qiight whiappr^ ! Come, ^w^eet sister I come 
to the realms of fmfa^wg. Uglft a^c( love — <^ome, join 
your seraphic tones with ours, in singing the praises of 
Him.ii^ ](0ye4 fUiifi an^. gay/P h^m^^iilf for w'^-— while 
she, with meekly^folded hso^ cM)d faith^uplifted eye, 
should apswer, \ Yes^ gladljy and ^ithwit^fear I come, for 
I know that ipy JR? d^na^r ttvetfe/" • . 

I had arranged with a man in Ke»f York to transport 
furniture to Havana, provide a house, and board Jenny 
Lind and our immediate party during our stay. When 
we arrived, we found the building converted into a semi- 
hotel, and the apartments were any thing but comfort- 
able, Jenny was vexed. Soon after dinner, she took a 
volante and an interpreter, and drove into the 
suburbs. She was absent four hours. Whither or why 
she had gone, none of us knew. At length she returned 
and informed us that she had hired a commodious fur- 
nished house in a delightful location outside the walls of 
the city, and invited us all to go and live with her during 
our stay in Havana, and we accepted the invitation. 
She was now freed from all annoyances ; her time was 
her own, she received no calls, went and came when she 
pleased, had no meddlesome advisers about her, legal or 
otherwise, and was as merry as a cricket. We had a 
large court-yard in the rear of the house, and here she 



318 SUOCESSFUL MAKAGEMfiKT. 

would come and romp and run, sing and laugh, like a 
young 8chool-girl. **Now, Mr. Bamum, for another 
game of ball,'* she would say half a dozen times a day : 
whereupon, she would take an india-rubber ball, (oi 
which she had two or three,) and commence a game of 
throwing and catching, which would be kept up until, 
being completely tired out, I would say, ** I give it up. ' 
Then her rich, musical laugh would be heard ringii::: 
through thi hotlse,a8 sh6 exdaimed, ** Oh, Mr. Bamnm. 
you me too fat and too lasy ;- you cannot stand it to play 
ball with me !^ . ' 

Her celebrated countrywoman, Miss Frederika Bremer, 
spent a few days with us very pleasantly, and it is difr.- 
cult to conceive of a more delightful month than w:^ 
passed by the entire party at Jenny Luid's house in tlit 
outskirts of Havana. 



CHAPTER XX. 

INOmENTS OF TBJBt XQUB. 

FBOVSMF A0AkKB^ MIOM Of VAVtankr^tOB ODBAlfa aU<iK}iniB <*• J JUUH X Lorp 
TAKSSTHSOITT BT 0TOBM ^ A liAainnCBKT TBIinCPH — - OOUKT PBNALVKR 
— A SPIiRsnHD OVntB-^aOL BltmolOEBBOn'^^BBHKRT FOB TBX HOSPITALfl— 
SBVOSIKO TO mMCmrVK Vmum-H-VtVAIiIjA AHD 1I!I»000 — hbkbtbsnkstt/— 
ma PABTIAI* IKBABITT — OUBYOTAOB SO IfBW OBLBAK8— THB BDITOB OF 

THs HTKw romti HBaAuy ofir Bqidn»>^i 8at» isb Xiirs or jambs qobdon 

BBBXinm^^ABBlVAL A9 TU CBSflOBini CITY-*CHBATIBO THB CBOWD— A 
DUPIJCATB 1II89 liOrD— A BOY DT BAFT0BBB— A MAMafOTH HOO^VP THB 
XIsn88lnn*-AXUi9CMBirfVOK'«)(4BDH--]|r.lA<hBnB WItB TBJi XVIL OKE~ 
AX AMAZKD KVIiACTa 

Soon after arriving in Havana, I discovered that a 
strong prejudice existed against our musical enterprise. 
I might rather say that the Habaneros, not accustomed 
to the high figure which tickets had commanded in the 
States, were determined on forcing me to adopt their 
opera prices, whereas I paid one thousand dollars per 
night for the Tacon Opera House, and other expenses 
being in proportion, I was determined to receive remu- 
nerating prices, or give no concerts. This determina- 
tion on my part annoyed the Habaneros, who did not 
wish to be thought penurious, though they really were 
so. Their principal spite, therefore, was against me ; 
and one of their papers politely termed me a " Yankee 
pirate," who cared for nothing except their doubloons. 
They attended the concert, but were determined to 
show the great songstress no fevor. I perfectly under- 
stood this feeling in advance, but studiously kept all 



820 INCIDBKTS OF THB TOITR. . 

knowledge of it from Miss Lind. I went to the first 
Tjoncert, therefore, with some misgivings in regard to 
her reception. The following, which I copy from the 
Havana correspondence of the New York Tribune^ gives 
a correct account of it : 

''Jenny Land soon appei9e<V^ed <fi <^]Bian<|r f^Ue^ Some three, or four 
hundred persons clapped their hands at her appearance, hut this token of appro- 
bation waA instantly silenced by at least two thousand five hundred deoided'hisaes. 
ThuB, having settled the mutter Huit tfaeM ilholiUl lie Ii4 forestalling of public 
opinion, and that if applause waa given to Jenny lind in that house it should 
firt^t be In^tostftbly earned, * Hie - iSMt ednno eilBiioB pw evefle d. h baivti heenL 
the Swedish Nightingale often \n. Bvrope ae well ae in AmcricA and have 
ever noticed a dJstifict tremtdoiuniess atteadiiig her fifstappearanoe in any city. 
Indeed tills feellngwae f^aiafly meniiMiled la hat opuntenanoe ae the neaied the 
foot-lights; but when she witnessed the Mad of reception in store for her-^so 
different from anything rtie had ¥ea8(ni4o< espect^^hnor e p nnt e aaace > dtaoged in 
an instant to a haughty self-poeeeeeion, her <e!ye flashed deflaiifi0» and, beoomiog 
immorable as a statue, she. stood there, perfectly calm end beautiliiL She was 
satisfied that she now had an;eedeal.to>iwuw mad « ^MMry • jko gain, worthy of iier 
powers. In a moment her eye scanned the inunense audiepo^, tlie n^u^k) began 
and then followed — how can I describe it? — such heavenly strains as I verily 
belieye mprtal never breathed except Jenny Lind, and mortal never heard except 
£rom her lips. Some of the oldest CastiUacns kept a frown upon MwAi brow and a 
curling sneer npon their Up; their ladies, however, and mcst of the audience 
began to look surprised. The gushing melody flowed on Increasing in beamty aiid 
glory. The cabaUeros, the senoras bad senorUai began to look at eaioh other; 
nearly all, however, kept their teeth clenched and. their Ups closed, evideoHy deter- 
mined to resist to the last The torrent flowed deeper and faster, tiie lark flew 
higher and higher, the melody'gtew richer aad grander; etiU ^vecj Hp woe com- 
pressed. By and by, ae the rieh notes came dashing in rivers upon our enraptured 
ears, one poor critic involuntarily whispered a ' brava.' Willis outbursting of the 
soul wa» instantly hissed down. The atream of htm^eny rolled on till, at the 
close, it made a clean sweep of every olM^ade, aiid. oarried all before it^ Not a 
vestige of opposition remained, but such a tremeudou^ 'shout of applause as went 
up I never before heard. 

"The triumph was most complete. A^d l^w was Jenny Lind affected? She 
who stood a few moments previ6iis like adamant; now trembled Hke a reed in 
the wind before the storm of entliusiasm which her o^m simplie notes had pro- 
duced. Tremblingly, slowly, and almost bowing her fiace to the ground, she 
withdrew. The roar and applause of victory increased. ' J&Kore / encore f encore ! " 
came from every lip. She again appeared, and, courtesying loi^, again withdrew, 
but i^ain, again, and again did they call her out and at every appearance the 
thunders of applause rang louder and louder. Thus Ave times was Jenny Lind 
called out to receive their unanimous and deafening plaudits, " 

I cannot .eixpresB ^}mt my feelings were as I watched 
this scene ftom the diBM cirQle* ' F^or Jenny ! I deeply 



raCTOBNTS OF THE TOUK. 321 

• _ 

sympathized with her when I heard that first hiss. I 
indeed observed the resolute bearing ^hich she assumed, 
but was apprehehsiye of the result When I witnessed 
her triumph, I could not restrain the tears of joy that 
roUed down my cheeks ; * and rushing through a private 
box, I readied the stage just as she was withdrawing 
after the fifth eacore. ^* God bless you, Jenny, yon have 
settled them I '* I exclaimed. 

^* Are you satisfied 1 ** said she, throwing hei^ arms 
arotmd my neck. She, too, was crying with joy, and 
never before did she look so beautifol in my eyes as on 
that efvening. 

One of the Havana papers, notwithstanding the great 
triamph, cOntinoed to cry out for low prices. This 

> 

indaced many to id)6ettt themselves, expecting soon to 
see a reduction. It had been understood that we would 
give twelve concerts in Havana ; but when they saw, 
after the fomrth concert, which was devoted to charity, 
that no more were announced, they became uneasy. 
Committees waited upon us requesting more concerts, 
but we peremptorily declined. Some of the leading 
Dons, among whom was Count Penalver, then offered to 
guarantee us $25 ,000. for three concerts. My reply was, 
that there was not money enough on the island of Cuba 
to induce me to consent to it. That settled the matter, 
and gave us a pleasant opportunity for recreation. 

We visited, by invitation, Mr. Brittckerhoff, the emi- 
nent American merchant at Matanzas, whom I had met 
iit the same place three years previously, and who sub- 
sequently had visited my family in Connecticut. The 
gentlemanly host did everything in his power to render 
our stay agreeable; and Miss Lind was. so delighted 
witli his attentions and the interesting details of sugar 

21 



822 INdDBNTS OF THB TOXTB. 

and coffee plantations which we Tisited thioogh his 
kindness, that as soon as she returned to Havana, she 
sent on the same tour of pleasure Mr. Benedict, who 
had been prevented by illness from accompaiiying us. 

I found my little Italian plate^dancer, Yivalla, in 
Havana. He called on me frequently. He was ip 
great distress, haying lost the use of hk limbs on the 
left side of his body by paralysis. He was thus unable 
to earn a livelihood, although he still kept a peiformiog 
dog, which turned a spinning*wheel and performed some 
curious tricks. One day, as I was passing him out of 
the front gate, Miss land inquired who he was. I 
briefly recounted to her his history. She expi^ssed 
deep interest in his case, and said something should be 
set apart for him in the benefit which she was about to 
give for charity. Accordingly, when the benefit earae 
off, Miss Lind appropriated $500 to him, and I . made 
the necessary arrangements for his return to his friends 
in Italy. At the same benefit $4,000 were distributed 
between two hospitals and a convent. 

A few mornings after the benefit our bell was rung, 
and the servant announced that I was waited. I went 
to the door and found a large procession of children^ 
neatly dressed and bearing banners, attended by ten or 
twelve priests, arrayed in their rich and flowing robes. 
I inquired tl^eir business, and was informed that they 
had come to see M#S8 Lind, to thank her in pe^rson for 
her benevolence. I took their message, and informed 
Miss Lind that the leading priests of the convent had 
come in great state to see and thank her, " I will not 
' see them," she replied ; " they have nothing to thank 
me for. If I have done good, it is no more than 
my duty, and it is my pleasure. I do not deserve their 



IKGIDHNT8 OF THE TOUR ' 323 

thanlcB^ aod I will not's^e them/* i r^tumed her 
answer, and tke iMdeiDS of the « ffV^i procesBion went 
away in disappointment. 

The «ame day VivaUa called, and brought her a basket 
of the most luscious fruit that he could procure. The 
little fellow was very happy and extremely grateful. 
Miss Liud hod gone oiA for a ride# 

^' God blese bar I I am so happy ; she is such a good 
lady. I si|^see/ii|y 'brothers and iiisters again. Oh, 
she is a ^vwy good ladyV' said poor YivaUa, overcome by 
his feelings. He begged me to. thank her for him, and 
give her the fruit. * As he was passing out of the door, 
he hesitated a moment, an^ then said, ^^ Mr. Barnum, I 
should like .ao much to have the good lady see my dog 
turn a wheel ; it is very nice,; he - pan spin very good« 
Shall I bring the dog and wheel for her ? She is such 
a good lady, I wish to please her very much." I smiled, 
and told him she would not care for the dog ; that he 
was quite welcome to the money, ^d that she refused 
to see the priests from the convent that morning, 
because she never received "thanks for favors. 

When Jenny came in I gw^e^ her the fruit, and laugh- 
ingly told her that Vivalla wished <;o shoV her how his 
performing dog could turn ^ spinning-wheel. 

^^ Poor man, poor man, do let him come ; it is all the 
good creature can do for me," exclaimed Jenny^ and the 
tears flowed thick and fast down her •cheeks. '^ I like 
that, I like that," she continued; "do let the poor crea-. 
ture come and bring his dog^ It will make him so 

I confess it made me happy, and I exclaimed, for my 
heart was full, " God blejss you, it will make him cry for 
joy ; he shall come to-morrow," 



824 ' IKCIBBNM OP THE TOUR 

I saw Yivalla the sAilie' ^ireiiiiig, aoA delighted him 
with the iht^Uigen^e^thtit Jentiy Would see his deg per- 
form the next day, at four o'clock precisely* 

" I will be pancftnd/' siaid Vivalltt, ia a voioe trem- 
bling with emotion J *' but I wa6- 9ure she would- like to 
see my dog p«ft)!rm." 

For full half an hour belbte Ate^ time apfxiintod did 
Jenny Lind sit in her Window tfa tiid second flbor and 
watch for VivaHa and -his dog. ' A 'few ttriA«te^ before 
the appointed hour; she sdW hini ciiimtig: **Ah, here 
he comes ! here he fcomed! '^i^i eicTaimedin defight, as 
she ran down stairs iali'd opened ^he door to admit him, 
A negro boy was bringing the smaH spinning-wheel, 
while Vivalla led Hie dog. ' Handing the boy a silver 
coin, she motioned him awa^, arid taking Ih^ wh6el in 
her arms, she said, " This is Vety kind of you to eome 
with your dog. PoI16\# fee. I WiH carty the wheel 
up stairs.'* Her servant offered to take the wheel, but 
no, she would let no ' one caity it but herself. She 
called us all tip to her ]f)arlor. Arid for one full hour did 
she devote* herself td the Wnpy Italian, ^hfe went 
down on her knees to pet the do^'and to ask Vivalla all 
sorts of questions 'a'bout his performances; his former 
course of life, his friends in^taly,' ihd Bis present hopes 
and determinations. ' Th^n sh^ sang arid Iplayed for him, 
gave him some refreshments, finally Insisted oh carrying 
his wheel to tHe door, •arid- iier • servant accom- 
panied Vivalla to his boatd5ng*-housfe. 

Poor Vivalla! He was plxAably never so happy 
before, but his enjoyment did not exceed that of Miss 
Lmd. That scene alotte would have paid me for all my 
labors during the entire musical campaign. A few 
months later, however, the Havana coilrespondent of the 



nrCIDBNTS OF THE TOUR 8^25 

New York Herald BXmoxtwied the death of Viv^lla and 
stated that 'the pobr Italito's • Ihat words ' wei^e about 
Jenny Lind and Mr* Barnum. 

When Captain Rawlings, <if the Steamer ** Isabella " 
made his next return trip from Charleston, he brought 
a fine lot of game and invited Messrs- Benedict, 
Belletti and myself- to* a breakfast on board, where 
we met' Mr. Jbhn Howard, of the Irving House, 
New ' York, Mr. J. B. Monnot, 'of the New York 
lloteU Mr. Mixer, of the Charleston Hotel, and Mr. 
jSIonroi* of one of the Havana- hotels. The break- 
fast was a very nice one, and was accompanied by 
sr>me " very fine old * Madeira,'* which received the 
bi;^est Encomiums of the company. 

" Kow," said Captkin Rawling-s, ^ you must break 
your rule once, Ml*. Barnum, and wash down your 
game with a glasi or two -of tliis choice Madeira. It 
is very old and fine, as smooth as oil, and the 
gxme is hardly game without it. Do take some." 

I positively declined, saying I did not doubt that 
he had the genuine article for once, but that most 
of what was ofFcrod and sold as wine did not con- 
tain a single drop of the jnice of the grape. * This 
led to a general talk about the impositions practised, 
even in the best hotels, in serving customers with 
*' fine old wines and liquors " at the bar and at the 
table, and some very curious and amusing stories 
were told and confessions made. Bat there could be 
no mistake about this Madeira ; it was rich, rare, old, 
oily, and genuine in flavor and quality ; all the connois- 
seurs at the table were unanimous in their verdict. 

But when the breakfast was' over and we were going 
ashore, as I was sitting next the captain in his own 
boat, he said to me : 



326 . IN0IDBNT8 OP THE TOUR 

^' Barnam, that fine old Madeira is the real * game ' 
of my game breakfast ; I wanted to test those experi- 
enced tasters, and I gave them some wine which I 
bought for a dollar and a half a gallon at a comer 
grocery in Charleston." 

In the party which accompanied me to Havana, was 
Mr. Henry Bennett, who formerly kept Peale's Mosenm 
in New York, afterwards managing the same establish- 
ment for me when I purchased it, tod he was new with 
me in the capacity of a ticket-taker. He was as honest 
a man as ever lived, and a good deal of a wag. I 
remember his going through the market once and run- 
ning across a decayed actor, who was reduced to tending 
a market stand ; Bennett hailed him with '^ Hallo ! what 
are you doing here ; what are you keeping that old tur- 
key for]" 

" O ! for a profit," replied the actor. 

'^ Prophet, prophet 1 " exclaimed Bennett, ^'patriarch, 
you mean ! '" 

With all his waggery he was subject at times to moods 
of the deepest despondency, bordering on insanity. 
Madness ran in his family. His brother, in a fit of 
frenzy, had blown his • brains out. Henry himself had 
twice attempted bis own life while in my employ in 
New York. Some time after our present journey to Ha- 
vana, I sent him to London. He conducted my business 
precisely as I directed, writing up his account with me 
correctly to a penny. Then handing it to a mutual 
friend with directions to give it to me when I arrived in 
London the following week, he went to his lodgings and 
committed suicide. 

While we were in Havana, Bennett was so despon- 

« 

dent at times that w? were obliged to watch him care- 



INCIDENTS OF THE TOUR. 327 

fully, lest he sliovld do some damage to himself or 
othet^. When we left Hiavana fot New Orleans, on 
board the steamer " Falcon," Mr. James Gordon Ben- 
nett, editor of the New York 'Herald^ and his wife were 
also passengers. After permitting' one favorable notice 
in his paper, Bennett; had turned around, as usual, and 
had abused Jetmy Lind and bitterly attacked me. 
Thefe was an estrangement, no new thiig; between the 
editor and myself. The Hertdd^ in its desire to excite 
attention, has a habit of attacking public men and I had 
not escaped. I was always glad to get such notices! 
for 4iiey served * as inexpensive advertisements to toy 
Mutii^crifi, and broughi custom to ine free of charge. 

■ Ticket-taker Bennett, however, took much to heart 
the Attacks' of Editor Bennett upon Jenny Lind, and 
whSe in Kew York he threatened to cowhide his name- 
sake, as so many men have actually done in days gone 
by, but I restraSned Kim. When Editor Bennett came 
on board the ** falcon,*' he had in his arihs a small pet 
monkey belotigihg to' his ^vife; and the animal \Vas 
placed in a safe place on the forward deck. When 
Henry Bennett saw the editor he said to a bystander : 

•' T would willingly be drowned if I could see that 
old scoundrel go to the bottom of the sea.'* 

Several of out party overheard the remark and I 
turned lartghingly to Bennett and said : " Nonsense ; he 
can't harm any one and there is an old proverb about the 
impossibility of drowning those who are born to another 
fate/' 

That very night, however, as I stood near the cabin 
door, conversing with my treasuref and other inembers 
of my company, Henry Bennett came up to me with a 
wild air, and hoarsely whispered : 



3528 INCIDENTS OP THE TOUB. 

'^ Old Bennett has gone for^a]:d alone in the.^dar)^ to 
feed his pionkey, and . d — ^n him, I am going to throw 
him overboard." 

We were all startled, for we knew t^e man and he 
seemed terribly in earnest. ' Knowing how most effect- 
ively to address him At such timesi I exdaimed . 

'' Ridiculous ! you would not do such a thing." 

'^ I sw;ear I will," was his savage reply, I exposta- 
lated with him, and several of our party joined me. 

^' Nobody will know.it," muttered the maniac» f' and 
I shall be doing the world a favor." 

I endeavored to awaken him to a sense of the orinie 
he contemplated, assuring him that it covld not possibly 
benefit any one, and that from the fact of the relations 
existing between the editor and myself, I should bp the 
first to be accused of his murder. I implored him to go 
to his stateroom, and he finally did so^ accompanied by 
some of the gentlemen of our paxty. I took pains to 
see that he was carefully watched that nig^t^ and, 
indeed, for several days, till he became calm again. He 
was a large, athletic man, quite able to pick up his 
namesake and drop him overboard* The matter was 
too serious for a joke, and we made little mention of 
it ; but more than one of my party §aid then, and has 
said since, what I really believe to be true,, that ^^ James 
Gordon Bennett would have been drowned that night 
had it not been for P. T. Bamum." 

This incident has long been known to several of my 
intimate friends, and when Mr. Bennett learns the fact 
from this volume, he may possibly be somewhat mollified 
over bis payment to me, fifteen years later, of $200,000 
for the unexpired lease of my Museumi concerning 
which some particulars vnH be given anon* 



mCSDESTQ OF THB TOITB. 329 

in New Orleans the wharf waa crowded by a great 
concourse of persons, as the steamer >' Falcon" ap* 
preached. Jenny lind had enjoyed a month of quiet, 
and dreaded the excitement which she must now 
again encounter. 

'^Mr. Bamum, I am sure I can never get through 
that crowd," said she, in despair. 

'^ Leave that to me. Bemain quiet for ten minutes, 
and there shall be no crowd here," I replied. 

Taking my daughter on my arm, she threw her 
veil over her face, and we descended the gangway 
to Ibe dock. The crowd pressed around. ^ I had 
beckoned for a carriage before leaving the ship. 

•^That's Barnum, I know him," called out several 
persons at the top of their voices. 

'^ Open the way, if you please, for Mr. Barnum 
and Miss Lind!" cried Le Grand Smith over the 
racing of the ship, the deck of which he had just 
reached from the wharfs ' 

** Don't crowd her, if you please, gentlemen," I ex- 
claimed, and by dint of pushing, squeezing and coax- 
ing, we reached the carriage, and drove for the 
Montalba buildings, where Miss land's apartments had 
been prepared, and the whole crowd came following at 
our heels. Jn a few minutes afterwards, Jenny and her 
companion came quietly in a carriage, and were in the 
house before the ruse was discovered. In answer 
to incessant calls, she appeared a moment upon the 
balcony, waved her handkerchief, received three hearty 
cheers, and the crowd dispersed. 

A poor blind boy, residing in the interior of Missis- 
sippi, a flute-player, and an ardent lover of music, 
visited New Orleans expressly to hear Jenny land. 



830 nrciDENTS op the Totnt. 

A subjicription had been taken up among his neighbors 
to defray the expenses:' This feet- coming to the ear.^ 
of Jenny, she «eni5 for himv played and sang for hira, 
gave him many words of joy and comfort, took him 
to her concerts, and sent him away condiderabfy richer 
thain he* had- ever Been before, i • 

A funny incident occttlred* at New Orleans.- Onr 
concerts' tvere -given * in • the St. Charles Theatre,- then 



managed by my ^ood friend, the late Sol. Smith. In 
the- open l6ts newr the theatre were exhibitions of 
mathmoft hogs-, five-footed horses, grii^zly bears, and 
othir Animals. 

A gentleman had a Son abbut twelr* years old, who 
had -a WondeWtil ear for rrrasic. He could whistle t)r 
sing any tune after hearing it once. His father did not 
know* n6r cafe fbr a -single note, but so anxious wa^ he 
to pleasfel his «on,^that he paid thhty dollars for two 
tickete (to the concert. •' 4 

" I liked the music better than! expected," said he to 
me' the next day, "but my son wa^ in rapture-s. ^ He 
was sb perfectly tochanted that he scarcely spoke the 
wh6le evetlftfg and I wottld on no account disturb his 
d^llghtftil reveries. When the concert was finished we 
catne out of the theatre/ Not* a word was spoken. I 
knevV that my* musical prodigy was happy among the 
clouds, and r said nothing. I could ' not help efrfvying him 
his love of music, and considered my thirty dollars as 
nothing, compared to the bliss which it secured to hftn. 
Indeed, I was seriously thinking of taking him to the 
next concert, when he spoke. We were just passing the 
numereus shows upon the vacant lots. One of the signs 
attracted him, and he said,- • Father, let ns go in dnd see 
the big hog \ ^' The little scamp ! I could have horse- 



INCIDENTS OT THfi TOtTEL 881 

wiAppeA himT*^ taM the father, ivho, loving a joke; 
conid not belt)^ laugfiing at Hie ludicrous incident. 

Some tnoti^ afterwards, I -was relating fhis story 'af 
my own tafbte to setn^srid guests, amOng whoto wai^ a very 
mattefKtf-lsiet'tnfta wiio had not the ftdttteet coneeptien 
of humor. After the whole party had laughed herirtfly 
at the iineedote, my ib^ttetMif^faot friMit gravely asked : 

" And was it a very large hog, Mr. Bamum? " 

I nucude ai*rangeinents wflth Ifie ciptaki ef the splen- 
did steamer " Magnolia," of Louisville, to take our party 
as far as <7aira, tUe- junction 6f the Mississippi and Ohio 
rivers, stipulating foSr #ufficietit delay in Natches^, Mis- 
sissippi, and ia Memphis, Tenaessee, to give a concert 
iu each place. It was no unusual thing :^or' me to char- 
ter a steambba'l or a sjieidial tirdri of -cars for our party. 
With such an enterprise as that; time and comfort were 
paramount to money. ... 

The time on board tiie stfeamer was whiled away in 
reading, viewing the scenery of the Mississippi, and 
other diveivWms. One day #e had a pheasant musical 
festival in the ladies^ ifaloon for th^ gratification of the 
passengers; at which Jenny volunteered to sing without 
ceremony. It seemed to us she «iever sang so sweetly 
before. I also did my best to amuse my -fellow passen- 
gers with anecdotes and the eslhibition of sundry 
legerdemain tricks which I had' been obliged to learn 
and us^in the Soutiii years before and uiider far differ- 
ent circutti*tances than thoie which ilttended the per- 
formance now. Among other tricks, I caused a quarter 
of a dollar to disappear so mysteriously from beneath a 
card, that the mulatto bdrber' on boai^ came to the 
conclusion that I was in league with the devil. 

The next morning I seated • myself for the operation 



33[2 INCIDENTS OF THE TOUR 

of shaying, and the colored gentlenma yemttired to dip 
into the mysteory. '^Beg pavdoa, Mr* Barmim»:biLt I 
have heard a great deal about you^ and I s«iw more than 
I wanted to see last night. Is it true that you hav^.^d 
yourself to the de?il) gp th(^ you o<^ do what 7o\iVo a 
nuttd to?" 

'^ Oh, yes," waa Biy. rc^ly> ^^ that is ^ bargain 
between uSf" 

^* How long 'did you agree, .fw ? " was t^ qjoestion 
next in order. 

'^ Only nine yeai:^" said I. " I have had theqe of them 
already. Before the oth^r six are out, I shaU imd a 
way to nonplus the old gentleman, and I hsfv^ told him 
so to hi^ face." 

At this avowal, a larger spao0 of wjbjte than usual 
was seen in the darkey's eyes, and he inquired, ^^ Is it 
by this bargain that you get so much money ? " 

'^ Certainly. No matter who has money, nor where 
he keeps it, in his box or till, or anywhere about him, 
I have only to speak the words, and it comes/' 

The shaving was completed in •silence, but thought 
had been busy in the barber's mind, and he embraced 
the speediest opportunity to transfer his bag of coin to 
the iron safe in charge of the clerk. 

The movement did not escape me, and immediately a 
joke was afoot I had barely time to make two or three 
details of arrangement with the clerk, and resume my 
seat in the cabin, ere. the barber sought a second inter- 
view, bent on testing the alleged powers of Beelze- 
bub's colleague. 

^' Beg pardon^ Mr. Barnum, but where is my money ? 
Can you get it ? " 

^^ I do not want your money," was the quiet answer. 
" It is safe." 



INCmENTS OF THE TOUB. 333 

."Yes, I know it is safe — ha! hal — it is in the 
iron safe in the clerk's office — safe enough from 
yon!" 

" It is not in the iron safe I " said I. This was said 
so quietly, yet positively, that the colored gentleman 
ran to the office^ and iqiqpire^ if all^was safe. " All 
right," said the clerk. " Open, and let me see," replied 
the barber. The safe was unlocked and lo! the money. 

a 

was gone! 

In mystified terror the loser applied to me for relief. 
^' Y0a will fmd the bag in yoor drawer," said I, and 
there it was found! 

Of course, I had a confederate, but the mystifica- 
tion of that mulatto was immense. 



• r 



CHAPTER XXI. 

' , JENNY WNP. 

« 

ASBXVAh AT ST. LOUTS •— StTRPRISIXO PROPOSITION OF MISS USlfU tmOMXTkKT 
—BOW THM MANAOKB XANA(»SJ> — ll|SAZ>Uf£a3 TO CANCEL ViB .QQifTKArr — 
CON8TTLTATION WITH ** UNOLE SOL.'* — BARXtTM NOT TO BB HIBED — A •*JnRK "' 

^TXMFBBAircB zmcmMK mrvau cheaxmi -« sou 'Sioth— a caxKDiAr. 

AUTHOR, AND LAWYER — UNIQUE DBDICATIOK— ■ JENNT LIND*8 CHARACn :: 
AND CHARITIES — SHARP WORDS FROM THE I^EST — ^ELFISH A1>VK»FR* — 
MI4B LDTD'S OBIOUIOUS DtPULSEfl^BBB 4IHPLS ANX> OHTTJ»Myj^ <gf Aj>4l TT 1 

— CONFESSIONS OF A MANAGER — PRIVATE REPUTATION AND PUBLIC REXOVN 

— CHARACTER AS A STOCK IN 11SLAB1S*-LB ORASt^ BWttrtt*^iaL POX.*** — THE 
ANGELIO SIDE KSPT OUTSIDE — MT OWN SHARB IN THE FUBLXO RKKSFITa — 
JUSTICE TO MISS LIND AND MYSELF. 

According to agreement, the " Magnolia** waited for 
ns at Natchez and Memphis, and we gave profitable 
concerts at both places. The concert at Memphis wa> 
the sixtieth in the list since Miss Lind's arrival iu 
America, and the first concert in St Louis would be 
the sixty-first. When we reached that city, on the 
morning of the day when our first concert was to be 
given, Miss Lind's secretary came to me, commissioned, 
he said, by her, and announced that as sixty concerts 
had already taken place, she proposed to avail herself 
of one of the conditions of our contract, and cancel the 
engagement next morning. As this was the first inti- 
mation of the kind I had received, I was somewhat 
startled, though I assumed an entirely placid demeanor, 
and asked : 

^^Does Miss Lind authorize vou to Give me tbi^ 
notice 1 " 



JENKY UNO. 335 

" I 80 jmdekstaa^ it," Wae the jfeply. . 

I immediately reflected that if our . cpptract was thuB 
suddebly cwcelled, MiBs Lind was bound to repay to me 
nil I hsid paid her over the (Stipulated fUOOO for each 
concert, and a little calculation showed that the sum 
thus to be paid b^ck iw^ts {S'^^^QOOs suace sh^ had 
already received irom m^ 813.7,000 for sixty concerts. 
In this yiew, I could ^ot but thitik that this was a : rusa 
of sQme Qf ben adyipers, and, possibly, that she might 
know nothing of the matter. So I told her secretary 
that I would see him again in an hour, and meanwhile I 
went to my old friend Mr. Sol. Smith for his legal and 
friendly advice. 

I showed him my contract and told him how much I 
had been annoyed by the selfish and greedy hangers*ou 
and advisers, legal and otherwise, of Jenny Lind. I 
talked, to him about the ** wheals within wheels " which 
sDu>ved this great musical enterprise, and asked and 
gladly accepted his advice, which mainly coincided 
vrith my own views of tb^ situation. I the» went 
back to the secretary and quietly told him that I was 
ready to settle with Miss Lind and tq close thei engago- 
ment ^ 

" But," said he, manifestly " takeu aback," " you have 
already advertised concerts ii:^ Louisville and Cincinnati, 
I believe." 

" Yes," I replied ; ^ but you m^y tak^ my contracts 
for halls and printing off my hands at q)st" I further 
said that he was welcome to the assistance of my ^gent 
who hf(d madei th,ese arrangements, and, moreover^ that 
I would cheerfully give my own services to help them 
through with these concerts, thus giving them a good 
start *' on their own hook." 



336 JENNY LIND. 

My liberality, which he acknowledged, emboldened 
him to make an extraordinary proposition : 

'* Now suppose," he asked, '^Miss Lind should wish 
to give some fifty concerts in this country, what would 
you charge as manager, per concert 1 " 

*' A million dollars each, not one cent less," I replied. 
I was now thoroughly axoused ; the whole thing was as 
dear as daylight, and I continued : 

*' Now we might^ as well understand each other ; I 
do n't believe Miss Lind has authorized you to propose 
to me to cancel our contract ; but if she has, just bring 
me a line to that effect ov^r her signature and her check 
for the amount due me by the terms of that contract, 
some $77,000, and we will close our business connec- 
tions at once." 

'* But why not make a new arrangement," persisted 
the Secretary, ** for fifty concerts more, by which Miss 
Lind shall pay you liberally, say f 1,000 per con- 
cert?" 

^' Simply because I hired Miss Lind, and not she me," 
I replied, *^ and because I never ought to take a farthing 
less for my risk and trouble than the conteact gives me. 
I have voluntarily paid Miss Lind more than twice as 
much as I originally contracted to pay her, or as she 
expected to receive when she first engaged with me. 
Now, if she is not satisfied, I wish to settle instantly and 
finally. If yon do not bring me her decision to-day, I 
shall go to her for it to-morrow morning." 

I met the secretary soon after breakfast next morning 
and asked him if he had a written communication for me 
from Miss Lind? He said he had not and that the 
whole thing was a "joke." He merely wanted, he 
added, to see what I would say to the proposition. I 



aakad Um>if Was lAxA mm iu the Hjpke,'Vaa l^e {C^^ed 
it ? He hoped I would not inquire, but wsouid >lett the 
matter dnq>. I went oii, a$ usual) lud . gaie fom ^ more 
ooonerli' jn St Loitis4«ttllfolbjir0d.o«taijjrprfgiVf«^ 
arrangail in etiier «itie» &r jnany im^ka . iS?Uowi«g«;< xmn: 
at ihat' limey aor^lttfaiiyrtMiis /a&Q0wav^,i(U4 Mii^ Lind 
give Me tfeie slaglM»«t lotioMtiw that ^k^ b/$j/L any Jmqw^ 
edge of the proposition of liecMaecflr^tary rA> caxui^l rQnr 
agnealtentoiD t() pmploy pie^ as h^.mana^n — i i 

DnriHgnewstD^^ajb j8L)Xl9lW^I/fl^ife]:^drat0«llP^ 
BSkcer Idefton ii^ ! <hQ ii^e^^^ sx^ rat, ittie i fdo$q| , . ampog 
othet «ignm9f el^ tbe>p)e4gie^ wisawy iH^^d-snll i^dfd^ei:, 
Sol. fiflilOt ''^Uod« 18k)U\^^^a^ 
was a famous character in his time^^. <i{e fws fafiqppel- 
lettt 'ooftiediai^,* ' aa >«iit)lipBy > ti mamigec i lyi^' '4' ifwyer. 
For a oMsidanible t^eriod ' of rbii li£^).bp^.1iaaMlf^^7 
cotacerne4 ia 'thMitiieaisfiyi/^Sjt^jUipiat/New Qdmaa ;eg^d 
otimrnHietf, iMd aaqfuited e liati^omf./pi^peijtj.; fie 
died/tft hfiperold/dge, a|;1869^l^99e?ted9n4:l9l09^ted 
by all ' f^rtior'kneir hjmi 'iM^ni. jft, ap. ^h^nopr ita. iN^e 
been b|ie a£ 'hk iBJtftinqie iffie^^^ . : ;; ,,} i ' > 

;A/fyeerferftNvie liefom 1)^ 4}e45 Jief pi»l>lji4i#d t^ t^ 
iiAei*etBi9 tpleMe/i9iYH^.tf'ifi^ 9^9911^ erf »tjie, Je^^- 
iDg ipeideeii^, In hi^-lfflVB^ eii4 ywadwcar^ert^ ^ acfqr 
and nmtiULgBft^ • Se^ faaA-rpix^i^^wly^ mrl^Siy.pub* 
lifiiied^irfa im(lAii>8ief»UQBl.«(rt|, mf^figmtitig ^Hvaooow^t 
<rf the^ '^^'teeond raetMkr yeetv of jiii^ .^^leff^f^op^ ii&»'' 
together witk' ehetchiffr o(S advfntwpe In-^a^lw Bmifs, 
aMi eatitledrt' 7to»/20ltffi«neKl leino^pWerik ms^ifm^ 
dotieflft AB^eUeiMbiii^.ef^JBtol^^i^i^ Al^- 

nery'etl4Mf,"'eta/ Wbiii unique ;#ovkff^/pfeeeid(ed'by 
a dedtnlkfa ^iMh I -ifkitaie to cepjr. It wfuirap.^- 
lowtft' •'. • ' • ' . 

16» 



096 jnBKmr turn. 

*• Oreat Iinpress^rio : Whdlst you tv^re < engaged i:j 
yotsf gfrefnif Jieiiiiy Ltnd «{>eeidatMni, thefoUo^vib^ cDmis 
driim went (h<d ronndf of the American new8patiec»: 
' ^<^' Wiry l#it tfaM Jenny UnA andBarBuanwill nevei 
fen btifeT' Awwcr : ^ Beca!a«e he is alirays'lEbit^ttin^ 
tod *e i« alWajA for-givrog.* * t 

"I have- iMTcr ask^d yoti tibe 'qii^ttoit^' ^dttti^tly. 
1i^3i^i* yki^ Mr. Barnonlv btaMed tkat OMuHdnim^ or 
not;' but I fttron^y miifpect dmtydu did^ At Ail eventv 
I nottfed ttiat yoar whole pcitcy wm^ dencentrated in: 
bne idea "^ to ttiake an ntiget of Jenny, 'and deptecint': 
yottrtelf in tof^fcraet a : « . 

"You- raajr r^membet that in tbis- eity (8t Lmii^). I 
acted in one falstancfe a^ydur-^ legal adviser,' aftd^a^sml. 
netesMrily bMame afe^uainted with all tba |mtttcal.ii* 
o^ your MtitUacC With die s»-(ialled Swe^^Mi Nigktiligrxb 
as well aa thetatiotta modificalUmA tMpied -"by th.. 
charit^le Iady4 aiad sub^iilted^ «o by y*tr aft^ he. 
arrival in this country? "which inodifteatiMs' ^l.snp 
pose It need no. loiigei' be a ^orfet9 ^(Mi^'i toiler — 
be^des tl^ drig^ftaal sti|kiktSwi «f ti0i/ithdwaftid d 
lars fbr eveiy cbncertv tttlifeniitinb^ daf«ia|jlM^ *^a«&stai: 
artisto^'ftnd a poaip^euer anA ^xtrid^agant MliBae^ nj 
(only) 9df kYkkfaspmh pl^ne^ss^^oiiii hatfitf Hiepraf.t 
of etkeh ^perfoirma^cte. ' ^ Yon : mhy «Ii^ vnaembar t 
legal it^rfee t ga've you oil the i)emBian 'Teftwed to 
and the iakitai^ nS^t^df »f«rair 4bil4\niig 1u« iHm teu5 
Ireniember the ektravagant joy jon^Mt' aft e i i viii d a ^ r 
Phlladelj^hia,' when the > Angela* dliade' ttp .hmrtotaQd t 
^r^aS heii^lf iof Qite^of 'th^ stt^lati^ntiiniiialr'coatra 
to break off at the end of a hundred nights, aod er^LV 



'.»i- 



n» 



bonglit out MTea* of flisik hundred «^siippo8tog tibat 
she could go on withoilt your ^d as wdOl ad with it. And 
yoa:teanii«t but E^duember^ how, like a lock^t-stick she 
droppffly'Vbeft your buiuneBtf/CGtulieotian^with her ended, 
aIId^b^4i«h^l ^fi^Mdoiit' .the reBnaiader ef heir eoikcert 
nig;htarWrr(hia' put of ^b^ ^iR^rld, and soon aiterwajrds 
retiifiji^ tp^herdoiOiBatiO'UiaaitQde in Sweden, 

'' You kaow» Mx* Baaradimiif you would only' tell, 
Vfbicb' oC' Abe. tiro it wm thfli wag ^for^ettingi' and 
whiib '/oB^vHig' ). (oafd^yon also know who actually 
gaF^ tbaiargw portion of * those sums -which you 
heralded' to ithe world aa the sole ^fte of the ' divine 
Jenay.': *; 

*' Of ^ your ^peculations — fvom the negro centena- 
rin^j .who didn't nurse General Washington, down 
to the Bearded Woman of Genoa—- there was not 
one ^fi^cb foqfuined . the oKcarcise -of so much - hum- 
buggeiry aa the Jenay lijad concerts ; and I verily be- 
Iieye"thMe j/» no-waB liying^ other than yourself, who 
could)* or iWQuld« have naked thO' enormoud expendi- 
ture fi money jEiedeasary^tD ea^ry them through success- 
fully ^r^itttK^UMiig, ^th »6i9ty' artists, foui^ thouHind 
mile^iMld'«givKi2g ainety^three concerts, at an actual 
cost of £brty-«Are lundred dollars eadi, is' what no 
other Jilan WDoldhave undertaken — you accomplished 
this^ and pocketed by the ot>elfi;tion bnt little less thah 
two hundred thousand dollars I ' 'Mr; Bai'num, you 
are vocurself, alone ! 

^ Fhpmr jUQi oh 1 Gtfeat ImfttMsaiior; as the most 
Mncdttmfvi iBaoiiger iA Amerka or any other oountry. 
Democratt'as ^mi axe, yon emu give a practtcai lesson to 
liho .TJ et a or ate of £ufiOpe how to \Y9(e. At ytAir beauti- 
lul aail tartdUL xeaidenoe, ' Iranifitan ' '(I do n't like the 



'840 iTEairsnr uosm. 

name, ttidugh,)7(]ii{ '^n^'knO! A> tmttfrtshfi ^Imt Himnk 
with a wii^irMtii if iLMpltadftyj erilrf 'd4pxaHed^;b^ 
the great landed proprietors <if ^heookl 'MoAirjrs' m 4if 
oui? own ^ siifitiy 'Sdttth/ >W4iilMi9idieB/aMi{Miuiiei^pi^ 
70m cofiets from' *)ifMrr t^ttetis * <ftedtiiiM * iw Ml /{miti^^iif 
tbe woiM, yoU' dd ttot hbafM yti<ir) 'inllMttM' ^iaMnfi^ ^ M 
continually' * iai9« i;lii^m ' iWrthi ndpwi ttie ^ Wttttirt ;^ jfcrtt^rd- 
ilig laW, ^iiieottt-agiitg the iM^tov^nd^lendi^ a»'4i41piQg 
hand to ibdtiM^ ift dl lbs- br^i^e^. ^ Vbt' 'ninlient^ *irftii 
dbin^ All (Jhis/yotr'dMl teie^g^Vib^¥B,)-s^itkm«t ^pfM- 
ttttiity oiters, Upon Ubi^ ridnW*^ * f tttetep*rtinee.» Ywar 
.labors in thi» gti^M CJ&tMe ilofie/i^h^ffld^'i^ntitte yM to 
the thanks of all good men, women and children* in 'ibe 
land; Mr. Bfenrtlrti; yttt -deBerVel itir^yoar goid li^ane, 
and I hbpe ydn ifeay'long KVe to 'enjoy yiHir wedltb and 
honor. ' * * — j.>'-m) i.i h.j . .w u ti .;•. -i jiu. 

<^Ad a small iiii^ahnettt 'towards ^Hie "debt, I^'MXMi&^f 
the comtntitoy, m^e you. Mrf WiA t!^ ii^pcr oTitfwd- 
ingyou aii )iour% amMemtot (if yon ^cati spate Uiat 
amount of' fiin^* lh)m ydut'initflewm' al^Matif6nl^ t€^' wad 
it), I present y^n ^t^^thk ^Uttie ▼ohtttieii -Mtttaimiig a 
very brief account of some of my -^-fMrti^y-Mmtk ' in 
the south gtiid y^»t ; and Yemain, ^ry MspedUbllyt^ 
^ Your friend,* and aflfectmMtetnielid; 
' * ' /• • . • . .*.*KSon« 

ii>«A» 
^ ^ Udde " Soli SfliMi< liuit ^h^ heU sofeiy tiwqpbAsible 
fot hifl^extratttgaoErt; fMtmafte >df R T«'£anHLi]k, jisdb foar 
his somewhat ^deprKoatcnry vieir of die ; attobutaar ^. tte 
^* divine ^^etiity." it ^s - triM that he deidved nfliqr«af ^his 
imprei^ibns eF Miss 'Imd froat tbe ^unbcrjABg feHcam- 






jBiav mzt ' 8il 

Btttttott 'flafreu faitiiiwi muim awk UsipsofesuaMialadrice 

came to me with an assumed authorization from h&t to 
nbMp^idi^miovxienga/gemaotL' . Sttt wbmi iSoJi. Sioitfi's 
dedioHiini ^ mbs - Arst pnblidie^ thwa . "ymte plenty ok 
p6O|d0fniApaperotfamQgbMJ:it^e;l^.tbfiitw^ e^^r 
to<«ateh iip'4«l iiidoitte/tliiAJiMmM^w of.Mi^ Liud*s 
cbttwcter, .. /£h^ Athemana werd . sQioetjiiaes. siek^ «(> 
dMfc*i:df kearilj^. Anstidw alwa)». oaU^d '\ the Jiiist/' 
Y^>e(xi«a£/tkeakaip diiiigS'Vhitfh Sol. ^voiJik meatus 
to Btjf «hoa*\Mjs»^Lindvap|)ly raithsr to the selfish, persons 
who, unfortuQAldLy,. .wevemoxe ia hm confidence. than I 
er&t aspiisd to tvv aa»d who.eAmmed to advise bel: axid 
thos-aa^fy pemveited hevhetter jodgmetrt. . 

'With mH iieresdeUeiit andeven aztraordinarily ^!!3od 
qtMikies, howeteVr J6niy^i^d'Wias..hnBian, though the 
refMilalluiafaer beee is Bunipe for. facv many chairitabki 
sxbt IM me to believe^ till I kssw . her, that she was 
neaiAjr )>exfeet« I think now ^at her natual impulses 
\fete mora 'Bimple, chU^ike, pure and geftenoas thto 
tb4>se' of dimoet.aaijr other person Iiever met But she 
hat^'beenpeMad,. ahnost worshi^iped^ so long^ that it 
wocdd ksve been strange indeed if her. nnhounded popu- 
larity had^not in;8€ane d^ree iiffected her to hev hurt, 
aM 4ilr«iaet not be (iiought extraosdiaery if she now and. 
then exhibited some phase of huamnvfealaieBs. , 

HkB most persoali of .u&Bommoai talent^ ehe had a 
strong ,will which, at times, she found us^yeraable ; 
bnttf dheww ever betrayed into adisplay of iU^raoper 
sIm- was nxmr to apologize tand express her. regret a&er^ 
wttnter « Le* Gfalid Smidi,. who ' was 4|uite intimate, with 
her, and who was my righlHhmdtman daddig ihe. en<ilre 
lilaid engageflOBnt^ used sometimes to^say to me; 



849 * jmnsY ynsmt . 

in always keepii%.J0nIlya'^'atl9sl^dd^^abNdG^ff]||l.*t|lQ 

public.'^ • • ' ^. 1 ' .. ' .. .. ij 'ill, •. ; .; i!] .. M. ! ..r «ifi. . 

MMe thaift ' one' EngUshniatt^^liima^rfaiiatteaj^rtlfeji: 
Dolby^ Msf. >I>i<Kkm8'«^ al^tiidntng.Ms^jiwtfiviiJifcjto • 
Akiierica ^^^^ ^^rssMd eorprise itfc the coii£papA. impme^ 
sioii'of ^^^kcAon"^ etitettMKktdihfAie ^cneqil ibmerii*. 
CM foblie 'ia mgard tor tiie fiwiddiskii It^igblittgafe; 
These thittgfi ai^ writteiiiwilli none ImtiiU iluariM: 
' feelhtgfi towards the lEiwMlrsciigtbre^^ditobintir'HiadiBfr 
the toO'tufyent idead ofaopegfanigtoi dx0elIeiDe<iirUBk' 
citntiot be oharaoteristic of amyr^mortal beili^ -. \:iu ,< • 
Ab I batrei befoxteiintinfiated : in JLJjfhruag tflefadiic.af my 

management of-thaieute^pziBeiy.beliemigv ^ i ^A wfaflx* 
I engaged hety in ^hev '^angdlio'^EQ^tQtkm^iliteijI&W 
enough to* ^^ufetstliatil cbniudeied her>pivrBtb jcdii^^ 
ter' a Ttiuable acyuncfc^ieteft mta l^vsiaoeai poi&trioltTttnf ^ 
to her renown as a suigen I admit Ihat I tofok her 
diatitips iiito at^oount aa plart of my : I'Mstotfc /in trade.** 
Whenever fiite sang for a pnblie or priti^te cfanriAy, ahe 
gaTe hefiyoice,'\vbich:wBB wpidiia tfaouiand doHais - td 
her every OTemng. Aibsneh ikueAi X alwafs UMisfed 
xxptm paying for. the hail, orchestra, painting, and' btfaer 
expenses^ beeausd I felt able amd wiiling to Gbnfri^te 
my fvU shai^ tonriods tiie vortby objects Wiekt 
prompted Aiesfe benefits. ' 

This natratioBi Would be ineomplotO' if I; did aot uAd 
thefit^wing: 

We were in Havana when I showisd to Mias Litid a 
paper containing the eonundram on. ^^£Dngetting" and 
^< foivginng/' at which she ianghed heaiAilfv biit immedi- 
ately' ebaoked hetsdf and said : ' Ifrl, 

^'O! Mrt Bbmamj tiuisi ^ia not £ur r inm know tisat 



JENNY LIND. 343 

yon really give more than I do from the proceeds of 
every one of these charity concerts." 

And it is but just to her to say that she frequently 
remonstrated with me and declared that the actual 
expenses should 'Wd^dubtefl ind tbel thts lessened sum 
devoted to the charity for which the concert might be 
given ; but I always laughingly tx>ld her that I must do 
my port, give my 'shtne, • and that if it - wm pavelyr 
a bottiieaa operation, ^' bread cast .uppi^ the wjatel.*^/' it 
wotdd return, perhaps, buttered; f»r the laiger her 
reputattttn lor Jib^ality, the moire Ul^viol the, public 
^v ould surely be to us and to our (enterprise. 

I hxfe noJirieh to conceal these facts; and I > certainly 
have no desire to' receive a larger meed of praise than 
my qualified generosity merits. Justice to myself and 
to my tnan^ethent,'«a'weU>aA %^ llfed' IhsA^^^bttad to 
permit/ifnottodeiMnd, thifi'eEptanatiKMll ' - "* i 



• *•' • » / .» ' ' ■ • ' ' .• •♦#!,« I • ^^ I jii I. III! I. 



( < 



• I 



f • 



I I 



'1 

< •' • » I I ( • 4 ^. • r ' • f .' ' ' • ' ' 



• / 



I I I 

• ) > • $ I .k\ • I n M ; • \ t 






I I I • • » » I • 

r , , . 

>t i'< fit,/,* • r/llt i , 



'♦ » fii'»'|ii /*»-<•'! •■ \ t 



'I • f * ' f 

' 1 1 1 > I ■ * < t ( 111. ' fi I t . . « I ) • , I i ( ) i * • • 
." 1 CLOySBOF THE CAMPAIGN. , , 

,, FBTNr-lpB ^CAHlp^ CAVE — BIOlfJB SAtVI— OBOilOB D. Pl^NTICK— PBR- 
rfS FlKAIi ^ONCEBT9 p CASTLB GABDSK A^m MET^^POI^TAIV HAxii>-TB£ 

»>V«iBB« A:fp]tfii^-HFaB iffiffn^^riftflib c<|NOlm*-^»iiAr dnfeB «o tXiO«B tub 

SNOAOBJfBMT-ylUM U2f^'0 ,I«BZT)BB AQf^XmNG 9fY PBOF^XTIOK --«rORT 
AQOUT AN "mPBOPEB PLACE '* —JBIWY's CONCERTS oifHBB OWlJ ACCob»T 

, BVprBBX TpSUUNP Q0J4>8QHMIX^ ASP MTWIiF — AT^OMB A<MIK— rTAIB- 
ICBNT bt" tA TOTaL BECBIP^ ^1^ 'fBX OOKCBBTll^ *^ * * ' ' 

,AxisSc^^. Wneeflfcp i».Sfc,J/OuiBfeFeijrwt to Nashville, 
Tennessee, wJt|«(» ,w«,.gftv§ 9ui;,,«i?;tjFr^ixtl?, a^ .«^ 
seventh concerts m this country. At the first ticket 
auction in that city, the excitement was considerable 
and the biddmg spirited, as was generally the case. 
After the auction was over, one of my men, happening 
in at a dry-goods store in the town, heard the proprietor 
say, ^^ m give five dollars to any man who wiU take me 
out and give me a good horse-whipping ! I deserve it, 
and am willing to pay for having it done. To think 
that I should have been such a fool as to have paid 
forty-eight dollars for four tickets for my wife, two 
daughters, and myself, to listen to music for only two 
hours, makes me mad with myself, and I want to pay 
somebody for giving me a thundering good horse-whip- 
ping ! " I am not sure that others have not experienced 
a somewhat similar feeling, when they became cool and 
rational, and the excitement of novelty and competition 
had passed away* 



CliOSfl OF THE CAMPAIGN. 345 

While at Naslrnile, Jenny Lind, accompanied by my 
daughter, Mrs. Lyman, and myself, visited " the Her- 
mitage," the late residence of General Jackson. On 
that occasioQy for the first time that season, we heard 
the ijnld mocking-birds singing in the trees. This gave 
Jenny Lind great delight, as she had never before heard 
them sing eixcept in' tbck Wire-bound oa^s. 

The first of April occurred while we were in Nash.- 
ville. I was coMideiwbly annoyed during the forenoon 
by ihe calls of dietnbertf of the H3om{>aBy who came to 
me aader the belief that I had seat for them: After 
diimes I eonoluded to give them ail a touch of ^ April 
fool." The following article, which appeared the next 
mcomiiig ia>the Nasi^ville Daily American^ my amanuen- 
sis having imparted the secret to the editor, will show 
how itims dofie>: 

*' A wriM of lAQghable jokes came off yesterday at the Veranda in honor of 
AU f!<^l9^ Jlay. Jir; flBlimim was at tibe bettcini of the mbchkif. He muna^ied 
in some inysterioqs naanner to obtain a lot of blank telegraphic despatches and 
enreiapel iMa one Of the offices in this city, and then trent to work and manufac- 
tured ' wBf^iaod^ inboUiseiKe ' l^r QM>st of the pivrti^ composillg tiie Jemiy Ijiud 
finite. Almost every person in the company received a tclegn^phic despatch 
wT iHau 'ttftdef th^ direction of Baimum. Hr. '^mnni's daughter was inr 
fonunl that lier uiother, h^r oousin, and se?cral other relatives were waiting 
for her in Louisville, and various other important and extraordinary items of 
diiiaeslie hitClli{{«iGe were oommumoated to her; Mr. LeGraiiA Smith was told 
by a despatch fr9m his £vther that hisi native viUage in Conpecticut was in ashes, 
ineldfllti^ his otl4i homestead, etc. Several of Barndm's employees had most lib- 
crul.ofsn «C **"|ffigfflmHff from 'batiks auA 6tber Institutiotis at the Korlb. 
Burke, and others of the musical ][»rofe88ors, were offered princely salaries by 
opQtafmi9lai;€rs, ixAd many of them received most tempting inducements to pro- 

cctidimfiMiAM' t(> tlm l^osU'fl FHx in I^iondon. 

*bne married gentleman in Mr. Barnum's suite received the gratifying intel- 
ligcmi^4&«k'|ie hibd Ibr two df^fs becta tlie ^ther of a pair of bouncing boys 
(mrither and children doing well), an event which he had been anxiously looking 
for during the week, though on a somewhat more limited scale. In fact, nearly 
everjr penaa. in Ihe party engaged by Bamum received mme ^xHkaotdinkry tele- 
graphic iBtelligenoe, and as the great impressario managed to have the despatches 
drHvered simultaneotidly, ^ach reclpioiit was for some time busily occupied with 

ii!0ow«.p^ffisoii|j net^m 

" By and by each began to tell his neighbor his good or bad tidings; and each 

wxs, ci€9drJti -rejoiced or grlevod accordilig to circumstaaoes. Several gave Mr. 



346 CUJSB. OF THE CAUPMGK. 

Barnam Qotkse of tlMir iatouiioii to leave bim^in opi^^iieii<)6 o/^Jbtt^i qH^n; 
and a niiinber of thetn sent olf' telegraphic despatches and letters by maU, la 
aaaweif to those received. 

" The man who had so suddenly heeome the ftither of twins, telegraphed to hia 
wife to * he of good cheer,* and that he would 'start for home to-raofrow.' At a 
late hour las^ night tb» secret had ntt got out, and we poeffuma tiiat^aatty oi fhe 
victims will first learn from our columns that they have been taken in by Bas- 
KVMaadAHFoolfl^Dtty!" 



* ♦ » • • 



From Nashville., Jenny Lind «t)d a few fneods vent 
hy way x^f the MammoUi Cave to LawviUe, whUev the 
rest of the p^y proceeded by steamboiJi^ 

While ia Havana, I engaged Signor Salvi for a jfew 
months, to begin about the liOdjt of April. .He joined 
us at Lonisville, and sang in the. three conc^Jte. there, 
with great satisfaction to the public. Mr. George D. 
Erentice, of the Louisville /(^tirnaZ, and his beautiful. imd 
accomplished lady, who had contributed much.taihe 
pleasure of Miss Lind and our party, a(H}QmpMkied us 
to Cincinnati. 

A citizen of Madison had applied to me on our £f$t 
arrival in Louisville, for a concert in tliat place. I 
replied that the town was too small to afford it, where- 
upon he offered to take the mans^ement of it . ii^ito. his 
own hands, and pay me $5,000 for the receipts. The 
last concert at Louisville, and the concerts at Natchez 
and Wheeling were given under a similar agreemeiit, 
though with better pecuniary results than at Madison. 
As the steamer from Louisville to Cincinnati .would 
arrive at Madison about sundown, and would wait long 
enough for us to give a concert, I agreed to his pcpposi* 
tion. 

We were not a little surprised to learn upon arrivingt 
that the concert must be given in a " pork house" — a 
capacious shed which had been fitted up and decorated 
for the occasion. We concluded, however, that if the 



C108E OF THE oam:^aign. S47 

nhabitaab vere Batiafied with the apecomiMdfttktii/ we 
)ught iMit to object The person who had cotvtriitcted 
or the.cono^rt came $1,SOO short of his agieement, 
^vhich I coBseqaently lost, and at ten o'eloclc we were 
4,'aui on board the &ie steamer ^^ Ben Frankim " boinul 
'or Cincinnati. 

The n^xt morning the crowd npcn the wharf was 
uimen^e; I was feaJrful thai an attempt to t^pisaf the 
New Orleans ruse with my daughter would be at lio 
I vail, as the jokehad been pablisked in ihe Oittdiinajti 
>apetd ; so I garie my attn to Mira Lind, and begg€fd 
ler to have no fears, i<Hr I had hit upon an expedietit 
vhich would save her from annoyance. We liien 
lescended the plank to the shore, and as soon as we 
Kid touched it, Le Grand Smith called out from the 
>oat, as if he had been one of the passengers, ^'liliat's 
10 go^ Ifr. Bamum ; you can't pass your daughter off 
or Jenny Lind thia time/' 
The rsfliiark eheited a peal of merriment from ihe 
owd, seiaral personis calling out, ^' I^hat won't do, 
imum I you may fool the New Orleans folks, but you 
ia t come it over ihe * Buckey^/ We intend to stay' 
.ere until you bring out Jenny Lind ! " They readily 
Uowed me to pads with the lady whom t^ey supposed 
be my daughter, and in five minutes afterwards the 
Nis:htiiigale was complimenting Mr. Coleman upon the 
eaodfi&l aj^ commodious apartoents whi^ were 
!evoted to her in the Burnett House. The crowd 
remained aa hour on the wharf before they would 
^e convinced that the person whom they took for 
ny daughter '\^qb in' £Eu;t Ae veritable '^ Swede. '\^lien 
liis was discovered, a general laugh followed thfe 
xclamalioii from one of the victims, ^^ Well, Bamum 
las humbugged us after all I " 



M 



\k 



'S48 ci^B.oF laam oampaigk. 

foujr. liQur$vt0 enajbleus to gite a conieert ih Wheeling. 

Ifc wa^ lUianaged by a doiiple.of gentlemen ia that dtj, 

yvhp p^rdhaded it for five thQusand dollara^im adrance. 
Jbsy 'i^foh.they «iadea handBotBapirDAif« tfaei9-lM»U^^ 

The concert was given in a church. * ' *^ 
^^..^MaJ^^hmg, like (tpea spooe ^nuniMHidiiig^'tfae cob- 
jC^rt/^Qfia \^caiaa crowded ijM&*i2i€ni^ of t^efesons, 

;Wh)9> fpbltdUy.i:efu^i^./to McaAUBodote* e«Bhr 'otlier by 
: j|i9te)iwg>tOj,tke lititoaitH. distfirhed; tfcel cDtui^ttriliBd detei- 
,^i^§4 tM.,td>,|?ave;lb6> nfiKti marnnig^ fbif^JBailisKH'e, 

j^f^^.of .gilding, arSi^cbnd cois^ert ttitit .had Wsit iidrer- 

:, . - 1^ CrKWdjJSmith bwe: paid ino off,fti^ my*' Ayirii fool ' 
j<)!^ev.,J|IeiiQd|i^P6d ii ^m^ of ;1ud a^kjnaiittftnoe to call 
D^jafeand r^iv^a} p^i^rrai^gemeut itfhSch sUs rpxieteiided 
^pqji4^t9}Jty )p.b^V4^,Qye|hj9fa:d.betwomifiottie.«iibiiiB^rek^ 
who were resolved to stop oxu: stagexboduclLbn/tlie AUe- 
gfraijyjrno»fttfti«$,.flLrid> cJomfnit highitmy^nahftiiaTu ■ The 
rt^ry s?ftm«d.i»cr^4iWesi.wd. >yet.*ha.fvdmaa^ related it 
W^,,^ 9ljildh ,Ap]^ieii£4tnof[]?ity>»/that.I 8W»lIowBd the 
• ,b^, flfnd.^r^iwttitfg to* New-Yoirk all tfaa^itibnof/Z had, 
<KQ^Itt b^'^ly ea<wgh to. .dcfreey our eacpeases* to- Balti 
WPr^f^I p wjcbas^ . «vetoal rCTolhrei» for, siich .thombcit 
Qf: tb?/ company,, a^inwew; nut )ah*eady\pniKrided5 and 
yfj^ Mi^MFitbfbucg' armed. :to. tlxeMteethJ / SmtisaatGh 
^^9py ^indandf^QT^alj^f theimnnpany Imk Icifi/tbefbit 
Lim^deitbis gi^asd discoViecy, and rhence aheoWat aavd 
'ia!i,y, j^Ppre^naioMvidn^ t)^ Itiaikieedlawto sa; 

^^ fow3i4 90^ApsQi£oKv9ur.j&]»aiiinB«.' t . ' k .-. . >•. 
,, , Wi^ rec^Qd:^€i^.]f79i3k early iaMay^J/SSl^x^pd iga\t 
li[}prt6(W . )ci(UQicertsi . . ijiH Qadtle. . .Gardea . And. iMetitipoHt^ 
}i(f^.. ,The l^t of ibm^ madef(the niaety^seookid reg^H 



CIX)88 OF THB OsUCPAIGN. 349 

I^ .coniQert under our eogagemeut Jenny Lmd h»A 
npw s^gain reached the atmosphere of her legal and 
other '^ advisers," and I soon disoovered the effects of 
th^ jin^HftP^' I» however, cared little what course 
tfaf^j ^vj^ed ^jT to. pursue* I indeed wished, tbey 
would prevail upon hear, to close, with her hundredth 
QpMc^fjtfiw X had become weary with xronstant excite- 
fl^nt and unreoiittvag ^ic^rtions. . I was oQnfident that 
if she undertook to give concerts on hec ownr account, 
she would be imposed upon and harassed in a thousand 
wi^ ; yet X felt it would be w^ ^ her to have a trial 
at it) if she saw fit to credit her advisers' assurance that 
I had not managed the enterprise as succeiisfuUy as it 
mj^ht have been done. 

At about the eighty-fifth conceit, tiierefore, I was 
most Jt|M>9f . to l^apsi ifom. h?r lips, ^at sbe had . concluded 
to. pay t^e forfeiturp^ twenty^-fivie thowand doUars^ and 
^gjTOJfiate t\uf qon^f^rts with tb^^ ono hutidredth« 

. ^fV^tTT^ ^ PhilftdelpbJ4»i,vrJb€8re Ibadadwortised the 
2fipei^,i|ecp|^d«;«i])6ty-tbir4>.jili»d ninety^fouri^ concerts, 
ip4:}t94 ^ffgra^ ^^ laigQ National Theatre on Chest- 
nut 3tafeetr It ,)iad been u»ed fat equesibriaii itod theatri- 
cs . .en^r^wmentcu but ww now tkovong^ly demised 
and fitted up by Max Mforetzek for Italiaa opehu It 
lift(s,&con7e|ue9t place £(»: our pui^se. One. of her 
" advisers,'* ^. si^erdinate. in her emplay^. who waa 
already^ itching for the position of manager^ mfade the 
s^ept^u of tl^ buildil^ pt pceteKt for cheating dissatis- 

fact^>n in the mind of Miss Lind» I saw the influences 

> • ' 

which were at work, and not caring enough for the 
j^ofi^ of the remaining seven concerts, to ocmtinue the 
engf^mei^t at the risk ot disturbing the friendly feel- 
ings whAC^ had hitherto uninterruptedly existed between 



SSP CLOaS^XF THE CAM^AIOK 

ihAtlimhf and inysalfyJ vwf» hot' d( letfer^l^ti^hg' to 
relini^itish the eogagetii^t^if ghedesit^'ltj^yt^he 'tef- 
miQ&tion of the conoert which was to take placd'tUkt 
evcaodugy upoahar simply allowing me a libonfland'' dol- 
lars per.eo&cert for flie seveti^^hlot^ ^IMuld 'y^t 'tefaSi& 
to naJke up the hundred, befii^spfiyin^- iite ith«-^i^ 
atipttlated M :a f odeiture far elMitt^ t^ etiga^emeiMf Kt 
the one^hiiJidTedtli obucattr ^Towtitdd (dV^iittg I'reosifdd 
the.foilowiiig ieflyi> - ; ./,{'»•/' .-. - «-j *- 1^ «' 

the 9iid of tho iH9&ty-^ir4 cpt)9er^ on <f9V^*»^(Pf "V BMlte'SPi^ sitieolihpft- 
fiand dollars, 'in audition to tho sum I forfeit under t^c condition of fiuiH^Iun; the 
fiUj3l0emaitit&.fhftAaaof«ibluiiiilr^^A€^t9'.: : »' . - •'• »'' • <*'' < * 

"I am. de:. Sir. your, tru^, .^^^ ^^y, 

I met her^t^eoonM^tt (b the evenili^v ^i^d' -^1^' '^^ 
polite.. and firiendiy a6 ctvep/ Between- 'the^'flr^'' and 
Becond parts ctf- the ■ concert, ' I-introdiicend'^'Gh*nerd 
Wel£h^.tiieles8Midf tke l)«Pati4Miai T-heatfe^, wbo'ifift^ffned 
her that Hke. wits qaite>wiili^ to 'release^ ^me^ frdm^'in^ 
^Bgagemeirt.iof .the baildii^, 4f «he' dld^ not dMire it 
longer; :She*xeplie^,'11iat>upon trials %he found ft dfinilk 
better lfaaii.filie>expected, and she wetild tfa^rdEbiie Itet^SA 
it for ihe remainder' of theconeerW. *• 

. In .the xnean'ti9ie,:her advisei^^ had been' fcirctiftifhi^' 
the story that I had. oompelled^ her t6^ sftig ^JhliTi* Im- 
proper plao&^jaid when 4hey"hearf she hid conelfided*t6 
remain, there, tbey beset hef mifik argnnients^ ^g;d{n^t4f, 
until at last she consented toTemoveher toncerts td'i 
smaller hall. ^ ^ ,. -^ » .m^ ^ " 

I had thoroughly advfertised^the three cc^ceitSjIn- Wife 
newspapers, within, a. radius of oire hundred ■ mHcfJPfrcrm 
Philad/elphiar and.hndisent^ulmission tiekets to'flie ^t^ 



agente, who*had IndiFectly aided in faidnging about the 
dissQlatiou of our engagement, rdfused to recognize 
tbesetickpta-. . I uxiged. upon him th^ injustit^ of siiob a 
couxse^ bat.raoeiyisd nq aatisfactton. I titen stated the* 
fact to, Mi^ Lind, and sbe gave> iiamediate <Hrders: that 
the^ tiokate aboold be ;rQc0i¥0d, Country editm:^' tick- 
ets, wi;^Gh -were afef 0d after I left Philadelphia,, were 
however refused by ber ^ents (coiitrairy to MjBt Lind's 
wish and k]M>wledg^), aad^tijie editors, leaving ocHW.frptt 
a diataape. F^ tb^ir ^y^$ purchased tickets, and I 
subsequently remitted the money to 'numerous .gentle- 
mea, whose complimentary tickets weire thu9 ifepudiated. 

Jenny Lind gave several concerts with varied ^ucoesst, 
and then retired to Nis^ara Falls, and afterwards to 
Nortbampt^n) Ma^eachusetts. While sojourning at ihe 
lattei: plaee, she. visited Boston and was mdrried to Mr. 
Otto Goldnehmidt, a Germaa composer and pianist, to 
whom /sb^.w^ mudik attached, and who had studied 
music .vifkh her ia Germany ^ He played several times 
in our jeOA^erta* He was a very quiet, iuofiensive gejl- 
tlenum, and a& accomplished musician. 

I met her several times after our engagement termi- 
nated. She was always . afiietble. On one occasion, 
while p^ssipg through Bridgieport, she told me that she 
had bf^oirpadly harassed in giving her concerts. *^ Peo- 
ple cheat me and swindle me very much^" said she, 
'' and. I &^ it very aaQpying to give concerts on my own 
accoiout."- 

I was always supplied with complimentary tickets 
when she -gave cQncerto in New York, and on the occa- 
sion of her last appearance in America, I visited her in 
her room back of the stage, and bade her and her 



BS& CLOU OF THE OAlfi^iilON. 

ktigband adieii) with my best wishes. Sb6 e^ressed 
the same feeling to me in returti. She told, me she 
should never sing much, if any more, in public ; but I 
reminded her that a good Providenoe had endowed her 
with a Y^Moe which eiYabled her to^ co*i tribute in «te em^ 
ineitit^ degree to «b« enjK^meBt of hei* felkyw beings, 
tmd>if libeno longer needed the fepgtf flumti of money 
whieh they were willing to fB^9(^t this elevatii^ and 
f&iijghtfal ^ntertsucimfent, she kii^w^ by eisrperienee what 
»«gidn)iMn6 pka0iA*e «he 'Wovtd i^ebeive by d^otifig^the 
money to the alle^iatiMi of the waa^^and soin^wsof 
thow who needed it • •' ' ' ' 

♦*iAhl Mr: BarniMii," «he repli^j ** thW is^y^ teue, 
and it would be iittgratefri inme to n6t fcontinue to^se 
fbr the benefit of the >poofr aa^ lowly, thM giA^'which 
our kind. Heavenly father hM M^ graoioui^ ' b^towed 
upon «me. Yes, I wii) <;ontinue to mng^o lo«»g as my 
voitte iasts, but it wm be mo^y for ehat4lable objects, 
for I am thai^fefal to'say Lbat« all' the vaoney^ whit^h I 
diall 'ever need.^' Pursuattfciito »thi« reeoltitito, the 
larger porticm of thfe ootH^ertS'Wbidi this-iMMe li^dy 
has given since her rMnrn to^Ewope^, bav«i'beM^<for 
objects of benevolence. • .. 

If ahe CKMisents to ^i^n^ f(W^ oharitable objeet in 
London, for instance, the &ct <fe t£o«< adverttsed at ^ all, 
but the tickets are readily disponed -of in a^'priYttte- quiet 
way, at a guinfea and half a guln^ eMh.'^ > 

> / 'After eo ma.ny months of ao^ciMy, labo^ MA ei^ite- 
ment, in the Jenny Lind enterprise, it will reaffily be 
believed that I desired tranquility. I spent a week at 
Cfupe May, and then came home to IranidGSn/' where I 
Tcnudned idnring tbe>emtire summ^er. ' '" < *' 



CLOMB 0F THS CAHPAMK. 



»68 



JXNKT UKD COKCEBTflw 



TOTAL EBGBD 


rrS, KOJRVHINQ Ol 


r CONGEI 


ITS DEVOTED TO 


QBASiJTX, 




(BTewTorl 


c, . tVTfllii 05 


K0.46L 


fiavansL ^ 
Kew Orleans, 


.» ft;ffil 9S 




i( 


. • 14,203 03 


47. 


. 12,899 85 




1 




48. 


II 


10,»0 42 


No. 1. 


«c 


12,519 09 


49. 


CI 


8,181 15 


2L 


•• 


. . H2f» 00 


00. 


CI 


r 1^19 85 


3. 


tc 


12,174 74 


a. 


II 


6,644 00 


4. 


•< 


15,0» 39 


52. 


IC 


9,790 90 


S. 


Boston, 


16,479 60 


53. 


IC 


7,545 60 


a 


•« 


, . 11,046^ 02 


54. 


^ • 


6^068 60 


7. 


(( 


8,039 <J2 


55. 


II 


4,850 25 


8. 


u 


10,169 25 


66. 


11 


4,495 35 


9. 


I*rovidflnc 


e, . 0,529 54 


57. 


II 


6,680 35 


10. 


Boston, . 


10,524 87 


5a 


11 


4,740 10 


11. 


it 


5,240 00 


60. 


Natchez, 


5,080 00 


12 


M 


7,586 00 


GO. 


Memphis, • 


4,539 56 


13. 


Philadelpi 


Ilia, . 9,291 26 


m. 


Bt. Louis, • 


7,811 85 


14. 


tt 


7,547 00 


62. 


II 


7,961 92 


15. 


*< 


8,458 65 


oa 


II 


7,708 70 


16u 


JNfltrYorl 


E, . 6,415 90 


04. 


CI 


4,086 50 


17. 


M 


, . 4,009 70 


65. 


11 


3,044 70 


1& 


M 


. . 5,082 00 


06. 


KashFilto. I 


7,786 30 


19. 


f< 


8,007 10 


67. 


it 


4,248 00 


20. 


If 


» . 6,334 20 


68. 


liOuisviUa, . 


7|838 9a 


21. 


<l 


9,429 15 


09. 


CI 


6,59d 60 


22. 


M 


9,912 17 


70. 


:i 


5,000 00 


23. 


« 


5^773 40 


71. 


Madison, 


3.693 25 


24. 


M 


. • 4,993 60 


72. 


Cincinnati, . 


9,339 75 


25. 


U 


6,670 15 


73 


»( 


11,001 M 


26. 


li 


9,840 33 


74. 


M 


8,446 30 


27. 


(( 


7,097 15 


75. 


CI 


8,954 18 


28L 


•f 


> . 8,263 30 


76. 


II 


6,600 40 


29. 


II 


10,570 25 


77. 


Wheeling, .' ! 


5,000 00 


3a 


CI 


10,646 45 


78. 


Pittsbntfft 
NewyaJk, . , 


• 7,210 68 


31. 


PhUadelpi 


ilia, . 5,480 75 


79. 


6,858 42 


3X 


<< 


5,728 (i5 


80. 


CI 


5,453 00 


33. 


II 


3,709 88 


81. 


II 


6,4G3 70 


34. 


•1 


4,815 48 


82. 


II 


7,378 35 


35. 


Baltimore 


, . 7,117 00 


83 


CI 


7,179 27 


30. 


!• 


8,357 05 


84. 


<C 


0,041 00 


37. 


11 


8»406 60 


85. 


C( 


6,917 13 


^ 


«l 


8,121 33 


86. 


cc 


0,642 04 


3d. 


Washingt 


on City, 6,878 55 


87. 


•II 


3,738 76 


40. 


ti 


8,607 05 


88. 


11 


4,335 28 


41. 


Blchmom 


I, . 12,385 21 


89. 


11 


5,330 23 


42. 


Clw^rlMtoi 


n, . 6,775 00 


90. 


<l 


4,087 03 


43. 


It 


3,653 75 


91. 


II 


5,717 00 


44. 


HsYana. 


4,066 17 


92. 


II 


9,625 80 


45 


II 


2,837 92 


93 


Philadelphia,' 


3,852 75 



CKABmr Ooiroaam. — Of Miss Lind's half receipts of the first two Concerts, 
»he devotad ^0,000 to charity in New York. She afterwards gave Charity 
Concerts in Btksteo, Baltimore, Charieston, Hayana, New Orleans, New York, 
and F1ii]adel|Aila, and donated large sums for the like purposes in Kichmond, 
Cincinnati, and elsewhere. Thece were also several Benefit Ooneerts, for tlit 
Orchestra, Lie Chand Smith, and oilier peiraoiis Mid ot^feots. 

23 



BM 



QwmiQW 7^« ^A»^4miif. 



RECAPITULATION. 

New York . . 35 CovcAtn: . ' ttAdEtM; $2HI5,flWf6* 
Philadblphja 8 



PR6vnrte!re« . 1 
Baltimore. . 4 

'AAllfiWTOl^ . ^ 

[uu«'o)n> ... 1 

;M4,|JL»fTOK.. 2 

Havana ... 3 
K^I)r,OiKLEAi{a 1^' 
Katchkz ... X 
HFMr^s . . 

St. lUxTis . , . 

KAflHW^LB \ . 

MADI9QX 
OlNCtVUrATT . ' . 

WifjpK%u(a . * , 
Pii*?j^Uj|fRa 



If 
1 * If 

<( 

u 
(t 
i( 
« 
(( 
*l 
it 
H 
n 
<( 
({ 






4i 
t< 

(f 

\l ' 
(C 

({ 
(( 
(( 
<c 

• «t 

• {{ 

« 
tl 

<t 
(I 



7U,3HS 1() . 

32,101 88 . 

10,428 16 . 

10^4.-«k04 . 

, ,87,4H(ii2 : 

6,000 00 .' 

,. 3o,(ua67 ; 

• 1^,0.']^ 30 ; 

lD,fil) 50 . 

a,(^ 25 ; 

. 44,242 13 .' 

' .6)000 00 ; 

7,210 68 . 



(i 



To^AL . * . 95 CoxcidtTs. 



1 1 



AVERAOB, $8,177 50 

G,110 55 

" m055 45 

* ' • ^,(m U 

8,00U 47 

/r7,«nj 80 

12,3H5 21 

5,214 37 

3,478 (» 

6,nob 00 

4,53f) 5fi 
.{6,li2 73 

^0X4 16 

6,47r» 50 

3,(2JC{ -i5 

.t8,H|8 43 

.jfi,Q00 0U 
7,210 58 



<c 
<i 

IC 

« 
« 
fl 

cc 
<( 
ii 

t 



Eeceiptb, $712,1(A 34 



JBi^NY MND'S ttltCKTpTS. 



AyBRAOB,. 97,496 43 



iM./ A'l^ 



^om t^e Total R«50iptoof *Ni<iety-flve ConcMs . . $712,1© 34 ,', 
poduct the rajeipte or tUe fiift jtwo, which^ aii bef\reen 
Vf !r: Barmim And vTBtiny I/iVid,- ^ere Jisul6 from jhe 
Contract, said aro uot numbered 11^ the Table , . . 32,007 08 



• l?o|»l Receipts of Conci»rt» from No. 1 to Ko. 95 . $080,094 26 
Deduct the receipts of th«!J8 06ncptt3, each ' 

of >Ti5ch frtl Hliort of $5,500 .'. . . $123,311' 15 • 
AJi^i) deduct $5,600 for each^ of the remaining ' 
. 63 Concerts •S57,5DO 00 480,81115 



liCavinar the toh\! ej^w*.'^^, a«r above .'.'•. .' . $199,283 11 , 
BeinKetiually divided/ -MIja Lliid' 8 tjortion w^ ,...-.,... 190; 

Xi)a.la«er $1,000 for eftdioftheD.l'Concerts .- •'.'.•. ^, 

Also 6uo half the receipts of the fitart two Concerts .... 



1(»,033 >{ 



$25,000 '. 



'Amonnt paid to J(mny LintT . . .j . . . . 
She toftmded'to ni© as forte itiire, p^r contract, in oose 
' she^ithdrew after the t(K)th Coticert . . , . '. . 
Sheafed paid -me 61,000 ewjh for the seveii' Ooricerts 

rcliotiuished .• . . ^ 7,000,^ Jj^^^ 

jEjjnr liiND^s net avails ojl) 95 Concerts ..■..,..•... ., $17«»,«?5 «> 

P. T. Barnum's gross receipts, after paying Misa liind . . I'v': oo5,4W 25 

> 1' 

Total Rbceipts of 95 CoAcerts '...'. $712,K)1 34 

Prick op 'Tickets. — Tlio highest prices paid for tickets were at auction ?j» 
follows: — .John N. Genin, in New York, $225; Ossian E. Dotlge, in Boston, 
$<m ; Ooi. WilUftm C Ka»«,.iu PrqnJoMte, $(i60 i -M* A. £uojk» a» >l^i|d<f)i4na. 

r> ; Mr. I>'ArcK^ K^w Orleau^ $240 ; a ke«»4^r pf a reficoa^eiU ^fMpn in 
U>i|»«,.^ldQ ; )iUagaorrotyj»Ut|4n B»ltaiiiqre,1&l0p, Xqam^.Qfw reciUI U^e 
namofoC |h0 laftfe two. Xtti^r.^ s^le i>f the first ljp^luit,4b^ ur«|^im.|MrtMUIy 
feU tp.$20, fMd«Q dawa>rard in Uie aqalo ^£ %ur9B. The nxod 'i^cc /u( tkkeu 
ranged from $7 to $a . J^xoih^immIo iitik^^ wea.^e. |rfii|i $2 W #1 «^«b. . . j ii« 



,» l^ . Ii M 






♦ 



-. i 



•«. • . ' • , 



- I 



!t 



OfiAPTtEB XXm. ^ • i 



XENAQBRIX" — HUNTINQ ELSPtfAKTS — OEXSOAI. TOM THUMB — BhEJ^HAfVf 
TUJVraO IN GONinSCTICUT — CURIOUS QUESTIONS FBOM ALL QUABTEBS^ 
TH9:.*«9UO jjTHW Q B r Vf KT ||6v9t« VASMl^Or^MoWilltnaft AVIIUtPAAHT 
CAN ^ALLY " DRAW " — COMMODORE VAjfBEBBII^T —DAN IffilC^ — SU>E f UOWa 
ACf9.VAl^N^ 'ANttSRHlisiM— t)to*QtlEs'0F iTAl^OiioK — THE CRYSTAL 
PALACgrr»CAHPiaiAIAgI^frT^»yE|ift4N INDlAlm IV. LCffVOif *-41IT«««ri01f 
SPEAKER — THE DUKE OP WBLtlNGTON — ATTEMPT TO BUy SHAKESPEABE'a 

BTOTCH BOTS.-T^ SOLVOTO X^E MX^T^I^Y QW ^UB^Ji^ ,8I0^T -* XSS , ^^B]^^ 
CHlXJmBS — CATHERINE HXtBS '— iRANlAfAN ON FIRE — MV BLIWST DAUGH- 



TAIN ORG VB CEMETERY. . . ,. t 

While I was mana^n^ ttie Llnd concerte, ill addition 
the American Museum I had othei- 'business jnatters' 
a opersitfon which were more thai enoiigh fo fengro'ss 
IV ent&re attention and' whtch, of cotcrsd, I wa4 cpm-* 
leHed to cotnmit to the "hands of associates and agpnt^/ 

In t8«9 I had projected a grdat travteirmg museum' 
nd mettageiie, and; as 'I had rieitHer time rior'iijclina-' 
ion to 1mftna^e*»uch a concern, I induced Mr. Spth B.' 
lowes, justly celebrated as a " showman/* to join me, 
nd tiike fhe- sole chargie; Mt. Sherwood E. StrattbA, 
*ther of Gtehei-al Tom Thumb,' wes also admitted to ' 
partnership, the interest being in thirds. 

In carrying out a pd-tion of ftie plan, we chartered 
be ship " Regatta," Captain Rr&tt, and despatched her^ 
3getber witii -our agents, Messrs. June and Nutter, 
3 Cej4on. '^he* «hJt) left New YorK in Kayi 1850/ 
nd wa» absent' oiie year. Their mission was to pro-^ 



366 OKHBB SNTBRPBXSB& 

cure, either by capture or purchase, twelve or more 
living elephants, besides such other wild animals as 
they could secure. In order to provide sufficient drbik 
and provender for a cargo of these huge atiimals, we 
purchased a larg^ q^^ti|f qf ^s^ Jn \Jiieyr York. Five 
hundred tons were left at the Island of St. Helena, 
to be taken on the return trip of the ship, and staves ! 
wd tuMp0 af •water^'Caaks were> ftlsa le£ti al-^e •same 
place. 

As our.ageat* w^pe uaable to porcfaaoe 'the le qm red 
Aumber of islephauts, either in Columbo or Kaody, the 
prnMipal tawBS- of the island^ (Oeylon,) they took one 
hundred, and sixty native assistants, and plunged into 
the jungles, wheiiB, after many most exciting adven- 
imes^' theif sucoeedftd ia secwiag- tl{irtee& elepinmts 
of a suitable size for their purpose, with a female and 
her 6alf> or " baby " elephant^^ oxUy six mont^ old. In 
tne course of tl:^ expedition^ Messrs. Nutter axid Jane 
killed lar^e numbers of the huge bea^, and had 
numerous encounters of .the most terri£a deacviption 
with the. formidable animals^ one : of ^ the most.fwrAd 
of which took place near Aoarajah P«ora,;wiisier they 
were endeavoring, by the aid of the aativea. and 
trained elephants, to drive the \i^ild berd of beasta* into 
an Indian kraal. 

They arrived in New Ygrk im 1851 with t^n,p( Hit 
elephants, and these, hamesaed in-paifs, to ^'^huiot 
paraded up Broadway past the Irving Hoa6e»:ivhik 
Jenny Liod was staying at that hotel, on the .eocasion 
of her. second visit to New York. Messrs. Nutter and 
June also, brought with the- elephants a naliyewho wa« 
competep.t to manage^ ai^d control them* We added a 
caravan of wild animals and maay nHUBeiwt caquMities, 



the pr^s^ne^ und' mlde^f the v patronage *' of GeiiiMal 

[>f fhe aMrftc^tti «tf ^Barattfitt'a'Qt^eaiiAsiafio ClilMVttti, 
MusMta attd^lVfmMgdi^ie^'^ rMumifiig liwimttGiise't^rdfltb. 

At the end of that time, after exhibiting in^ a&'s^- 
ioos of Ak^ t;btmtty^ we 4)old' eat «ii« ieiftire edtablish- 
nent — ^ammiLte, €^0) chaiiotd and pai*<^6nklia, 
xcepdng one elepHa&ts ^i^ I teiained^'in'itiy-^'own 
)osseMi<m two Inontlis'&rdgrieiAtitral imr^bdfe&J It 
)ccii]Ted to toe tfanrtif I oo«ld' |mt aaa ^lie^aut to ptow- 
i\g for a wfailfi 0& my form at Brklge^dtt/it vrould 1>e a 
ipital advertiftemeitft for the Ameviean iMuse^itn,' wMeh 
vas tfaM, and alwftys -during 'my proprietorship of tli&t 
^tabiifiliment^ fMemo8<>in my- thoughts, '' i 

So- 1 $«]it 'hkii to'Coanecftieat in (ihaa^ of his Uee^, 
vbom I dressed in Ori^nttil costume, and keeper ^iid 



.1 



le 



phant were stationed 'im a sbc*aore lot^hichr lay dlosc 
^c side the track of the 'New ■ Vork and Ke«r Haven 
iiiboad; Thie bMper was fnmished withr a titt^iable 
t the lOad, with speciai instmtrtioDS to bi^ bnsHy 
n^aged' m his work whenever passenger tMiiis from 
ither way -^fevd passing tiiifoiigh; Of cbur^, the m^tMr 
oon appeared in the papers and went the entire fouMs ef 
!ie preie in Ais oc^Otry and even in £aropev€ind iff was 
\ erywhere annoimced «bat P^ T. Bamwn; ** PSroprietor 
f the "oel^rated Am^tisan M«ss*m m'•New'^ork^--- 
nd here is whew- the adVertlsemeitt 'caine in^^-^iad 
Ltrodneed elephants upon bis farm, to d'e his ploivltig 
id heavy Awrft wo A. Sundredli of pitofde bame many 
lies to witness fee newl epectacle. Letters peurtd in 
)onmefretttbeseGl!^tltiieB^ hnndreds ^ State asid 



;9 JElB OXHBB 0K7£B^|t»S»a 

, Cq wty agricultural BoeietAeer &r(>ugb«at tii^ XJaiw^t etat- 

JOg that th^ prefiiA^^ aod dATQCtevsi of v(}ii«b?.«fo\cietie8 

' had requi^ted tbem to propoui^ to iiK a s^rj^avC ques- 

Mtianaia ragard t« t^^i^ {Kjfwac Ithafl ^uAjin.#pejrotioii 

MV my farm. .Tfeew ^ qawtiowi i weja gTO^tty i^wewiflwi 

Jittttfie y^fDdrai cm" ofi tbaiii^:TVM0's«MtUniS''^^ 

.:tbelfallQlvki9ii .. ■•* V .\'t'. : ? iij t/ 

. > : : j^* /* How fuMoh. can <iii dephant plqwf m :%.4ay In 
j:/.($.v/'iI{fir^}mUok>tatLHar.djpayf:l'' -rrup 

r ! 4. '« H^MrrmAcb does he . datr^ <^.thb. quMtiMr^as 
iiHfwridbl)i[,a$kaa» >a«d ^rai la very liiqMictaiit osi«^.. nr 
r ^ • *! WiJl^ QiQphatibi tlake fthetnaelvM gfeiiferaUj^ t«fol 
, fQi^ [a^ faiw 1 7 ' I Anp^oae/ sortiei of my iw^m^ti^ thi^g ht 
:itH$ (^phaiai would jgickTup cbi^, or .«vda .piiia<i»4»ey 
have been taugbt to< -d^, and i«wuld jKXk tba - Hallfi aad 
,^ alUth0:tibtoittes» itickK^iig 'tli^ Mmwiiid caityiii|^f a 
] tr^Qk, ^>tltet (haQ bia awin; tx> the depoL : no. 

€. " Wbf(tria thepriee of •aa «alopba3rt 1 ". v ♦i-.idq . 
. 7} 1'^ .Where oan fttelA wta be-jJnAdiailadil " .:• ^j^ 
' .Xh«# "^wi^d 4pUoIv frrMoia lof othec ia^flrie^^arib-AB, 
^^ha(he« Iblophaftta^w^ereri^asUy lajwa^^; ,tf .rtieyipipjrid 

n ho w oM c^ olephanta. biuak . be^hefai^ tiiey^ 
-iibtiiF owi^rUmagii MMi'«fr:Oii iadafioitdyu' : I:bagi)^||»-he 
>.alaif(ni^d.^^; 6Qi^ «^^- ah(f«ild ^ay^an 4lt9>hMrtod|4L «o 
^ahiOfe^ fetjd^-^lixrfia ivho d<ay«ieriP:a^ullwl|UMi(1 
.ilid;n^/k4a\fn¥J^^<fea44Av^^iHm/ T TVnfTfritlipfl||||llaT^ 

.aadil-^hen Mated, tbc^ggiii^: My cQiiwpi^g^^ fc 

.XQ^Atiaa it)".th4t to me the elephant waa a valuabk 

agrie^l^r^l aiamd« hf^c^ae h^ was ao eifrpoHeiit; a^ver 




r ' - 



« 



OTUSB KNTJBHPBISE8L 959 

isemeiit to my Museam ; but tkat to otheir farmers he 
\onld prove v^ry unprofitable for many iBaBons. In 
)}e first place, such au animal would cost from $3,000 
f5 10,000 ; iu cold weather he could not work at all ; 
n any weather he could nob eam even balf his living ; 
le would eat up the value of his own head, trunk, and 
ody every year j and I begged my correspondents not 
do 80 fooUsh a tiling te t^ nnda!ts^e elephant fuming. 
Newspaper reporters came from &r ilnd near, and 
rrote glowing accounts of the elephantine perform^ 
nres. One of thefn, taking a political View ttf the mat- 
r, stated that the elephant's sagacity showed that he 
new mo/re than did any laborer on the farm, and yet^ 
hamefol to say, he was not allowed to vote. Anotheif 
tid that B&rnum's elephanat built ail the stone wall on 
he farm ; made all the rail fences ; planted oom with hia 
unk, and covered it with his foot; Wai^hedmy windows 
:id spfinkled the walks and lawns, by taking water 
om tiie fonntain-^basin with his trnnk ; carried all the 
iiildreu to school, and put them to bed at night, tuck- 
.:; them up with his trunk ; fed the pigs ; . picked fruit 
om branches that could not otherwise be reached; 
rned the faniiing mill and €om*sheller; drew the 
omng macMnfe, and turned and cocked die hay with 
'^ trunk ; carried and brought my letters to and from 
le post-offiee (it was a riiale elephant) ; and did all the 
ores about the house, indudin^ milking theoows, and 
iinging in e^gs. Picturiss of Bamum's plowing ele- 
'iUQt appeared in illustrated papeis fit home aiid 
>road, and as the cars passed the scene of the perform- 
if^c, passengers* heads were out of every window, and 
riong many anid varied exclamations, I heard of one 
an's saying: 



300 oxHSR vjsnnsBvjasE&, 

' '^' W«il,)I dedhire! Thatkis certemly ^ ar lea^ ; eie^bant 
and exxy-wMa wfao^ has tso; mahy'^J^pbaQts that -he ' can 
ASbvA to.-work'lhem on his farm, must have, lots of wild 
animals atodcurioas ^ crilters ' in his Museum, and I am 
bound to go'Hwreiike first thing! aft^i: my armai.au New 
York/' •• ^ i)5 '• r " •"...•.•.' > !. -n 

Thersik acfraBrw^re/plow^^yjeiiiat le^ sixty .times 
before I thougl^t the adTeitiseaiiejat si^S9)ciei)Uy ioroulated, 
and I then jsold-thefrelepbimtto Ymi.Ambur^h'a ]^ena- 

• A sabstantial^ ifiantier: friend, of rmitie^ . ^jt.. Gideon 
TUolBpson, oalfed^tlxanistan^tiriiig the elephant excite- 
ment iand asked note to aecooDapany him^tQrthe ^lA to let 
hini^ee '^hutirthe bi^^atdmaL W4>rked." X^knefr him to 
be a) shrewd;,' ishai^i man: aiidia;good farmer, and I tried 
to 'okcTtsermjmlfv ha I did 'nM wi^h to ]ie too ,. closely 
qTve^tionedi' ilnfleod, for^'Uote satnetr^ason^ I made it a 
point at air times to avoid being [pr^e&t wbea 4h^ plow- 
ing ^3s geln^ on.; i But the: bid farmer rWas^ 'a particular 
friend .^iid'-hb liefuscd to tike ^' nl>'' fi^ran s^nsw^r ; so 
I' ivfy^nt with' him r^ to feefe th? elep^aQj;.". ' • 

' Arriving atlbe-field, Mrd'tompspn-said n(>tliipg, but 
stbod with folded axias and sf^dately-wi^tchedfttl^ ele- 
(ifasuit for at lesbt fifteeurminuft^ei. Then hfi la^Iked ,put 
onto tbe.plow»dtgi^iu»d, andibupi^ itasOfipiieillo^^lJbL^t he 
sflink' nfealrljri.inp to his kne^s ; for it had , Ahre^^JTv been 
ptewedoovelr ^ndiover:.niany:.ticnes4. As] u^i^, several 
s^iectBtom'wereipDesetit. Mi?<;Wb[0|npsan. walked up to 
witere {'wasistandiflig, alad^si^o^liiUg^'mesguafrely ia the 
-eyes; h^ aslked with mut;h' earoestiiess^.; . • . 
; \; " WfeaiiSs your object^ ^h\ki ttingitig ihat,gTeat Asi- 
'siic anifaiaLdn- to a I^ieiv. England; farni?'' / . j.. ,. 
" To plow," I replied very demurely. 



• . ' r # 



OTHER E:5nnBT£PKrfiB8. Sftl 

** To jjow I " said Thompson ; " do n't talk to me 
about plowing ! I have been out where he has plowed, 
and the ground is so soft I thought I should go through 
and come out in China. No^ sir ! You can't humbug 
me. You have got some other object in bringing that 
elephant up here ; now what is it? "' 

" Do n't you- see for yourself, that I am plowing with 
him ] " I asked. 

" Nonsense," said Thompson " that would never pay; 
I have no doubt he eats more than he earns every day ; 
you have some other purpose in view, I am sure you 
have." 

" Perhaps he does not eat so much as you think," I 
replied; "and you see he draws nobly — in fact, I 
expect he will be just the animal by and by, to draw 
saw logs to mill, and do other heavy work." / 

But Uncle Gid., was not to be put aside so easily 
so he asked very sharply : 

** How much does he eat in a day 1 " 

_ m 

" Oh," I replied carelessly, " not more than a quarter 
of a ton of hay and three or four bushels of oats," 

" Exactly," said Thompson, his eyes glistening with 
delight ; " that is just about what I expected. He 
can't draw so much as two pair of my oxen can, and he 
costs more than a dozen pair." 

" You are mistaken, friend Thompson," I replied 
with much gravity ; " that elephant is a powerful 
animal ; he can draw more than forty yoke of oxen, 
and he pays* me well for bringing him here." 

" Forty yoke of oxen !" contemptuously replied the 
old fanner ; " I do n't want to tell you I doubt your 
Avord, but I would just like to know what Ipie can 
draw." 



ti€2 OTHER EKTERPifelSBfi. 

" He can draw the atteiition of twenty milHons of 
American citizens to Bamum's Museum," I replied. 

" Oh, you can make him pay in that way, of course," 
responded the old faimer. 

*' None but a greenhorn could ever have expected he 
would pay in any i)ther way," I replied. 

The old man gfeve a hearty laugh, and stud, " Well, I 
give it up. I have been a farmer thirty-five years, and 
I have only just discovered that ai elephant is a very 
useful and profitable animal on fe farm — provided the 
farmer also owns a inuseum/' 

In 1851 I became a part owner of the steamship 
" North America." Oiir intention in buying it was to 
!run it to Ireland as a passenger and freight sihip. The 
project was, however, abandoned, and Commodore Cor- 
nelius Vanderbilt bought one half of the steamer, while 
the other half was owned by thr6e persons, of whom 
I was one. The steamer was sent around Cape Horn 
to San Francisco, and was put into the Vanderbilt line. 

After she had made sevoral trips I called upon Mr. 
Vanderbilt, at his oJ05.ce, and introduced myself, as this 
was the first time we had met. 

"Is it possible "you are Barhum?" exclaimed the 
Commodore, in surprise, " why, I expected to see a 
monster, part lion, part elephant, tod a mixture of 
rhinoceros and tiger ! Is it possible," he continued, 
"that yon are the showman who has made so much 
noise in the world ?'* 

I laughingly replied that I was, and added that if I too 
had been governed in my anticipation of his personal 
appearance by the fame he had achieved in his line, I 
should have expected to have been saluted by a steam 
whistle, and to have seen him dressed In a pea jacket, 



blowii^ off steam, and crying o^t '^ a^ aboard tha^'if 
going," 

" Instead of which," replied Mr. Vand.erbilt, " I sup-f 
pose you have come to asl^ m^, ' to walk up to the 
Captain'a office and settle.' " 

After this interchange of civilities, we talked about 
the success of the "North America" iii having got 
safely around the Horn, and of the acceptable manner 
in which she was doing heir duty on the Pacific side. 

"We have received no ^t^^meut of her earningsi 
yet," said thfe Commodore, " hut if you waftt money, 
give your receipt to our treasure?, and take gojqae." " 

A few months subsequent to this, I sold out my share 
in the steamship to Mr. Daniel Drew. The day after 
closing with Mr. Drew, I discovered an error of several 
hundred dollars (a matter of interest ovl soipe po;rtion of 
the purchase money j which had been overlooked). I 
called on Mr. Drew, and asked him to connect it, but 
could get no satisfaction. I then wrpte him a threaten- 
ing letter, but received no response. I wa^s qn the eve 
of suing him for the am^ount due me, wh^n the news 
came that the steamship ." North America " wag lying 
at the bottom of the Pacific. It turned out ths^t she 
was sunk ^several days before I sold out, and aa the 
owners were mulcted in the sum of i^any thousands of 
dollars damages by their passengers, besides suffering 
a great loss in their steamship, I said no more to the 
millionnaire Drew about the few hundreds which he had 
withheld from the showman. 

Some reference to the various enterprises and " side 
shows" connected with and disconnected from my 
Museum, is necessary to show how indiistrioualy I have 
catered for the public's amusement, not only in America 



864 OTHER EKTBEPRI8BS. 

but abroad. When I wis in Paris in 1844; in addition 
to the purchase of Robert Houdin's ingenious automa- 
ton writer, and many other costly curiosities for the 
Museum, I ordered, at an expense of $3,000, a pano- 
ramic diorama of the obsequies of Napoleon. Erery 
event of that* grand pageant, from the embarkation of the 
body at St. Helena, to its entombment at the Hotrf des 
Invalides, amid the most gorgeous parade ever witnessed 
in France, was wohderfully depicted. This exhibition, 
after having had its day at the American Museum, was 
sold, and extensively aiid profitably exhibited else- 
where; While I'was iii London, during the same year, I 
engaged a company of " Campanalogians, or Lancashire 
Bell Ringers,*' then performing in Irfeland, to make an 
American tour. They were really admirable perform- 
ers, and by means of their numerous bells, of various 
sizes, they produced the most delightful music* They 
attracted much attention in various parts of the United 
States, in Canada, and in Cu^ba. 

' As a compensation to England for the loss of the 'Bell 
Ringers, I despatched an agent to America for* a party 
of Indians, including squaws. He prdceeddd' to Iowa, 
and returned to London with a comjjany 6f sixteen. 
They were exhibitJed by Mr. Catlin on' our joint account, 
and were finally left in his sole charge.' 

On my first return visit to America from Europe', I 
engaged Mr. Fater, an elderly and ingenious German, 
who had constructed ah automaton ispeaker. It was of 
life-size, and when worked with keys similar to those 
of a piario, it really articulated words and sentences 
with surprising distinctness. My agent exhibited it for 
several inonths in Egyptian Hall, London, and also in 
the provinces. This was a marvellous piece oTriiechan- 



km, 4iioii§^ ^QT 6ame vQaoeomitable reamok itudid not 
prove a success. The: Duke of WeUxogton leisited it 
seYexal tiaiee, and at first: he- tfiiougfat thiit tlie ^' voice '" 
prooeeded firom the exhibitor, whom lie assumed to be 
a skillful Tentriloquist ELe was asked to touch the keys 
with - his own fingets^ and after some i^istrtictioa in the 
method jo£» cqpeiating, he .was able ^ .make the machine 
spe&k,. not .onljt. in -EogUsh .but alsaiin.' Gatmtn, with 
which /Miguage thb Dake.Becisied faimliar^ Theseafter; 
he emtftfieft chl6 uMsie ^ the exhihiter u lantegraiph book^ 
and! cettified tiiftt-J^^^JkilaaBiatQn. Spyrakdr '^S1!Kla"ali 
extrao]]diini:yjpMdi]AtuMft.6f .MechanideLligfiii68j .. a 

Duariagon^ first ririsit to. lEIngland I.obteinedj v)erbally( 
through, a > friend, .tUe .tefiaaal' df .the- hduse itai which 
ShakespeaK wns 'botm, disigaoing to . remove it in ksiections 
to my Museum in New. York; but the.pj;GJeet4eaked)oati 
Britisb pride iwas ApudaedV land seveiral Finglish gentle^ 
men mterftred aaid p«il'chi&ed the ^remi^es for (^Shakes- 
peajSan Associatibm. : Qad* they stept a &rwtdays longer^ 
I fdoLonidihatfi made Qil:are^:epi^culatidri, ibrl^waSiSubse-i 
<}ueatiylasavlred liiQti thejBritisib people^; nsithiiff : ihan snfr 
fee Ubatj hfnmti ^a i b& temmwd/ ltd i ! Ametito^ Would . hcuKd 
boi^lv^ ne nff rwidi. tvwhtji t^eiiamd pounds^ . X (^ :not 
hesi|t&te toiebgage,!ion>dt*eBifife.tei; seciise.anyt^g^ at 
any expense, ^/pliaise/my^pata'gns in the United ifilatesi 
and .1 iMade an effort to . tontsfer . Madame. Tussaud's 
world-wide celebrated wa;^- work collection entire to New 
York. The papers were actually drawn up for this 
engagement, but the. entBrprise finally fell through. 

The models of machinery exhibited in the Royal Poly- 
technie Institution in Lgcidon,. pleased < me ;si> well, that 
I procmned' a xlnplipate ; ;also 'duplicates of the V Uisaolv- 
ing Voews,^' the Ghnmiatvope and Pfaysioscox>e,iincludr 



866 ' 6XEEBB a^TSBBBISBa 

mg many American soeaes painted expresflijr^lo my 
order, at an aggregate coet of 97,000. After tiiey had 
been exhibited in my Museam, they weare sold to itmer- 
ant showmeQ^ and some of them were afterwardb cm 
exhibition in yarioos parts of the United States^ 

In June 185 0^ I added the celebrated Chinese Collec- 
tion to. the attractionB of the. Ameiican Mn^ieiun. lako 
engaged the Chinese Family, consisting of -taro men, 
two '^ small-footed" women and two ehil<hceii» My agent 
exhibited them in London during (te WoddJs Eair. 
It may be stated here, that I subsequently sent to Lon* 
don the celebrated artist De Lamano to pmat a. pano- 
rama of the Crystal Falaee, in which the Wojdd's Fair 
was held, mid Colonel John S. DtisoUe, an able and 
accomplished editor, whom I ^ sent with De Lamano, 
wrote an accompanying descriptive lecture* Like most 
p^inon^mas, however, the exhibition proved a failaxe* 

The giants whom. I sent to America were not the 
greatest of my curiosities, though the dwarfs might have 
been the least The ^^ Scoteh Boys " were interesting, 
not BO much on account of their weight, as for the ^mys- 
terious method by which one of them, though Uind- 
folded^ answ.esed questions put by the other nespeeting 
objects presented by persims who attended the snxpris- 
ing exhibition. The mystery, whieh was .merely the 
result of patient practice, consisted wholly in. the' man- 
ner in which the question was propounded ; in. fiftot, the 
question inToriably carried its own answer ; for instance : 

^' What is this 1 " meant gold ; ^' Now what is Hm I " 
silver ; '' Say what is this 1 " copper ; '^ Tell me what 
this is," iron ; ^^ What is the shape 1'* long ; ^ Now what 
shape ? " round ; ^^ Say what shapes" square ; ^< Please say 
what this is," a watch;, ^^ Can yMi tell what is ia this 



&rBJ^^ sNTE^jspBisBa 967 

lady's bttndb? " e jmrfle ; ** Now p|eM0 ^y wM tj^ifl is T* 
a key; "Come now, what is this?" r^or^j; *^Ho^ 
much ? ** a penny ; " Now how much } " sixpei^ce ; " Say 
how much," a quarter of a dollar ; " What color is this ? " 
black ; " Now What ocdor is this ? " wd ; " Say what 

^ color," greea; and so on, (jui if^niium. To such per- 
fection was this brought' that it w^s almost itt^p^ssibl^ 
to present any object that could . u6t be quite, closely 
described by the blindfolded hoy. This is the key to a^l 
exhibitions of what is called " second sight." 

In 18^0, the celebrated Bateman children acted for 
sereral weeks at the American Museum and in June of 
that year I sent them to Lo];^dpn with their father and 
Mr. Le Grand Smith, where they played in the St, James 
Theatre, and afterwards in the principal provincial thea- 
tres. The elder of these children, Misa^ Kate Bateman, 
subsequently attained the highest histrionic dist^nctiDn in 
America and abroad, and reached the very head of her 
profession. ' 

In October, 1S52, haying stipulated with Mr. George 
A. Well^ and Mr. Bushnell that they should share in the 
enterprise and take the entire cha^rge, I ^g^ged Mi$s 
Catherine Hayes and Herr Begnis to give a 'series of 
sixty concerts in California, and the eng^ement w^ ful- 
filled to our entire satisfaction. Mr. BUshnell aftet- 

, wards went to Australia with Miss Hayes and they were 
subsequently married. Both of them are dead.' 

Before setting out for California, Miss Catherine 
Hayes, her mother and sister spent several days at Iran- 
istan and were present at the marriage of my eldest 
daughter, Caroline, to Mr. David W. Thompson. The 
wedding was to take place in the feveuing, and in the 
afternoon I was getring ' shave^ in a barber-shop in 



868 OTHER ENTERPRISES. 

Bridgeport, when Mr. Thottipson dj*dve up to the door 
in great Baste and exclaimed: 

*' Mrl Bamum, Iranistan is in flames ! " 

I ran out half-shaved, with the lather on my face, 
jumped into his wagon and bade 'him drive hotne with 
all speed. I was greatly alarmed, for the house was 
full of visitors who had come from a distance to attend 
the wadding, and all the. costly presents, dresses, refresh- 
ments^ and everything prepared for a marriage celebra- 
tion to which nearly a thousand guests had been invited, 
were already in my house. Mr. Thompson told me that 
he had seen the flames bursting from the roof and it 
seemed to me that there 'was little hope of saving the 
building. 

My mind was distressed, not so much at the great 
pecuniary loss which the destruction of Iranistan would 
involve as at the possibility that some of ray family or 
visitors would be killed or seriously injured in attempt- 
ing to save something from the fire. Then I thought of 
the sore disappointment this calamity would cause to the 
young couple, as well as to those who were invited to 
the wedding. I saw that Mr. Thompson looked pale 
and anxious. 

" Never mind ! " said I ; " we Gah*t help these Ihings ; 
the house will probably be burned ; but if no one is 
killed or injured, you shall be married to-night, if we 
are obliged to perform the ceremony in the coach- 
house." 

On our way, we overtook a fire-company and I 
implored tHem to " hurry up their machine." Arriving 
in sight of Iranistan we saw huge volumes of smoke 
rolling out from the roof and many men on the top 
of the house were passing buckets of water to pour 



MOfT.VTAiTf eaurji: cji.ii£r££. 



OTH£B BNTKRPRESBa S69 

npcm the fire. Forttinately, seTeral men had been en- 
gaged dctring ^ day ki repaimg the roof, and their lad- 
ders were against the house. By these means and with 
the assistance of the men employed upon my grounds, 
water was passed very rapidly and the flames were 
soon subdued without serious damage. The inmates of 
Iranistan were thoreughly frightened ; Catherine Hayes 
and other visitors packed tbeir tmnka and had them 
carried out on the lawn ; and the house came as near 
destruction as it well could, and escape. 

While Miss Hayes was in Bridgeport I induced her 
to give a concert for the benefit of the ** Mountain 
Grove Cemetery,*' and the large proceeds were devoted 
to the erection of the beautiful stone tower and gate- 
way at the entrance of that charming ground. The 
land for this cemetery, abotit eighty acres, had been 
bought by me, years before, from several farmers. I 
had often shot over the ground while hunting a year 
or two before, and had then seen its admirable capabili- 
ties for the purpose to which it was eventually devoted. 
After deeds for the property were secfured, it was 
offered for a cemetery, and at a meeting of citizens 
several lots were subscribed for, enough, indeed, to 
cover the amount of the purchase money. Thus was 
begun the " Mountain Grove Cemetery," which is now 
beautifully laid out and adorned with many tasteful 
and costly monuments. Among these are my own sub- 
stantial granite monument, the family monuments of 
Ilarral, Bishop, Hubbell, Lyon, Wood, Loomis, Wor- 
din, Hyde, and others, and General Tom Thumb has 
erected a tall marble shaft which is surmounted by 
a life-size statue of himself. There is no more charm- 
ing burial ground in the whole country ; yet when th^^ 

24 



870 OTHER ENTEBPBlSEa 

project was suggested, many persons preferred «H inter- 
mural cemetery to this rural resting-place for theii 
departed friends ; though now, all concur in considering 
it fortunate that this adjunct was secured to Bridgepoi: 
before the land could be permanently devoted to othci 
purposes. 

Some time afterwards, when Mr. Dion Boucicault vis- 
ited me at Bridgeport, at my sdicitation he gare a lec- 
ture for the benefit of this cemetery. I may add that on 
several occasions I have secured the services of General 
Tom Thumb and others for this and equally, wortli} 
objects in Bridgeport. When the General first returut*! 
with me from England, he gave exhibitions for the ben- 
efit of the Bridgeport Charitable Society. September 
28, 1867, 1 induced him and his wife, with Commodore 
Nutt and Minnie Warren to give their entertainment 
for the benefit of the Bridgeport library, thns adding 
$4:75 to the funds of that institution ; and on one occa- 
sion I lectui^d to a full house in the Methodist Church, 
and the entire receipts were giV'On to the library, of 
which I w^ already a life member, on account of pre- 
vious subscriptions and eon^iibutioiijS. 



< : > 



CHAPTER XXIV. 



f ■ 



WORK AND PLAY. 
Ai.TTijn> mnr^t OFTmtmr l^kb THBAiitB— AiirtTBtNo wtervibw — mr. tJbyt, 

OV IHB liOjtfDON DJOItT TRUBORAPa — VACATIONS AX SOMB -r MV PBKBIDSNCY 
OF THE FAIRFIBLD COUNTY AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY — EXHIBITINO A PICIC- 
POCKRT — VHTLOSOFBY OF HUMBHO^A CH6^-^AIX]gN' mtKXT-SELUIR — A 
PBOMPT FATHASXSR — BARNUV IN BOSTON — A DELUDED HACK DRIVER — 
nULLIPS's FIRE ANNIHILATOR — HONORABUE ELISHA WHirTLEiTEY — TRIAL 
OF m AHKIHItATOR IX NEW TOSK — PEQUORNOOK BANK OF BRIDGEPORT 
— TffE UXUaTBATED NEWS — THB WORLD'S FAIR IN NEW YORK— MY PRES- 
IDENCY OF THE ASSOCIATION — ATTEMPT TO EXCrTB PUBLIC INTEREST — 
MOKitEll. Jt714^IXN CONCERTS ^ItBSIONATiON OF TftB GBY8TAL BAX^^CB PRES- 
IDENCY — FAILURE OF THE CONCERN. 



In the summer, I think, of 1853, 1 saw it announced 
in the newspapers that Mr. Alfred Bunn, the great 
ex-manager of Drury Lane Theatre, in London, had 
arrived in Boston. Of course, I knew Mr. Bunn by 
reputation, not only from his managerial career, but 
flora the fact that he made the first engagement with 
Jenny Lind to appear in London. This engagement, 
however, Mr. Lumley, of Her Majesty's Theatre, induced 
her to break, he standing a lawsuit with Mr. Bunn, and 
paying heavy damages. I had never met Mr. Bunn, but 
lie took it for granted that I had seen him, for one day 
after his arrival in this country, a burly Englishman 
abruptly stepped into my private office in the Museum, 
and assuming a theatrical attitude, addressed me : 

" Bamum, do you rem<:5mber me ? '* 



372 WOEK AKD PliAY. 

I was confident I had never seen the man before, but 
it struck me at once that no Englishman I ever heard 
of would be likely to exhibit more presumption or 
assumption than the ex-manager of Drury Lane, and I 
jumped at the conclusion: 
J " Is not this Mr. Bunn r* 

''Ah! Ah! my boy!" he exclaimed, slapping me 
familiarly on thp.b^c^, 'M thqng^t ypp i^ould remember 
me. Well, Barnum, how have you been since I last 
saw you ? " 

I replied in a manner that would humor bis . impres- 
sion that we were old acquaintances, and during has two 
hours' visit we had much gossip about men and things in 
London. He called upon me several times, and it prob- 
ably never entered into his mind that I could possibly 
have been in London two or three years without having 
made the personal acquaintance of so gr^it a hem as 
Alfred Bunn. 

I met .Mr. Bunn again in 1858, in London, at a din- 
ner party of. a mutual friend, Mr- Levy, proprietor of 
the London Daily Telegraph. Of course, Bunn and I 
were great chums and very old and intima;te acquaint- 
ances. At the same djuiner, I met several .literary and 
dramatic gentlemen. 

In 1851, 1852, and 1853, 1 spent much of. ^ny time 
at my beautiful home in* Bridgeport, gping. very fre- 
quently to New York, to attend to ^natters in the 
Museum,, but remaining in the city only a, day or two at 
a time. I resigned the office of President of the Fair- 
field County Agricultural Society in 1853, but the mem- 
bers accepted my resignation, only on condition that it 
should not .go into effect until after the fair of 1854. 
During my administration, the society held §i;C'faij:9 and 



yffi&tas. A^m play. 1B73 

« 

cattfe-dbcPM, -*^ four in Bridgeport and two m Stam- 
feid^-^uid tbe interest in these gatherings increased 
from year to year^ 

Pickpockets are always present at these conntry fairs, 
and every year there were loud complaints of the depre- 
dations of these operators. In 1853 a man was canght 
in flM& aet of taking a pocket-book from a country 
farmer, nor was &is fai^mer tibie only one who had suf- 
fered ki tbe same way. The scamp was arrested, and 
proTed to be a celebraJted Bnglislt^ piekpdcket. As tii^ 
Fair would close the next day, and as most peisons had 
already visited it, we expected onr receipts would be 
light 

Early in the morning the detected party was l^;ally 
examined, plead goilty, and was bound over for trial. 
I obtained consent from ^e (Sheriff that the culprit 
shonld be put in the Fair room for the purpose of 
giving those who had been robbed an opportunity to 
identify him« For this purpose he waa handcuffed, and 
placed in a conspicuous position, where of course he 
was *' the observed of all observers." I then issued 
handbills, stating that as it was the last day of the Fair, 
the managers were happy to announce that they had 
secured extra attractions foe the occasion, and would 
accordingly exhibit, safely handcnffed, and without extra 
charge^ a live pickpocket, who. had been caught in the 
act of robbing an honest farmer the day previous. 
Crowds of people rushed in " to see the show." Some 
good mothers brought their children ten miles for that 
purpose, and our treasury was materially benefited by 
the operation. 

At the dose <tf my presidency hi 1854-, I wns requested 
to ddiver the opening speecth at our Crounty Fair, which 



874 iroBK iufa> PXiikv. 

was held aft Stemford. As I was iiot^ aUe to gim agricdt- 
tural advioe^ I d^liyered a portion of my ljerGtiife< on the 
"Philosophy of Humbug." The n^xt .Booniing, as I 
was being shaved in the village barber s shop^ which 
was at the time crowded with customers, the ticket- 
seller to the, Fair came iu. 

" What kind of a house did you have Isiafc lug^t ? " 
asked one of the gentlemen in w^ting^ 

^' Oh, fiist-rate^ of c<mra^« Bajrnuia alymyn ^jm^a a 
ci^wd," was tbe repl^ of the tbkel^aaller, touwbiom I 
\vali Botknown* . < . . 

Most of ;^e gentlemen prese&t, howereir^ kdew- vie, 
and they found much difficulty in restraining their 
laughter. 

" Did BarnuAi make a good speedx ? " I d^jki^j 

*^ I did not hear it. I was out in the tiekeitHoffice. I 
guess it -was pretty good, for I never henrdjo mnch 
laughing as there was aU through his • Speech. Bat it 
makes no difference whether it was good or jobt^^' oon- 
tiiLued the tickeib^skUer^ <^the people wiU^goitotsee Bar- 
bum* ^ 

^' Boafnum m:ast be a curious chsp,"^ I jrenmark^d* 

^* Wdll, I guess he i»iip to all the dodgea." . m,. 

^^ Do you know him V I asked; 

^^ Not perBooaily," he replied ; *^ but I always get iato 
the Museum for nothing. I know the doorkfeepec, ^M 
he slips me in free." 

" Barnum would not like that, probably, if he knew 
it," I remarked. 

*^ But it happens he don't know it," replied the ticket' 
seller, in great glee. ' » ^ ' 

^^ Barnum was on ^the cars the other day^vifca »his way 
to Bridgeiiort," aaid I, '« and I lyeard <me\yf tiie ipassea* 



WOBK AND PLAY. 87d 

gers blowing him up tenibly lus a humb«ig. He wm 
addressing Barnum Bt Uie time, but did not know him. 
Bamum joined in lustily, and indorsed everything the 
man said. When the passenger learned whom he had 
been addressing, I should think he must have felt rather 
flat" 

'' I should think soy too/' Said the ticket seller. 

This was too much, and we all indulged in a burst 
of leiiig^ter ; still the ticket-seller suspected nothing. 
After I had left the shop, the barber told him who I 
was. I called into the ticket*ofiS,ce on business several 
times during the day, but the poor ticket-seller kept his 
face turned from me, and appeared so chap-fallen that 
I did not pretend' to recognize bim a^ the hero of the 
joke in the barber's shop« 

This incident reminds me of numerous similar ones 
whioh have occurred at various times. On one occasion 
— it was in 1847 — I was on board the steamboat from 
New York to Brk^eport As we approached the har- 
bor of the latter city, a stranger desired me to point out 
'^Bamum's house" from the upper deck. I did- so, 
whereupon a bystander remarked, ^^ I know &11 about 
that house, for I 'was engaged in painting there for sev- 
eral months while Bamtmi wa$ in Europe." He then 
proceeded to say that it was the -meanest and most ill- 
contriieed house he ever saw. ^' It will cost old Bamum 
a mint of money, and not be worth two cents alter it is 
finished," he added. 

" I suppose old Bamum don't pay very punctually," 
I remarked. 

'' Oh, yes, he pays punctually every Saturday night— 
there's no trouble about that ; he has made half a million 
by exhibiting a little boy whom he tck)k from Bridgeport, 



3Ti6 WORK AND PLAT. 

and wkom we never considered anj^ greai ek&kes till 
Bamutn took him and triained him.*^ 

Soon afterwards one of the passengers told him who 
I was, whereupon he secreted himself, and was not seen 
again while I remained on the boat. 

On another occasion, I went to Boston by the Fall 
River route. Arriving before sunrise, I found but one 
carriage at the - depot. I immediately engaged it, and 
giving the drivfer the check for my baggage, told him^to 
take me directly to the Revere House, as* I was in great 
haste, and enjoined him to take in no o&eir passengers, 
and I would pay hi& demands. He promised compliance 
with my wishes, but soon afterwards appeared with a 
gentleman, two ladies, and several children^ whom he 
crowded into the carriage with me, and placing their 
trunks ton the baggage rack, started off. I thought 
there was no use in grumbling, and consoled myself 
with the reflection that the Revere House was not far 
away* He drove up one street and down another, 
for what seemed to me a very long time, but I was 
wedged in so closely that I could not see what route he 
was taking. 

After hctlf an hour's dnve he halted, and I found we 
were at the Lowell Railway depot. Here my fellow- 
passengei^s^ alighted, €Uid after a long delay the driver 
delivered their baggage, received his fare, and was about 
closing the carriage door preparatory to starting i^ain. 
I was 80 thoroughly vexed at the shameful manner in 
which he had treated me, that I remarked ; 

" Perhaps you had better wait till the Lowell train 
arrives ; yon may possibly get another load of passen- 
gers. Of course my convenience is of no consequence. 
I suppose if you land me at the Bever^ House any 



WORK AKD PLAY. 87^ 

time tins v^eekj it will be as much as I have a jright to 
expect." 

'" I beg your pardon," he repKed, " but that wa^ Bar- 
num and his family. He was very anxious to get here 
in time for the first train, so I stuck him for ^2, and now 
ril carry you to the Revere House free." 

'' What Bajnum is it T' I asked. 

*'^ The Museum and Jenny land man/' he replied. 

The compliment ^d the shave bot^^ ^ halving been 
int^ided for me, I was of course mollified, and replied, 
" Yon are mistaken, my frieud. Jam Barnum." 

^^ Goad^" was thu!nderstruck, and offered all sorts 
of apologies. 

" A friend at the other depot told me that I hqtd 
Mr. Bairnum on board," said he, '' and I really supposed 
he meant thlB other man. Wh^n I come to notice you, 
I perceive my mntake, but I hope you will forgive me. 
I have carried you freqwntly before, and hope you will 
give me your custom while you are in Boston. I never 
will make such a mistake again." I had to be satisfied. 

Late in Augulst, 1951, I was visited at Bridgeport by 
a gentlem£fn who was interested in an EngUfiih invention 
patented in thid^ country, and known ai3 Phillips' Fire 
Annihiliator. He showed tne a number of certificates 
from tnen of Eminence and trustworthiness in England, 
setting foMh the merits of the invention in the highest 
terms. *Tbe priicicipal value of the machine seetned to 
consist in its power to extinguish flame, and thus pre- 
vent the s{>read<!>f fire when it once broke out. Besides, 
the dteafm or vapor getierated in the Annihilatorwas not 
prejodtcial to human life. Now, as water has no effect 
whatever Upon flame, it wad obvious that the Annibi- 
later Wotald at the lea«t prove a great amitcnU in extin- 



378 WORK AKD PLAT. 

guffihing conitc^rations, and that, especially iti theincip- 
. lent stage of a fire, it would extinguish it altogether, 
without damage to goods or other property, as is usually 
the case with water. 

Hon. Elisha Whittlesey, First Comptroller of the 
United States Treasury at Washington, was interested in 
the American patent, and the gentliemaii that ' called 
upon me desired that I should also take aii interest in 
it. I had no disposition to engage in any speeubition ; 
but, believing (his might prove a beneficent invention, 
and be the means of saving a vast aHMnnt of human 
life as well as property, I visited Washington Gitj for 
the purpose of conferring with Mr, Whittlese?^, Hon. J. 
W. Allen and other paarties interested. 

I was there shown numerous certificates of fires 
having been extinguished by the machine in Gr^ 
Britain, and property to the amount of many thousands 
of pounds saved. I also saw that Lord Brougham had 
proposed in Parliament that every Government yessel 
should be compelled to have the Fire Annihilator on 
board. Mr. Whittlesey expressed his betief in writing, 
that ^^rf there is any reliance to be placed on human 
testimony, it is one of the greatest discoveries Of this 
most extraordinary age." I fully agreed with him, and 
have never yet seen occasion to change that ofiinioii. 

I agreed to join in the enterprise. Mr* Wfaitdesey 
was elected Pre^dent, and I was appointed Secretary 
and General Agent of the Company. I opened the 
oifice of the Company in New Yorkj and sold and 
engaged machines and territory in a few months to the 
amount of $180,000. I refused to receive more than a 
small portion of the purchase money until a public 
experiment had tested the powers of the maehiae, and 



VrCfBK AKB FLAY. 879 

I voHiiii6ariIy defivered to every purchaser an agreement, 
signed by myself, in the following words : 

*' If tiie public test and demonstration are not per- 
fectly successful, I will at any time when demanded; 
within ten dsiys after Hxe pnblie trial, reftmd and pay 
back every shilling that has been paid into this office 
for madanes or territory for tihe- sale of the patent" 

The publie tiial came off in HamUton Sqnare oni the 
1 8th December^ 185 1 . It was an exceedingly cold ajid 
inclement day. Mr. Phillips, who conducted the experi- 
ment, *wa8 ktecfef ed witli and knocked down by some 
rov^dies who were apposed to the invention, and the 
building was* ignited and consumed after he bad extin- 
guished the previous fire. Subsequently to this unex- 
pected and unjust opposition, I refunded every cent 
which. I had received, sometiBies : against the wishes of 
those who had purchased, for they were willing to wait 
the result of further experiments ; but I was* utterly 
disgasted with the course of a large portion of the 
public upon a subject in which they were much more 
deeply interested than I was. 

The arrangements of the Annihilator Company with 
)fr« Phillips, the inventor, predi<:ated all payments 
wfaichr be was tio receive on bma Jide sales which we 
should abtually make ; therefoore he really received 
notfaEiDg, aood the entire losses of the American Com- 
pany, -^liioh w^?e merely .for advertising and the 
expense of trying the experiments, hire of an office, 
etc., smouirted to nearly $30,000, of which my portion 
was lesfj than f 10,000. 

in* the spring of 18&1 the Connecticut Legislature 
chartered the Pequonnock Bank of Bridgeport, with 
a camtal of ^ two hundred thousaiod dollars. I had no 



880 WOBK AND PIiAY, 

itktereflt whatever in the <^arter, and did apt eveti know 
that an application was to be made for it. More banking 
capital was need^ in Brl<%e|>ort in consequence of the 
great increase off trade and manufactured in that growing 
and |>ros^roU8 city, aod this fatt appearing in evidence, 
the tsharter was granted as a public beriefit The stock- 
books, were t>pened xmSasv (he direction of Stifte Com- 
missioners, Mcordimg to the laws of the Oomkiipiiweatth, 
and iloasly douUe tiie .tmioimt of cti|Htttl wHs sabecribed 
on the &r$t day. The stock WA distributed by the 
Gommisiioi^xB aiaobg si^vferal hundred appiioemte. Gx* 
oUtti^aancesoaiespectedty Occurred which induced me to 
accept the presidency a£ the bink, in lOomplianoe with 
the tinanimdus vote of its directors. FeeHng that I 
could not) frdm my many avocations, devote the requisite 
personal attehtion to the duties of the office, C. B. Hub* 
belL, Esq., then Mayor of Bridgeport, was at my request 
appodmted Vice-President of the institution. 

In the fall of 18dr2,a proposition^ was made by certain 
parties to commence the pnUication of an iUustrated 
weekly newspaper in the City of tfew York- The field 
seemed to be opeafor such an enterprise, and I invested 
twenty thousand doUiirs in the concern, as spiecial-part- 
ner^ in connection wit^ two other gentlemen, who each 
bontributed twenty thoTftsand dollars, as general partners. 
Within a. month aflier the publication of the first number 
of th^ Illustraied News^ which was issued on the first 
day of January, 1863, our weekly oirtulation had 
reached seventy flhtousand. Ntmierous and almost 
insurmountable difficulties, for novices in the business, 
continued however to arise, atid my partners beeoming 
weary and disheartened with constant over*exertion, 
were ankious to wind up the enterprise at the end of 



the <n|i^fl9l^^*I%[9^f old-WiH ^Hif^ tte 'ei}g«ia^$^^< Wke 

in 1^1, ^hmi4Le idaa'of oii>eimig4 Wbt^M'^'I(&ie)n 
New Ydxk4«iJ3 firstf brpfiJohedyl ^gj^ Wai$dil^|>^' by 
Mr. mddejl and ^tdie other <>i%i4bt0rd of^ «ke 6ch<^iti6, 
wd biTi&ied^ jomia gettiii^ iiljd^lijMd; '^<Wk% 

as aceabomtiitttaai|;bia{»r«^ti«a0,4b^^ 

plan, Wtrerar, ii^4)ipriod li)t^^te£>u»'tb;M^p'^tHiikiM 
'rant tbi». Kieiv:' )¥brV Iieglfelitiit^; >^'Tb|^'i^l&in^^i(^s 
reeled d&'i ^ot 40f gfoimA/ i^iMc'^iNsG^rWd^ 8%tf^fe, 
eased td khi^ aB8aqltitlD!i/4^ tt^Oity df-Ki^v^^lTbriii ifdr 
)nedift}aiper d9»uiD[.<'' T^ It^il^)^ b^ihg 6)ui:^n6£tes 
listai^xiliif^he^ C%)B^Q^^Am(l^ t^bflgh of'>4tklf ^'to kill 

^ve]^v^I]b'^tili<@]fyBt^i^aI»celI<l¥^IJ^ ffcl^'l^tMiife'ia 
ruly, 1853. Many thousands of strangeift^Mtd'&irdy^t 
o N^W . ¥Md, tad .hWvibt6^^ aMi^titftt^' tftt^ dtrt^t^nse 
nay tHA^ |Kif0V§dlW -t&tir ^6«khdldfe]:4ii^ i^ Is^^e^d^fli' KMlt 
:he g«!ie98t']^r^MlAf^«Jt&^^i«y4M^Wk 
)ey^iiSl A^im^^e^k^kWaf this MiMe^ip^jOkihtA i *i' -< 
Inf-Fi(fotMti^j4i)94v^ttietoM isteSlifhdl&^M ^|)Iibd «o 
ne ti^4A0oe)^1itie 'PreMi6eii6y of ^ffi&^'Cfy#filBiK^4ce;'oK 
Ls it wm^' 4&da^^' Tb^iAkddatidn fMp tB^' E^Mbi^iob 
>f die4fldttk|ty o^'^ll'I<««lo]^.^ ^I-^terl^jde^Mttd^'Ii^- 

] oyeltyi hUd^^8i^^^a#ti3^i 'add' ' t&^% it^ iwbtA&Aie diMeult 
o reii1«^ptiMfe«ytei*sitath4^^feii?i ' ^ /.j .li.:;*.. 

ShOTfh$^'*afterWafd^;h6W»t«i',I ^a^ ^4i0ii«ed^ tip^^ by 
iume»Mi4'iii^tletif!lcd ^dt^ite^ii, a^ ^oil^)y Hi^^ to 



882 ^ WOBK AND PULY. 

iUow my name t6 be naecL I repeatedly oljlecbed 
tiiiii and it latfc ceMeiitedt mafh egaioet my «>wn jul 
ment Having been elected one of the dixectont I i;^ 
by that body cheeen President I accepted the on^ 
GoaditionaUyt zesenriiig the eight to deoUneif Ithoagl 
upon inyestigationy that there was no vitality left in i 
inatitutioa. UpDn examiniag the aeoonnta said to ex 
agaiofit the Aaaociatioii, maay wer^ psoaoiliicoi indefi 
•ible by those who laoppoaedkaew tiie.£uto in the c^- 
wUk various debts existing tigaiost tha ooitcem wr • 
not exhibited when called ibz; and I knew nothing < 
their existeaee nntil after I accepted the office of Pre^ 
dent I finally accepted it| only becmse no Buit/ 
person could be; found who was willing to devote 1 
entile time and services to the enterprise, and because 
was £requently urged by directors aiul stockholders 
take hold of it for the benefit of the city at large, in 
much as it was well settled that the Palace would 
permanently eloaed eacly in Apidl, IS64| if I did n 
take the hehsu 

These considerations moved me, aod X euleied v:* 
my duties with all the ^or which I oould cewmai. 
lo save it from bankruptcy, I advMM^ la^ sums 
money for the payment ef debts, and tried by every lee 
imate means to create an excitttneni and hriiig it ii. 
life. By extraneous efforts, such as the Be-inaugmati^ 

. the Monster Concerts of Jnllien, the Gekbiation 
Independence, etc, it was temporarily galvanized, iv 

•igave several life-like kicks, generally without mater 
fj^sultB, except prostrating those who handled it : 
familiarly ; but it was a corpse long before I touched 
afi^^I foupdji after a thorough trial, that my first impr 

(i|iau w^ ^nept, and that so far as my ability was c. 



rW^OSK AND J3W^. ; 883 

cemed, '< the dead conld not be raised." I therefore 
resigned the pseaideiiey fixid the QOJkcemisoan went into 
liquidation. • ' 

In 1854, my esteemed fnend, Beverend Moses Ballou, 
wrote, and Bedfield, of New York, published a volume 
entitled " The Divine Character Vindicated " in which 
he reviewed some pf dua picincipal featwes of a work by 
the Rev. E. Beecher, brother of Hen^^Ward Beecher, 
'«The CoiidietM^. Agesi; <tt:^ the iGbnat Debate on the 
Moral Relations of God and Maji." ^0^ dedication in 
BeT. Mr. BaUou's vohme wai^«i ibUMTs : 

To P. T. BABNinr, !EsQ., XiUKtstAir. 

Sfy Dear B.i^ I am more deeply indebted Iq yon fpr peiiPonankTon Hian to any 

other Ihring m^, and I HxX that it ia but a poor ack^wledgment to beg your 

acceptance of this volume. . Still, I know that you will yalue it somewhat, not 

only for the sake of bur personal friendship, but hecau^e.itis an advocate of that 

interpretation of Christianity of ifrhlch you have ever b^ a most generous and 

devoted patron. With renewed assurances of my best regards, 

' I am, yours, always, 
BsiDQiEPOBT, January 22, 1851 , Y^* H. B. 

The following: -Infiing iacidbnt ..wkieh occurred at 
Iranistan in the winter of 1852, has t)^en called to my 
mind hy a lady friend frmti Philadelphia, who was 
visitang us at the tpoe. Tlt^ po^m W^ s^i^t to me soon 
after the occuxz;exice, hut was ilpst.f^d the subject 
forgotten until my Philadelphia friend recently sent it 
to me with the wish that I should insert it in the present 
Yolame: 

WIKTBB BOTTQTTET^S. 

As IHCUDSNT ni TBS UTB OOP AK AHBBlCAft CiTIIBir. 



The poor Qiaa's gaipden liftl99 li^- /. 

BeneaUi^ a fall of snow ) 
Bnt Art isoost^ gr«enboiisef^ 

Keeps Summer in full glow. 
And ^aste paid gold for bright houtiqvCs, 

The jB^rlor vase thai drest, 
TMaoeiitMl £'asl^Qn's g^y boudoiir, ,. 
, Orhlo««i*doaBefiui^*»tei«a^ 



r ■ 



884 ^^fltK AAO^ tOiAY. 



Within his Bc^\ptnred halla ; . . 

Had reared those stately walls. 
, He to his fj^rd^ner 9Pj^^, and said 

'^ X waj^t ai l^undred fia^ b^uqufits — *. 

Canit make them, John, fbr mef ^ 

i ' .' ' / •• .♦ » . , : 

Jdin's eyes became exceeding round, 

" ' ^^Cl^<raJ^ni*belbjh^lMte^i '' 



1 1 • 



i ( • 



• t 






' Mi> • 



♦ f 



And £e answered not a wbrdl' 
<>J|M1^4itt;'41tfri^tM/Ui2i|ttii|'M^ i 

• '-"•'-' ' i*Tiat safest tohairlhonumher;'6iii?' ' '* 

Kow John prized every flower^ tBa '(Wfi^. 

A daughter or a son ; 
And tliou^t. Hke Began -^ "what t3bie need 

Of ifty, orWone^'* 
^nt keeping hack the thought, he said, 

" r think, sir, that I might ; 
)But it would leave my lady^s flowers 
' In very ragged pligljt.** 

** Well, John, thy vegetabM pet9 
, .Ifust need^ respected be ; 

>:i9IiirhflmJlli4'iiAinb«t'^iM<4^^' •'* i i 
Makfiliweiitiy^Teilprm^. , 

And hari ^e, John, irnen ^ey are made ' 

And m give thee a iisl! of those * , 

• ' 'J ' '' ttx#h6Mttie'iio«*W8miiBtgo.'' ' ' ' ^' " 

' ' ' 

■' ^' Hie twetfty-fl^e bou^tiets trer^ inadd, '' '" * 

. /. |^.yoi|n4^^Tll](f|g|i 9e»tj i :• 

And to whom^ thinkes^ thou, my friend, , 
i '-^^ *-* - T<rtWrionilje>ifre»#^At?- -•••• -"• i' * •' 
Kot to the beautify and proud — 

2lpt Xfk tbe jigh a^id g^y -^ 
who. Dives-like, at Luxui^s feast 
' > limMslfed^Nraiy dfl^i 

An V^ Piu«6r, on Ids dMk 

Saw those fair pres^hers stand; 
A Wido# wept upon the gftft, 

And blessed the giv^t^n lioAd. 
t-^WlteM Por^eny'bent iftit^t task,' ^- 

They cheered lAie lonely IrodiiL; 
AnffMtmA {h« Md Wheite fRGaaMBft.1i^, 

TheJr^^Ai^^irealflf li fMMt ^^me. 



t' 1 



>i.t 



WORK AND PLAT. 



385 



Ghl Idndly heart and open hand — 

Those flowers in dunt are trod, 
Bnt thej bloom to weave a wreath for thee, 

In tiie Paradise of Qod. 
Sweet is t^e Minstrel's task, whose song 

Of deeds like these may teU; 
And long may he have power to give, 

Who wields that power so well! 



MBS, AkBCA BiA€BX» 



Philadklfhza. 



./ 'r f.r 'T "1 C7 / ' '^ ^^ 

' -••It M. t I / 



.^^» 



» • 



• ■. /I • ' » : I ]" 



I I' r 



* < 



f 



J 



1 * »•■ . ir 



. t 



• • • 



f I 



f V 



I , 









1. 



. f 



I / 



> . 



Pip' I • • 



I 



1 i ' 



i . 



: . . . ■ ' T.j 



» ■ 



f/'l Af V A .'Jit'. 

CHAPTER XXV. 



THE JEBOME ChOCK. COMPAITT ENTAK ^^ 



cii..^,-.i:f«v^ 



VHB BA0T BBIDOXPOBT XIHIXBPBIBB — W. H. NOBLE— PLANS FOB A XKW ^ITT 
— DB. TIMOTHT DWIOHT'S TEBTIMOKY— INVE8TINO A TOWtWH — BSLLCTO 
CITY LOTS -^ MOVST MAXINO A 8XGOKDABT CONBIDBBATIOK — GIX)CX COX- 
PAinr IN LITGHFIBLD — THE "TEBBY AND BABNITH MANTTFAOTUKING COM- 
PANY*' — THE JEBOME CLOCK COip*ANY — BAITINO FOB BITEB — FALSE REP- 
BX8BNXATI0N8 — HOW I WAS DELUDED — WHAT I AGBEED TO DO— THE 0017K- 
TEB AQBEEMENT — NOTES WITH BLANK DATES — THE LIMIT OF MY BESTOX- 
8IBILITY — HOW IT WAS EXCEEDED' — 8TABTLINO DISCO VEBIBS — A BXHSm 
MAN — PAYOra MY OWN HONEST DEBTS— BABNUM DX7FBD — MY FAILUBX- 
— THE BABNUM AND JEBOME CLOCK BUBBLE — MOBALIBTS MAKING USE 07 
MY MISF0BTUNS8 — WHAT PBEACHXB8, PAPXB8, AND PSOPLB SAID ABOUT 
MB— DOWN IN THX DXPTBS. 

I NOW come to a series of events which, all things 
considered, constitute one of the most remarkable expe- 
riences of my life — an experience which brought me 
much pain and many trials ; which humbled my pride 
and threatened me with hopeless financial ruin ; and yet, 
nevertheless, put new blood in my veins, fresh vigor 
in my action, warding off all temptation to rust in the 
repose which affluence induces, and developed, I trust, 
new and Better elements of manliness in my character. 
This trial carried me through a severe and costly disci- 
pline, and now that I have passed through it and 
have triumphed over it, I can thank God for sending 
it upon me, though I feel no special obligations to the 
human instruments employed in the severe chasten- 
ing. 



I 
CLOCK COMPANY IfiNTAKGLEHENT. 387 

Wheal the blow fell upon me, I drought that I ooaM 
never xecover; tbe event has shown, however, &at 
I hare gained both in .character asad fortune; and what 
threatened, for yeaxsy to be my min, has proved one of 
the most fortunate happenings of my career. The 
'' Bull Kan " of my life's baittle was a crushing defeat, 
which^ unknown to me at the time, only presaged the 
Yic^torieB whSoh were to follow* 

In my genend plan of pieptoting the £act8 and inoi- 
dents of my life in chronologieal order, I shall necesr* 
sarily introduce in the history 6f the next seven years^ 
an aecooDt of my entanglement in the " Jerome Gock 
Compaay," — how I was drawn intq it, how I got ou* 
of it, and what it did to me and for me. The great 
notoriety given . to i my connectiou with this concern — *- 
the feet that the jbumals throughout the country 
made it the subject of aews^ gossip, sympathy, abuse, 
and advice to and about me, my friends, my persecut- 
ora^ ai^d the public generally -~ seems to demand that the 
story should be briefly but plainly told. The event itself 
has passed aiyay and with it the passions and exciie* 
ments that were born of it ; aojd I certainly have no 
desire now to deal in personalities or to go ihto the 
question of the m6tives which influenced those who 
were interested, any farther than may be strictly essen- 
tial tOia fair anc^ candid statement of the case. 

It ia vital to the narrative that I should give tome 
account of the new city, East Bridgeport, and my inter- 
ests therein, which led directly to my subsequent com- 
plications with the Jerome Clock Company. 

In 1JB51, I purchased from Mr. William H. Noble, of 
Bridgeport) the undivided half of his late father's home- 
stead, consistii^ of .fifty acres of land, lying on the east 



38tt ciiOCK aoacpAXY extakglement. 

diteofIthe:liVisro^|)(isitei.tfaB^3i!of BoAdgsxpoxLa «We 
inttoded ' tU^i ias^ ^tke - !Budiet s ] jof ^ a nefiftr pits^v )whdch we 
0Q]l((^(lied^cKl1lkM IsoiMb 1»:fa^ of 

diaajToaalturoltfLdvi^tagea that it poi^seBads^ 
' 1 Before giwng (publicaly to ronri pl^ma^ > hdrvifefver, we 
purdh&5«di iDbe ibmidrod and ieTeiit^-fanf accoa^fcotltiga- 
dub tb i^at iif hi<!lio\Ye. already. ownedy aud thiM.oiit the 
entire property in regular/ ^ifirilets^ and. -liiied. then ivith 
Uom^ braeriisi^ a^Ueegitifiil) giqvd afii^'or'ng^iaciibs, 
^ixdii \^ dEcIo^d^ taid> oc^ujeitefd' tiUb >kip(UDblie> park 
Wet then'CfiiniK6nced'lsdHi^td»tiirndteiiot8vi^^ game 
pKog )wliicd]i (hti hdldidoMi tt8> bj^ the fotei • Xter'sales 
^eieM^^y^^^^^' ^^ ^^^ boaditi^n that- a '.amfable 
dnoQ^ing^Dusfiv^tord, boixnanu&ldfbiiy thdal&^bb teretted 
HpoDDu the laddy ^fitfain^ mso yeaap froni^ *tbej diBte^.tdT piov 
c^toe<; tha<^]eytey.buihlii% ihoiild[be^'j>laiwd lit it ceiv 
taHL<Qisf;aiitejfirqm,<j|&e i^^et^ vk a gihrle of aiiihiteotaB« 
afrpniive^ fajiua^ Ihat ttae grounds^ eUcmldbe^eiuilDted 
witii^ate&ptabld) fonoes, and Kept cteaii>aad dAaibfi iKith 
dth€tf Bosditidii^ which Airoul^ tedd^the loccdUrpd^di^ir* 
able'ionelfaE rcapeistqble tesideiit6,:aiidcop«rai;e %»{ the 
auitiftal baheifit of all IpersoDiB who^aUoold beeoitie aet* 
^tletos iH'theo^ew'city.- " < .'t.-t^v.^ . !,,j;. ; y. •»!» i- • 

uCFhifl<«iitird piopeilji cohsiito of ai4MaKtifiil<plateaa ot 
groui^ yr lyings withioKfeaBlbaiih^ th0 iteEBtre 

of Bridgep$»i;)cili^. €6asidelilig^tlLai«iijmnan%^i'dr the 
8itafttionv:it ;ife u .ivoider. ^at the :City df Biftdgepoffc iras 
Bt>t!oH^all7 fokin4ed ufibn thktaidetxf thai tiTer:>- The 
lati^ Dt. iTipiothy D wight, for a long dme PwBide&t of 
Yale Collega, m Ijia " Tfav^ iu Ne# Ehgiiand iaiSia," 
^Sdf flfe.Ucalitljf:// .•!/ !••' ^ :..; . 1 J- • 

.'>;Xhei:e is.ftottiA thbtStai^'alptettiev vill^-«l)a|^>the 
borough f)f» Bi!id^e|>Qri la the yeA: idl88j ihme : 



OEMS osmBJcsfn wrsAxmjLo^msgm. 869: 

tains pfefeteUj! more Htau 013^ itiiiidr^, built.: cm J^otti 
sides 0^ Fnghqaonnuok (F^q'^ounock) river, a beautiful 
millrstreatp, &qputig sAiU mQHtb Hm hMbar of ^ridg^^ 
poet I%i9 iilfmtion of tbk mfSi^^ A$ ^mtf •hcddrfoU^i 
pantiftelwdjftoni titociUrtem tidfi^f 1^ mm. Axoimi 
cheerfol mid dt^|fmt piece .«f giifAmd tetfniscMrceljr be 
imagtncfd than the ^oiti& wbicb ateetcbM bejbween . tlna 
Pagbqfioitimok 'aUd tbe old «uU^ttff)Qk 1 't^ the fiimh 
peets.yreseiit^ by tbe harbOfa mt :th0 looutbs of tbem 
stre^martbe'Soutod^aad'the lamrrfuwU^ ^untry, iwe« 
in a Que 4fAa<»l|, gjay imd In^iagijb, fierbf^ps wlthiMi^ n 
parallfiV ■ . . , J. 

Thiflr^Vilhewfiiltnd' elegant pieee of |prot]|id»*^ aK Dr; 
D wight so truly da^bribes Ity jbad 'oj^y^been^ iMfifa ifroib 
maiket bf ;^e wazltr of m^ajia lef i^eeiAl A' n^tv/ fifot* 
bridge W9i» bttUt» ctdineotilig t^is plaire (witb the City of 
Bridf^ortt, and a j>i»biia toU^boddge irhibh Iwlonged . to 
n^ wab'itteroirm <)^gi1 ^ Ih6, fmbHe &m^ ! Wb laho 
obteined&bm tboiStaite Ldgifillatnrd al charter lor etool^ 
iog b'toU-bti^etbeMften/thei two facidgcfB fafa^ady exists 
ing^ afjii tmdeffTtbatTcbarte B ^:piit npia -fiae .toYecsd 
drati^^hridgd at 4irTCobt ofi $16,000 nftncb idsorrtre made 
free toothdt |iii^6 fot wvend yeli!rd. ; Wo bnih and 
leased )to*fa' uition cdmpany d£ youvg ooadLmakdxa a 
large iaiAielegant^cqachtnaaufiuB^^ m» of 

tbe finft buiUixfgar tericted ihete,; acA whidli iredt ioAo 
opetatiteuMVithorifinrtr of. January,' 1862, attdn^vi ibe 
beginning of the extensivb ifaannfcictOrida * whteb ^i^e 
snfaaevyabiriiy'buihnin jBaat B^ > ' ,: . 

Bradei the.indbeement which w^ hdd out to pain 
chasers .to oMiiiii>theirlote at a meiiely nngMmal price^ 
we advanced one haUy two^thirds, and frequently all 



S90 oLeoK mmvfjosnt wspiAMSJEMmsis. 

« 

tlie f inidft nicesimrf to • '^ct tteto >b«EUdiiigsy ^ {itiviittiBg 
them to repay M in siiiiM as small as fl^e dolHrS) at 
tibeb mni convenience^ This arrange^aeut ^ enabled 
many peisoM* to seeiirs* and nltinately paiy ibr bome» 
K»hiohi th^y vxAd not oAierin6& hstve obtaiiicicL We 
looked / for *<i«tfp»iflt» scdlily to^ the rise* in tii^a'iMdiis of 
(be fesevvisd 'kPts^^hfich me mtfi^ eonfidliailj mast ensue. 
Of conrse, theM estraordinary ind^icemettts lad many 
persons to tmild inutile new eity, ahd i«>begati«to df^lop 
and increase with It Irapidity iarely witoeseed tb tiiis 
seeHoit 4f'(^ country* Indeed, oui; spet^uktionj iHiieh 
cai^ te ^tmo/^ ai profitable . phkant&Mpyf soon 
promised to be so remunerative, that I offer^ Mr. 

Noble* fWhls'iiterest in thb estate^ $60^999 mote tkan 
the pi^lMJ MSt/wiich edlei he dedinisd* • 
: Ifiwtlltib^s be >Been that, In 1851 , my pe^' ichene 
Was td h«ild tip a '«ity' ki East Brtdgepert ' I bad 
made jL ^Mcge* fohnne and was imK^ous to be i^ieased 
&dm tibkf hannedng ten^ of. actttte bacpnessw Btit i eoold 
not he d^e;' tmd i if I ioocbtd bd insfcfumental* in; ^grving 
vtehie to. laiNl cqmpttatirfelyiiWovtbl^; >tf »ii. oe«U by 
fi» jadicMute mtpstilieat «f a^piorlioiiiofiBT^iiapiMopen 
the way/foor^wiiitastiMd &jad ^v^iunm&iif I' ikhonld be 
6f seihrice to /fiiy lldlow faienandfind {fxa(eM' employ- 
ment l»an^«iieigssauid'tia^ 1 '8aw•that^*ill/ciBe of 
sacosss ^eiA^i^ims pvtifit n in)r pvojeefei'laoft:-! iw 
eiough' likbidoRudEind. in gehehdi to:.ladBiilpiia tbe 
enlaif^emtefp o£^ «^ measiaiab a cotortmntatssnidewwrtly 
aad/'ie^itidmtely'td^' iriahedy ' 'f •' .•!( o -^a^iI: ■ 

Yet, I can truljTeay tbtH tsMei xoAimjf^MkiBg ^^ 
atsecaddary fafanfaideration. in my: eettemad) I^twaAted 
to biiild;« rcstjrron' the beautiful plateda «n»B8 idie. over ; 
in{ the eippossdiFe phrase of the day, I ^^ had East 



CLOCK COMl^AOTr ENTANGLEMENT. 891 

B^gept^rt on the b*ftin." Whoever approached me 
with a project which looked to the advancement of my 
new city, touched my wealc side and found me aa eager 
listener. The serpent that beguiled me was auy plB,x» 
ible pro|M)8ifton ' thut * premised prosperity to East 
Bridgeport, a^d it was in this way that the coming city 
connedted me with that source of so many annoyances 
and woes, the Jerome Clock Company. 

Tbete wttd a small clock thanufeictory in fhe town of 
Litchfield, Connecticat, ili which T became a stock- 
holder to tfaie amount of sit: or seven thousand dolltm, 
and ray* duties ks* a director in the compaily called me 
oecadomdty to lAtchfleld > and made me Somewhat 
acquainted wifli &e cI^kAc business. Thinking of plans 
to fot^rard my pet East iBridgepbrt enterprise, H 
occurred to me >^at if the LitchMd clock concern 
cotilA be transferred to my prospective new city, it 
would necessarily bring many families, fhiis increasing 
the gf owth of the pl&ce and the value of the property. 
Negotiations wt^ns at once commenced and the desired 
transftftr of the business Wbb the redtdt. A )i6# stock 
company was formed ubder the iciame bf the ^» Terry A 
Bamum Marnufacturitag OompAny,'* ar&l ih 1852 a 
factory was 'built in East Brid^port 

In 18S5, 1 deceived a suggestion from a dH&teti dt 
New Haven, that the Jerome dock Company, then repu- 
ted to'b€f a weklthy concern, shontd be removed te EaW 
Bridgeport, and shortly afterwards I was visrted at Ittat- 
istan by Mr. Channcey Jerome, Ihe President of that 
company. The result of this visit was a proposition 
from the agent of the company, who also held power of 
attorney for the president, that I should lend my name 
as security for f 110,000 in aid of the Jerome Clock 



|P9 CLOCK (JO^VA^X l^WBA^iMS^WEXlf^ 

tjKap^l^n rp£r- thR . gr^at rjqi^aillafjtorivg ' remioem$r ^h it0 
§iavaj% buiidred to,op^ them^nd opeFo^Tefr/toisy beloved 
E#4t?3i?4g^Wt^ ' It WW jfii»t (ttifr ^^ for tl^e .$9)» ; I 

substantial entei^atOTi^i^t jfa^^bl; Mt(?)y.1}e'>^8.tedk7T 

^^pF^qtp^ si^.);^«;qm9«^Srye3^ibi^ai«lfiital.«f fttOO,' 
QCIQu^r^AWptes ,of .^1^:Z,QQ0, tin •4}U'<(»d%9Q0. - !I£e 

9ftfly/a^th9i«ai?)ntt(tgl4t(i«d Ivltitlftibrt ^o«4s, i4li^rilBtme* 
4iAt^,i|^a^^mfndspwhi)sl)iriq|k«tf berftPfftJ " J.wt»tiao 
^p.se44f|4o^4i tlwypatlwilc J«ierthf»tth^/?oiftniway. •ww 

^0iiV^i4u%Sngra^9<«f4^irriWib'>4»P<«B^jiQ^ Jftwf 

^^'j^9«^v?9P|rta)fiCif(i%Vf^7f" f. - ■< f,( H, .,.>.• f • 

.,i^a».^«iftj qt»tewwt.ft«p|iwd ««|*ifafi|»i7f, 9li«ir' J'<«mv 

|jnwin»4fte;(7or^|ipie»,emtfll(^i«4, MiOtii»fth0id«U-p<lBSOB. 
|S)if,99fipa92ft YAa,^»pjateA -.tifMbe fuwfcjj.t tfci(e/rP»w^«Bt, 
)([iVe,eiiaffpcfjFrnJerow%;bwl) baifc:,»->K*«W*r i»rfJfe* 
Haven, at a cost o^rf4Ai)P9(, ap4. pij^qfj^ft^rfre^wt it 

^gqg^ ^,i^-,w«H(drtiy,,rf-Xfe«'- Jif«9nwf*rto«k» w4w for 
s^i?,^U,fl?f^4UQ'Aw44»fy?ir9ft'i»fC!W(|»jfwMlse.4b^ 
IJiaM t^^rei «^4 ,^ to^ e«jb«-«te /^-wfiY^WeijIl/' "HftdjiMe 
Ij^^ <«^e9^)E9r .litU9teiD|)leprft)i* tb^; id^ls^ <illtts fmma% 
t^t-f^^tlx was - possible, ^vithoot " worHSb"* Se -ivivaitbf 
aod <f o ,m4aly^lfaown a>o(nnp<my would • swreljr- be a 
gcand) ac^ieition to my. city. • < 



¥xbdthar teetwumiP oHfaeior |;1^ ihrn^^fl/lftrJk#e]r,ffi3^ 
the .CEi9bii^r^f>/pQ^{0l^ tfae^J^wi H^teii lwil^,,i?Kpr^Sr 
ing Hab bigltoit C9nftd9n0e in, the fi^aiidial ,st74Agt^ ei 
the ocMBcemi aM owok antjblftation ^t.I ^ut^o^p^f^^ 
givixi^tMipamty likl9liiidi/i¥Q«ld;J^ imrk- 

that my^YidiiiiiibiiytcbrnspMiii^.hi^ «»7 iittewit tin \ib» 
truasfei mi vthd- 'ijOBormi , OmpAby' fjMM ^o^) )ifoieA.t^ 
£aBEt-B]xUlgBptitt^.4iiiiUg^ll:(W«^ sjdbteijfMwAly )i9£9rnifi(i 
that the bank, of which my. jiontfeafiOlident vg^^i ^ 
caakMto|fvinoht€»fi the tlvgii«tvi£7iM>t ibe.ku^t^ ««4!ltor 

Un^cte alL th^ ^diteiiaiftemGeiv and Uifliidiici9dil3(}r.rihf 
yo86-ooloiBd;Qre|E)itaBtai»illSr^flMul^ tQ(itie,ilot.Ja98 thra 
by .ddl3^1maiBk>:toopriish 'thaz/gioiivth ai unyinevvi d(gsd 
finally laMe^ited. .tte 0ra|mdthii..«id bohdented.it^ 
an agncnenft that 1 J ivtmdd. lenqlotfae jdock iccmpAay 
my^nqtaiifipcaiAsiaotr t6, once^; ($50,000, and. aocept 
dMaA^d^unk.emamvM^WAiibi «QD»Qd $60,000./ /It .'was 
thiuwgtiBy iiifadferatddfl tlnAiI 'vss <m iniftifcaiBe;.tlV'he 

cscdv^ fth4' ^irfeittta ^^oarasrt^.-of I Qbi^^nflf^ • J^«!*i0 ,&4/; 
in doJeipnli'ikftidd)! loa^ ibf) Him Iq^j^a^ <he. ^(maU 
beaoh]l»^^acMiiaUy ?j[fin9omp^h:]f6K tb^ 'ifip^jm?)^^^' ^f 
trds. MUitig. Ibcft ^oAj} 'kxo^, r/lfbe^j taJte^. Upr ^IjfQuld 
be 7«Be«vfeAiifi ffMred)iiKt;)MWr oft^y prfi^Yld^w^Jt* f^tipDr 
kted nbgdmiimr<»£ij|UP>Q0a^h9M^ {o^vra- li0O^(9«de4 
I vaBdvflalBreMAghM{hQjiv^¥or4)^^r^ I3^ffi9e^9tetfe9# 
thaskrfife ifBte impQteiUe to.'0fiy>^xAetil^r wh^p jift) Woui4 
be seteasaiy to uite the lajotea, to put my najxlo t9 
sevGiral. notes &}i $3,000, $5,000, find 110^000, leamg 
the date of payment blank ; but. kt was agi^ed tbat ihe 



994: CLOCK OOMPAKV BMTAKaLKMSHT. 

bkaikB fihooid be filled to make the notes payable in 
£ve, ten, or even sixty days from date^ according to the 
exigencieg of the- case, and I was careful to keep a 
memoraiidam of the several amounts of the notes. 

On the other aide it was agreed that theJerom 
Company sbovdd -exchaii^ its stook inith Ae Tenyfr 
Bammn stockholdeia and thus absorb ttnati compaoj 
and unite the eutkre bnsiMea in East Bndgepoit It 
"Was searcriy a aionth before the Becretscy wsote me 
that the company would soon be in oond]tian.to ^' snq) 
ita fingers at A^ banks." 

Nererthdess, three nodthB «ftet the consoHdatien of 
the companies, a reference to mynsfmovanda dumed 
that I bad almady beeoane/nsponsible for the atapnUted 
anni of (110,000. I uras than 4»Uie4 niton in Net 
York by the agent who wanted fiye notea of $6,000 
each and I decUned to famish them, unless I should 
teeeive in letum an eqnal amount in my own cancelled 
notea, since he assured no ihey war cfcanceUing these 
«« every week," The canceUed notes were bcoughtto me 
next day and I nnewed thanu This I did fte^aaitlyi 
always xeoeiving caneeUed notea, till finally wf confi- 
dence in the company became so establiahed liint 1 did 
net ask to see the notes that had boeoa taken. up, but for- 
nishfed new a<^commodation paper as it waa^caUe^ for* 

By and by I heard that Ihe baoks began to hesitate 
abont tMscounthig my paper, and knowing tiiat £ was good 
lor f 1 10,000 sereial timea orret, I w<mdeied what was the 
isiatter, till the discolrery oame at last dial my notes had 
n<oit been taken up as was rep^resented, and tiwt some ol 
the blank date notes had been m^ payable in twelve, 
eighteen, and twenty-four months. Further investiga- 
tion revealed the •frightful fact that I had endorsed for 



CLOCK coftPAWr mf^AtmumissT, -JO'S 

the ^lock bomt>Q!ki7 to the titettt 4f m6te fKHn lialf 
a raSIton dollars, and most of the notes had' been 
exchanged for old Jerome Company notes due to the 
hanks and other cteditoifs. My agent who made these 
starflttxg disebverles (iame back to me widi thd refresh- 
ing fntS^i^nce that I Wai a rtiined man? ^ 

IVbtf^oife; I had the inottntam of JetdtAe debts on 
my hkdki btrt t fdnnd means t6 pay every claiitn agaitost 
me at tny baiflc; 411 ihy stbre and shop debts, tibtes to 
the amount of f40,000, which banks in my neighbor- 
hood, relying upon my personal integrity, had diricotmtfed 
for fftfe Oloclc Company, and theto I -^ ftaed I ' 

What a dupe had I befen ! Hete was a great co*opany 
preteiiditi§ to be worth $387,000, asking temj^orary 
assistance td i&e amount of $110,000, coming down 
with^a crsi^, ^ro'sefoh te tfry'hel^hrg hand v^m Iremoved, 
and sweeping me dowh witili it It failed ; ttid ^ten 
after 'abso*Wng fny fdrtuhe, it paid but ftom 'twelve to 
fifteeA per cent 6f' its obligations, while, to cap^ the 
climax, it nfev*i" removed to East BridgepoW at* all, 
notwithstanding this was the only conditioil which eVer 
promiitfed ike ^ *dvancfe one doHeit tc^ the rotten 
conceHdf?' i '■"'-" •'■'•• 

If at krfy^'finie *toy v^rfty Tisd been chai^ by the ftar 
that affc^toiywtitetnentfMm &e Jentfy lAtiA lihterprise 
the "#6^8 tMMIS'{bl^^e;'thfe aSkit vpeeAiily reassttred 
me ; I had notice enough to satisfy the most inordinate 
craving' for notoriety. All over the country, and even 
across the ocean, '^Bamum and the Jerome dock 
Bubble ** was the great newspaper theme. I was taken 
to pieces, analyzed, put together again, kicked, 
" pitched into," tumbled about, preached to, preached 
about, and made to serve every purpose to which a 



8S^ GUKW: QQHBJ^JIV JfiKXAtf l^adBICSim 

\ 

flep9ati<m-lciviaQig iKoi^ 94ii]4' put |QAm We}il I was 
ao^ in traizuog, in i^ uqw Achool, wd. was,.leanuiig 
x&ew and ttraage leASOOJi. 

Yet» tboao new lefii30iuf conveyed the , 014^ old Atory. 
Them rwe|i9 t]lio«e ;wl;i9 budiawwjdiy^aa me in ix^opras- 
parity, who non?^ jfler^;^ jpy .^fefgj^ j |>^tfqp)je whom 

their ing^tmile ; .pf^i^n^wbichf "^/fkv^i |h«d rtbe raeaos 
tp m%k^ it an o)>}ect 6)r them ta 1^ pa g|]|ad tenns with 
];ae»oOvq:lQfii4^. ^^ ^th ,^i)la|tiqaiy.Dow .attempted to 
oimcwhehn n^ e with «l]fase ; and, thaa the imnease 
amourt o£ pn^^i^aUzing . qi^r tlie /^ii^st^iliky p^ l^amn 
&rt^ii(^/i and fispeqially the, xetirijb^^e, jfipjtice that is 
imse. tp* follow r '' il^fot^ gwws"/ whic^« my^ ^peosocs 
.a^»9ifme4 Iq^l^P tjlw B^n and s^k^ff;i^e. qf j^y ipnprahly 
acqm^ 9^^ n^uptrieji^uAy f Wi9ffked , fyxprgipf^ I kave 
n^4()mii^ thffit m^ch of ih^e l^nA^f ^^^4<Ue.^a8,beIie?ed 
l^y t^e tfr^ddlf la to be auficereji r^^ , thua^ifOf cape was 
^f^tu^ P^^- to ^rti^i^t{i4:^»ch^ and ^nelfgipua ^dib>9 
who.wefl^,^ '^oflit ,of ^^ iUHrtW^<W; wMr^Wtb ^ 

spond. I was confident that with energetic purp^ aafi 
.4jlfin^(a^^f^{ /ilWvWf ffif/iW /lvmltb-tfil-iif« were 

i^^Y^ jwti^fj^ a»d .¥e?i#Q4 t^e^e^peotefilWrWdl^^ 

t! ;■! I :" »' <.i -I'l * !',:•• •.»"•. y\r. n [m.:1 1 



:, • / 






f 



■ f » t 



i' •• '/. .'i ' ■ " • ■:'•.. 1 .f 

• I ' '** ' :• -I .» ••• , , tl 1 1 ^ • .: •/ '. 

r * • ' t/ .. I. . ,. • . .7 . .." * ^ I'l '• J /, '. ' ' 

FBimnS .TO TSE BS^C^B-^ MONET OFFBBS REFUSED — BEITEFITS DECLUnSD — 
KAOKOICBKT OFFBB OF PBOMUnSNT NEW TOBK CrmOHH^'^WfUfaA^ Mi 

B««iair'-*i.MQu vHm^TT-yrmi^iMs, in^hor-^xwwm^ wm ifsjm»^mpi' 

TORIAX« ftTHPATHY-^'^A WOBD FOBBABNUM'* IN BOSTON — I^TTBB FBOM 

**Kaa. CABvixoroir" — cixgwirs* vBBTXNa in. bbzbobbobt — b««oi.ution» 

OF BBSPECr ANB OOKBOI^NCB— XY I«BTT£B ON TBB 91X17 ATI9N — T1»<BE& 
OF FIFTY THOU0ANI> I>OLI<AB^ — MAQNITUBB OF THB PECEPXION FBAQ- 
TtemB ^^PPN XE*^f«aPOUTia2r >OF GQ9|PB09CI8E with 'MX, CBBI»T0B9^A 
TBAP LAID FOB HE Of FHIIiADBLFmA— 'THE. BII«V£B XJNZNa TO THB 
Ci:X>in>^THB BI'OW ABEHEFir TO XT , FAXILT-^TKB BBV. DB. E, U^ 
GBAFIN^ICT .DAVOBXEB ^^UVN-*-A LE^BB WOBTH X|Uf. XH9U9A«9 9Qlr 
XJU(8*-017R VEW HOVE Ui BEW XOBH. . . 

HaWilt, tiiere is always tfaore t^heat than tkete U 
chaff. While my eneikiies and <a' few envious persooB 
and misguided inc^tJists w^roabusmg and traducing me, 
my yery teisfottilne^ revealed to me hosts <of hitherto 
unknown friends who te^idered to me something ' more 
than ntere sjfmpfeAy. Fttnds werft' offered' to Ae in 
unbounded quantity ibr the support of xay £imily amd to 
re-establish me ifi* bti^^rtete. I declined the^^ l:etider(» 
because, on principle, I never accepted a money favor, 
unleris i extepti^ei sfliDgii^>i»o€(ipt'Qf a jbimU putal.wtiich 
came to me by mail at this time and anonymously so 
that I could not return it £vea this small sum I^at 
once devoted to charity towards one who needed the 
money far more than I did. 

The geitefosity of toy friends ni^d the to accept 
^' b^iefitB " by the seoie^ the xeftums 4d which would 



398 CLOUDS AND 8UNSHIKS. 

have made me quite independent' There was a pro- 
position among leading citizens in New York to give a 
series of benefits which I felt obliged to decline though 
the movement in my favor deeply touched me. To 
show the class of men who sympathized with me in mj 
misfortunes and also the ground .which I took in the 
matter I venture to copy the following correspondence 
which appeared in the New York papers of the day : 

Ksff YoSK, June S^ ISK 
Mr. p. T. BAxmmt 

Dear £Mr,^Th« flnaiieM rain of » man of Mk&owMged energy «d4 entorprae 
is a public calamity. The nudden blow, therefore, that hae swejit away, from s 
man like yourself, the accumulated wealth of years, justifies we think, the public 
sympathy. Tlie better to manifest our sincere respect for your liberal exanpk 
in prosperity, as well as exhibit our honest admiration of your fortitude ander 
overwhelming reverses, we propose to give that sympathy a tangible e iy te a iioa 
by soliciting your acceptance of a series of benefits for your fkmily, the result 
of which may possibly secure for your wife and children a future holne, or it 
least rescue them from the more immediate oohsequences of your misfortune. 

Freeman Hunt, E. K. Collins, Isaac Y. Fowler, James Phalen, Gornelios 
Vanderbilt, F. B. Cnting, James W. Gerard, Simeon Draper, Thomas McElnth, 
Park Godwin, Bw^F. Carman, Qen. G. W. 8aBford,Philo Hnrd^ Preaideot H. 
R R. ; Wm. Ellsworth, President Brooklyn Ins. Co. ; George S. Doughty, Pres- 
ident Exeelsk>t Ins* Oo. ; Okas. T. Cromwen, BoAeit Btuyreaaiit^ C I* Livinsston, 
& Bosteedt Wm. P. Fettridge, £. K. Haughwoot, Geo. F. Nesbitt, Osbonie, 
Boardman & Townsend, Charles H. Delavan, t. & C. Bertien, Fisher & Bird, 
Bdtomon 4S Wsat, B. Young, M. D., t^adweU, Aoker 9o Oo., Si Kich<rfaa Hotel, 
John Wheeler^ Union Square Hotel, S. Leland & Co., Metropolitan HoUl, 
Albert CUirk, Brerooft House, H. D. Clapp,' feve^tt ^^ouse, Jdhn Taylor, Inter- 
i»tloiial Hotel, Sydney Hopman, Bmilh^nian fiot^, Messrs. I>elmoDio(s 
Delmonioo's, Geo. W. Sherman, Florence's Hotel, Bangsley & Ainslee, Howard 
Hotel, lilbby^ Whitney, tovejoy's ^otel, :tfowaird & BfOwn, ttLxnmhUyEaJi 
Jonas Bartlett, Washfngtni HQte\ Patten As Z<y»de, Pacific Hotel, J. Jobiuon, 
Johnson's Hotel, and over 1,000 others. ' 

To this giatifying oonnnuaication I replied as foUovi : 

Long Islaio), Tuesday, June 3, 185& 
GxMTLEMXN, —I cau hardly find words to express my gratitude for your very 
kind pvopoBitioiL TbapofviteB syn^^thy it to jne fiw' moie pradoiia titan gold, 
and that sympathy seems in my case to ext9n4 from my immediate neighbors, in 
Bridgeport, to all parts of our Union. ■ ' ' 

Proffers of > pecuniae assiatanoa haTe.seao|ii0d ma from «veiv qi^aifar, not only 
from friends, but from entire strangers. Mr. Wm. E. Burton, Miss LianraKeene 
and Mr. Wtt. KlUohta^e in the kindest nani^ tendered me the reoalpta of ^l^ 



GLOVIM^ AND S0NOTttKX. 399 

theaiTM for PM erenlii^^ Mr. Goi^irh , TolaTifoere^llif probeeii of mm qf llfo •i^ ! 

tractive lectures ; Mr. James Phalou generously ojSered me the free use 9f the Acad- 
emT of Slosfe; t^axkf proftssfoftal ladfesaAd gentlemen )i«ve vrge^ ine to axx^ept' 
their gzalnitoos mrrices. X have, P)»£rlDCiple> iv«pectfal}j[ ^aoliAie^ th^fi ]all^ /bi9> 
I hog, with the most grateful ac^owledgments (at least for the present)^ to decliue 
joion--iiat telBVse. » iMdefit^ iti ItseM; ifl ttn ol(feotiotehl» tlting, ' hut heoitiiM^ I ' 
have ever ma^e it a point to ask nothing of the puhlic on persoi^ grouAd)»i 9Xid 
should pfeftr, vvliile I c^n possibly avoid that contingency, to accept nothuig 
fnan U witlUit H^ hoatfl^ fluvvjotim HhaA 1 h$/^ ixidifidiiaUy glvea it •jAmtlum.a ■ 
full equivalent. 

While 4bvared w?tih'lieieifl/li, 1 feel competent to «ani tM honetrtf IfveKhooi for 
myself and £uuUy. Hffwa t^«M»^tl^ I sllaU oertaiali^ p^er ikltf m|ki( wi|b <«««l|. m 
load of debt suspenclecl in terrorem over me. "Wliile t earnestly thanXyoji, there- 
fore, fat yotir geneKoue eod^etatieti, genHenneii, I tralit yoti wfll epprMiate my 
desire to live imhviailiated by a sense of depemdenoe-^ and heheve me« sinotiely 
yours, P. T. Babnum. 

To Messrs* Aia^Buiv Ajtit, B. K. Ooititttf, lAd elheri. 

And with other aSets of assistance from far . and 
near, came the foUowinjg from a little gentleman who 
did not forget his old friend and benefactor in the time 
of trial: 

Jbinss' Hotel, PHiLADBLPHiAf May 12, 18d6u 
Mt Dsa»H<. BASmm,--*! lUtderifland yeur fiisiids, end that means "idl 
creatioxif" intend to get u^ some bepefits for your fan^. ISqw, siy d^^ 0^, ja4t he 
good enough to remember that I belong to that mighty crowd, and I must have ^ 
finger (ocaileastfr^^thiiinb'') in ^aH pie. lamhoundtoappeaf ottall8ui:ho6o»» 
ca&ions in aome shape, from " Jack the Giant Keller," up staii;p, to<the doqrkeeper 
dowxl,iriddhever may serve you best; and there are some feats that I can perform 
as vrell as any other man of my inches. I have just started out on my if estom 
tour, and have my carriage, ponies and assistants all here, but I am ready to go 
on to New YotIl, hag and baggage, and remain at Mrs. Barnum's service as long 
as I, in my small way, can be usefuL Put me into any "heavy" work, if you 
like. Perhaps I cannot lift as much as some other folks, but Just take your pencil 
in hand and yon wiHr ^etX oan draw a tremeadotiB kwL I drew two hundred tons 
at a single pull to-day, embracing two thousand penona, whoin I hauled up 
dafely and satisfiustorily to all parties, at one ezhiUtioa. Hoping tUat you will be 
able to fix up a lot of magnets tiiat will attract all New York, and volunteering 
to sit on any part of the loadslione, I ain, as ever, your little but sympathizing 
friend, , On. Xom Thumb. 

Even this generous offer from my little friend I felt 
compelled to refuse. But kind words were written and 
spoken which I could not prevent, nor did I desire to do 
60, and which were worth more to me than mroney. I 
should fail to find space, if I wished it^ to copy one- 



10& CQ^UDS Aim BB^NaimiB. 

tenth part of theeMdia) and 'kind artlctes md para- 
graphs that appeared about me in oewspapero thioogh* 
oat the country. The foUotving ' i^ntence from an 
eiditorial article in a prominent New Yoork journal was 
thi^ key-note to many similar kind notices in all parte of 
the Union t ^^It is a fact beyond dispute that 'Mr. Bar- 
num's financial difficulties have s^ocumulated fjrom the 
goodness 6f his natute ; kiiidvbeattefd aai} generous to a 
faulty it ha^'ever been faia custom to land a helpkig hand 
t& the strdggling ; and hbnest indhfttfjr and enterprise 
have found his friendship prompt aad futhfid/' The 
Boston Joumql dwelt espqcially upon .the ,U3e | had 
made of *m^ mdney in my days oi pros^^rity ih assistbg 
deiderWn^ laboring mep ,and, in giying an impulse to 
busiAess ' in the town where I resided. It seem^ only 
just that I should makg this TQry brief allusion to these 
things* if only. as an o&eft to tha nabounided ntNue of 
those who bdieved in kicigitig m^ merely bqcausjB I was 
down ; nor can I refrain from copying the f^Uowiog 
from the Boston Saturdojf JEveninff Gazette^ of May 3, 
1«56: 

BABUXTM RlEJDIVIVira. 

DBjAnvh, 7t)ar liaad t Though ^ouiiM *^d^imi'^ 
' ulAflseaitilliaaiiyAftigfd «ii6ifld6n 
' Ba l»nMre, toy bvielr, inA tlMtlgh tli^ frerim, 
£toTB 4fa!at mMfattulw ibflddM y4tt' bdUlw. 
Tbete'g many a.msn th«4 easeri, my hev», 
AnA former praise converts to scorning, 
Would worship— when he fears— a Nero, 
, , Aad bepd "f where thrift may fi^llow fewning.** 



I' 
..? ' I. 



You humbugged us — that we hav« seen, 
We got 6ur mohei/s itortk, oW ftllow, * 

We never thought your ?ieart was yellow. 

, jQu4g t^;a|8i6t|a faajiifr lfcjDth«iv . ^ , f * ... ; ^;j ; , 

' And, wifh such >irtue8, what's the harm 
All memories of your fanltf* to smother? 



/WekadJ|ot.:^d.tbejpeerlw,JfWlf, , . (. \/ . 
Bat for your spirit enterprisiilg, * , 
Tott/imnttteAuiitaryittflowlad^ i •*«'.•-.) I '• ■ . 



And ma^e a 09w> C9iife8e^ sifip^igii]^ 
YouVe Te^koned m your native town ' 



your native ^wn * ' 



You ©v«r keep the latchstring down, 
Aad ^eel with opea hand the stfatq^r. ' ' ' . ^ 



1 «. 



! f 



' BtteteyourVipperrip.'' ^odkJo#' • ' . • 

Who are your firiends and who your foes no|f] 
We pay for knowledge 03 we coi , 
. ' '*A4idr||oltgtily«il'gil8^t»$^j<i^t)ldwi^Mo#^ * •; '• ^ i 
, Xo5ifvpafi^.fi«J4,-^|iQiii^or^cfafre,.-T^, ^-- ;, , 
Tne storm once passed win find you braver^ ^- 
■ ' ' SKWti;Ctifd1fc«iuilodgiiid^y«to«are;.' ...:' ' if i [ 
And on 'tl)e right side, never waveri f > 

Deinrtuij bf knotWtig^ wild V^'-th* tfotbor ofiMs 
kindly 6fftiBibii,''T WtofcJ WhO^ pfepftriijg rtii>' antofcid^- 
raphy, td Mr. R P. 'Sbfllab^i', oiie *f the Attoirs of ihe 
journal, and Well kiraWn to Dib fmbltc ti^ " Mri l?^ing- 
ton." fii ifeplt; I'yieeWed'thefbllowlng fettfei- if/ Whidh 
it will 1)6 «een tli« he'. ni^tei'dym^athfeWciJlnsfeWto 
the Ijottriiig 6^%'lasl' •Masetim,'&iiyk'fe^''W66fcs 
befbrt the dkie-bf lia fetteiJi'' .-^ ' i ' ';' • -■ •"■ 

.'* *'i' * t' •' <*'.'r 1 : .' ' I. '.■•'f' '•» 

Mt-Dkab Mr, :p4iun7iK:~ The poep in qupstion waa written by A. *Wallace 
ThAxtCT^ oMkM^ <ldHotoiM^(Mt.iqili|i|)!lilidfsiyri«U;. llM &amml^ce 
deoearod,.* gIgtJQua. Wlp:^ f- whp vrp^UgMenpi flrpHJi » siiyWDa fee^jjg^f admi- 
ration for yohrselt 'Mi. Clapp, fHoni W. W. Clapp,) published it ^i^Jth his full 

upprotetlknu. JJttMd Wi j^ur'^crritt^oUej fay nxy^tw iQliambkr^irhe^e % tme 
l^-en 9U wiotCTfc with Tep-^t. and(\p^iah^ypu as ready a please fr^nj attending diffi- 
culty as your^^ud hai^ idflieVtb acnIeVed' linger like th^^i^tantj^. ^ 

B. F. ShujaAbbb. 



• J 



'But Uie mm^erta^on^^ of sympathy which came to 
me from Bridgeport, where my home hftd been for ttidre 
than tan yeaxs, were thie moat giratifyipg of -i^U because 
they showed nnmistakably that my best friends, those 
who wwe moet constant in - their &ieiid«hip and most 
emphatic in. their' egfceqm^ were my neighbor? ^joA asao- 

26 



1 4>02 OliOUBa AKD BUKSflXKE. 

dates who, of all people, knew me best. 'With such 
support I could' easily eiidttre the attaokft of traduoen 
elsewhere. The New York JimeSy Aptil 25, 1856, 
under the head of .^^ Sympathy for Bamum," published 
a full report of the meetix^g of vaj fellpw-citizens of 
Bridgeport, the previous evening, to take o^y case into 
consideratioii. 

In response to a call headed by the mayor of the city, 
and signed by several hundred citizens, thisj meeting was 
held in Washington Hall *^ for the purpose of sympa- 
thizing with P. T. Bamum, Esq., in his recent pecaniarr 

. eml3Wiirrwi|Wentar»n^ 9f «iWPS ^9V^ pnl)li9.,p3q?j;?fsioii 
to their views in reference to his financial' miaj(brtnnes/* 
It was tb^ largest pubuc mating ,wh|ch^ up /tp that time, 
had oyer been held, in Bri4gepo)1;. 8^y^^ prominent j 
citizens n^ade addresses, apd resplution/i .were adopted | 
declaring V tt^at jrespect. and sympathy w.ero 4w^ .t9,P. T 
Bm^ujfi in retuni for his many a^ cf^^ep^, f hilan- 
thropy and public spirit," . e;ip}:^si^gr,,\if^t^fd^en eoufi- 
dence in his integrity, admiration for the *^ fortitnde and 
composure with which he has met reverses ^into which 

. he has be^i dragged through no fiudt of his own excq)t 
a too generous confidence in prptetided friends," and hop- 
ing that he would ^^ yet return to that wealth which he 
has so nobly employed, and to the community he has so 
signally benefited." During tiie evening the following 
letter was read : 



Wn. H[.. »TaMJ^:l»iq., f 

Dear Sir :--I have just reoeived a slip containing a ciAl ibr apnblic meeting oi 
^ cHlMnsW Bridge|M>H (0 feympathlie miUi^^kie in aiy thMiIlM;, US»li4ttded b; 
£^a' Honor th4 HAyoK, and ia wgned bgr moat of your prominent piti^seaa^ as well af 
by many men who by hard labor earn their daily bread, and who appreciate a calam- 
l^irhkaLt*ttftlm|i^<llo«riitri|Ma*latt«f IJifomile/hto'^illVh tb* 

worldfy comforts which years of diligent labor had acquired. It is diiAto tmrb 
to say that I knew nothing of this movement itntll yoitr letter 'hiforMtf ine of ii 



CLOUDS AND 6Xm8HI2CE. :403 

« 
In nAa/httmub Hie true gympa itt iy of nelghboiti l« more eooflDlhig ad peeeloiu 

than anything which money can i^nrchase. This volnntaty ofieriag of my fellow- 
dtuMBS, liioagh it thrills me trHb iMMfal emotioiiie and o^oses tears of gratitude, 
jet imparts to me renewed strength and fills my heai^t with thankAilness to Prov- 
idence for raising up to my sight, above all this wreok, kind hearts which soar 
above the sordid' atm6spherd of ** dirty doUatft.*' * I can never forget this aaex- 
pected kipdnqss tem.my o)d friend^ and neighbors. 

I trust I am not blind, to my many fxulta and shortcomings. X, however, do 
feel gnwt eoosolRlloA in bellevifig that I ueter used money or posittkm to ot^piess 
tlie poor or wrong my lEellow-men, ai^ that I never turned empty awa^ thoee 
whom I had th0 power to assist 

My |^0er«ick trilby Jirhb ziBeds'fbe bracing 4lr whisb/Oftr 0]»nde«r hivne ivmi^ 
beautifkil by her willing hands) would now have afforded her, is driven by the 
orders of lier physician to a secluded spot oh Long IMand whete the sea-wind 
lendft its httdttilk) iiiflnma^ and Hhete X hive 9kf^ retired for fh^douhle f «rpose 
of cetisoling her and of ^recruiting my own constitution, which, through the exdte- 
meiffii of tile Het few months, has most sericmsly 'ftuled ihe. ' • • 

Xn our ^oiet npd h^imble re^eat^ thft which X moet sincerely pray for 13 tran- 
quillity and contentment I am sure that the remembrance of the kindness of 
mj Bridgeport nel^ibors will aid me in securbig itiese -ebeiiAed hlettitgi. 2fo 
man who has not pMsed through similar scenes, can fully comprehend the misery 
whicli haa been crowded into the last few months bf my life ; hue X hate ditteavored 
to pieMTve my itttegritf , and I hnmbiy. hope and biiUavs tl^t | am Ij^Vog ' tMght 
humility and reliance upon I^videnco, which will yet afford a thousand times 
more peaod and triie happiii^ss than can be flcqtdredln the diii, Malfe^fttid tunboU, 
«xciteiq«nt« 9pd $^g^eB of thip money-^oishipping %ge. The ifan irtio ^ns 
his hrahi and blood into gold, who wastes all of his time and thought upon the 
ftimigfaty^ ddUisr, who Ioi^db no higher IbAn Meekt of hm mo tf And^ tmets of land, 
oAd whose iiun dbeift Is crammed With «tqcka and mortgages tied up with his own 
heart-strings, may oonsdie himself with the idea of safe mveetmehts, but be misses 
a pletfMirci whi«(h I firmly b^ll^ve tfiis -lessen wte fntendBd/tOi stfraw to m^ $ad 
wiuoh it will aeovre if I can fully bring ,my m^d to realise its wiadom. X 
think X bear you say — ^ 

*' When thf) devU ?^ sick, 
The devil a saint would be. 

> Batlrh«athedcrvflgot'«tdli- 
Ihe devU a saint was he." 

Granted, but, after all, the man who looks upon the loss of money as anything 
compared to- the loss of hoiior, at health, or iself«respeet, or friends,— a man who 
can find no source of haj^piness except in richee,*— Is to be pitied for his blindness. 
1 certainly feel that the loss of money, of home and my home comforts, is dread- 
ful,->> Aat ta be driven agabi to flad a reetitig^placaaw^y Horn- thotfd X kite, and 
from where X had fondly supposed X was to end my di^, and where X had 
lavishBd time, money, everything, to make my descent to the grave placid and 
pl««Baiit.<-».is, indeed^ a severe* letsoti; but, itflet aU, X firvUy ta^Uei^ it is Ibr the 
be^t, and though my heart may break, X will not repine. 

X r^fivt, beyond expression^ that any num should be m loser for having* tmsted 
to my nsone; it wou^d aot have beeo so, if X had not myself been derived* As 
it is, X am gratified in knowing that all my individual obligations will be met. It 
wo^Jd hav« been- mueb bettor *if. clock oredltora bad aoospted the bast offer that it 
was in my power to make them; but.it was not so to be. It is now too late, aud 
S9( I willingly give up all I posseMS, I cun do no iiion*. 



4fl4 €]b0^7i>B i AND i^qyrwi^fs:. 

whidh I hliv9 slwuys looeived from the (utUeos /^ Bci^^pprb 

P. T. BAKST UAL 



> • I ■ Ti- t 



gentleiQQU in Bridgeport offered me a loaxi of ^0,000 

' li that . Bum would b^ ^l3;t(UIVie^t^ jiq, «:|cti;ic0ti9g me 

&om my entanglement. I could not say, that this 

maoQttt would meet the exigeaicy; t coiild pal;!say, 

Meanwhile; my eyes were fuUy opocied to thef entire 
magnitude ot &e-4^fiRptiw .ti»t^.%4 ^t^l^fift ..Rr^-cJ^ed 
upon ijay too corifidirig nature* I not <«ily diacoy^t^d 
thafcmy n0te» had be«AjaAea to mQ i»m^.mQ^ ^mouut 
I..J9$tf.Mlft^^ i.Of .^^pected, but .tl^at they had. J;een 
•applied, not to^ reUeving . th^ company from tempor^y 

^p^^f^^&imml .ft^f^ 'm-. conAectipft Tyith,it,,^ut,^{most 
Ifp^holly to ;(he redemj^on of old and rotten elaim» of 
.}ttfiiB..aad.im(»Uhft/ goopirliy. ...^...(^iltoiW. tl^..'(3i?:jt^ to 
jehlc^i^ tbte, fr^sh Ti d^eliberately bled^ it ijotay be 

•tatod ' tlust I imttiittdiieed to. become. Auretj^i tcMys^of 
the isfew Haven banks inihe dum of ,|30,00p tcl^^ipdeip- 
nify the bank against firtilre Idsaee'it might mcur firom 
the Jerome compMiy after :]i]^,/canpection with itt and 
by some legerdemain this bond was made to cover past 

/ptUgaiiQw wwh y4r^jpI4sK. e^^^^ ftp* jpay..k4cjj)4^e 
of ,th6 existence of the QOittpany. In every way it 
seamed aa if l' had been, onieUy. sidled ^4^^^ 
irately d^fraud^d,/ . ., .; V, , ;,. . .,,„., l/,^,^. 
' As the <dbek compeny bad gone to pieces aod w^ 

PftyJSg.but ftoxp.<»^elYft to..fiftm;PW CSiiifor i^ip^er, 
I sent two of* my ffjl0»ds to New Hwen to ask ^or a 
meeting^ the ^areditors and I. inatructed. tbiem XfkJ^ in 
substance for me as follows: 



« I •■ » 



^ GtentlemeU: TUis is b capiCdlpractim! jok»! Be- 
fore I negotiated with your cAoek tompstnyatfall, I irea 
assured by several of you, and p^i1i(mlaiiyl)y & r^Ii8sen^ 
tatiye df > the bai^ whioh was the largest dreAitor of the 
concern, that the Jerome comp4ii7t;\^enbieatly're6p6i^ 
siMe and that the hetid^ofitlie dame was idtoconmokily 
pious. On the istxength ef snel( repredbntidiois sol^, 
I was hifluo^.tb iagree to hidorse aial'^aMept ^aper for 

sum i afeu now wilUfig te pay for my* oimx venlancy^ 
with an • additiuniil wgah of f 4^,000 for yeur 'dutdness^ 
making a total of 1150,008, y$SakkC yoa tan bate if y6a 
cry * quits'' with the ideecedr sfaofwuaii and'iet Inm; off;"- ^ 
Many, of the old creditDie Havoxed thifr^pra^sitMmi 
but it was found'that' the indiefbtednese was ^e scatiejred 
it would be impraiotieafale to attempt a -settletnent by An 



nnan&dns' oo mp ro m ise cf the eredatoiStf '. It Was 
necessny to liqtddotian that my pvo^erty should go 
into the hands of assignees ; I therefofe*at onaei torne^ 
orrer" my BiSd^eport property to Oonnectioirt rassigntees 
and I ismaTed my family to New York, when I also 
made an assignment of all my real and peraonal^state, 
excepting what had idreadybeenteipiafieRed m Cositiedfe' 
ieut. 

About this 4ime I rteei^ed a liatter firom Philadelphia 
proferring . li^OQ in case my cicenmBtanees mererBMok 
that I really stood in need of help. The very wording of 
the letter awakiened' the smsfiif ion in itay mi|Kd €iat it 
was fi. trick to atcertain whetiier I reaUy had 4ny prop<- 
erty, f6r I knew that banks and btokera in 4hat eity 
held seme of my Jerome paper whidb they nefused to 
eompeund cht oompromise. So J at onoe wrote tiiat I 
did need <|50Q, and, as I ex]|^cted» tbe. money didjuojb 

19* 



Ji06 CLOUDS. AiSTD StrNSHIlfE. 

-come,' nor waaimy Utter amwered; 'bat, « 'n-^dataral 
eom^quence, * 'Aa PhUafelpfahi bsnkeft tRhoTwere 
holding thte Jerome papet for a faigha peietfiftoge at 
oiice acceded to- the fenoB wkidi I iiad afmiMiilced tiif- 
fldf aible.aiid.wiUii^ to-pay. ' ; r . * 

BrwBy dollar which I lumeady owBd o&fmjr owa 
apcoomt I had alnady paid i& full or had sallBfaatocily 
arranged* * For the HaUiilies inottxred hiy the ddRheiate 
deceptian whaob- had invdised me- 1 offeied ai|di^a fer- 
oentage /as I> tiboBogbt my estate^ ivhes aoUv teooM 
erentataHy pay ; kni my wife, from her ot«!& property, 
adTaiiced ioroBi tiflie to fime AsoDiey tor take npr aacb uMes 
as conUthb aacnred'UpOR' dteBO'terms:.. . >' £t ms^ hon € wsi^ 
a slow psooesa. More'thaii:One creditor wpiiM hoU on 
fa> hie note» which possibly he had ^ tfiaFed*' attiifli rate 
of two or thDoe per cent a mondi, andsay : 

*^ Oh ! yon can't iheep Battaum daim ; he wffi^^dig: oat 
after a while; I shall neter seil my elaiinffer/laBB'lhaa 
par and interest J^ 'i: 

Of eoatae, I knew yery wdl that if dl the credi toCT 
took this ifiew I sbouM never get ontrof tbo' entkngie- 
ment in which I had been involved bythe old eeediton 
df the JeroneCiompany^ who had so ingmiambf man- 
aged to make me take their place. All I could do 
was to take a thorough survey of the 8ittia(Mti,;and^n- 
sider, now that I was down, how I couhiiget up 
again/ 

*^ Srery cloud," says the prorrerb, "^hiae a ailMr ho- 
ingv and so I did not despairv '' This Mow,'' i^dhougbt 
•* may be beneficial to my children, if not te me/^ They 
had been brought up in luxury ; acduitomed to call 
on servants to 4»teqsd to every waiit: and aldcNrtraiiliin* 
ited in the expenditure of money. My daSightcar Helen, 



CliOUDS AKD SUKSHINE. 407 

especially, was naturally extravagant. She was a warm- 
hearted, generous girl, who knew literally nothing of 
the value of money and the difficulty of acquiring it. 
At thia time she was fifteen years old, and was attend- 
ing a French boarding school in the City of Washing- 
ton. A few dt^ys fi&^ thje luews of, my failure was pub- 
lished in the papers, my friend, the Hev. Dr. £. H. 
Chapin, of New York^ was at my house. He had long 
been intimate with my family, and was well acquainted 
with 1^: extravagant ideas and ways of my daughter 
Helesu One morning, I received a letter from her, filled 
vntlok tysipathy and sorrow for my misfbrtunes; She 
told me how . miLch shocked she was at hearing of my 
finaaeial'disasterfir, and added: ** Do send for mfe^ imme- 
diatelyi for I cannot think of remaining here at an 
expense which my parents cannot afford. I h&ve 
learil^' to. play, the piano well enough to be able to take 
some Uttl^ girls as pupils, and in 'this way I can b^ 
of fiome assistance in supporting the family/' 

Qiij:ea<^ng this I wsb deeply affected ; and^ handing 
the letter to Dr. Chapin, 1 said : *^ There, sir, is- a letter 
which is worth ten thousand dollars." 

f^ Twenty thousand, at the least ! " was the exclama- 
tion, of the Doctor when he had sead it. 

We w^ese now living in a very frugal manner in 
a hir^ furnished house in Eighth Street, near Sixth 
Avenue,, in New York, and our landlady and her family 
bcinnied ..with us.- At the age of forty-six> after the 
aci}i%i8itkm and the loss of a handsome fortune^I was 
once more nearly at the bottom of the ladder, and was 
aboiat to * begin the world again. The ^situation was 
disheartening^ but I had energy, experience^ health 
and hope* 



CHAPTER XXVn. 

KAOT, but KOT BtJS1?« 

- 

BALE OF THIS MUSEUM COLLECHON — BUPPLEMBNTAHY FROCEKDIXCIS OF VT 
CRXD1TOB8--- EXAMINATIONB ik COUET — EASHVM iB A BAA TSJlVfeft — ^^<^ 
I0BCUTIOE — THE BUMMEB SEASOIT OX LO|fO ISI^Aia^ ^ THE lBD«BCnc KA> ^^ 

•HOW— CHAKLEfl HOWELL — A CHEAT NATURAL CURIOSITY — VALUE r-T . 

• * rioNi^*— raor^mro vo bty it^a. beack #haijb TA'm mw mcvuTu' 

BOARD— A TUB^ XV THE TXDE^THB WHEELER AMD WILSON &KWING »• 
CHTKE COMPANY — THEIR REMOVAL TO EAST BRIDOEPORT — THE TT r< T 
AICD* BABIOJX CX/OOK FA<m)RY <)OCUPtB»-^iaSW OITT rSOHKB^Y X<0OKr>' 
UP— A LOAN OF ^,000 — THE CAUSE OF VY RUIN PROMISES TO BE MT I:. 
DBMPTION— 'BETTINa SAIL FOR BNOLAKB— GKNSUIi ^M TUlhcB — UTTIi 
COfRDBLIA BOWABDb 

t 

In the summer of ^855, previous to my flnanci I 
troubles, feeling that I was independent and coul: 
retire from active business, I sold the American Mu- 
seum collection and good will to Messrs. John Green- 
wood, Junior, and Henry D. Butler. ' They paid n.e 
double the amount the collection had originally cost, giv- 
ing me notes for nearly the entire amount secured by a 
chattel mortgage, and hired the premises from my wife, 
who owned the Museum property' lease, and oh which, 
by the agreement of Messrs. Greenwood and Butter, she 
realized a profit of $19,000 a year. Hie chattel mort- 
gage of Messrs. Greenwood and Butler, was, of course, 
turned over to the New York assignee with the othe: 
property. 

And now there came to me a new sensation whie: 
was at times terribly depressing and annoying. My wide- 
spread reputation for shrewdness as a showman hiv 



BEST, BUT NOT BUST. ^09 

induced the general belief that my ; meipis were still 
ample^ and, certain outside creditors who had bought xny 
clock notes at a tremendous discount and entirely on 
speculation, made up their minds t|iat they must be 
paid at once without waiting for the ^low process of the 
sale of my property by the assignees. ^ 

They -therefore took yhat are termed ^' supplementary 
proceedings/' which ^ enabled th^Qi to haul me apy day 
before a Jt;dge for the purpose^ as t]^y phrased it, of 
*^ putting Bai^ium through a course ' of sprouts," and 
which meant ^A examination of the debtor, upder oath, 
compelliug him to disclose everythii^ with regad:4 to hia 
prope^rty, his ppsent means of living, and sa on. 

I -repeatedly ansjwered ^U qiiQstions on these points ; 
and reports of the 4^7 exatninatioi^ were publishedb 
Still anoth^ and pother, and yet smother credit9>r would 
haul mp up ; .'and his ^tomey would ask me the same 
questions which had already been answered a^d, pub- 
lished half a dozen times. This persistent and unneces- 

which was not only expressed by letters I received 4a|ly 
from various parts of the country, but the piiblio ^ess, 
with now and then an es^ception, took my part, and even 
the Judses,^ before whom t appeared, said to me.x>n 
more than one occasion, that as men they sincerely 
pitied' me, but as jt}(%es of course t|xey must ^^^^inister 
the law. After a while, however, the judges ruled that 
I need not answer any question propounded to me by an 
attorney, if I had already answered the saim^ questipn 
to some other attorney in a previous examination in 
behalf of other creditors. In fact, one of the jud^9» 
on one occasion, said pretty sharply Vi> ^^ eyflpn^ning 
attorney: 



410 kest; but not bttst/ 

' '^l^isj sir, has- become simply a case of pcnrsecntiion. 
Mr. Bamum has many times answered ever^ 'question 
Hhftt can-properly be put to him to elicit the dedred 
informatioii ; and I think it is time to stop ' these* exam- 
inations. I advise him to not answer one interrogatory 
which he has replied to under any prerioos in^pc&iies.^ 

These thin^ ^y^ ine some' heart/ sa that' itt< falsi, I 
wetot up to the" sprouts' with- lea? rtluctauttc;* rfnd 
began to try i to ptoy off my piersecTttors -^n 'their oMm 
coin* ' "" ■ "^ * * ' "" * ■ ' " * '-""«♦.♦:• T-/. . - , 

'On one occasion, a dwarfish little^ lawyer, #ho 
reihindfed mtf cff^ ** Quilp,^ commenced his^ examSn^on 
in behalf 'bf a ' note^haver who held a thonsand d(dlai< 
note, which it seemed he had bdnght for seVen huudiled 
dollar^. After the oath had been adtnidibtercAd' ihe 
Kttle **lhnb trf- the law ^arranged his* pen, ink atod 
paper, and in a loud iroices and with i inost :perettt{iibiy 
and eilpercilious air, askeil : , * ** 

" What is your name, siH " .....:..• 

I answered him, and his n^t qtiestidti, glVefn' in 
a louder and nfore peifem ptoi-y totie, was : 
" What is Jybut business T ' 



.♦ ( 



. « < . • • V 



- «< Attfending bar," X faefeklv repUfed. • 
' « Attendmg bar ! ** he ^efchWd, with in' appeasimce of 
m^chsurprisfer" Attending baH Why, don*t fou 
profess tb bfe a; tetap6rance man — t teetotaler?** 

*^Id6,'* I replied.; ' ^ 

*' And yet,^i8iir, do yoti hate the audacity to'asseA l&tt 
^u peddle rum all day, and drink none yourself T** 

***I doubt whether that is a relevant question," I 
said in a low* tone of voice. 

^Xwfflappeirftd-hfe honbr the jud^e', if you Bon^t 
answer it instantly," said Quilp in great glee. * " 



r 

BEST, BUT KOT RUST. 411" 

**^ I attend -imr, Knd yei never diicAc fntoricatiiij^ 
liquors," I replied. 

*' Wlier6 do you attend bar, and for whoml''. was 
the next qnestion. 

" I uttend thfe bar * of this court, ^ nearly etei^ day, 
for fli6* benefit 'Of two-penny, tfrdold-be liawyers and 
tlieir'^rtedy clients,** I toWeiied. ' ' ' ' 

A Idud-fltterihg-ln^heTicinity only added i!o the rpx- 
ation wiiidi' wa^ abready yisiMd on^ tibe cotiiitenance of 
my iiitenogatbr, and he sobn brbugbt has eticainination to 

Dii'libdther ociisEdioir, tryotLn^ laW^tet Ms '-pod&hiii^ 
lii^ lif^flk'tfr k'gireatl^^H, Wh^,iiri half latigldiigf, 
apologfefib tttie; hfe fedkT: ' * •' '• ' ' i 

'•* tb^'e^Mi^i^^oMak'^i ^tsiieat^^^iftet the smM 
things ; I am willing to take eteh the dttliiahs Which faA. 
froih iti&'nkli manV tMeH*" ' ' ;• ' '. ' ' ^ ^ 

♦* WliSch )B*b i^u, Lkiaifttsr oir tthe. bf fiie ibg^t* 

** 1 ^689 a hlddd-hbtitta' ^6(11^ i^ot ini^l! W iiiu6h oii 
this traiK" h^ said' gdod-natiin^aij', addyg* il^at he ioA 
no radt^-btte^fons'tb ask; ..•■"•'■'-■•' ^ -^ 

I stin cohtinued to tecttve toafey; offers of peiuriiarjr 
assistinfib,' WhfctiV'W^^^ of k 

gifti"<'inVarkWy>eftised. In a nttttibei^ of mstancei, 
persbnAl-' friends tendered I nife thfeft/' chdcfcs ' ftfr ' ^506, 
f 1,000, and other^tnis, W I klwai^ riisponded it 
sub^fatfce: ^'Oh,no, Itftfankyoit; I'dottbtTieed'it;'my 
wife hfaff couMderable* property, bcsidfes a -large income 
from her. Museum lease. I want fbr'nbthing; t do licit 
owe a dollar for personal obligations that is not. already 
secnred, tfifl'When't% clbck oredftors We f uUy, itlvesl^- 
gat^' and^ ihol^t over the mattet,'! think tlief will be 



4l!j[ ^bst; Bx?y jror bust, 

me up." .'. • . I 

Juafc nft^r, ivji failure,, and on. account ojf the 31- 
health of my wife, I spent a portion of the summer 
Witl^ ipyf^m^yiftrl^«.farf»l*o;»pe!9f iMf- G^afles H<^ell, 
At We8l;haffpt9ft,;«ft.i.ong.?;9i^, tXtf.placf is ». mile 
west of Quogue, and [ wjjp,,. fl^ei^ «^l?d[ /'^^tchebpn- 

J>PF^^ft».«^^.% iPl^^e !^# ¥c9'R?.. a -Sprite Tcsprt- 
Mr. Howell's farm lay dose upon the ocean and X fo^nd 

#M5,jr^9idai<^ ^.cp9;.w4,4e^^tful;p^je,., ^.]^, Ijat^g, 

%Wl»g^p^*o/p^;a^,,fipe;ic>^,fqr dr^^ the 

season pass pleasantly and the respite jttpvfi, f^fpy^ Cfe and 

Our landlord was an eccemtric. character».who took 

. ^af flplea^u^^ iij. ^Jijoi^jng i^p to )ils. fi^en^s 91^ fjeigh- 

bors as " the Museum man," and consequently, aq a f^^ 

jp]Bi^s|<y;,foij,in,bif fjs^^^^tlie Apj^can Mqsaum 
waa chief '^i^aong the infitiitutions of NeiifiYork. He 
was in a habit of gathering shells and such, r^ties^ as 
pftme ,mthin his .xeaph) yh^dx h^ ^ took to tlip |^ity ^nd 
^di^pQsed^of .at. the Muse\im. ,He;9Jftep 9po)ce.pf certain 
pheqomeiiff^ iji bis , , neighborhop^ , whjch , ]^p . t|^oi^ht 
l^j^uld .^k^ w^U^w^^ if they vepre prop- 

^ly.hro,i?ghj;^oijt .Oneday/h^ . , 

. *S]^r^ BarpjfjajL, I . am g^^g. t^ Morjcti^ this morning, 
aj^d I want -ypi^ tp go along with »e and see a great 
ci|jriQ8i^ there. jis the^e/'^ , 

.,•" What isjtr; J asked. . ' !. . 

. /; i^t i^jf^ mai; ^li9 hw. got flu njatur^l A^qnk/ " replied 
.J^9|i?r^l^"iapi^i^ 



BE8T, BUT NOT RU8X. HB 






A honk { a honk ! a perfectly natural hoixk ! he 
makes fif^y 49Hars a year out of it," Howell relterafed. 

I could not compreheud wh^t a *^ }^ppik " vrasj but con- 
clude th^t if it was worth fifty dollars a^ yciar an^opg 
the I^n^ Island fi8herme:{L apd fafij^ejps who epu)4 h%rdi$; 
be )^s;|^c^ to ]gay nmch/or i^ere sight-sen^ipg, {( wovdd 
be mv^ yyre valuable to ,f x^ljit in X^ie ]Vf i^seuogu Sf> X 
rem^ed^t as I wjis ^au^^j^orized^by M^WB^ Gareen- 
woo4^ £^nd.. Sutler ^jpurcha^^ curiosities foi: thfiQi I 
wo^ul^ jgp with him and buy tb^ j[i(»;^ from its posses^ot 
if I.<jpi]id^et it aj;^reasonj^lepric^. . .. ,. _., ', 

"Buy ft!" qi:;;laimed IJowell ;* '^^ I gue?^ ypu jfanlt 
buy it I You don't seem to ivndqfrpta^ui me; the. man 
has got a natural h9nk, J. tell you ; .th^at i^ ks ^hQllk^ 
exactly like a wild goose ; wh^u ^c^ciks ar^. flying s>y^ 
he goes out an<jl, honks. and tl\er geese, ^s^ppo^ing that 
some ^oqsp has set^l^d and \^ Jbonking fox the lesi.of 
the flock ta come down and feed, all flv towaxdf thet 
ground and h.e ^ l^ts ^tp 'em '. .>vit^ his gu»,>thUs ^killing 
a great pu^py, And in ,this w^y; his honk is wfur tb fifty 
doUpp^^jear^^o h^pi,iand, perhaps j»ore,"^ - 

X deqd^d not fo. attempt. to, l^^y t^$ ", h^nk/'jbuit my. 
eajg^rness j^ ^^^so ai^d my entire, ignpranp^ of the char- 
actCjii^ of tl^ ieuriosity furnished fqo^. for l^uighter to 
Howell an^ his neighbors for a long time. > . 

One morning we discovered that the way^: .hftdi 
thri^}^ ppp^ 1J|^ ,bepph aypung./bjftijk >¥hale some 
twelve ^^feet IpjUgi^.I^t wa^ {lead, but th.Q ficih injas hard 
and fresh ai^d I bought it for a. few ,doil^>..frpmLthp 
men who had taken possession ^ JLt I seat It at; 
once tfi th? Museu^, .wherjs it vyap ^^hibited jua a h^g9 
refrigerator for.a :5bw days, creating consideral^le ex^te-' 

Q 



. .414 BBBf>, BUT NOT WOm. 

ment, the general public considllerihg' it ^^ a bigf^ng on 
ieo/'4k«id the mant^ers g!|ve me -a share of the profits, 
which amounted to a snifficient sum to pay the entire 
board bill of my fttmily for the season. 
^•^'hi# incident both anmsed alid amazed toy Long 
I«t«ikd: landlord. ^ Well, I dedare,'' saM iei '^ that 
beats'' all;* yon are the lackfert man I ^r htttiA of. 
Here ye^ C6me and board for foiu: month? witifat yot^ fkm- 
ily, ai^ wben <your time is nearly up, and you ar6 gcUbig 
ready to leate, out rolk a black Whide oh durb^ac^, a 
tMtog nev^ heard of before, in liiis viciinty, and-you 
take that whale and pay your ^ole bill with' 'it! * I 
wotulei? if diafr aiii't < proyidential' ! Why, tiiat basats 
the ^ natural honk- all to pieces ! " "Riis waSs^ followied 
by4moh a laugh as'ohly Charles Howell cotildglre, -and 
like^ona of ^ hie peouliar sneezes, it- reso6ndefd, e(dioed, 
and roNSchoed &rough the whole neig^hborhood. 

ISeon after my yetam to New York^, somotfahig 
oodnnvd wUicU I foresaw, I thought, ai the time, wiets 
likdy indirectly -to lead ifle out <^*ttie wildenarieM into a 
cljBat field again, and, indeed, it eventually diii' ao. 
Strange to say, my new eity which had been * my tuin 
wafr to be my redeaiptidn; arid dear East l^ifid^eport 
whieb plunged me into the slough was to bring n!re' out 
again^ '^ Dear" as the place had literally i^roted to me, 
it was to be yet dearer, in another and better sfe)i6e, 

The now Ifigantic Wheeler J& WOsonlSewingMdl^ife 
Company' waa then doing k eomparatirely' smistll; yet 
rapidly gtowltog business at Watcrtown, Connectlcat 
The i!eitrf &'Bamuin clock factory was standih^ idle, 
almost wcArlihlefes, in East Bridgeport, and Whe^r & 
Wilion Baw in ike empty building, the situation, th)e'ease 



BEST, BUT'5fOT S17BT. 

of OoOMimltealSMr vrKSt New iFotk, and other advai 
pcedseljr'wftat Aey wanted, ijrovided they conld j 
the . ptMlifies at a rate which would compeiksat( 
fbT the expense andtarouble of remorhig their i^t 
iMttt 6<itan^WatertoWii. It is enongh to siry hei 
Uie «loek ftMlory was fl6ld fbr a trifie^and the Vi 
As^Wihirfi CompM^ fnovfid ii^ it and speedily ei 
it I lelt then that this was providehtial^r the fB 
tk^etoflsf TMdMSxig eould-be t^aply ptllicbased v 
Ubm to0M^ fer 'the rettioral ofihis ^aterix>wt] 
{ttiBe '4o 'BbMb Brid^{>c)rt, and was one of tt 
iHdiMfieito^ that iny fkilnre itxight prove a ^^hlefe 
dkigtise.'!^ it wy a fretrh ifarptd^ towards the h 
lakp of Ihe aew dty and ttte consequent increase 
tratHe of the Ittnd belonging to my^ estate. ' Many j 
diA not $e& these' things m the same fight in 
tlley wer*^ presctoWd to nie,'bnt'I had so long pd 
upon the' yarions means which were to make tli 
city prospettms, that I was qtiitik to* catch aby ind 
whidi promised benefit to East Bridgepoxt; 

11^ impoilHnt tnorement of the' Wheeler ar 
son Company ^are'bietiie greatest hope, and mo 
Mr: Wheeler kitidly offered me « loan of {J|5,O0C 
ottt security, and as I was Visions to have it i 
pixrcliasihg the Eiost Bridgeport property, when 
public auctum h'f my assignees, and also in tak 
such clock notes as could be bought at a Seasonal 
cetitilge,'! attepted^he' o£Asr and bority^ the 
TIdsmm,Sdfh'm£my liKmsahd dollars' more be! 
to my wife, was deVoted to these purposes. 

ft teemed ad if' I had nbw'^ot hold- of flie^ 
wHich Wdtlld Wdituaily lead me out of ^ labyJ 
fiiianbiai difficulty in Which the Jerome enian| 



<^16 BBeT,.QUT NOT, KCBT. I 

.. ^d4 actaaUy did njitf^^&i, even jl^jioad' b^* ^ont mn- 

SVp.e. .^piec^itioDS, ev/^nliuiiJly piMliqg •piQ|E»'|)«««ey.iiito 

917 ;pqc]i:^,tbaja t]jye J^rojue cQ|Qp^iq0o](i had l;ai^:«ut 

-iryet^ji ^/preww t^JStthe pros^«B ¥»;<j(nid,'. j^^WSMoly 

. ^ TW «rwr^ ,.^ %*» <iWpiy!?»r9 (9J5ter?fW* i Jwd wde 

; wry:litUe pwffefif^, .,^ Ii,<?9>wjjw^ to, M,Ji»W.npw 

?fi0^9?ii roy; j?pJ^<W^. JJP««i^<*^Wd.'atte»Siw, .perhips 
, :^y.;p«ing,re^, e^f^„,ii^prk, fqr . t|^ qwflpr^.pll. Wght 

j»'ri(?t9W,^ wk«p; Qf.aiwfliF, wd^w^dj-Jfeej^esigftiof co^- 

■ .*f «^ P. .tl?« Reyjr acfi^muifitioft.a^id qf ^i^.^eome- 

thing to,^ tqtiie amow^^i, I ina^e/pp. wy m^^d ,to,go 

WJLfor active .eiflpjojmsfjt, ^4 .^<m^y .dj?^ij;9ijifr of get- 

i ?^«?!?;.1^ ^oY'.fi?. WjP»Tt cou^d. %^fl ,r?«^yf . . "While 
my aflFairs' w^re . ,Mr;«:,lpi«, jut; tfeeflMply^ M ;^W.iow» 

..i^W:?»4 W ^^9 >pepdi^8,t m^fffi^ij^o^l^f^.l^ p^t be 
,d9UD» Wn^^Hg< for: B»X§elf ^d fl^: wy %»ily.,. . 

. . . , ^ Acfip^ingly, le^yiijg ;ft|l .W .\>V^i;tfi?s ;a^D»j^f,i^- htipie 
.,in|,the bauds ,o^.iny„(n^fi^8,e^lor in 16^7 I,»et,^ <}pce 

. , ^nd. alpa l^Uq .pQr4^Jj^ ^ Howard a^^ 1^ ^ffSfei^. . , .^Ws 
- JO^Ba.gW ^4 »WW^4.ft« .exteflded. reputation fqr her 
.•#^i&<*c..,pe|^Pfl^9P o^ " W^,i%^",V?,, tJie^nJAy of 
;.V;U»ple Tyi^;: a,nd ,«Jie,diaplaypd a^precpaaua ,^ei\t ,m 
' her rendering of. ot^^er juyenile qhajracter^ i^ith these 
MtW^tiops, awl /with w^at el^e Iinight pe jabiefo do 
'jnjf»PWr-.I.4«^'^i?54 to. mal^e,;,9s,.puch^.ijipn^,j<»8 I 
, pi^ji^d, ,inf^i^dii^ to remit t^e same to my wife's fnends, 



BEST, BUT NOT BUST. 



417 



for ihe purpose of reparchasing a portion of my estate, 
when it was offered at auction, and of redeeming such 
of the dock notes as could be obtained at reasonable 
rates. 



• t •-. 



^'#.^ • .' 






, ♦ 4 



> • 



> > 



/ I 



^ 



. ,' A . 



'. » 



.••:* r 



> « 



> 4 i 



f ♦ 

t 
4 • J 



. ; > 






I I 



t i 



1 



» ■» 



S 4 



• f . 



•I •' 



/..•' 



k *• 









' ' • > • '. * ■ 1 



CHAPTER XXVm. 

ABBOAD AGAIN. 

OlJ> FBIEMBS IK OLD BKOLAVD—- ALBERT SMITH A0 A SHOWXAJT^HIS ASCKRT 
OF MOMT BLAKC — POPULARITY OF THE EMTEBTAIKMENT — THE OABBICK CLCB 

— "PHI2rBA8CUTECRAFT"'-THB BLBVEIT THOUSAND YHiaiNS OF OOUMUfB*- 
UTILIZIXa INCIDENTS — SUBTEBBANEAN TEBBOBS — A PANIC — EOYPTIAll 
DABKNE88 IN EGYPTIAN HALL — WILLIAM M. THACKERAY — HIS TWO TI8IIS 
TO AMERICA — FRIENDLY RELATIONS WITH THE NOVELIST — I LOSE HIS SYM- 
PATHY—BIS WARM REGARD FOR HIS AMERICAN FRIENDS — OTTO OOLI>- 
8CHMIDT AND JENNY LIND OOLD0GHVIDT— TENDER OF THEIR AID^-THS 
FORGED LIND LETTER — BElfEDICT AND BELLETTI — GEORGE AUGUSTUS SALA 

— CHARLES KEAN — EDMUND YATES — HORACE MAYHEW — GEORGE PEABODY 

— MR. BUCKSTONB— MY XXHIBITXONS Of ENGLAND— S. M. PBTTlNOIU« — MB. 
LUMLEY. 

On aiTiving at Liverpool, I found that my old 
friends, Mr. and Mrs. Lynn, of the Waterloo Hotel, had 
changed very little during my ten years' absence from 
England. Even the servants in the hotel vi^ere mainly 
those whom I left there when I last went away from 
Liverpool — which illustrates, in a small way, how 
much less changeable, and more "conservative" the 
English people are than we are. The old head-waiter, 
Thomas, was still head-waiter, as he had been for full 
twenty years. His hair was more silvered, his gait was 
slower, his shoulders had rounded, but he was as ready 
to receive, as I was to repeat, the first order I ever gave 
him, to wit: "Fried soles and shrimp sauce.'* 

And among my many friends in Liverpool and Lon- 
don, but one death had occurred, and with only two 
exceptions they all lived in the same buildings, and pur- 



ABROAD AGAIK. 4]!9 

sued&e sAme voeatkns m when I l^Hiem m 1847. 
When I reached London, I found one of these excep- 
tions to be Mr. Albert Smith, who, when I first knew 
him, was a dentidt, a literary hadC) a contributor to 
Pun^^ and a Wiitet fop the magazines, -^ and who was ^ 
now transformed to a fir^-class showman in die full tidfe 
of suceess, in my %wn old exhibition quarters in £gy{^ 
tiau HaB^ Piccadilly. ^ 

A year or two before, he had succeeded in reaching 
the t6p of Moiit Blanc, and after publieihiifg a tAost 
intereiBl«ig He^MnuM, ^hich was re-'pnUished and tvttaa- 
lated- iaio' sevelnal languages, the whole world OTJEfr, he 
cofndtNl^ to miQce further Use of his ^xpeditk>n by 
adapting it to a popular entertainment. He theiefin:e 
illui&ated his ascent by means of & finely paintied 'and 
accnrale panorama, ai!id he' accompanied the ^exhibition 
Mriih a descriptive lecture full of amusing and interest- 
ing incidents, illastratiye of his remarkable esfjierieniies 
in acconrpUshing ^e difficult ascent fie Mso gave a 
highly-colored and exciting narrative of his entire jour- 
ney from London to Switzerland, and back again, inclnd- 
ing Ins trip up and down the Rhine, and introdbcing the 
many peculiar characteifs of bothsexe^r,' he ckiined to 
hare met'at difierent points during bis tour. These he 
imitated and presented in so life-like a manner, as to 
fairly captivate and ccsmilse his aufienees. - 

It was one of tl^e most pleasing and- poptdar estet- 
tainments ever presented in London, and was immensely 
remunerative to the projector, — resul^g, indeed^ iii 
a very handsome fortmie. The entertainments were 
patronised by the most* eultiT^ted dasses, for infermAr 
tion was blended with amusement, and in no exhibition 
then in London Was there so much genuine fhn. Two 



400 ABROAD AGAXy. 

Mt Ukree tunefr Albeit ^txd^ :wa9 eo.QiiWi^4^ t^^jippear 
4]|efQre due <2ufiea.at Buckinghata P^al^qe, andja^ WM- 
aar,€iQd as he gave bis Qntertaimnent with gr$a(j|U£ce66 
.on these j^ccasions,* spite of the fact that he,/QQ)iId not 
take his paxu)«tix^ mth^him^ jit cap fmiHy. b^:^z9l^^ 
'tiiiatthe &ame. waaq^uite as ^[^d ap ,i^9 vki9xp^wi 
•^Miytihe lectujce ^ .qqjbo^w^ :st'^k ^ pfin^ran^iS^n^- 
rable as both were, was by no meai\s th^:)e%4 GHMtl ^^ the 

CaUing upw. 4^bert i^iftith, J |ip?njd.,yiq.,tb^.,s«ne 
<Q^il^/i;leA4 aa,eY^-, %nd. be^j^.on*^ S0^^^ on 
,l^e/fp? Jjsli^f ij|a.P9te^ii;u^ent^^8fldaj4^ mj 

(ivrng frequently yith Mi%i ja^ .^is.fi^jfovite c^pb, the 
jG«iTick^ .... - ., ^. 

7}l§ first t^m§ ; I Jwit^essed -l^is exbil^tion Jig gc^e me 
>.^ YfinJ^ {rpqi tl^.s^e at |b? >n.oinefit. Q^ his.describ- 
-}B« ft; sfipfle :Jfi.^Ui^ ^ojcjen .fhaxi^ei:. pf St.,..IJ^s^lafi 
.q^iKg|i,c^9 CqlQgfi^j^jjrh.eje thp old.sextflp, was.^Wffrfatiog 
,.th9. story qf .thp as^ aqd,. bjfpes 9^ |he^ olev^ ^ thou- 
.«^pd iaiw(jep;(i. vw'giu^ w^o, accwclijjig. to tfadkiop^j^wei-e 
^a^'i^ed pn 91 certain, occajfion. Oiji^ oi[ ^^ . d^^cters 
whom ^e ^prptende^ ty h^e^ ix^t. 'sevej^a^l t^ig^ on 
ifeist trip>) :&^nt JBl^nq, >xfs,a Yankee, yl^oRi^hj^ri^ed 
" Phi^eqis Cut^cr^t? Xjte ^wiflk jcainje. ,^t ^^tim^.he 
j|nti;od|xced,ph^nea8.ii^,JJie. Cplogna. ^C^iurc^^.anJ^^jfi^ 
him say at .tli§ qa^ .of th^.-^^jtbq^ stpry . .a^ut .tfee 

,. ."^Qld>llft)yj ^^hat ,T?iUjqu t?i]cfi.fof,,%t ^.i^lLi^ot of 
ihoifl^^i nil wftftt tb?/nioi:,mx:MHseiffla ift ^e4cft^'; 

. When, the flyu€|8);^n Jbifid beea interpsfttedjjtp t|ie old 
.Qerfliftn,,h? , exclaimed in horrox, fC5iOf*d^S..fo i^bert 

.Swift;'/- . f _ : . ^; .., ,,.. ^ ^;.i .,;^. . 

V MifliQi. Gottl it is ^mp?s3sible I A^e ^ ^ne^'' *^ 
the Virgins' bones ! " 



aother kirof bone* to .njr Mwiewn» •wMT.nuite. fur^ 
le real banes of the Yirgms of Gc^iogAQt and buri^t up 
our show!" 
Thift jJimjis mccsited tbei hdtittest laughter ; b«it Mr. 
laitiK ^oMmr^dty iMlItiiat 1 i*Didd 9t oooe seeogniEte ^ 
3 H^^wn^bmm ^si^fthBrnoeam ^wberaiiLibeiiiad figltiieA 
viih. JM^ ib lB44:«t l^e ipoittor si lodge txf /Wltxl^i^k 
:a^aoi . lailit TOUjcseraf ibs nt(n3faifUQ0tit«)iiwi^ 
lad ^momi iiii mnnamiis aajtodstatl ^h^ ttold limi al^ 
hot .fiiter.atoi.JDany^ iacitibiita 06 our.rewinrMP^ l?0it 
dso^bwMti^d tod iMfterto* qoobilhits te. tberintoT^qf 
lis 4e*^pfi«Aio£.tlieiwcfcAtof. ]^Q^ . ..: . , 

IW^hML ^w wsat iti ^e^CnuKisk^ dttb Jtbat (As^^r AlW 

[lis ^twdiw'in; 1ii0 3IMV bnwMM." )M w^Jvwl? 
ITikily aiBais«;to9etltex».b0..rfix^ M J( .mUf^.l^M^ 
recognized several old acqiiaJntenow 1 W tb^ SHQodotep 
at \m «»teftemi«wl;i Upon, imjl »n*F#rwg ti^tJ[ did, 
'' ipde^r ha r^itt4r]««d^ MyQ» a^r^/ toft c^d *#boviBW| 

not Uk}tJ^Qw ttot m order. ia be .|y){ml^i 9)( oHiftMiip up 
and IflMlsie ftU tba good Ihtegs mhibh me o0niSi AcrobsuT 
13 J tbM rengtaflBBg; .fak yanods ^qj^oxknas updo this 
miotic JtoacfBiiritaihsBnit, Albeit ^faii^h: suoceededin 
scnri«if. up.a. ii|dingftii£ &a^ «^^ rdiihod 

alika b^ roTdlmid loss dsrtmgiiishfld? palates* 

M/mifi oiihB. SgTpiian }Isil iaatiiaees» iJfasrt. fiimth, 
espying ibe iaiber andicBeeyaeut an. usher to me with 
a note o£ inyjistum to idiiie oiritb biiaand amuQbair of 
friends iataiediatsly afbr ^ha olose <of Jtheentertaintnent 
To ihis imitatioii he addni the> request that as soon ai3 

he oGMlvidod \m lMtu».;l/al¥Hd4atpii(S0 <»in0 to bioi 
throngli iba \SQmE dttor: widnr ilfa*i8ts|^.a(t ti^.^2tid.Qf 



491 AB1tOAi>kiMLm. 

V6 shmfld 0av0'4ua^^d'r8ao)ifilfe cltib^afc auvUMor -for 
an early dinner. ! ^<«) - . 

' ^^a 'MOD ^ai^^ lie uttered; th^ laiA irwd^sf rJ|i»/]Mti]i-ib, I 

^tidisilc^ /irbMhiJonitbiB Moationinvln «udifl|riiifte ap 

if^Mi^, ime«RwUiWr«Iiw^y-.i|ird9rd8Ul%i<Di9^ 
«ii^i«)iiaitli»««dtau«m wte 'it)pliqiiiig tlkmioutAliniik 
lielMtibiM^4fl'pbplilwiabQMu ^ fiiiMnngi the xstago/ Anr 
tefafaid^<«ev i" infttantiy fitaiiia'«Qrsetf>ieni«bp0iftti Att 
^g^tiiiftidaifltai*»iirlkhi0(waatp^D^ topqfMMMyiflatft 

«v^rtiPf iliMdi' toitMJldtttcf gttt/oall* bat f Lbst mbtniniuii wwui 
I>a<Ai6S8^ (m/*^ Cduittaia lahoaMiifaiidb uiidar>iliu»f tfppce- 

i 'iSrio^i4% inpf !waf 'bliCfdlyiQQd hiOi&gimjF'l&ti^ iti^ektil 
tifoifei^'^dlgtfirisi' Mildty)' 1bMCil6yl«biikttiti»i toi tdf»iB% I 

*bobi >bu«u<to nlyl(dIikflay^tflllatt.(lM^ellitltt&adi(folbhtfe 
<diitside|'* iJaiffteUpg^ iAK>tri^/lMi^9l«ii^AiMAiMW^^ 
:Ooli^ of » >beUi puitb, Jhofli/of i wfaidiiili Aii|niiiMi% Jiriiad 
^aiAihaaiidva ftitii^^i)Uio|^ teit^vfiAfipaiitqidiwiiiinu. 
Next, I heatd)«be[liftii^r;Q|aatail>dH^4Hn^ ioikma 

.xkpiiRyi1sUi]i9«aKb4heiMi^ ^dnel^.the 

«tttmio«4n«»tha»diOh00trlMaiuld«l]^'i«^^ iiii48|rid 

teaddji > nuLdefaitaiidi i>y\ ^he ahiieto io£ Jtllb' i wdtteilv ^and 
the* Acrod i| ttrte g<ttioo>.^;<tf mitoatifiBe iMtcMctiia); thftgas 
^ad heea tahuML^iQffiiaiid^tbeliiPVholfe hoiMi kit ii^ajrk- 
itii^W XUii^fiWifdHdiWd^ibylhittlisdlaM^ 



ABAOAD AGAll^. 49^ 

• 

^asmeii^i^jaigon ^f'fofetgn nmsiciaiis in fSxeMchesM; 
and tke etolkest < voice <if my itiend- Smith ♦excitedly 
cxolttitiEHbgii' *^ Who rang those belkt why are we ali 
left in the dark ? Light tip here at onee i bless my 
soid'!")9fliaft4M8 alibis ihe^?*^ - ^ .1 : 

I'WQi^attiaeed^^yM afamsed aoid'hail (da«m«a. 'WHslt 
to dd,il'dldii^ knolw, so I ! sat still oh'I^ bdx 'v^iehl 
had <«k«aibled every as w^U as'tipbir^'aMid'to'tooi^ ol* 
pnt^ mAfmff ^Mid'le^ t tsi^ht'teuchM^me madfaidery 
which^WdRftUl ^te* tke^eignal fbr' ththider^iid fightnttig^ 
or mtt eaitbqiritke, ^ tnete Ukelly, a Mo4t Bk^ 
avaltm^ei^ tteettfred tMn^iUity oi/^head etsscrr^'tt^ ^ 
thatithe gmhBA befell yeli^bted; *'I knewSitiittK ikn^t.^e 
ansMiriy '^wailing iBltfe^ fo^ he Wad"klo1l''a 'ihatt to'bD 
belHBd time whe^ BO Hnpoitant^a mfMStejif as^dtdnert(r«^ 
the motit4& of'tbe a^peiiitment; "Som^thin^ desperate 
mmv btt^'4oiie>; M I eardftiH^* ^ped* my wiiy * tio th^ 
Btage^ it^ok again and with a'lstrebg'^^flbrfc taan^ig^ t^ 
wrench it opeU.^ Cfrv^ed^'Mtli'tta^t atid pbr^pitetioti li 
follMvi&d behfkid tibe real! ef th& odt-gi^iilg emdibnet^ and 
found -i^itiittiv M' #hem ^I inai^ated iky under^^rdtrnd 

Bnfi»lMsi waief^atAl towels soon ^^iheonce^mb^Mtf 
prMWtt%d« cMadilioQ Olid wis w^i^to tiid i:knidt ChlAi 
whMl^uwto^di^tiai w&O^ isei^r^ ^ntf^otieti ^ df Hbt^ J 
Smith could Hilt j^ilukiftontt't^atl^t^ ifiish^s M^ 
theit<(M*sequteMes im «iy. seatrdh* feif liim ^tMder dM- 
cultt^sv ^an^ Weifee* yet, under his* stagi^, and ' gtebt ^ was 
the mebtaetitrolvei^-the'Mea* that an dd m^tta^ likb^ 
m^seil* slMdld s#^lo0e htt reekonhi^ in a place* with M^iich 
he might wett be supposed 1X) be perfectiy famiHar, '^ 

Whe* tiii^laiee^Williiiiif M. Thackx^ ^otode his^^fi^ 
Tkit td «* llAttMl^fitkte^,^ I tUiik ina«52j he ciilled^ittl' 



Q\!pi ,iHVktixai,,£fimi^, Albert S^ut^., II9 epepj: an, hour 
ffitl) ,^e, ijuai^y for ^e ptu^poee of asking ip|r a4viQe in 
regard |t9 the n^a^gement oi fhe qou^Q ,o(f lef^ur^s on 
"The English Humorists, of t^e .^igUte^njth, Q^fii^jxy" 
^i)ie)i heip^ftppftpd, Jq,4(eUy§r^ a& tie,4ifl fSt^^f^ds^ \^th 
J^vgJ!^^ P'i9cp8,8ii».t^e p?iwp«i QVlpi^ ^f. fee, Union, 
j; gay^ ^i tb«( .:b?g^ ftd^tpq il ^oj4d ^. $0 .p^Mt^g^m^nt, 
^1^ 3^ ipti^vhe .oi^t; <?> T^if, ^ii^fek* he.^a% vpry 
gratefi^ ffa^ Ii^.cfU^pn, ^e| whpn^y^z |ie W9fi. in New 

Yps^Ej. ^I.fikp.say? Jjiipa jfQpgatpdly wl^.M *«> 

. AfPfnca tl^e ,9fC|9ipb4' tin^e fi^it^ lu; fidfo^We l^f;(9e«fl on 
ffjcjv?, JgpjW;.^€ffgp8,",wi\icij!, ifejwU hj^ |eme«i^«e^; he 
dqlijffr^ ip Jh?. ynjte4 Stfit^.jn t^ ae^pa of ift5»A-56, 
^re Jj^?„re^ Ijl^jf^e .IfcjaHrea ^ to au^ieftpes.iP >Qf:eat 
ftPt^if^-^./Myjf^atiflps \?ith lljiB ,pea^i,npyeli?KJ tm 
pi;9u4,to 8ay,,:weip ,cpr<tial j^n^ intiqia^ ; ap4 »ow, yf\m 
j;,qjl^ XLjfpi \fijfi, ip^^asi,;^ ii? .ftwn hp^se he 
grft8ped.TOehp^lilj;l)y,^l\ft^^ildiapd.9aidf , .... . 
i. ."M^r.^W^rJ adjpir?wyoi*i»ore ftpp.PTSeac, , I We 
l^?^ .%.i^<»o'W^ in the. :p^pfs& pf t^.^j^iHpin^tipna 
you underwent in the New York courts, apd $}|e ppsi- 
tife .plpck yop e^hi^it m^jr-ypny f^uiviiiiry piivrass- 
?»«P^ V:Wor|l»y^.*4.Br^i8)^. . yop ifppjd w<r«!R.l»TO 
recei^e^ .cr«dit iE'ff!.*^ p]^*lo*oplv. jpu,roaftife«t» if t}iepe 
i^wnoifl ip^oct^e8?baa,np$ ORsriakw J9B-ln 
. I jf^?W Ai«» W ^is fiPBnpJf»ca?ijt, .ap4 ^.«piD|ipHed : 
, "Bpt teJl jne, Barouip, are xpu ;5eally m »^f>f w^- 
9^,^?i8tance 1 /py if ypi^jfrp ypu.ffjupt *)e hslp^" . 

" Not in the least," I repUe^t l^afgja^gi " I n«ed piore 
money. in order to get out pf^b^kruptcy and. I, intend 
*P -fiW ft J *# 90 % as 4aily ^|irea4 w c<»!»r»p4» J • f^ 



ABROAD AGAIK. 425 

'•ft it possible? ''Tie Exclaimed, with eviflent ddHglitS 
"well, now, ybn have l&Sf all mjT B^^fapathy ; MrSy;- fliSt 
is ibore <han I ever bxjeot to Ife worth; I 'shiBl' Bfe 
sorry foV you rio moiV -' 

Dtoittg niy dtay inlxAdon, I in^t Thackeray eiVetnl 
ti'me^, feia on one oocftkm f din^ X^fA' him. fife Vrtfc 
a m6st: ^^hial, itdbU-Ya^kft^ getftl^man: In oni' <:biiver^£t- 
tio6«* h& iipoke wife We Wairih^sis apfH^ctafidn Of Ather- 
ica, and rf his iwttferoufi firfeadb iiTthis 'cottntry, add lie 
repeat«ily eitpr^ss^ hii^ oMigation0^^o me for tHb 
advice and' a88istan<^e rliad giveii him oti thfe occasion 
of his first lectdrtag vi^t f6 tlie UnitedStetes. • - * 

Th6 late Charles Kean, Aen manager of tJfePrinefesrf's 
Theatre, itt Lobdoh, was also exfceedirigly' p6lile and 
friendly fo nie. B^ placed a bois: at iny disposal tit all 
timed; imd took fne thifOngh hid theatire to €(hbw iti6 the 
stage, ' dr^sdng ioofijrf, ahd partidcdaHy the valuable 
" properties ^ he h«d ^^Meeted. ' Am&^ other ttHttgi, 
he httd twenty or*Wor6f eoiAplet^ siiitft '6f real ftrttOr 6ti4 
other' Wsttime^ anft appointment^ essentfal to th^ pro- 
dacti<)tt of historical plays, in the most dompleie €in& 
authehttb ihannerl Iii the ni'ere matter of Bfi%6-settibg, 
ChajfletflCeltiihtthe^v^'beefl btirpattied. *' * ' • 

dtt» t5oldschmi(lt,'tbe htisband of JeiSny Ltnd, also 
call*^ dn: me in lionddri. He aid his Wife were then 
living in Dresden, atfd he said the first thing his wife 
desired mm to rfsk me was, whether T'wad itt #ant I 
assured'him that T wfes not, 'although I wad managiig to 
live in* an economical 'way tad myftinily ^uld soon 
come over to reside in t.dftdbn. He then'udlrlsed'me to 
take t^em fo Dresdeti, laying that liVihg was ver^ cheap 
there ; and, he added, '•*'my wife MtiTi gladly look np a 
proper'house for yoti t6 UVe in^ I thankfully dbclbfed 



.1^ PfCQ^flpeid kui^VQss^ a& Bie^den was too &r away from 
fioy buipaes8«r A y^ar aubsequetit 4iO' thi9^ a ' letMT was 
^nerfUly publis^^ u^ the Amerioan^ papers^ "piirpMtiug 
to have been written to me by J^miy l4ffd, and |>]»ffer- 
[ix^o^a^J^iga^npif^vKin^- liifiBa^dii^ypwiMlttfced 
ilt]V9 l0^r, « forgQi^, and I iseidi): aftenwaiidfi.ieee&red a 
.communipatiqii froip>« ' young rapotttf in fliiladripliia 
i^lf»o^vf}?dgiBg himeelf m tb9 %(«tb(if, and 9ayiiig4hat 
>e i^ot^ ijl; firo<n a igpod mothre^ hoping it ircMld %eiuefit 
q^. r Qn the oo8iti»ry at abtioyed iA6 oxeeadingly, 

jMy.pld. fiiwddM Jolitu Ejienediet^ and- Gio^mu 
Belietti, called Oft m0 ssA we faM iMHno T^sry plMMnt 
.^tinnorB to^eftherv when we tallud; over ineideiitf of 
iheiPi travels m: AmeiMa^ Among t^ gedtletnen whom 
I. met ia liond^n^^ome of tb^m tt^tiite fireqpieMfy at 
dom^TEk/'Were Mri Geoiigt Augustus '^ala, Mf. Ednund 
Yat^9r'Mi!U .H<Hrace Mayhewi Mcl Alfred B«nnr Mr. 
Lumiteyi of H^r Maje^y'a VhealMj Mif. Buclc^ttei of 
ihe B;^ymB3c]sef,,^^Mi\C^ 

m&^ Mr^ Qieorg^ Peabodyt Mr. J. MrMocrkythe nMiager, 
3^ Batosisof jBi^rii^ Brot^onsi&rCoM Mar. Ondoford, 
dcamatie ;ppdtic of th^^ Looidon Times^ Br. Bi^rd/ the 
American denti^t^ and many ottier eqiiBctit p^nnmB*' 

I had numerouB offers fmm professiomd firieHiB^on 
h&Oi mAfis of r the Atlantic who supposed me. to fb^' in 
ne^ of employment, Mr* Basney Willmmsj wh» -had 
not.theii ai(ted in. England, proposed inthe kindest man- 
aer to ma)^a ine has agent ibr a tonr tiiMUglMiShreat 
jBatainv a^d to give me onetithini > of the piofitoi whfeh 
he and>Mr§i. Williams might make by their ae<ugi ^ Mr. 
&..M« Fettengill, of Kew Yoi^r^he newspaper adkertia- 
ing'^eoi^ oflfered metthBfine salary/of $10,000 a^^ar 
to transact, hnsiosss for him in Great 'Britaiai.<:< .He 



b^ttflttHMJi I[MMlf^wW;fi>)fredteffTSO:4iiixtorilh(fvf wl^ 
would do." The6e.«M,jboili^i«;^M0. ^iHfahitt iiii4 
Mr. Petteagill, I was obliged to decline. 

Mr. Lumley, manager of Her Majesty's Theatre, nsed 
to send me an order for a private box for every opera night, 
and I frequently availed myself of his conrtesy. I had 
an idea that much money might be made by transferring 
his entire opera company, which then included Piccolo- 
mini and Titjiens to New York for a short season. The 
plan included the charter of a special steamer for the 
company and the conveyance of the entire troup, includ- 
ing the orchestra, with their instruments, and the chorus, 
costumes, scores, and properties of the company. It 
was a gigantic scheme, which would no doubt have been 
pecojiiarily successful, and Mr. Lumley and I went so 
far as to draw up the preliminaries of an arrangement, 
in which I was to share a due proportion of the profits 
for my assistance in the management ; but after a while, 
and to the evident regret of Mr. Lumley, the scheme 
was given up. 

Meanwhile, I was by no means idle. Cordelia 
Howard as " Little Eva," with her mother as the 
inimkaUe *' Topsy," were highly successful in London 
and other large cities, while General Tom Thumb, 
retuning after so long an absence, drew crowded houses 
wherever he went. These were strong spol^es in the 
wheel that was moving slowly but surely in the effort 
to get me out of debt, and, if possible, to save some 
portion of my real estate. Of course, it was not gener- 



19ft AKMAD JAftnst 

I 

all)r Imemn Ihrt/ f Ifttdiafcy idtgiwt ^w l wt tf f e i; 1ft ^thi^of 
these exhibitixins'; if it h&d'h^il, pottMy Mttie df the 
ciock creditors inmld have 'nmoyed ide ; Htit t imtied 
ioyn^' ill tHete mid ih triher ^miTt, ^^vwltiitg inittMtis- 
Aully afld luttkiBg aadi vumef ;^^hldt f bonsttttfy 
nndtted tb iny toMsl^r iq^ 






I • 



^ f I !•.♦•• ■•*» 






' . 



.»• •• • J .;'•.'; . • . '• •^' '' ' ^ •» ■♦ •• 



1 ♦• >"*-ll • .l ^^J 



r « I r r - t, ■ 

I • • • •• - I • 

* r • 



•1 , . - , - • " ' . 



t ♦ 



« V 



• r ' • ' 

• r • • 

• • t • • I < » 



.' . 



> 



# « 



1 /ji 

* . ' . ■ ' : ' ' ' • ** • , .. . •;■■!. 

• • < r 

' T •' . ■ ■ • • • ' • 



r,^ . \- t ' 



'1 



I 
• • • I 



I ' *• 









CHAPTER XXIX. 

nr GSBHAN Y. 

mOM LOITDOK *0 BADKN-BADliK — *BOtrt!I.» Ttf FAKTS— 8TlUfiBOrB£»-^flCEyB 
IN ▲ QKBItAy CVaTOX-HOUSK-^A TSSIHBL35 BILL-- SIX CVKT0 WOBtH 01^ 
AGONY — UAMBLINO AT BADEN-BADKN — SUICIDES — GOLDEN PBICRS FOR 
THK GBITBRAL — A CALL FBOM THE KIKO Olf ROLLAITD — TRS OSRWAK SPAtf 
— HAXBUBO^* EJUS AND WIESBADEN — THE BLACK VOBEST OftCBXaTllIOir 
MAKER — AN OFFERED SACRIFICE — THE SEAT OF THE ROTHSCHILDS — 
DimOITLnn IK FIUITKFORT— a POMt*OIM COMMimiONER OF POLICE •-> 
BEIMTAPE^AN ALARM — HENRY J. RAYMOND — CALL ON THE COMMIS- 
SIONER — CONFIDENTIAL DISCLOiSlTRES — HALF OF AN ENTIRE FORTlTNE IN 
AM AKBBIOAN RAILWAY ->A9TOUNI»IN0 SEVSLATI01fB-rM>Wy TIB RHXtrB'* 
DEPARTURR FOR HOLLAND. 

After a pleasant and successful season of several 
weeks in London and in the provinces, I took the little 
General into Gtermany, gbing from London to Paris arid 
from thence to Strasbourg and Baden-Baden. T had not 
been in Paris since the times of King Louis Philippe, 
and while I noticed gredt improvements in the city, in 
the opening of the new boulevards and the erection of 
noble buildings, I could see also with sorrow that there 
was less personal liberty under the Emperor Napoleon 
m., than there was under the « Citizen King/' The 
cnstont'^house officials v^ere overbearing and unne- 
cessarily rigid in theilr exactions ; the police were over- 
watchful and intolerant; the screws were turned on 
everywhere. I had a lot of large pictorial placards of 
General Tom Thumb, which were merely in transitu^ 
as I wished only to forward them to Germany to be 
used as advertisementB of the forthcoming exhibitions. 

20* 



430 IN GERMAKY. 

These the French custom-house officers determined to 
examine in detail, and when they discovered that one of 
the pictures represented the General in the costame of 
the First Napoleon, the whole of the bills were seized 
and sent to the Prefecture of Police. I was compelled 
to stay three days- in Paris before' I c^uid convince the 
Prefect of Police that there was no treason in the Tom 
Thumb pictures. I was very glad to get out of Paris 
with my baggage and tnking a seat in the es^presa tiam 
on the Paris and Strasbourg ridlway I soon fbigcM; my 
custom-rhouse annoyances. 

One would (Suppose that by this time I had. had 
enough to do with clocks to last nne my lifetime, but 
passing, one night and a portion of a day at Strasbourg, 
I did net forget or fail to witness the ^at church 
clock which is nearly as famous as the cathedral itself. 
At noon .pre^ifiely a mec)ianicaV co>fQk (aroiv^; t^e bell 
strikes ; i figni;e|s pf tfa#. twelve. ap^^^es appye^ itqdjralk 
in propes^pi^i Vod, ofber exti»aqi;4uu^]i^ ,QM|^etlCQft' of 
wphderful meqh^nii^iil jfft, age daily, cffih^lpited >}iy this 
curipwsqld dock.^ ... i .. !■ 

Frqip . Strasbourg Wf we>4 to J^adoQ-^Qa^eBt , I had 
b^en abroad Siopiuch tb^J^^^oald/Und^JT^tcmd ajid.iiiiaa' 
Qg^ to 8tpealf,Jfxench,,but I.hftd qeY^^F tfeem ifl>,Q#ni»i>y 
and I did not know uis, mot^ Qf th? IftffgH^f^t^f tiiiat 
country, .iu» ^ qQuseq4ieacp,^ lirfla^fidr to passirit})f. Ws- 
tQ,mrJb^u9i9. at K^i Jteaxlg ^pppH^e StraA^^jmgft: j$nd 
the ,^t town oa the Qqrmi^a Ifpr^^i a|(;.J}|a^j^iM« 
Wh^ .t^ ^iljgep.C€{..stopjppd at this, pAftfte ii ftwiy 
trembled, I* lff^7 ;that I; Iffi^d no lf$iggage..whjxik-wi^ 
righ^uUy ^siuly'Qct^^o dut^, ^^ X ha^< UOthHtgl * bHt«; n^y 
nece^sai^ cloth|ng,and the {i^ckage of pj^ojc^iter %nd 
Uthograp^is illu&trati^ the General^s exhihitioiipL This 



was liie paQkag;e li^faioh had given me so niuch 
trouble in Paris, and as the official wa3 examining my 
trunks, I assured him in French that I had nothing 
subject to duty ; but he made no reply and deliber- 
ately handled elvery article in my luggage. He then 
cut the strings to the large packages of show bills. 
I asked him, in French, whether he understood that 
language. He gave a grunt, which was the only 
audfele sound I could get out of him, and then laid 
ray show bills and lithographs on his scales as if to 
weigh them. I was almost distracted, when an Eng- 
lish gentleman who spoke German, kindly offered to 
act as my mterpreter. 

" Please to tell him," said I, " that those bill< and 
lithographs are not articles of commerce; th&t they 
are siraply advertisements." 

My English friend did as I requested; but it was 
of no use ; the custom-house officer kept pilitig thenli 
upon his scales. I grew more excited. 

" Please tell him I give them away," I sadd. The 
translation of my assertion into German did not help 
me ; a double grunt from the functionary was the only 
response. Tom Thumb, meanwhile, jumped about like 
a little monkey for he was fairly delighted at hiy worry 
and perplexity. Finally, I said to my new found Eng- 
lish friend: "Be good enough to tell the officer to 
keep the bills if he wants them, and that I will not pay 
duty on them any how." 

He was duly informed of my determination, but he 
was immovable. He lighted his huge Dutch pipe, got 
the exact weight, and marking it down, handed it 
to a clerk, who copied it on his book, and solemnly 
passed it over to another clerk, who copied it on still 



432 ^ GBRMANY. 

another book<^ a third eletk then took ill;, and copied it on 
to a printed bill, the size of a haif letter sheet, which wa> 
duly stamped in red ink with several official devices. 
By this time I was in a profuse perspiration ; and as the 
•documi^t passed from clerk to cledc, I told them thei 
need not trouble -themselves to' muke out a bill, for I 
.twOuld not pay- it ; : they would'^get no duty and they 
might keep the property. 

To he sure, I could . not spare the pliteards for any 
leugth of time^ for they were exceedingly Valuable to me 
as aidvertisementd and I ^could not ea^ly' have duplicated 
them iiL Gexxj^jms ; hut I was determined that I jwoold 
not pay duties on articles which were not merchandise. 
Everf transfer, ttherefore, of the bill : to a new derk, gave 
me a fresh twinge, for I imagined that every clerk 
added more charges, and every charge was a tighter 
torn to the vife which held my fingers. Finally, the 
iliasC cl^rk. defiantly; thrust in, m,y face, the terrible official 
document, on :l^hich were scrawled certain ^csbalistic 
'CharacfctvS) signifying the amount of money I should be 
foroed to pay to .the German government befprel^ould 
have my property, . I would not toudi it ; hut resolved 
I would really leaive. my. packages until I could commu- 
nicate with one of Our consuls in Germany, and I said 
ask ituch to the En^ish gentlemB(U who h^d kindly inter- 
preted for me^ . r 

. He took the. bill,iand examindi^ it,i burst into aloud 
laugh. " Why, it is but fifteen kreutaers I " l^e said. 

'VHowmuch ]i» that?" I asked, feelix^ far the gol- 
den sovereignsi in my'pOcket ' 

" Sixpence i " was the reply. 

I Was astonished and delighted, and as I handed 
out the money, I begged him to telL the ^ffiicials that 



IN GERMAjnr. 433 

the cnstoni house charge would not pay the cost of 
the paper 6n which it Wa* wfrttei. But tbili ;was a. 
very feir. illustration of ' siindfy red-tape dealings in 
other countries as well as in Getmany. 

I found Baden a delightful little town, cleaner and 
neater than any city I had ever visited. I- learned after- 
>vardfl that Mr. Benazet, the lessee of the kurdsal and 
gambling house, Was compelled ' ahnudlly to expend 
lai^ sums for keeping* thJi' streets and public places 
clean. Ittdeed, he could well afford- to db so, as one 
-^voold readily perceive upon witnessing the vast amounts 
of Aicney which were duily lost by the^ meii and Women 
of nearly all nutions, upon Ms tables of r6nlette and 
ratine et noir. 

The town has all the characteristics iand accbmpani- 
tnents of a first-class watering^lace', — a theatre, pub- 
lic library; and several very fine hotels. The springs 
are presumed to be the indubemeiits Which draw hun- 
dreds of invalid^ to Baden-Baden ^very sntnmer, but the 
gaMing tables' are the real attriictions to thousatids of 
far weaker persons who spend the entire season in 
gambliug. It is no unusual thing to see ladies sitting 
around these gaming tables, betting their silver and gold 
pieces, until they lose five, htmdred or a thousand 
dollars, white • men frequently " invest " many times 
these amounts^ If they happen to be winners, they are 
very sure to be tempted to try again ; and thus in the 
long run succumb to the " advantage " which' is given 
In the game to the bankers over the *' betters/' 

The games open at eleven o'clock every morning, 
Sundays included, and close at eleven o'clock at night. 
Players have been known to sit at the table, without 
once fiding, even to eat or to drink, through the etitire 

28 



434 1^ GEKMAX7. 

» 

day and zxight s^ssioa. Very early in the day, howeyer, 
many a player finds himself penniless, a]]id,.lu such case, 
if he does not step to some quiet place and .blow his 
brains out, the proprietor pf the " heil " will present to 
him money enough to carry him at least fifty miles from 
Baden-Baden. 

A few days befpre my arrival, a young lady hang^ her- 
self. Indeed, several suicides occur in all the German 
spas every year from the one cause — ruin by gambliBg ; 
but so callous do the players, as well as the Q£uid-dealers 
become, that I can easily credit a story told - me at 
Xlambuig, the greatest gambling place in Europe : A 
Frenchman, sitting at the table where scores of others 
were betting their money, lost his last sou, and imme- 
diately drew a razor from his pocket and cut his throat. 
The circumstance was scarcely sufficient to induce the 
players to raise their eyes from the cards ; — it was a 
mere incident, an episode in matters more important 
A sheet was thrown over the body, and as the servants 
quietly removed the corpse, some one slipped into 
the vacated chair, the dealer crying out in French, 
'' make your bets, gentlemen," and the play went on as 
usual. 

In due time, when our preliminary arrangements were 
completed, the General's attendants, carriage, ponies 
and liveried coa^^^man and footmen arnived at Baden- 
Baden and were soon see^ AQ the streets. Hie excite- 
ment was intei^e and increased from day to day. Sev- 
. eral crowned heads, princes, lords and ladies who were 
spending the season at Baden-Baden, with a vast num- 
ber of wealthy pleafi^ure seekers and travellers, crowded 
the Sjaloon in which the General exhibited , duriio^ the 
entue time we remained in the place. The cbarges 



us. OIUBMAITT. 4^5 

for admisdioii were much higher than had been demanided 
in any other city,. 

Some time before I left America I received several 
letters from a young man residing in the Black Forest in 
regard to a wonderful orchestrion which he was building 
^ and which he wished to sell or send to me for exhibi- 
tion. When he saw the accounts of my arrival with 
Tom Thumb at Baden-Baden, he announced his willing- 
ness to bring fats orchestrion and set it up in that place 
8o that I could see and hear it. His letter wsts for- 
warded to me at Frankfort and I replied that my engage- 
ments were made many days in advance, that my time 
was invaluable, but that if he would have his orches- 
trion set up and in perfect order at such a time on such 
a day I would be there promptly to see it. Arriving at 
the appointed time, I found that he had not completed 
his work. The beautiful case was up, but the interior 
was unfinished. I was much disappointed, but not 
nearly so much so as was the orchestrion builder. 

" Oh I Mr, Barnum," said he, '' I have worked with 
my men all last night and all to-day aikd 1 will work all 
night again and have it in readiness to-morrow morn- 
ing. If you will only stay, I will go down on my knees 
to you; yes, Mr. Bamum, I will cut off one of toy fin- 
gers. for you, if you will ohly wait." 

But I could not wait, even under this strong and cer- 
tainly extraordinary inducement, and was obliged to 
return to my engagements without hearing the orches- 
trion, which, I afterwards learned, was sold and set up 
in St. Petersburg. 

From Baden-Baden we went to other celebrated Ger- 
man Spas, including Ems, Homburg and Weisbadon. 
These* are all fashionable gambling as well as Tater- 



436 n^ QhJK6ILA2SY. 

iDg plateo;, atd during attr visite they Ttere crowded 
with visitors from all parts of Europe. Our exhibitioiLs 
were attended by thousands who paid the same high 
prioes th^t were charged for admission at Baden-Baden, 
anid at Wiesbadeni among maliy distinguished 'persons, 
the King of Holland cam6 to see the little General. 
Thesd exhibitions wore amomg the most profitable that 
b^di ;6ver bebn given, and I wai . abl6 to remit dicmsands 
of dollars to my agejatii in die United States t6 aid in 
le^puroba^ing my teal estate and to assist; in taking up 
^uch dock notei dJi were offered for sale. A short but 
very remunerative season at Frankfort-on-thQ*Maine, the 
home and starting^place of the great house of the Roths- 
childs, assisted me largely in carrying out these par- 
poses. 

There ww thfe greatest difficulty^ howeieif, in getting 
permission to hold our exhibitions in Frankfort. When 
I applied for a permit at the office of the Commissary 
of Folicei I Wa/3 fold that office hours were ended for 
the day, and that the chief official, who alone could give 
me the permit, had gone home to dinner. As I was 
in a great hurry to begin, I went to the residence 
of the Commisaa^, where I was met at the door by 
a gorgeously arrayed flunkey, to whom I stated my 
business, and who informed ibe that I could on no 
account see the distinguished offidal till dinner was 
over. 

I waited one hour and a half by my watch for that 
mighty man to dine, and then he condescended to admit 
me to his presence. When I had stated my business, 
be demanded to know why I had not applied to him at 
hli9 office in the proper hours, declaring that he woidd 
do no business with me at his house, and that I must 



IN GERMANY. 437 

«'td:ifliri tb-jA6tt6'^i I' went, and dfier a great deal 
of ^ticfetloiiing :«tf4 Vlseflaf,! 'receir^d tie sbtigy-fbr 
liceusg to eihibit ; but I have 'never sfeeh wore red-tape 
wound up on a dingle reel. All my men, all Tom 
TLTiumb's attendatitti, the Genel^l and mysellP, in addition 
to showittg^ onr passports, were obliged to register our 
names, ages, tocicupations, and what not, in a iingis ^bok, 
and to atisW^ ill i'otfs'<Jf qtieiitions. ' At lakt ^e' were 
p«plitte* tAgo,'toiSi'wfe dpl^ned 'Otir dodts' tti th6 fclfrcing 

Buta)di(y or 'two after dnr ^hSbitions be;gdn,' came a 
naefssfengej? wiHi u cotaitnaiid th^tl shotild a^at before 
the CoiSattiis^ty of Police.- I was Very muAh fri'^htcined, 
I confess; I Was sure that some of my mien had been 
doi^ 01? itifmg scimettmg' Which ' hdd, bfiWiided 'the 
authotities, and althbu^h I Was fcofn^rodsi Biat liay own 
cottdict'bad bfeSn di^<!*m^^ct; t stdi1i6d iof the ■p'olice 
offide in fbai and tr<3ithblitig. • bn the wajr,' I inet Mr. 
Henry J. RsfcyAiond, editor of the iV'iftt/ ' Ti^rA Titnes, who 
wa» itl coinpttny witha^entleftwtn from Ohio, to Whom 
he introduced me, and thereupon^ I statfed ttiy iroiible, 
and ttiy dpinWn'that I was about to fee fined, impriisoried, 
poasUriy UdleAdledi — I khev^ hot what! ' 

"Don't be alatJtied,^^ feaid MrMlaymond, "we mil 
keep an eye oin the proceedings, and if you get into 
trouble we will try to get you out'* 

Arriving at bead-quartei*s, I was solemnly shown into 
the private office of the Gbmmissary who asked me to be 
seated, and then rose and locked the door. This move- 
ment was by no means calculated to calm my dgitation, 
and I at once exdaimM, in the best French I could 
summon : 

" Sir, I demand an interpreter." 

E 



'JC*JKJ -m..^-* \J *Jt X*H.^M.^^.i.^ M. I 



" We do not need one," he replied ; " I cfin under- 
stand your French, and you can underatand mine ; I 
wish to consult you confidentially on a very private 
matter, and one that concerns me deeply." 

Somewhat reassured at this remarkable announce- 
ment, I hqgged him to proceed, which he did as followa ; 

" Do not be uneasy, sir, as. this matter wholly effects 
me ; I must state to you in entire secrecy that this half of 
my whole fortune is invested in the bonds of on?, of j^our 
American railways (giving me the name of the. road), 
and as I have received no interest .for a long tijoae I am 
naturally alarmed Tor the safety of my property.. I wish 
to know if the road is good for anything, aad if so, 
why the interest on the bonds is not paid," . 

1 was happy to tell him that I had met that very morn- 
ing a gentleman from Ohio who was well acquainted 
with the condition of this road, which wa$ in his vicipity 
at home, and that I would speedily derive frotn him the 
desired information. The Commissary overwhelmed me 
with profuse thanks, adding ;. ^^ Remember, the hp.lf of 
my entire fortune is at stake/' 

Impressed with the magnitude of the loss he. might 
be called upon to suffer, I ventured, as. I was going out, 
to ask him the amount of his investment. 

" Four thousand dollars," was the reply. 

When I thought of his liveried lackeys, his house, his 
style, his dignity, and his enormous consequence, I qould 
not but smile to think that all these things were sup- 
ported on his small salary and an " entire " fortune, of 
$8,000, one*half of which was invested in the bonds of 
a doubtful American railway company. 

We exhibited at Mayence and several other places in 
the vicinity, reaping golden harvests everywhere, and 



IN GERMANY. 439 

then went down the Khine to Cologne. The journey 
down the river was very pleasant and we duly " did " 
the scenery and lions on the way. The boats were very 
ill-provided with sleeping accommodations, and one 
night, as I saw our party must sit up, I suggested that 
we should play a social game of ejuchre, if we could get 
the cards. The clerk, of the boat was prompt in 
affording the gratifying intelligence that he had cards 
to sell and I bought a pack, paying him a good round 
price. Immediately thereafter, the clerk, pocketing the 
money, stated that ** it was nine o'clock and according to 
the regulations he must turn out all the lights " — which 
he did, leaving us to play cards^ if we wished to, in the 
dark. 

The slowness of the boat was a great annoyance and 
on one occasion I said to the captain : 

•*' Look here ! confound your slow old boat. I have 
a great mind to put on an opposition American line ^nd 
burst up your business." 

He knew me. and knew something of Yankee enter- 
prise, and he was evidently alarmed, but a thought came 
to his relief: 

" Yoii cannot do it," he triumphantly exclaimed ; 
" the government will not permit you to run more than 
nine miles an hour." 

We remained at Cologne only long enough to visit 
the famous cathedral and to see other curiosities and 
works of art, and then pushed on to Rotterdam and 
Amsterdam. 



M 



J J 



■ I 



> ' •• • •.' ■ t . . t r I I I i n* I 



_L ''• '.Ml' '1 1 • .rj- }.J/ 

THB FINEST Ain) FLATTESt COITNTRT IN TRB WOBLI^^ SUPSB-CLKAXLIKEStS ~ 

— A GENEROUS OFF^R — VALUA^^i^fe * PICTttaM — All A^littTOHED ' vii^tkOSi- 

tvMmtri^'Bkxai^ T^ 'tNp(zjA2l9**^]«|VKPrr|QV8 pr aykNcyiiQmai'^l jKsrqsir 

A«A^ , .TO . AMERigA — FUN, ON ?HB VOYAGE — MOCK TRIAJLS — BAJCVCM Ad 
A FROSActJTOR AND a/ A* 'Pllfe«>NEB— X501L» kiotTtDSKS tN ItfcW t^K — 
PKBFARINO TO MOVE INTO MY OU> HOME — C ARBUSSS PAINTSUS A3fp (QiK- 
PENTBBS — IRANISTAN BURNED TO THE GROUKD — NEXT TO NO INSUAANCE 

— SALS OF" TBB FROFBiriY -^ BUA^ ^O^ J& 

/ HotLAiiiD ^aire. inie npoce gf^waji^e* sB^^fac^iw than 



ajaiy otitUerforpigor cpuntry I hav(? e>^er lisiled*. if I 
Great Britain. Redeemed as a large |partio]?k.of'tbf) ^ole 
surface oil the laud has been frop^ tba bptf^iu <¥f^t^:&ea 
by the wonderful d:y ke^, which ^^ monumcs^ ^ the 
industry of whole generations of human b^wfOfs^'Hol- 
land seems tome (ihe most tufloUs (Sfi wieU asiiatQii&sting 
country in the woildt: The pdoplcj i^qo^ - wi% fheir 
quaint costumes, their extraordinat^ ctt^lUiiHifiSy their 
thrift,: industry, and fru^lity^ pltosed m6 Yevy'^aqh.. It 
\% the universal teistimony' of all travellers th^ tiM Hoi- 
landers are the neatest and iiM>st economical p^lOple 
among all nations. So far as cleanliness is coftoesoed, 
in Holland it is evidently not next to, but far ahead of 
godliness. It is rare, indeed, to meet a ragged, dirty, 
or drunken person. The people are very temperate and 
economical in their habits ; and even the very rich, — and 



as HOLLAND. 441 

tbere is avast amount <^f vrealth in the country -— live 
'witb great frugality, though all of the people live well. 
As for the scenery I cannot say much for it, since it 
is enly diversified by thousands of Windmills, which are 
xnad(& to do all kinds of work, from grinding grain to 
pumping Wftter from the incnde of the dykes back to the 
sea again. As I exhibited the General only in Eottei^ 
dam and Arndt^rda^p, apid to no great profit in either 
city. We • spent most' 4ii pur time in rambling aboiii; to 
see ' what' was to be seen* In the ieonntry villages it 
seexii^d sis if ev^ry house was scrubbed ttrice and whiter 
washed once erefty da)r in the week, excepting Sunday. 

ft 

Soi^ places were almost painfully pure, and I Was iq 
one village where horses and cattle were not allowed to 
go throi^h the streetis, and no one was pecmitted to wear 
their boots or shoes in the hoti^es. There is a general 
and cdristant exercise of brooms, pails, 4oor brushes and 
mopd aU over HoUsind, and in some places even, this 
kitid of thing is carried so far, I am tdd, that the only 
trees set out are scarub-oaks. 

The reason, I think, why our exhibitions • Were not 
more successful - in Rotterdam and Amsterdam, is that 
tii'e people are too frugal to spend much moiieiy for 
amusement, but they and their habits and ways afforded 
us so much amusement, that we were quite willing they 
should give our entertainment the " go by," as they gen- 
erally didi We were in Amsterdatii at the season of 
•• Kremis," or the annual Fair which is held in all the 
principal towns, and where shows of all descriptions are 
open, at prices for admission ranging from one to five 
pennies, and are attended by nearly the whole popula^^ 
tion. For the people generally, this one great holiday 
seems all-sufficient for the whole year. I went through 



442 IN HOLLAND 

scoreft^ of booths, wHere curiosities and monttrositlM of 
all kinds were exhibited, and was able to make some 
purchases and engagements for the American Museum. 
Amcxng these, was the Albino family, con'sisting 4^ a 
man, his wife, and eon, who were by far the most inter- 
esting, and attractive specimens of their dass I bad ever 
seen. 

We visited the Hague, the capital and the .finest city 
in Holland, It is handsomely and regularly laid out, 
and contains a beautiful theatre, a public picture-gallery, 
which contains some of the best works of Vandyke, 
Paul Potter, and other Dutch masters, while the maaeum 
is especially rich in rarities from China and Japan* 
When we arrived at the Hague, Mr. August Belmont, 
who had been the United States Minister at that court, 
had just gone home ; but I heard many encomiums 
passed upon him and his family, and I was told some 
pretty good stories of his familiarity with the king^ and 
of the "jolly times" these two personages frequently 
enjoyed together. I did not miss visiting the great gov- 
ernment museum, as I wished particularly to seethe rich 
collection of Japan ware and arms, made during the 
many years when the Dutch carried on almost exclu- 
sively the entire foreign trade with the Japanese. I 
spent several days in minutely examining these curious 
manufactures of a people, who were then almost as 
little known to nations generally as are the inhabitants 
of the planet Jupiter. 

On the first day of my visit to this museum, I stood 
for an hour beforfe a larfre case containing a most 
unique and extraordinary collection of fabulous animals, 
made from paper and other materials, and looking as 
natural and genuine as the stuffed skins of any animals 



IN HOUiAHD. 443 

in the Ameztc&n Museum. There were serpents two 
yards long, with a head and pair of feet at each end ; 
froga lia laxge as a man, with human hands and feet; 
turtles with three heads; monkeys with two heads and 
six legs ; scores of equally curious monstrosities ; and at 
least two dozen mermaids, of all sorts and sizes. Look- 
ing at these ^' sirens " I easily divined from whence the 
Fejee mermaid originated. 

While I was standing near this remarkable cabinet 
the 8U{>eYintendent of the Museum came, and, intro4uc- 
iog himself to me, asked me from what country I came 
and how I liked the Museum. I told him that I was 
an American and that the collection was interesting and 
remarkable, adding: 

'.^^ You seem to have a great rariety of mermaids here.** 
**Yes," he repU^; *' the Japanese exercise great 
ingenuity in manufacturing fabulous animals, especially 
mermaids ; and by the way," he added, ^^ your great 
showman, Bamnm, is said to hare succeeded in hum- 
hugging the Americans to a very considerable extent, 
hy means of what be claimed to be a veritable mer- 
maid«'' 

I said that such was ihe story, though I believed that 
Barnom only used the mermaid as an advertisement for 
his Museum. 

"Perhaps so,'* responded the superintendent, "but 
he is a shrewd and industrious manager. We have had 
frequent applications from his European agents for 
duplicates from our collection and have occasionally 
sold some to them to be sent to America.** 

The superintendent then politely asked me to go into 
his <xBSce, M he had something to offer me, which, as 
an American gentleman, he was sure I would prize 



444: IN HOLLAND. 

highly ; but the basineas was of a strictly confidential 
character. He asked mie to be seated, and cantiotlsly 
locking the door and' drawing his chair near to mine, he 
informed me in a tone scarcely above a Whisper that 
he was the executor of the estate of a wealthy gentle- 
man, recently deceased, with power to dispose of the 
property, which included a large numbeir of exceedingly 
valuable ancient and modern paintimgd. 

" You must be well aware," he cohtinu6d^ '^-that my 
countrymen would be extKmely unwilling to permit 
these precious specimens of art to leave Holland, bat," 
and here he gave my hand a slight but most friendly 
squeeze, ^' I have such a high respect, I might almost 
say reverence for your great repubUc that t am inlj 
too happy in the opportunity now afforded me of allow- 
ing you to take a wry few of these fine paintings to 
Amenca at an unprecedentedly low price." 

I thought he was a little too generous, and I gave 
him what the Irishman called an ^^ evasive answer ;'' but 
this only seeni^d to stimulate him to farther efforta to 
effect a sale, r-* so he turned to hid memorandum* book 
and pointed out the names of gentlemen from Bdstoo, 
Philadelphia, .Baltimore, and New Orleans, who- had 
ordered one or more cases from this laige gallery of 
paintings. This exhibition was conclusive^' and '!• at 
once said that I would not decide to puroba^e < till I 
returned from Amsterdam. I quite understood the 
whole thing ; but not to leave my anxidus friend too 
long in suspense I quietly handed my card to faim^ 
remarking, "Perhaps you have heard of that name 

before." 

His cheeks were fairly crimson; ** surely," mM he, 
^ you are not Mr. Bamum, of the New York Hus^iim { " 



IK HOLLAND. 445 

^ Nobody else," I replied with a laugh. 

He stammered out an apology for Ms mermaid 
remarks, but I patted him on the shoulder in a friendly 
way, telling^im it was " all right," and that I considered 
it a capital joke. This re-assured him and we then had 
a very pleasant half-hour's conversation, in which he 
gave me several valuable hints of curiosities to be pro- 
cured at the' Hague and elsewhere in Holland, and we 
parted good friends. 

A week afterwards, a young gentleman from Boston 
introduiced himself 4o me at Amsterdam and remarked 
that hk knew I was there for he had been so 
informed by the museum superintendent at the Hague. 
•' And, by the by," he added, " as soon as this superiu^ 
tendent discovered I was from America, he told me if I 
would go into his office he would show me the greatest 
curiosity in the Museum. I went, and he ponited to the 
card of *P. T. Bamum' •which he had conspicuously 
nailed up over his desk ; he then told me about your 
visit to the museum last week." 

" Did he sell you any paintings ? " I asked. 

" No," was the reply ; " but he informed me thtit as 
executor of an estate, including a fine gallery, he could 
sell me a few cases at a very low price, mainly on 
accotint of his high regard for the gr^at republic to 
which I belonged." 

I have no doubt that this estate is still unsettled, 
and that a few of the valuable paintings, if cheap 
Dutch artists keep up the supply, are still for sale to 
the public generally, and to representatives of the 
revered republic especially. Undoubtedly this kind of 
business will continue so long as Waterloo relics are 
m^ufactuied at Birmingham, and are sent to be 



446 nr HOUiAKD. 

plowed in and dug up again on the memoralife field 
where Wellington met Napoleon. And how ihany 
very worthy persona there are, like the sitpetint^ndent 
of the Hague Museum, who have been teq^bly shocked 
at the story of the Fejee Mermaid and the 'Woolly 
Horse! 

After a truly deUghtful visit in Holland, we Went 
back to England ; and, proceeding to Manchester, opened 
our exhibition. For several days the hall iras ci^owded 
to overflowing at each of the three, and sometimes foux, 
entertainments we gave every day.* By this, time, my 
wife and two youngest daughters had come 'over to 
London, and I hired furnished lodgings in the suburbs 
where they could live within the strictest limits of 
economy. It was necei^sary now for me to. return for 
a few weeks to America, to assist personally in forward- 
ing a settlement of the clock difficulties. So leaving 
the little General in the hands of trusty and competent 
agents to carry on the exhibitions in my absence, I set 
my face once more towards home and the west, and took 
steamer at Liverpool for New York. 

The trip, like most of the passages which T^have 
made across the Atlantic, was an exceedingly pleasant 
one. These frequent voyages were to me the rest^, the 
reliefs from almost unremitting industry, anxiety,* and 
care, and I always managed to have* more or \etsA' fun 
on board ship every time I crossed the ocean. Efciring 
the present trip, for amusement and to pass awny the 
time, the passengers got up a number of mock 'trials 
which afforded a vast deal of fun. A judge was 
selected, jurymen drawn, prisoners arraigned, counsel 
employed, and all the formalities of a court established. 
I have the vanity to think that if my good forttme liad 



diredted me to that precession I should have made a 
very fair lawyer^ for I have always had a great fondness 
for debate and especially for the cross-examination of 
witnesses^ unless that witness was P. T. Bamum in 
exanmiation under supplementary proceedings at the 
instance of some note-shaver who had bought a clock 
note at a discount of thirty-six per cent In this mock 
court, I was unanimously chosen as prosecuting attor- 
ney, and as the court was established expressly to con- 
vict, I had no difficulty in carrying the jury and secur- 
ing the punishment of the prisoner, A small fine was 
genexally imposed, and the fund thus collected was 
given to a poor sailor boy who had fallen from the mast 
and broken his leg. 

After several x)f these trials had been held, a dozen 
or more of the passengers secretly put their heads 
together and resolved to place the ** showman" on trial 
for bis life. An indictment, covering twenty pages was 
drawn up by several legal gentlemen amoog the passen- 
gers, charging him. with being the^Ptjuice of Humbugs, 
and enumerating a. dozen special counts, containing 
charges, of the most absurd and ridiculous description. 
Witnesses were then brought together,' and privately 
instructed what to say and do, . Two ' or three days 
were devoted to arranging this mighty prosecution. 
When everytiung was ready, I was arcested, and the 
formidable, indictment read to me* I saw at a 
glance that time and talent had been brought into 
requisition, and that my trial was to be more elaborate 
than any that had preceded it. I asked for half an 
hour to prepare for my defence, which was granted, 
ilcanwhile, seats were arranged to accommodate the 
court and spectators, and extra settees were placed for 



448 IN HOLLAND. 

the ladies on fhe upper deek; where they could look 
down, see and hear ail that transpired* Cariosity was 
on tip^toe, for it was. evident that this was to be a 
long, exciting .and laughable trial. At the end of half 
an hour the judge was on the bench, the jaiy had 
taken their pldced ; the witnesses were ready ; the 
cooQBel for the prosecution, four in number, with* peas, 
ink, ai^d paper in profusion, were seated and ^erythisg 
seemed ready. I was brought in by a special constable, 
the indictiqent read, and I was asked to plead guflty, or 
not guilty. . I rose, and in a mbst solemn manner stated 
that I coiild not conscientiously plead guilty qr not 
gnilty ; that I had in iBibt committed many of the acts 
charged in the indictment, but these acts I was iready 
to show were not criminal, but on the contrary, w<^hy 
df praise* ; My plea was- received and the first witness 
called. 

m 

He testified to. having visited the prisoner's Museum, 
-and of being humbugged by the Fejee Mermaid ; the 
nurse of Washington ; . and by other curiosities, natural 
and unnatural. The questions and answers having been 
aU arranged in advance, everything worked smoothly. 
Acting as my own counsel, I crdss-examined the witness 
by simply asking jiivbethir he saw anything eke in 
the Museum besides what he had mentioned. 

'^ Oh! yes, I saw thousands of other things." 

'* Were they curious ? " 

'* Certau^ly ; many of them very astoniishing." 

^^Did you witness a dramatic repsesentation in the 
Museum ] " 

" Yes, sir, a very good one." 

" What did you pay for all this ?" 

" Twenty-five cents." 



44 

46 



m HOLLAK0. 449 

'^That wiU do, sir; you can step down/' 
A aecaidj third and U^vath witness were cidled^ and 
the exaaooinatioii was Biimlar to the foregoing. Another 
witness then-^ appeared^ to testify in regard to anothe!r 
count in the I ttdictinenjk^ He stated liiat for sereral 
weeks 'he Wa» tfaie. guest of the prisoner at hii» country 
residence, Iranistan, and ^ he gave a- most amusing 
desdiption of the Tasiotts schemes and contrivances 
whi<d& were there originated: for the purpose t>f being 
carried ent^atjMmie' future day: in the Mu^um. 

''^ How did. you live, there?" asked one of the counsel 
for the prosecution. 

Very well, indeed, in the daytime," was the reply; 
plenty of the . best to eat and drink, excejpl; liquors. 
In bed^ howeveav it wa$i impossible to sleep. I rose the 
first nighty struck . a hght, and on 'examination found 
myself cov^ied wHh* myriads of little bugs, so small as 
to be almost imperceptible. By using my microsope I 
discovered diem to be infantile bedbugs. After the first 
night I was obliged to sleep in the coach^^house in order 
to- escape ^his amioyance." ^ 

Of course this eli^ted much mirth. The first ques^ 
tion fmt lOn &e cross-examination was >&is : 
"Are yen a naturalist, sir ? " 

The witnees hesitated. In all the drtlling that had 
taken place before the trials neitJier the counsel nor wit- 
nesses had thought of what questions might come up in 
the dros^xamina4non, and now,* not seeing the drift of 
question^ the witness seemed a little bewildered, and the 
counsel for the prosecution looked puzzled. 
The question was repeated with some emphasis. 
"No, sir!" replied the witness, hesitatingly, "I am 
not a naturalist" 

?9 



450 IN HOJbLANB. 

*^Then, niv^ not being a naturalist, dare 76a affirm 
that these microecopic lEsects were not humbugs uistead 
of bedbugs " — (here the prisoner was inllerrapted by a 
iiniyersalrahoat oi laughter, in which the solemn judge 
himself joined ) — ^* and if they wece humbcige, I sup- 
pose that even the learned counsel opposed to me, will 
not claim that they were out of plajoeJ '* 

'' They may have been humbugs," replied the witees. 

*' That wiU do, sir — you. may go," said I; and at the 
same time turning to ibe array of eounsel, I remasjced, 
with a smite, ^^ ISou hid better have a naturaHstfor your 
next witness, gentlemen." 

•* Do n^ be alalrmed, ^ir, we have got one, and we will 
now introduce him," re j^lied the counsd. 

The n^xt witness testified that he Was a planter from 
Georgia, that some yeats since the prisoner vbifced his 
plantation with a show, tod that while there he discov- 
ered an old worthless donkey belonging to the |>lanter, 
and bought' him for five dollar* ~ the neSt year the 
witness visited Iranistan, the; countty seat of the pris- 
oner, and, while walking about the groufods, his old 
donkey, recognizing his former master, bWyed; ^'where- 
upon," continued the Witness, " I walked up to the 
animal and found that two men W€i^e engaged in 
sticking wool upon him, and this animid was afterwards 
exhibited by the prisfHi^r as the woolly horse." 

The whole coprt-^ spectators, and even the '* pris- 
oner" himself were convulsed with laughter at the 
gravity with which the planter gave his very ludicrous 

testimonv. 

" What evidence haVe you," I inquired, " that this 
was the same donkey, which you sold to me ? " 

"The fact that the animal recognized me, as was 
evident from his braying as soon as he saw me.". 



IN HcoucAiiro. 461 

<' Aret yoof a naturalis^v firtr t "^ i 

^sYeSi I ^^i^t" replied 1;Ue planter^ with 'Sxtn emphasis, 
as muoh as. to say, you can't catch me as you did the 
other witness, i < . 

':0h! you are a naturalist, are you? Then^ sir, I 
ask you, as a. naturalist, do you iiiot know it to be a fact 
in uatuxal history that one jackass always biray^ as soon 
as, be se?s anx)therr^ « • 

This. qiK^stion was. j*Gceived with shouts of laughter; 
in the. midst of which the nonplussed witness backed 
out of couilfe, and all the.e£5orts of special constables^ 
and even the high sherifif himself , were unarailing iii 
getting him again o^n the witness stand. 

This trial lasted two days, to . tlie great jdelight of all 
on board. After my su/ccess with the ^^ naturalist " not 
one half of the witnesses would appear against me. In 
my final .argument I sifted- the testimony, analyzed its 
beai^ngSy rufiled the. learned counsel, disconcerted the 
witnedses, flattered tiie judge aad. jury^ and when the 
judge had delivjered his ohaigei, ^he jury, acquitted 
me without leaving, their seats. . The judge received the 
verdicl, and. then! announced thai he should fine the 
natu^:alist . f or the, mistake he made, as .to .the Cause of 
the donkey^s braying,4aJnd he should also £ne the several 
witnesses, who, .through fear of the. cvoss>-fire, had 
refused to testify. 

The trial .afforded a pleasant topic of conversation for 
the rest of the voyage ; and the morning before annviog 
in porty a vote of thanks was passed to me, in consid- 
eration of the amusement I had intentionally and 
unintentionally furnished to the passengers during the* 
voyage. . . 

Aft^ fll^y arrival in New . York^ ofteritimes in passing 

21* 



452 ^ HOU^AND. 

up and down Broadway 1 9aw old and prosperous fiienda 
comiog, but before I came anywhere near them, if they 
espied me they would dodge into a store, or across the 
street, or opportunely meet some one with whom they 
had pressing business, or they would be very much 
interested in something that was going on over the way 
or on top of the City Hall. I was delighted at this, for it 
gave me at once a new sensation and a new experience* 
^' Ah, ha ! *' I said to myself ; '^ my butterfly friends, I 
know you now ; and what is more to the point, if e?ef 
I get out of this bewilderment of broken clock-wheels, 
I shall not forget you " ; and I heartily thanked the old 
clock concern for giving me the opportunity to learn 
this sad but most needful lesson. I had a very few of 
the same sort of experiences in Bridgeport, and they 
proved valuable to me. 

Mr. James D. Johnson, of Bridgeport, one of my 
assignees, who had written to me that my personal pres- 
ence might facilitate a settlement of my affail's, told me 
soon after my arrival that there was no probability of dis- 
posing of Iranistan at present, and that I might as well 
move my family into the house. I had arrived in August 
and my family followed me from London in September, 
* and October 20, 1857, my second daughter, HeleU) was 
married in the house of her elder sister, Mrs. D. W. 
Thompson, in Bridgeport, to Mr. Samuel H. Hurd. 

Meanwhile, Iranistan which had been closed and unoc- 
cupied for more than two years, was once more opened 
to the carpenters and painters whom Mr. Johnson sent 
there to put the house in order. He agreed with me 
that it was best to keep the property as long as possible, 
and in the interval, till a purchaser for the estate 
appeared, or till it was forced to auction, to take ap the 



clock iRft&ft wlfienev^' they v^ere offeired; Hie Wdrkmeb 
who ^^e employed in ^e hotide wetie specially iqMruoted 
not to ^moke there, bat nerertheleBs it vrM s^ibsequently 
discovered that some of the men were in the habit ooca- 
sionally of going into the main dome to eat their dinners 
whicK they brought; with them,- and that they stayed 
there awhile after' dinner to smoke their pipes/ In all 
probability, one of these lighted pipes. waa left. on the 
cushion which covered the circular seat in thexlome and 
ignited the tow with which the cushion was stuffed. 
It may have been days and even weeks before this 
smouldering tow fire burst into flame. 

I was staying at the Astor House, in New York, when, 
on the morning of December 18, 1857, I received a 
telegram from my brother Philo F. Barnum, dated at 
Bridgeport and informing me that Iranistan was burned 
to the ground that morning. The alarm was given at 
eleven o'clock on the night of the 17th, and the fire 
burned till one o'clock on the morning of the 18th. 
My beautiful Iranistan. was gone ! This was not only 
a serious loss to my estate, for it had probably cost at 
least f 150,000, but it was generally regarded as a public 
calamity. It was the only building in its peculiar style 
of architecture, of any pretension, in America, and many 
persons visited Bridgeport every year expressly to see 
Iranistan. The insurance on the mansion had usually 
been about $62,000, but I had let some of the policies 
expire without renewing them, so that at the time of the 
fire there was only $28,000 insurance on the property. 
Most of the furniture and pictures were saved, generally 
in a damaged state. 

Subsequently, my assignees sold the grounds and out» 
houses .of Iranistan to the late £Um Howe, Jr., tb^ q^]- 



454 



IK H0l4l4ia)t 



TbQ ptroperfiy bix>iig]att $50^000, ^ich, with the. $28,000 
insurauce, weat lata my 4a8€ta tQ ^sitisfy dock creditors. 
It was Mri How6 s. i&tetttioa to erect a spleiidid uiansion 
on the ee^tate, but hic^ utitimel{^ f^ud lamented ^eath pre- 
Teated the fulfiltteUt of the ' pl«3i. The eatltte (iu 1869) 
was to be divided ataiong Mr- Howe's three ohUdjren and 
in aU pipbabiliity three liouses will: he built upon the 
kmutif ul gENHinda* .- 



} . ''• :- 



'. t ' 1 i 



J • / • I 



i'.i 



> I . / 



> . 



••i 






1 1 



> ) 



• i » • :■ 



' 1 1 . 



J t 



./ 



. 1 



1 , ' 



1 1 



• / 



■ I « 



> 1 '. 



'■ ! ) 



.V » ;, 



« 1 



CHAPTER XXXL 

* ■■ • • . . ' . ' 

* t 

BACK ONCE MOBB TO XNOLAKD — TOUll THBOUGH SCOTLAIO)' AXD WAUES — HO^ 

I oAKsniiiMtthiff— *AbviCtt€tfiryvi9aoa>s^^jttirzteo*it^ 

MONEY AJID paw TO KEEP l^ — WHAT THE PAPEB9 SAID ABOUT MB — PRAJ8E Of 
TBS UOVDOK PBE88 — LSCTmH^O IN THE PROVINCES — PEBF0BMANCE8 At 
CA2i^B|>CaB---CALI^ FOB JOICE .^BtK — XXT»|kCliU>I|UBY TUK AT OSTOIO) 
— THE AUDIENCE AND LECTURER XAKING^ TURNS — A UNIYER^ITT BREAK" 
FAST—KAdNincENrr OFTEB FOR A COFVBSQHT*— StTCCBSS OF MY ANTEB^BISE 

— MOBB lf02tBT flQB ZBB CLOCK GBEJ>ITOBS« 

> 

Seeing the necessity of malang more money to 
assist in extricating me from my financial difficulties > 
and leaving my affairs in the Jiands of Mr. , James D. 
Johnson — my ,wife, and youngest daugnter, Pauline, 
boarding with my eldest daughter, Jlrs. Hiompson, in 
Bridgeport — early in .1868, t went back to England, 
and took Tom Thumb to all the ' ]jrincipal places in. 
Scotland and Wales, giving many exhibitions and makr 
ing much money which was renutted^ as teretofor^, to 
my agents and assignees in Amerix^a. ' ^ - / < ,, 

Finding, after a while, that my personal attentioix 
was not needed in the Tom Thumb exhibitions and 
confidiug him almost wholly to agepits who* continued 
the tour through Great Britain, under my general 
advice and instruction, 1 turned my individual atten- 
tion to a new field. At the suggestion of several Amer- 
ican gentlemen, resident in London, I prepared a 
lecture on **The Art of Money-Getting." I told myr 
friends that, considering my cIocIl complications, t 



456 THB ABT OF MONEY OETTIKa. 

thought I was more competent to speak on " The Art 
of Money Losing" ; but they encouraged me by remind- 
ing me that I could not have lost money, if I had 
not previously possessed the faculty of making it 
They further assured me that my name having been 
intimately assoqia^e^ ]Evitlv the J^npy^ind concerts and 
other great money-making enterprises, the lecture would 
be sure to prove atteactiva and profitable. 

The old clocks ticked in my ear the reminder that I 
akould inaprove e^ery opportunity ta ^^ torn an honest 
penny,'* and my lecture was. duly, ainnou^ced for.d^^yery 
i& the great St. James' Ha)l, Regent Street, Picca- 
dilly. , Xt wa^.thofpugl^Iy. advertised — ^ fe^atwre, I never 
neglected — and, at the appointed time, the hall, which 




fifty cent^,) per jseatp ac9oraiQ^. to location, it was the 
evening bf JD^cember 29,' 18oii. ' Since' 'my arrival iu 

months 
wa3 

to. presept ^'yself m a new^fapajCi^^ lo'ijje' E^^ 
uc as a lecturer. . X could see .' in mv audience . all, my 
American friends who had suggested this effort; all mv 
theatrical ana fiterarv friends : and as I saw several gen- 
tlemen whom I knew to he/connecte'd with the leading 
IfiOndpn jpapers^ I telt pure th^t ii^y success or^fa^ore 
would oe duly chronicled next mprning. tChere was, 
moreover, a gei^eral audienije that ^eemed e^er ^q see 
the " showman** ot whom they, haa hear,d so much, and 
to catch from l^is lips the/' art which, an , times past, 
had contributed so l^rgel^ to his success in lifq, , Stimu- 
lated Jy Jtteseihipp,.^^ dp pajr best and I thipk 
X* did it., T^e fpIIo^iDg' is uie lecture subs^jo/ia^^, £^ 



THE AKT OF MONEY QBTTINa. 457 

it was delivered, thotigh it was interspersfed with many 
anecdotes and illustl-ations which are neceBSarily omit-* 
ted ; and I should add, that the subjoined copy being 
adapted to the meridian in which it has been repeatedly 
delivered, contains numerous local allusions to men and 
matters in the United States, which, of course, did not 
appear in the original draft prepared for iny English 
audiences : 

. THE ABT OF MONEY QETTINO, 

III the United States, where we have more land than 
people, it is not at all difficult for persons in good 
health to make money. In this comparatively new field 
there are so many avenues of success open, so many 
vocations which are not crowded, that any person of 
either sex who is willing, at least for the time being, to 
engage m any respectable occupation that offers, may 
find lucrative employment.* 

Those who really desire to attain an independence, 
have only to set their minds u^n it, and adopt the pro- 
per means, as they do in regard to any other object 
which they wish to accomplish, tod the thing is easily 
done. But however easy it may be found to make 
monay, I have no doubt many of my hearefd will agree 
it is the most difficult thing in the world to keep it. 
The road to wealth is, as Dr. BVanklin truly says, '* as 
plain as the road to mill." It consists simpfy in expend- 
ing less than we earn ; that seems to be a very simple 
problem. Mr. Micawber, one of those happy creations 
of the genial Dickens, puts the case in a strong light 
when he says that to have an income of twenty pounds, 
per annum, and spend twenty pounds and sixpence, is 
to be the most miselrable of men ; whereas, to have an 



468 THE AIET OF MOXKY GETTING. 

income of' dnly twenty pounds, and upexid btit nineteen 
pounds and sixpence^ is' to be thd ba^^picdt of mortals. 
Many of my 'hea:rers may feay, *^ we! understand this ; this 
is economy, and we know economy is jvealtfc ; we know 
we can't eat our cake and kfe^p it also." Yet 1 beg to 
gay fliat perhaps 'more cases of failut*? arise from mis- 
takes on this poinit than almost any oth^r. The fnct is, 
many people think they understand economy when they 
really do not. 

True economy is 'misapprehended, and people go 
through life without properly' comprehending what fhat 

9 

principle is. Some say,"r'havd an income df *o much, 
and here is my neighbor who has the samte; yet every 
year he gets something ahead and I fell shd^t ; why is 
it? I know all aboiit economy." He ihinks he does, 
but he does not. There' are many who thiiik that 
economy consists in soring cheesle-paritigd and candle 
ends, in cutting off two pence from ihe laundress* bill 
and doing all sorts of little, mean, dirty things. Econ- 
omy is not misanness. > The ihtsfortune is also that this 
class of persons let their economy apply in only' one 
ditection. Thfey fdncJy they axp so wonderfully economi- 
cal in savirig a'haif'penny Where they ought to spend 
two pence^ that they think: they ban iifford to squander 
in other duiedtions. A few years ago , befor^ kerosene oil 
was discovered br thought of, one might stdp over iiight 
at almost imy farmer's housfe in the agricultural ' diistricts 

■ 

and get a very gdod supper, but after supper he might 
attempt . to read in the sitting room, and would fihd it 
impossible with the inefficient light of one candle. The 
hostess, seeing his dilemma, would say : " It is rather 
difficult to read here evenings * the proverb sat^ * you 
must have a sihip dt sea in order' to be ablte to btttti two 



a?HB ABT OF MONET GETTIKa. 459 

candles at once ; ' we never hare an exti-a candle eiccept 
on extra oocadom'*'' TheBe extra occasions occur, 
perhaps, twice a year. In this way the good woman 
sayes fire, six, or ten dollars in that time; but the' 
mformation Which might) be deriTe4 fitim having the 
exti*a light would, of cotirse} far outweigh a ton of 
candles. 

But the trouble does not end here. * l^eeling that she 
is so economical in tallow oatidles, she thinks she can 
afford to go frequently to the vilkigd md spend twenty 
or thirty dbllats for ribbons and fnrbelows, many of 
which are not necessary. This false econorny may fre^ 
qiiently be seen ib men- of bumn^ss, and in those 
instances it often runs to 'writing paper. Yon find* 
good business men who feave att the old envelopes, and 
scraps, and would not tear a new srheet of papir, if 
they conld avoid it, for the world. This is all very 
well ; they may in this way save five or ten dollars 
a yeac, but being so economical (qnly in note paper), 
they think they can afford to waste time; to have 
expensive parties, and to drive their ' carriages. This 
is an illustration of Dr. Franklin's '' saving at the 
spigot and wasting at the bimg-hole '* ; •• penny • Wise* 
and pound foolish." Punch in speaking of this " one- 
idea " cloAs of people says '* they sire like the man who 
bought a penny herring for his family's dinner and then 
hired a coach and four to take it home." ' I never knew 
a man to succeed by pratjtising this kind of economy. 

True economy consists in always making the income 
exceed the out-go. Wear the old clothes a little longer 
if necessary ; dispense with the new pair of gloves ; 
mexrd the old dress ; live on plainer food if need be ; so 
that under all circumstances^ nnless some unforeseen 



accidfsot Qcearsi th^e will be a oiasgin in favor of the 
mooaie. A penny iiere, and a ddllar theirei placed at 
iut^rest, goe^ on accumulatiiig, aod ia this way the 
desired result 19 attamed. It Requires .some tmsiiig, 
perhaps, to accomplish thi$ . eoojoomy, \mt when once 
tlsed to. it, you will find there ia mare saljidf action 
in' rational saving, than in irrational spending,.. Here 
is a recipe which I recommend ; I have fymid it to work 
an excellent cure for extravagance and especially ibr 
mistaken economy : When you find that yoo have 
no surplus at the end of the yew, and yet have a good 
income, T advise you to take a few sheets of paper and 
form them into a book and mark down #tery item 
of expenditure. Post it every day or week in two 
columns, Oiie headed " necessaries " or even " comforts," 
and the oth^r headed ^' luxujries," and you will find thafr 
the latter column will be double, treble, and frequently 
ten times greater than the former. The real comforts of 
life cost but a small portion of what most of us can eanu 
Dr. Franklin days *' it is tfaef eyes of others and not our 
own eyes which ruin us. If all the^world were blind 
except myself I should not care for fine cbthes or fur- 
niture." It is the fear of what Mrs, Grundy may say 
that keeps the noses of many worthy faihilies to the 
grindstone. In America many persons like to repeat 
''we are all free- and equal," but it is a great mistake 
in more senses than One. 

That we' are bom "free and equal" is a glorious 
truth in one sense, yet we are not all bom equally 
rich, and We never shall be. One may say, " there is 
a man who has an income of fifty thousand dollars 
per annum, while I have but one thousand dollars ; 
I knew that .fellow when he was poor like myself; 



THE AKT OF MONEY GfETtma 461 

now he in rich and thinks he is better than I am; 
I will show him that I am as good as he is ; I will 
go and buy ahorse and buggy ; —no, I cannot do that 
but I will go and hire one and ride this afternoon on 
the same road that he does, and thus prove to him 
that I am as good as he is/' 

My friend, you need not take that trouble, you can 
easily prove that you are " as good as he is " ; you have 
only to behave as well as he does, but you cannot maker 
anybody believe that you are as rich as he is. Besides, 
if you put on these " airs," and waste your time and 
spend your money, your poor wife will be obliged to 
scrub her fingers off at home, and buy her tea two ounces 
at a lime, and everything else in proportion, in order 
that yon may keep up " appearances," and after all, 
deceive nobody. On the other hand, Mrs. Smith may 
say that her next^^door neighbor married Johnson for 
his money, and " everybody says so," She has a nice 
one thousand dollar camel's hair shawl, and she will 
make Smith get her an imitation one and she will sit 
in a pew right next to her neighbor in church, in order 
to prove that she is her equal. 

My good woman you will not get ahead in the world, 
if your vanity and envy thus take the lead. In this 
country, where we believe the majority ought to rule, 
we ignore that principle in regard to fashion, and let a 
handful of people, calling themselves the aristocracy, 
run up a false standard of perfection, and in endeavor- 
ing to rise to that standard, we constantly keep ourselves 
poor ; all the time digging away for the sake of outside 
appearances. How much wiser to be a " law unto our- 
selves "and say, "we will regulate our out-go by our 
income, and lay up something for a rainy day." People 

s 



4$3 THE ABT OF MOWEY GirTFIHG. 

ought to be te sensible bn the subject of fatoney^gfettiBg 
4B on any -dtbeif subject Like causes ptodbuee likd effects. 
You damtot acdu^mulate a fortime by taking' thb road 
ticiat leads to poverty. It, needs no ptrophet t6 tell ns 
tihat those who liiria fidly up to their ' ideans, ifithmit 
any thought of a reverse in this life^ oan' nevev attain a 
pecuniary ihdepeildeiiice.' ' ' ■ •• ' ' 
• Men and wdmdn ateustomed to -.gratify every ^ whim 

• 

an!d oaprice, vwiUfiiid it hsbrd^ at'tiirbt^toicut d!ov^n> their 
vaiiouis unneoe^sary 'expenses, <axtd tHU fed it a great 
^elf denial to live in ai smaller . house than they: have 
beeli aocustoriied to, ^thless expensive famiture, less 
company, less cdstly Clothings fifewdr* servants, k* less 
nutaber of .balisv parties^ tbeiitreigoiligB^ <5aMage ridings, 
ptteastir0 : excursions, cigar smokings; liquor drinkings, 
and other 'extrivaganoes ; but, afteif hll, if itfeey will try 
tiie plan 6f .laJying by a *' nest-eggy'^ot in ^other troWs, a 
smadl' sum of money, at ioterfest ^or judiciously invested 
iK land; they will be eur^riSed^ at the 'pleasure tto be 
derived fr^m constantly iddding to theit little' *^ pfle^" as 
wdll as' fVom. all: the ' economical 'habits which are 

engendered by this course. • " • • 

The old siiit of clothes, and the old bonnefr«nd dress, 
will aiisweir f6r another seafeon ; the Grot6h or spring 
wWer will taste betteir than champhgne ; a cold bath and 
a brisk walk Yi^ill'prtDve: more exhilarating th5an' a ride in 
the finest coach ; a Social chat, an eveAin^'s teadii^ in 
the fainily circle, or ah h6ur> play of •' hunt the slip- 
per " and " blind mto's buff," will be far more pleasant 
than a fifty or a five hundred dollar p^rty, when the 
reflection on the difference in cost is indulged in by 
those who begin to know the pleasures of sttvins:. 
Thousands of mien are . kept poor, and fens of thou- 



TBS ART O? MOKEir GlffmKG. 463 



ands'tare' made so afteir they liare aoquiored quite ;6tiffif- 
ctent to" BUpport ^em* wjell thxougk life , m consequenoe 
of laying tfadr plans of living on too braad a platform. 
Some fttmilies expend twenty thousand < dollars per 
annwn, and some mneh more, and would searoely know 
how* to live on less, while' others se<;u):e moiia solid' 
enjoyment frequently on a twenHeth ^part of that 
amounti Prosperity is a moiiB severe ordeal than 
adversity, especially sudden prosperity. "Ea^ come, 
essygOy' is an* old and true proverb, A spirit of 
pride and vanity, Vli^n permitted to have full sway, 
is the tmdying canker worm which gnaws the very 
vitals of a man's worldly possessions, let them be 
Bmall or gieM^ hundreds or millions. Many persons, 
as tbey begin to prosper, iinmediately expand their 
ideas and commence expending for luxuries^ until in 
a short time th^ir expenses swallow up their income, 
and they become rtiin^ . in their iidiculous attempts 
to keep up appearances^ and ttiake a ^^ sensation." 

I know a genttetaan of fortune whb says, that when 
he :fitBt began to prosper^ his wife would have a new 
and elegant sofk. ^ That sofa," h^ says, ^^ cost tne 
thirty thousand dollars!" When the Sofia reached the 
hoai»e, it was finmd necesiary to get chairs to match; 
then mlo-boardB, carpets and tables ^ to correspond " 
with them^ and so on through the entire stock «f fnmi^ 
ture} when at' last it /was found that 'the house itself 
>vas quite too small and oId*fashioned for the furniture, 
and a new one was built' to correspond with the new 
purchases;* ^^ thus," added my friend, "summing up an 
outlay of thirty thousand dollars caused by that single 
sofa, and saddling on me, in the shape of servants, equi- 
page, and the necessary expenses attendant upon keep^ 



464 ^^2 A^^ O^ MONEY (^JBTTIN^. 

r 

ing up B fine ^ estaUisbment/ a yewly ontlajr of eleten 
thou8ai»l dollars, atid a tight pineh at that ; whereas, 
ten years ago, wo' lived with much more real eomfdit, 
because ivith ' mnch less care, on as many hundreds. 
The truth is," he continued; ^ that sofa would have 
brought me to- inevitable bankruptcy, had not « meet 
unexampled tid^ of prosperity kept me above it, and 
had I not checked the naturaf desire to ' cut a dash/ "* 

The foundation of success in life is good health ; that 
is the substratum of fortune ; it is also the bads of hap- 
piness. A person cannot accumulate a fortune .very 
well when be is sick. He has no ambition; no incen- 
tive ; no force. Of course, there are those who have 
bad health and" cannot help it ; you cannot expect Chat 
such persons can accumulate wealth ; but there are a 
great many in poor health who need not be so. 

If, then, sotind health is the foundation of sncctes 
and happiness in life, how important it is that we 
should study tte laws of health, which ie but anotiier 
expression for the laws of nature ! The closer we keep 
to the lavrs of nature, the nearer we are to good health, 
and yet how many persons there are who pay no atten- 
tion to natural laws, but absolutely transgress them, 
even against theit own natural inclination. We ought 
to know ihat the ^ sin of ignorance " is never winked at 
in regajid to the violation of nature's laws ; their infilie* 
tion always brings the penalty. A child may thrust its 
finger into the flame without knowing it will bom, and 
so suffers; repentance even will not stop the smart 
Many of our ancestors knew very little about the prin- 
ciple of ventilation. They did not know much about 
oxygen, whatever other *' gin " they might have been 
acquainted with; and consequently, lliey buik their 



Wffi AJBX 09 MQKBX ChBTTfifCk 46S 



houies wi& titder 6Q¥eii'*by<«ine feet bedroomsi and 
tfaue^e good old piou^ Purttaaa would lock themselves 
up ioL QxiB of these cells,, say their prayers, and go to 
bed, la £be morning they would devoutly retilra 
thanks.^ the ^'preservaticm of their lives,'* during the 
night, and nobody had better reason to be thankful. 
Probably. some, big orack in the window, or in the door, 
let in. a littlq fresh air, and thus saved them. 

Many persons knowingly violate the laws of nature 
against their better impulses, for the sake c^ fashion. 
For inatanoe, there is one thing tliat nothing living 
except a vUe worm ever naturally loved, and that is 
tobacco ; yet how many persons there are who deliber- 
ately train an unnatural appetite, and overc(M)2e this 
implanted aversion for tobacco, to such a degree that 
they get to love it. They have gQt hold of a poisonous, 
filthy weiEKl, or rather that takes a firm bold of them, 
licre are married men who run about spitting tobacco 
juice oil ttie carpet and floors, and sometimes even upon 
tUcir wives besides. Xliey do not. kick their wives out 
of doors like drunken men, but their wives, I have no 
doubt, often wish they w^re bntaide of. the house. 
AnoAer perilous feature is thatr this artificial uppetite, 
like jealousy, '^ grows fey wha* it feeds on" ; when you 
lave that which is unnatural, a. stronger, appetite is 
cr^at^ for the hurtful thing than ihe natural de»jre for 
what i^ hannlessi There Is an old provecb which says 
that '* habit is second nature," but an artificial habit is 
stronger than nature. Take for instance an old tobacco- 
chewer; his love for the ''quid" is stronger than his 
love for any particular kind of food. He can give up 
roast beef easier than give up the we^. 

Ypung lads rogret that they are not men;, they 

30 



466 VHB A)KP 09 MOKiinr (Stmrm^. 

vwald like to go to bed bofs and ^ake up nenn 
and to accomplish this they copy the bad' hbbita of 
their semors;^ Little To^my and Johhny see their 
fathers or 'uncles smoke a {>ipe and they say; ^'If I 
could only do that I would be a man too ; uncle J^n 
has gone out and left* his pipe of tobacco, let vm try -it." 
They take a matdk and light it, and then puff anray. 
**We will learn- to smoke ; do you like it Johhnt?'' 
That lad dolefully implies t " Not Yery much ; it tasrtes 
bitter " ; by and by he 'grows pale, bat he persists; and 
he soon offers up- a saoriiice on the altar of fashion ; but 
the boys' -stick to it and persevere until at last they 
conquer th<^ir natural appetites and become the viciims 
of acquired tastes. 

I speak " by the book," for I have noticed its efibcts 
on myself ^ having gone so far- as to smoke ten or fifteen 
cigars a day, although I havb not used the weed during 
the last fbutteen years, mA never shhll again. The 
more a man smokbs, the more he erases smoking ; tiie 
last cigar smoked, simply* excites the desire for anbther, 
and so on Incessantly. 

Take th^ tObaccoM>kewer. In the morning when he 
gets up„ he puts a quid in his mouth and keeps it there 
all day, never taking it out except to exdiange it fer 
a fresh on^, or when he is going to eat; ohi yes, at 
intervale during the day ahd evening, many a obewer 
takes out the quid aigid' holds it in his hand long ^enough 
to take a drink, and thto pop it ^goes back again. This 
simply proves tliat the appetite for rum is even stronger 
than that for tobacca When the tobacco chewer goes 
to your country seat and you show him your grapery 
and fruit house and the beaixtiee of your garden, when 
you offer him some fresh, ripe fruit, and say, *< My friend, 



THB AWS OF MOKET aSTTINCP. 46V 

I haipe gat here: lihe most delicious apprles akd pears 
and ^^eafiheh' and apricdt^ ; > I have imptoited them frolil 
Spain, Frajice :and .Italy; *-*- jpst see those luBcious g^rapes- ; 
there is nothing! more delidous nor more he&lthy thari 
ripe fruit, aotheJip yourself; I want to see you delight 
yourseJif witht these i things^" ite wiUiTorll ihe 'dear quid 
imdet his. tongiiie^<aaidia]is\Vejr, * ^' N^o, I thamk you., I have 
got' tiibaoeo m my moiathi.'' . His^ palate has become nar- 
coti^^ by the inoxiouta weed, tad h^ has lost, in' a 
great measure^ the delicate and enriabie taste for fruits^ 
This- shawa whai expensive^ useless andiiDJurions hab^ 
its meik'AyUl: get into.* I speakifrom experience. * I 
have wioked until I trembled like 'an aspen leaf^* the 
blood rushed to tny head,* and I had a psQpitation of thd 
heart TThieh I thiolighf. was heart- disease^' till. I was 
almoati Iqlledt with fright;. When I ooosolted my phy-* 
sician, he said ''breafe off tobacco nskig'/' I was not 
only rii^uiting my heaXtdb and 'ripeiuding r U' gve&t deal ' of 
moneys but J was setting a bad example.> 'I obeyed hia 
couQseL • No youaag man in ^ the world ievcir looked ' so 
beautiffd, as he tholight 'he did, behicd- a fiftben cent 
cigas or a'm&er$chauiifti!M i • ♦ . . ' 

These reviarks ' apply with rteu-fold/ foaroe* * lot ; the use 
of iatoxicfktiQg ididBkB.:. Tiq. make moniojf, r^quiiito a! 
clear; hgaik^. > A man hm ]got to se^^ thalt tt^o and two 
mak^£surr^e most' lay: sdl -^ his « plans with reffleition 
and.ife^thought, atid^elosely examiner aU tiebe details and 
the ins ilndr data of bu$in6ss. ' A& do man < can sno- 
ceediin basiness unless he has a brain to. Enable him to 
lay his plans, and reason to guide him in their execu- 
tiooH.M) no matter how bountifully, a man may be 
blesaadi witiif inteUigeiice^ if the braifll> ss' muddled, and' 
his ;ju^[slent .warpbd. by intoicicating dtinks, it is: 



468 TMB ABfP Orr MONBf d^TTHlO. 

impossible for him to caity on bnsinese ficfcees^fMly. 
How many good opportnnilies have passed, nev*r to 
return, while a man was sipping a " social gla^," with 
his friend ! How many foolish bargains have been mnde 
nnder the influence of the " nervine^" whieh temporarily 
makes its victim think he is rich. How many import- 
ant chances have been put off tttrtil to-nhl^rrow, aid then 
forever, becausd the wine cup has throwtt the systen) 
into a state of lassitude, neutralising the energies so 

esteniial to success in buedness. Verily *"wine Is a 

• 

mocker." The use of intoxicating drhiks as a beverage, 
is as much an infatuation, as ib the Smokidg ' of o^ium 
by th^ Chinese, and the former is <iuit^ as de^tfruetive 
to the success df the bushiess man as the latter. It is 
an untnitigated evil, utterly indefensible ill the Hglkt of 
philosophy, religion, or gbod sense. It is t)ie pareitt of 
nearly evety other evil in our eounftry. • ' 

Don't MiBTAitE tour VocaticIi*. -^ The astfeM plan, 
and the one 'most sure of success for the ybung" man 
starting in life, is to select! the vooafion which ib * most 
congenial to his tMies. ' Parents and gttafdlatts kte often 
quite too negligent in regard to Ifci^. It iS vttry com- 
mon for a fether to^ say, for exataplfe : «* t hAVe tlvft'bdys. 
I wiH tttttke Billy n clergyttiati ; John a laWyet ; 'TWu a 
doctor, and Dicfkb farmeif."^ H^ then goes niW^town 
and looks atboirt to see what he vnU do with Stiiriamy. 

« 

He returns bothe and says " SamAry, I see wdtch-tftAing 
is a nice, gdttteel business ; I think I will miike you a 
goldsBiith." He does this regardless of San/s ttatnral 
inclinations, or genius. 

We are all, no doubt, bom for a wise purpose. 
There is as much diversity in our brains aft in tcrti#tS6nn- 
tenances. Bom» are ' bom natural m«clltttli<iH(;f"1rhOe 



TSSB ABT OF MOlffinr GfiTTOie. 460 

BOffld^ havfi )gi€f^tt . amrsipn to Hiachineryu (Let a doaen 
\>&fB ^f tea yaais: get together and you will sfooix observe 
tw«;^ or ;tl^ree &$e, '^ wluttiiQg " outcome ingenious device ; 
vrorking. wUb looks or. complicated maohinery • When 
they we^e ,bat five years old, their father could find no 
toy tQ: pteme them like a puzzlei They are natural 
mef^ai^ics; biiit>tlie other, eight or nine boys have differ^ 
ent. ,aptiti»d9^ J belwg to the latter ola^s; I never 
bad the, stigbtest ]iQye fpr ooAechanisiBi ^ on the contrary» 
I hAve^l&fSort of . ahhorrenoe for complicated machinery. 
I nevor^ had . ingenuity enough to whittle a cideUr tap aa 
it would: n9tjeaik.> .1 nei^r could make .a pen that I 
could write tiWitbi» or understand the princ^iple of a steam 
engjae* If a>;Baan was.to.take such a boy as I was and 
attempt to m«^e,fi. watchmaker of ^him^ the boy m^ht^ 
after an/apprentipes^p of five or seren yeats, be able 
to, take api%rt and put together, a watchj but ail through 
lifO' hOfiWQPld .be^wpiirking up hill and sekiiig every 
exGiUae l^r <l^viugi his work aqd idlmg aw^y • his time^ 
Watehi m^kwg i$ repulsLve toi hlm^ • 

UnlQf s a<mau'0lktflrs upon , the , voiQaiikml /intended fot 
hini by.natprcv an4 best jiuiled* tO;hls petiuli^ gieniue, he 
canQOt.sue^sQedi, •• I amrgb^ tQ belielte that the majbiity 
of peisat^>dp find the right v)Qcakion»i ,Yet we seemaay 
wt^ hane iwst^iken theil? cidling,; froni th^ blacksmith 
up (or down) to the clergyman^ You Will see for 
instMM^ that extraoisdiniry ilila^ttist the.^^ learned black- 
smitli," who ought to have been a teacher of langmages ; 
ai^ you may have seen lawyers, dooters and clergymen 
who were better fitted by nature for the anvil or the lap- 
stooe, 

Ssfjfifffi SB^r^ . ttfiQim XiOCiii?ioN«^-^ After •secozin^ the 
rif^TOMiionsP yau; must be oaartf ul to select; the ptcfpeat 



470 i5tft AM Of Mbirtrr OBterni^a 

locattoil. ■ ^ YoH^. inttjr' ha^e betti ttst ottt fc^ « Iwtd 
keeper, and tbey my itteqnireh ft grains tb *«kh6wiwnr 
to keep a hotel" Ymi might conduct a hotel'Iike dock- 
work, and provide featiifactorily for five hiiiidred guests 
eTcry day ; yet, if you should locate youi*' hOtfs^ m a 
small village. where ttvei*^ is no railroad ' cotiiitttluiidaticn 
or pJiblic travel, tho location would b^^bai tuiu. It is 
Equally imp6i1:aut t&at ybu do t^t coimraenM'bUiniiess 
wtiei^ there ai?e already enough to riieet all demande- in 
the 6ame <>o^upation. ^1 remember a ctee Whidh ' ilhss- 
trates thi» subject. When I tras iA LOndoii in 1698; I 
was i^ia^ing dowu Holbdru with an^EngHsth -frfeiiii utid 
ctmi& to the ** petiixy shows.'' ' llity had ifmmeMe 'tar- 
toons outside, portrayitog the wtimJdlfUl ttitiositie^'tb- be 
seen •♦ all for a peftuy/' Being a' Httle in' the *^«hoir 
line " myself ,' I -feiid '•let 'Us go iti here;" Wo* toon 
fbund ourselves in the presence of -thfe 'illustrtous show- 
man, and be proofed to be the ^harpist man in 'that line 
I hnd ever tai^t He tofd us some tefittiOldtnalrj^ stories 
in reference to his bearded ladies;' hid 'AlWttos, Wd his 
Armiidlilos,'WMoh we corild 'hardly 'bfeli^ve, but thdtight 
it *' better to H^eVe It «hah look '■ hftet ttie iJtoof.'* He 
fluially begged' to call 6u!l attention to somewa* WalWary, 
and showed" \!^s a lot of the'^ti^i^ and fiK^ieM wax 
figures imkginablei 'They looked' a« if th«y iind not 
seen wmter since rtie Deluge. ' ' ' • " * 

'* Whtrt is there ^o- wonderful abdUt your etatatiiry ? " 
I askfed* • ' '^• • » » • . - i ..^ - . .. : 

• " I beg you nottO speak so satirically," he* rtfpKed, 
" Sir, these are not Madam Tu6sttud*s wax figures, all 
covered with gilt and tinsel and imitation diamonds^ and 
copied from* engravings ''and photographsv MiM, sir, 
wef e ttftkoAi firoib liliii i WkenetOr yew iook ^ptm* tmo' of 



tlioM "figufm^ 3tou ^maj- doaaider thstnyod'aare looking 
^2poir#th6 living individual:'! , > r. > i' .«> • / .. 

Gidnoiflg cawtiaUy, idi theux, I sj^wone labelled - ^ Henxy 

YIILJ' and feeliBg a little curious upon seeing,. that it 

Iciokad lika Gal via Edsoui the< living skeleton, I.aaid : 

".Bo- ym icall that ^ He»ry the, Ei^th ' T' 

He jreplied, ^'. Certainly « sir ; iA wa3 taken frotfi life at 

fiaia^^n 'Court by i spMial ordec o£ hi9i majesty > on such 

Me ,wottId have givea tbei boar of -the. day if I* iiad 
inetotedi; I said '.^ everybody knowd^ that ' Hencyi YIII/ 
was jft (great stout .odd. king^ aind that figure i& lewn and 
lank ; * what do you say .to th»t ? '' •'> i. . 

*'. Why," he i^pliedi **yoa would be lein and lank 
youtself^ >if yrQfu.98ut;tbere ae kmg as he.haa."' . 

Tbene waa no resistwg such arguments.. I said, to 
u^ylEngiifih fnendy'^X^et us! gpoo^it; do not , tell, him 
ivbo i ;ain ; I sho^ the whit^ feathw ; , he. beats, mW! . 

« ■ 

HeifoUpi^diW to Che.'door), and ^eeisg the: rabble in 
tbe'iiti?eet. he called •oiUj . ^' hdads and. g^ptiLemen, 1 1 beg 
tp :dww yelu^iatHieiition to tthe i areap0(ttahle: •ch&mcter . of 
my. yisitAW ipoiiitifig tp .us as lym walked: away. I 
cfd^ upo»i himia oouple .of .days afierrvards.; told.hip 

^^ (My frieudv y<>U are an lexcellent sbbwrnam^but y^u 
haYe selected a bad location." 

.Serireplied, ^^Tbds. is. true, air; I. feel iihat all my 
talents are thrown away ; but what .can; I do 1" . , . 
. " Yon can go to Ameiiiay" I replied. * ' You. caa give 
fuU play to your fa<;ulties over there; you will find 
plenty of elbow room in America ; I will enga^? you 
for '.two yeam-,; ^aftey that youf will he rafale ' lO go oi^ 



472 THX ABI OF MOKBY GXTTDra 

He accepted rxty e&r and remaineGl tvro yean in 
my New York Museum. He then went to New Or- 
leans and carried on a tniveUing show busiuess during 
the summer. To-day he is worth sixty thousand* dol- 
lars, simply because he selected the right Vocatioot and 
also secured the proper location. The old proverb 
says, *' Three remo^^s are as bad as a fire," but when a 
man is in the fire, it matters but little how soon or 
how often he removes. 

Avoi& Debt. -*— Young men starting in life should 
avoid running' into debt. There is scarcely anything 
that drags '41 person down like debt It is a slavish 
position to get in, yet we find many a young man 
haidly out of his *^ teens " runniug in debt He meets 
a chum and says, ^* Look at this ; I have got trusted for 
a new suit of clothes." He seems to look upon the 
clothes as so much given to him ; well, it^ frequently is 
so, but, if IxB succeeds in paying and then gets trusted 
again, he is adopting a habit which will keep him in 
poverty through life. Debt robb a man of his self re« 
spect, and makes him almost despise himself. Onmt* 
ing and gioaaing snd working fov what he has eaten 
up OS worn out, and pow when he is called upon to 
pay up, he has nothing to show for kis money ; tiiia is 
properly termed *^ working for a dead horse.? I do not 
speak of merchants buying and selling on credit, or of 
th9se who buy on credit in order to turn the purdtkase 
to a profit. The cdd Quaker said to his farmer son, 
*' John, never get trusted ; but if thee gets trusted for 
anything, let it be for ^ manure,' because that will help 
thee pay it back again." 

Mr, Beecher advised yojung men to get in ^bt if 
they could to a small amount in the purchase of land in 



THE ABT OS* J&CONjSY QBTTX2ir0. 478 

the cp^ritrj districts. '^Jf a young ixi«b»" he says, 
'^ will only get in del^t S(fs ^me laud and then get mar- 
ried, these two things will keep him straight, or noth- 
ing will." This nxay be safe to a limited extent, but 
getting in debt for what you eat and drink and wear is 
to be avoided. Some families have a foolish habit of 
getting credit at '' the stores," and thus frequently 
purchase many things which might have been dispensed 
with. 

It is all very well to say, " I have got trusted for sixty 
days, and if I do n't have the money, the oreditor will 
think nothing about it." Ther^ is no diass of people 
in the world who have such good memories as credit- 
ors. When the sixty days jcun out, you will have to 
]jay. If you do not pay, you will break your promise 
and probably resort to a falsehood. You may make 
some excuse or get in debt elsewhere to pay it, but that 
only involves you the deeper. 

A good locking, lazy young fellow, was the apprentice 
boy Horatio, . His emplpyqr said» '' Horatio, did you ever 
see a snail t " "I — think — I — have," he drawled out 
'' You must have met him then, for I am sure you never 
overtook pn^," said the " bo^s.'* Your creditor will 
meet you or overtake you and say, " Now, my young 
friend, you agreed to pay me ; you have not done it, you 
must give me your note." You.give the note on interest 
and it commences working against you ; ^^it is a dead 
horse." The creditor goes to bed at night and wakes 
up in the morning better off than when he retired to 
bed because his interest has increased during the night, 
but you grow poorer while you are sleeping, for the 
interest is accumulating against you. 

Money 19 in some respects like fire — it is a very 



. 474 ^ THB AKT OP MONEY GBTTma 

excellent aMV^ant but <i terrible mckster. When you 
-kare it . mastering you^ wh«en iMeredt ii^ comitantly piling 
up against you, it will keep yon dewn in the worst kind 
of slav^?y^ Bat let money work for you, and you have 
the most devoted servant in the world, it is no " eye- 
iservant" • Theire is nothing animate or inanimate that 
will wprk so faithfully as money when placed at interest, 
.w^U secured. It wo)?ks night and day,;and in wet or 
dry weather, ^ 

J' was boro in the blue law State of Gonnecticnt, 
.whese thex)ld£uritanshad law9 »o rigid that it was said, 
"they fined a* man for kissing his Wife on Sunday." 
Yet. these lioh old Puritans Would '*baTe thousands of 
jdjollaxa. dt interest, and cm Saturday night would be 
worth .a . certain amount ; • oji Sunday they W4>uld go to 
church and "perform all the duties of aOfaristian. On 
lyaking up on, Monday ^ morning, they would find' them- 
selves considerably richer than the Saturday night 
preinou^, simply because tbeiar'^one^ plaeed at iiiterest 
had worked faithf ally for them Ml ;day Simday, acterdiug 
to liW'i'. .1. ' . 

Bo iUjQt .let it -work ^against you ; If * you do, there is 
nO' chance, for suibcess in* life^'sb far as money is con- 
iserned.r John^Iland(>lph, the epcentric Virginian, once 
exclaimed in Congress ^ " Mr.' Speaker ^ I have disfcovered 
the philosopher's ' stone c pay as you go.** - This is 
indeed nearer ; to . the philosopher's stone than any 
alchemist has ever yet arrived. ' 

) Pjcbssvers. i^^— When a man is in the right path, he 
thwt pedjsevere. I speak ci this because there are 
some personi^ who are *^ bom tired " ; naturally lazy and 
possessing no self reliaaee and n# perseverance. But, 
they can cultivate theeequaliti^) as Havy Oroekett said : 



•mE ABT OF lif6NEY"OETTmi&. "4l5 



I)e8iu&you.arej0fht,.theqr|roa))eadc" ^ -^ , 

It'i^ 'fins' gofabeadMiTJSiiess, thb'detetBntmtiott net 
to let-tIJ0''**^kaaerctr» " cor ttro- ^^blved^' taise .^seisicm 
of 7<ra; %o i» to • make' j^jjl i^hx ^Roiir «Be]^gie6 Jail liie 
stmggle'forind^ieiideaQe, wfafekyocbmu^.ouhL^imtB. i 

How many have almost reached the gaai^of tleou: 
ambitionvbi:ik loiliQg' *M.^ iiL'themfielta^iianre- related 
their energies, and the golden prize has lieeii lost 
forever. ' - • ^ i'-"* t '".• •' 

It tav no doobt) eftin tnie; hs Sfaatespetfrencys r 



•• • 1 



'• . • «'«ertiiia'ltteHithea<*Mr*o/'inert, ' \ "''' . ' 

IP ybn hesitate^, wtiie bolder '^hantfi^ dtt«t(^h <mt 
befbre ^oti and get' the pH^e, fiemeftiber ^ proverb 
of Solomon: '•^He bi^dom^tto {)0or th« ^fteftle^i 5*idi a 
slack h&nd; btft the hand dt the ditigeni m^i/lt^tll)^h/' 

PerstfverdUce ft Somfethhes t)ut anothte lft»d fot' ^itf- 
rellaflcel llfeny persons natur^ll;^ kiok"t^ti<iheidirk ride 
of life, and borrow trouble. They ard bom so. Theh 
they ask for adviie, and they wffl be governed by one 
wintf' and "blown by another, and <»iinot rbly upon 
theiftslF^es. tJiittl y6vL get so tK«J yon iftid trty 
tii>on*^rseifr ybn need not Mpect to kiociwSd; ilifa^ 
kiio#iih€tt' personafly who have m^t Svith pecaMaiJy 
reveres, atidabsolntely comrtiltted sniddfe; becansfe they 
tllodghf tb4y eohl^ mefet cJvercotoe their misfdrtan«. 
Bnt I have known others who havo met knore serious 
finanfcial diflfecnities, and have bridged- them over ^by 
simple x>^rseverance, ai^ed by a firm belief that thi^y 
were doing justly, and that Providence Would •* over- 
come evil Mth^gobd;" 'ton will see this illustrated in 
any sphere of life- ^ * • 

22* 



Take two Gfeiittels ; both uoderstaiicl military tactics, 
both educated at West Point, if yon please, both 
equally gifbed ; yi9t ome, faaimig (his pifmciple oPpek^seirer- 
aaeet mil the othm iMking i*^ the -foraiAr 'will ts^eceed 
in hiB pfoieBffikm^ while ikelotter will »f»l. < 0»e may 
hear* ^d ^cory^ '*^ the enemy an^ ^oming^ 4iii they have 
got^anninii'' t ' . • .1 *• 

«^ Got cannon ?'' says the heaitatiBgGenBiial. 

»*Yca*P 

*• Then halt every man.*' 

He waata time to reflect ; his h^tatimi' is hi« min. 
The enemy passes unmolested, or overwhelms him. 
The General of pluck, i)er8everance and self reliance 
9oea into battle Inlh a wiB, and amid the dlAsh of nans, 
the boomiflig of eannon, and the slurieks of the wouaded 
and dying, you wUl see thi# man persevering* going^ on, 
cuttiipif aad slashing hn way through with anwavering 
dk(ermlDatio»^ and if yon ai?0 near cmoi^hy you 'wiU 
hear hi* shoot, "I will fight it oiU on tfats line if it 
takes all summer." 

Wa4Tavsii Tou no^ do with au. toub xxgkt. — 
Work at it, if necessary^ early and l9to, in season and 
out of season, i|ot leaving a stone unturned, and never 
deferring for a single hour that which can be done just 
as well now^ The old preveib is fiill of tmtfa aad meau- 
ing, '^ Whatever is worth doing i^all, ia worth doLng 
welL" Many a man acquires a fimrtuae by doing his 
business thoroughly, while his neighbor remains poor 
for Itfe because be (mly half does it Aml«tion, en»gy, 
industry^ peneverance, are indispenss^Ue requisites for 
suocess in business. 

Foortune always favona the brave, and never helps a 
man who does not help himself. It won't do to spend 



w»^99 Q]r^i«»r9ar €ari^«» ^ i^^^ 




to . ^Stumiiiip." irVo weU am (<^99' <rf (ttwo' tbiog^^ ^^u- 

worHJot aU of «w^if ill w^ f^quftlly : diyid^d,; tJuAi ww^ 
yoix, it iw^4 he Ofent ki two.m(^th9s f^ wbM;Woal4 

* • 

I ifM^ifMiitly.rdMfogtn aJ^q^^ paper fia. aecouoA 
of a like^ i^ulOBQpMci pamper irba ifWr . loduM out 4f a 
cheap jboaidiiigfhpiiae beo^^sQ.liife eQuUi not pitjthia bil); 
bujt be.jhia^ a roll of pape;?$ st^dang -oat of his coat 
pockilts>wjDi^l}i>ff pQil 9S;AmiaertiQTi, proroi tp be. his: plan 
for paying off the national debt of E9gla2id ivijthguC 
the ai^fSf A p(E0]>y. iP^^P^ b^9 g^ to do a3 Qipm- 
well said: ^ not only truab in Fxovideneei but keep the 
poYT^Xsiiry^i^ Dqjobt yarit of tU^. work, or you caur 
not i& mftm^ :yi§b0m»U (Ki9^ night, whUei euGamping. in 
the '4?s9i^ (H^ihear^ one of his fk^gdfii followers 
rei^wlfiif'.'^I wiy, l^oso: my «aineli and ixmt it to .God." 
'' ^Oy.l^^t jEptrAp/' ffiud the prophet, ^'.tie thy camel, and 
trust i$;^.|Gtod!" Do 9)1 you cfm for yourselv^, and 
thenutfwt to Fjfovjdenaay or hick,- or whatever yon 
plaa«^ Uk 4^)k, /or t^ :i:eat. ' 

D^iisN9!Qfoi«r TOUR OWN < psBsoN ikL Bxsftnofiis. — The 
eye o£;^ iMiployar its .often woriAt more titian the haad« 
of a do2ieu employees. In the uataie of' things, an 
agea^ eaimot be so faithful to his employer as to himself. 
Many lYho/ase .employers will eall to mind instano^s 



^t Zi 



where YKe belt eitipld^eM hov^ -^y^tocdfied kftpoflaat 
]^mt8 which couM not htii^ escaped &eir -dwi^-c^Merva- 
tion as a proprietcn No fltan itas a right to ^eicpect to 
fiueceed in life vnilefis he understands his busineflS) aad 
nobody can- understand- Mb 'bf»iness thorough ;ixAla8| 
he learni^ it by personal applioation and experfence* A 
man may be a manufectorer ; he haa g^ t» leaai 4be 
many details of hi^ business ^ersenally ; he mil learn 
something ''every day, e.nd he will find h^e- wUl make 
mistakes neenrly every day. And these V4»ry nmlaked 
ate helps to him in the way of exp^encM ii he but 
heeds them. JELe Will be like the Yloikee tki-peddler, 
Vrho, having been cheated ^as ta quality in the ^purchase 
of hfs merchandise, said : *^ All . right, therq's a htde 
information to be gamed every day ; I will never be 
cheated in that way again." Thus a man buys his 
experience, and it is the best kind if not purchased at 
too dear a rate. 

I hold that every man should, like Guvier , the Fkencli 
naturalist, thoroughly know his businesisf. So proficient 
was he in the study of natural history^ that.ycu might 
bring to him the bone or even a section of a hone of an 
animal which he had never seen described, and reason- 
ing from analogy, he would be able to draw a piotaere of 
the object from which the bone had been takea.^ On 
one occasion his students attempted to deceive him. 
-They rolled one of their number in a cow skin and put 
him under the Professor's table as a newepecxmei^^ When 
the ^ilosoj^er canie into the room, some of the 
students a^ked him what animal it was. Suddenly the 
animal said '^^ I am the devil and I am going tio eat you." 
It was but natural that Cuvier should desire to classify 
this creature, and examining it intently, he said. 



THB AB90 (^ WmSZ GfiTXIMb- 4^11^1 



He kn^w that an animal with a split hoof must live 
Upon grass aad grain, or other kind o£ yegetaiiqn^ and 
would not4>e inclioed to eQt flesh, ^ead or alivei so he 
conndecedryimelf perfectly ^afe^ ^ - TMe . possession of a 
perfedt knowledlse of your bmiiaet^- U an ahsqlUte 
necesflUy in order far iamre eimsesftt . 

Among the maxims of the .elder £etbsehild was one 9 
aniqi^Brent- paradox : ^^Be cautiQus and bold.'- This 
seems to: be a contcadiction i^ term^, but it is not> 
and'ihereiB gteat wisdom* in the maxim. It is, in 
fact, a oondensed statement of what I have already 
said. It is to say, '^yon m«st ^ercis^ your caution in 
laying your plans, but be bold in csurying them .out." 
A man whe is all caution, will never dare to take hold 
and be snccossfdl ; and a man who is all boldness, k 
merdy reddess, and mnsi eventually fail. A man may 
go on ^^ 'change " and mabe fifty or one hundred thou- 
smd 'dcdlars in speculating in stocky, at a single opera- 
tioiL But if he has mmple boldness without caution, it- 
is mere chance, and wjl^at he gains to-day he will lose 
to-montyw. You must bare. both the caution and the 
boldness, to insure success. 

Tlie 'Botbsdiilds have another maxim : ^^ Never have 
afny^iEg to do with an unlucky man or place." That 
is to wiy, never have anything to do with ^ man or 
place which never succeeds, because, although a man 
may appear to be honest and intelligent, yet if he tries 
this or that tiling and always fa^ls, it is on; account 
of some fault or infirmity that you may not be able to 
discover, but nevertheless which must exist. 

There is no such thing in the world as luck. There 
never was a man who eould go out in the morning and 



find a 'imn^ MI Df ^Id Infb^ idtiMtt(>^^jciiid'C«tt%rer 
to^niohxy#, and sb an,^ay stftk daj^^ H^nkkytAo^ io once 
in his life ; btft s6 f aor as mere Intk iBimxioeraettl^te is ts 
liabte tb \6se it aa to fiia^ It^ < ^' Lilie ^Mitt^tf |irAdiice 
Hk^ ^fffectB.^ 'If 'atmatt adopte'^ttie ^^piiopiil'^MliodB 
t^^ tiwc^Mfui; '^^ktck^^Will not prewM'idm; fi& he 
does not succeed, theieai^ vexMiui folriti althbiigh-ptff- 
h£tp^, lie may ndtby aWe'ta«be Ihemi ' ' ' ^'^^^ » . 

UlsE riiR ri£S¥ TooLa^'^^Mealn en^fagfafgtenpi^irjfceB 
sKiy^ld b^ caMul to get' the best i Undentand^ . yoa 
(ittnnot have tM good tools to ^^rk Irith^ and therms 
no tool yoH should be ^so |iaartl<mlar> atoout^ as ^iiting 
tdbls. Tf y6u get a ^6^ -oile^ it >9 better ta ketp Imn, 
than 'keep cldBliigitijg. ' 'It^ lebUM iometUng eiciy day, 
and you are benisfltedb^'the experiecbce be ocqiiites. 
He IB worAf more^ to you l^ia yeix than Imt^ aad^Iie » 
the last laan to {>a^ iMth, proHded iiis habito) aro ^^ood 
acid he oontitiues fai^fiulj If, as he gets more (tain- 
able, he demands an ei^oii^tant ihcrease of « ntibtty cm 
the aupposition that yo«i ^caia't do^ without ' hint, let him 
go. Whenever I have soch an employee, I ohrays 
discharge him ; first, to confyinee' him that his pl»ee may 
be supplied, and second, becsmae he is good 'for ii6th* 
ing {£ he thinkd 'He isiftTaloable and cannot bd^lBptftM. 

But I would keep'Mm^ if pMsMe:, in- order to^iitoofit 
ttbm th« Insult 'of his expetfiexice. An importaatt ide- 
ment in an employee is <Sie brain. ¥o« canaae^iiUa 
up, « Hands WaMed," but " hande " are not worth a 
great deal without ^^ heads." Mr. Beecber illustrates 
this, in this wise : 

An employee offers his services by saying, ^ I ha^e a 
pair oir hands «nd one of my fingers thinks." ' ^ Hiat 
is very good,'' says the employer. Anotber man'tmBea 



JfiB AST OF HOKBT QBTTIKa 461 

that is better .'^ But a Ibird calls iu and days that 
^^ an faSs fingers and thumbs think/' That k better still. 
Piotally aneitheir steps in, and says, ^^I have a brain ' 
that tiiinks ; I think all or?er ; I am a thinkii^ as well 
as a working 'man ! " f * You.are the man I wanC says 
the Mighted employer. 

Those meti i^ho hate bramsf and experience aie there* 
fbre . the most valuable aiid not to be readily parted 
with ; it is better fot theta, as vrell as yourself, to keep 
them, at reasonable advajtoes ia tiieir saliUies from time 
to ^me. 

Do M^ osT ABOve TOtfR BUSINESS .-^Yotmg tneu after 
they get flirough ttieir business training, or apprentice- 
shtp, instead of pursuing their avooation and rising in 
dietr business^, will often lie about doing nottnng. They 
•ay, '* I have learned my business, but I am not going 
to be a hireling ; what is the object of learning my trade 
or pii^itesioQ, unless I establish myself ! 

** H&ve you capital to stall; widi 1 

^ Noi hvA I am g^mig to have it' 

^' Haw are yo* going to get it I** 

^* I- will tell you eonftdentially ; I have a wealthy old 
aunt^ and s^e will die ptetty soon ; but if she does not, 
I expeet to find some rich otd man who will lend me a 
few thousands to give me a start If I only get the 
money to start with I will do welL" 

•There is no greater mistake than wheii a young 
man believes he will succeed with borrowed money. 
Why! Because every man's experience coincides with 
that of Mr. Astor, who said, * it was more difficult for 
hmi to accumulate his first thousand dc^ars^ than all 
Ae succeeding millions that made up his colossal f<n> 

81 



LI f ** 

It 

n 



4^ • T«E J^T. W; JftftT^, GKipVf^, 



yaiaats ^.it \ij §xperiencp.; Giv9 a bay tweiit^ thops^d 
dollars and p\it hinx in business and. the .chances are 
t}i^ti^e.wU} Ipse every, dollar of it befoire bci is ajeax 
Q^d^r.. . £i^^ ^'^Si^ & ticket if^. tbq lott^^yi an^ dr^wp^g 
a;Wiz?,jt;iB/le?8y.j;Qjeej, quy go." .,^...#?j| pQt 
know the value of it ; nothing is .70^.th;afF^^U))§^.aAle&i^ 
it. :^m^iiP9<^,:^ .Wi*ft!ttt jsplf 4^4,. *iii^.;#c«aaify, 
HjMienp, pad fiersjpv^ajyce, »ft4 oowjn^jikjtiqgwitk capital 
^hich JPu.lW[PJ*ot.iBWO^a'CM*Me oqt^^ijjce Ui ipccsfld 

ini:.f^Q*fiapl«Minfti- YPWg. «*^a Jiwtead |rf V w^llS^g £or 
dead men's shoes " should be up and doing, for tb^ise. ig 
^Q da^. of peTftms wl^o are :sa . i&BAcepnMiH^diitiiig in 
r^tfd to .^yiag. ^.. tbeapi licb.old pesjeku «ki»d H i» 
foftunate. :l^r the ;^2^eQtfiiit b^r€ that it if so^ Njjje ^ut 
of tq^ of tibe iiieb. JSiea of our^GiRintrytQ^y, started 
out ia lif% aft jopr ^Ijpyi^ with det^rfaine^ wiP&s io^usteyt. 
pejgeveMMe^epi^iopy and gp^d b(^t^. They wei^ oor 
gradually, made tl^oir own mopey aixd fi^Figd it; aa^j^ 
is the best way to apquire ;a fortune. St^f^n .Qb»)nd 
started life as a pocnr. cabin. boyi .la»d .die4 worth riiiaie 
million dollars. A. T.. Stewjirt W94 a f&0T J^Uh ib^ l 
nowJh6'pay^;tax^s ati a .9(uUioa.iwd a hnlf dpUai^of 
ino^qa, per.j^^.. jfobn Jacob Astgr WA9 a.j^ocir/ffMmi^. 
boy, ^ap4 di^t wpj:tb iwj^y miUiOMi Om5i^«^. V^u- 
dQrt>Ut. l]M3g«n Jiff rQfvruig n bo^t frop Stat^a I^^drto. 
New York ; now he pteaieiits our . goyanw^t witb a 
ste^ittshii) worth a millicia of -dc^kura, iumI: h^. ia^marth 
fifty^anUliotts, . i , 

^^ There is no royal roa4 to learning," saya (he proi^rb^ 
ao^ I may sag it is equally true, '' there ia no isiyalrQaid 
t0.we^l|;h/.\ Sot I think Ih^ire is. a royal ro»d to bq^» 



THE AJEsa? OF mm^x GwnmQ. 483 

enabl^a the ^todent-to expand bisiateljaot aod.ftdd 
every day to his stock of knowledge^ until, in the pleas- 
ant process of intellectual growth, he is able to solve 
the most profound problems, to count the stars, to 
analyze every atom of the globe^ and to mesiBuxe the 
firmament -^ this is a reg?.! highway, axui it is^ the only 
road worikh irayelling. , 

So xBi regard to wealth. Ga on in confidence, eiudy 
therulest aHd.abpve all things^ study, human natur^ ; for 
" the proper, study of mankind is n^ap," and you willtfind 
that vhile e:^panding the inti^Uect and the muscles, your 
enlarged experience will enable you every day to. accu- 
mulate moi^e and more principal, which wiU increase 
itself by interest and otherwise, until you aixive at a 
state ef indepen4ence, Yi)u will find, as a general 
thing, that the poor boys get rich and the rich boys get 
poor. If or instance, a rich man at his decease, leaves 
a Jarge estate to bis family. • His eldest sons;, who have 
helped him earn his fortune, know by expei*ience ^he 
value of money, and they take their inheritance and 
add to it. The scpamte portions of the young children 
are placed at interest, and the little fellows are patted 
on the head, and told a do2»en times a day, '' you are rich ; 
you' will never have to work, you can always have what- 
ever you wish, for you were bom with a golden spoon in 
your mouth." The young l^eir soon finds out whiU; that 
means ; he has the finest dresses and playthings ; he is 
crainmed with sugar candies and almost ^^ killed with 
kindness," and he passes from school ta school, petted 
and flattered. He becomes arrogant and self-conceited, 
abuses his teachers, and carries everything with a high 
hand. Ue knows nothings of tit&e rea} vadiiue of money, 
having never earned any ; but he knows aU about the 



464' THfi AM? OF M05ffEY GMTmtf. 

pcJOT felloW^tirdcntsr to Ms toom trfe^re he ** wines and 
dines ^' them. . He is csrjolfed and caressed, dnd called a 
glorious good fellow, because he is so lavish of his money. 
He gites his game suppers, drives his fadtliors^s, invites 
his chums to fStes anfl parties; determined to^sLiieloi^ot 
"good times.** He spends the night* iii f rdficS ' Attd 
dftbttttthtfry, and leadsr 6ff his*' com^anionH "witlf 'fte 
familiat* tton^, " i^e worft go -home till mortting.^ 'He 
gets them- to join him iir pulling dbWii signs, teking 
gates' from 'their hinges And throwing thei6 into tia^ck 
yards aiid horse-ponds: If the police arrest thtenr, he 
knocki* them dowti, is taiken to the 16ck-up; and joy- 
fully foots the hills. ... i ... . ' . . 

" Ah ! my hoys,^ he cries, **'what fe the' user of* being 
ritehi if ydu^ can't enjoy yourself T*^ 

He might more trhly say, ** if you cim^t nmke a^foof of 
yourself* ; but'he is ^fast,^' hates dow things, to'd ddH't" 
"'see It/' Yotmg men loaded down with bthei' peoplfe'd 
money are almost sure to lose all they inherit, an^* they 
acquire all «orts of bad habits which, in the inajoritf^ of 
cases, ruiM tifciem in health, purse and character; • In 
this ^ountiy, one generaition follows another, «rtd*ihe 
poor of t(>-day are rich in the next generation, Of'^he 
third. Their experience leadi them on; and Ithey • be-* 
come rich, and they leave vast* riches to thetr ydutt^' ' 
children. Theate children, having been reared in Iu3ft6^; 
are inexperfeiiced and get poor ; and after fonjg ei^fteW- 
ence ^another generation comes on and gathei* 'tip 
ricAe^ ag^iti mtnm. And thus ** history repeats itself;" 
and happy is he who by listening to the experience of 
others avoids the roeks aand- shoals on' whidi so mativ 
have been wifecked. 



tRK ABT OF HOmSX 61ETT1HG. 4^ 

hi^ #on or daughter learn saiiie trade or profeBsibn, no 
that itx these 'days of dianging fortanes--* of being rioh 
to-day and j>oor to-morrow, —* they may have somethiilig 
tangibTe to fiiK back upon. This pttreision might save 
fnany 'persons from mis^y, Who by some- vaaetptcibbd 
tiitn of Ibrttme hihre lost aU theit means* 

liW HOPB tBj&voMtifiiTty mrr bit iror too ^isiosiitt. 
— ^ifdhy i^ersofls aife always kept poo», becanse ihey are 
too yMonary; B^fHry prrtj eet looks to them lik^ tm^ 
8Uob6^, ^and' th^ir^ford' Aiey keep chatlgiiijg fttAa ate 
bustikesb to anoth^, alwaiyd in hot Water, always *<iind6r 
th^ harrow." The plnn of ** countmg the" chickens 
before they are hatfJhed*' is an eiroir of ^cietit date, 
but it does not seem to improve by age. 

1)6 NOT BCATtnssL roifk powers;-*- Engage in one'kind 
cfi MshiMs ittniy, and' stick to it fiiithfbliy tditil y^u 
autcMcF, or tmtfl ^nr esiperienee showis Shaft yod shotiM 
nbaiidbn it. A constant hammering on one nail wfll 
generally dkhf^ it home at la^, so that it can he 
clihchisd: 'Tfhfeii a nidn's trndivided attention is- cen- 
treffl on biie object, his mind will constantly be saggest- 
ing improvements of valne, which wonld escape^ hhn if 
his'bhdn Vas occnpied hy a ddzren difierent ismljects at 
onc6. Many a fortuniel ' has slipped through a tmtal's 
fingert hidcattse he was^ engaging ifi too nrtny* oCcnpa- 
tto^ at a'tinid.' There icT gbod sense in the old eantio& 
agb&lit'havi^ too many frons itt the fln^ at once. 

Br stfifrftMA^ib. — Men should he systertiatib in fli6tr 
bosin68i. A person who does busfness by rWtei hav- 
ing a titne and place for everytMug; ' dbmg his *work 
promptly, will aftcomp/Ksh twice ks-fhuch'larid w?fli half 
tiie trbubte of him who does' it carelessly and* sfipefaod. 



,4^6 XHB. ^KT QF ^fOlf^Y GETJPJWG. 

.,pn<^,.tJ4nj sM;, a.^no^,. ^Iw^y^, njeeting apiHW^weftte- with 

■■pvmf;^lft)ity, you fiiwl 4«isi;^e for , paatima faid.jificiiea.tioa ; 

yii)^^es^ t^.map, , who, only ,haj( .djot^.ofm <tl^iQ&i.^ 

tl}«n..tiws,,,tp...WflfietUii|g Q^p ,^..]^.,49!fa tl^^, 

know when hia (Jjiylft ^oijV -ift 4pqe».% 4li WXf'l.WJtt> 

.^<BjU(;h,«i4^iflg,09.i)S«!g,foiQ ^yj^enimtVr^ ^M«ffi.W PWP 

.f^y tljai. %y, Wft fl^m ^,,^tem.;flgwi„. Uffi too 
.f)aucj),i like;. the. ,^!yfi^ taps,". forpalj^y at \yft^hipgtof, 

w4 Jfrli .PJci^^nft' ,'J Cvi«u»l<»cpiUP» .Q%e,'.'r-r«»JJl.rtl*- 
ory and no result. . .i ,. .. ., ,.i . , . .•.,,...•. . -. . 
• JV[hen,thti." A^foi Hpifse " W9,9 firf^ starts .ii^.,^few 
ry.pr^^i.fi^ty^ jyt.-Mfw \p^^u^t,^y,..tbe be^ tipt0 m tiv? 
covintry,, Tl?ie prppriQt;9i9.hiid l^s^rne^, a.gppd 4f)^ in 
Ej^q|^,regavdtfigJtv»tplfl,,,^ % , l^jjlcjpds fr^i^, 4;»?pud 
of ^e, rigid, >ys(ejn w^ic^^ petfv^fje^ eyjeify- depfurtfnep^ 
9f..,th^r,gjref^t,*^ta(bli?iljp«eJD^t. . ,Wh^n .t^P^W a't^p^k at 
nii^thad arrived ,ai^d ^ife w/ere a .niiml>er .pf..gi|^^ 
ai;qniid,^^me.qf:.tbe proprietors yvja^Xd eay^.'^ I^oijpb $hat 
.lieUj^oh^",; and in ,tvp, minuses e.ixty.^^v^nts 7J«tha 
wa^r jbijpHetj.in padfi. baud,, wp^Jd pr^eent tijem^pjves 
in the, . hall- " Thi^,*' .said the landlord,, ^^r^p^ing .his 
,g^ies^, .":?? .qttr,,^re )n^\ f /^t .wHl sbp^ yqj^.T^e^are ^i;ute 
safe here,; we 4o, eyerythiug aystematiqf Uy." TJJ|f^,lf^^^ 
b(?^r^ the. .Croton .wa^r was , injtrqduced in/» ,tlie.,.^ty. 
3ut tbjej^ ^i^n^titnes cj^-riedtbcgir system /too ff^. , Qn 
^|u*^,o?f5a8voj[^ w,be^ Ijhe Ji9tel,.wa^ tbfonged wiib gpes<?, 
iWTipif/J^?rfW^>^ Y^. *»«^e»ly<.in4isepged. ^.al- 
tj^tj^h tlfjgfe were, fifty. w^t^,,i« the hjojteli^.thfi ,1^ 



** system*' would be interfered with. Just before din- 
ner time he rushed down stairs and said, " There must 
be -an04b0r waitear,' I am one waiter short, what can I 
do?" He happened to see "Boots" the Irishman < 
"^ Bitli7 aiti^ hs^ ^^ w^sb .ynur. hax^ds smd face ; taka that 
vflwt» ^prw Mid «oinQ' jmbo. t;ki<6, dining ^oom ix^ fiv^ min- 
ut^- j^s^i^ly PojttappciiMriQ^ aaareqwred,a^^ 
pri^^a^id; i^^ Now. I!at,jf0[u.. most' stand bel^ind these 
UvQ c\»m ao4 WPitjon t^^ gentlemen who wiU occnpy 
tbefn ; dW J<^ »ev(?i: a^cfc as u .waiter ] " . 

"^ I, Jmow all abput it swe, but I jquaver did it" 

Like the IiiUh p^lot,, on, oqe occagiQo wh^n th^ . cap» 
taip,ithinking-.4ie was . poa[isiderably out of his covurse, 
ask/e4f ^' iM^ ^^ou cert^n. you mideirstand lyhat you are 
doing?" 1 , 

flat r^^plied); " ^ufQ and. I knows every. locfc in the 
chaimeL" . . .i 

That mpxxie]|t " b^ng ". thum|>^d t)ie; vessel agai}Q<st a 
rock» . 

'^ Ah! be jabQjcs^ and that ^a one oJl .'em," continued 
tber pilot. ^ But to return to liie diniafig-^raom- "Pat," 
saidithe la^oird^^hierQ we do everything 'systpmati- 
call^f. Yqu must £rBt give, tl^ gentlemen each, a plate 
of spup, ^nd when they finish th^U a3k them what they 
will 4^ve next" . 

Fat re^edi,: "Ak! ai^M. unde^atand paijbctlj' tine 
vaji^^ of phystpm,"' , * 

Very soon in came the guests. The plates of soup 
were placed before them. One of Pat's two gentlemen 
ate his sonp^rthe. other did not care for it^ He /said 
'^ WoitervtsJce thia.pUte >away wd brii^ me^some fish." 
Pat looked at the nnta^sted plate of soup, and remeon- 



4M TflB AW OF ItfOKttY 6^»1?T^Wrf. 

bdriiftg %h^ injtitictiM^ cxf the^ laitdlard Sii t^f^ fb 

•« Bystem/' replied : ' 

♦• Not till yehaTe ate yer impel" '^ 

Of cour&r^ that •wtA eotrying **dy«(diri^''e]ltif^ too 
faar. 

•IlfiAU THfi NfitrBPAMM. ^— * Altrrfy» tsak© II- ttrustwortky 
iiew6p9^fmdtbi;td1ceep tilK)(^gMy |yofefMdte!Mg^^Mfo 
the ; tratiftaotidnfi - ttf '<fa^ f«^rldi ; He Whb^ is ' ^th<yat a 
tiewfirpaper i« eut off^ota his spici^/ In ttkes^'flttys 
df felegifajAd ami steam ; many itn^brtaitt lAVeHtlotia anfl 
improvements in every braiidi' of tradtei ai^'b^g nUide, 
and he wW don't' consult thenews^peis'WiB'iiloAi^ find 
himeeftf and life Imsinesk left oW in the toM. ' " 

Bfeiv»A*K • OF " otfrstOE opEftATioi^s/'— 'Wi^ softiirftimes 
see men is^ho 'have obtarned f6rttmes,'rtidQeiiJ^y becotne 
poor. In many cases this arises from intemperismce, 
arid often <iom gaming, ' and <>thei* 1)ad' ^habituf. - Fre- 
quently it occurs because a man has been eng^i^MP hi 
" otrtside opertttions/^ trf'^ome -sort. Wh^^ he* gets 
rich in his legitimate business, he is told of a gfMA 
spcfeulation where he can make A s6bi*e of thotisands. 
He fa conMiantly flattered' by his friends, Who tell htm 
that he is "barn Iticfcy; that efvei^thing he tbudhes • tdrriis 
into gold. • Now if he forget* that' his * ec^nomital 
habits, his rectitude of conduct and'afpei-sonalalO^tttion 
to a business which he understood, caused hi^ sU6^ess ih 
Mft, be wHllisten to the syterf voices. He says^: * * 

" I will put in twenty thousand doHaf^/*'! hat^*bei*n 
lucky, and my good luck wBl sdoribriil^^Ttte Mc^Wxty 
thousand dollars.'" " • - • * ' ^^ * ' 

A few days elapse' and it' is discovfer^d he ttlfist^utin 
ten thousand drflars more; soon stfleThe te tbJtf '^It is 
aH righti^ but certdin matters not foreseen tef|ttflre"an 



THEi ART or MONI^Y GBXTINa 48)} 



advtiiioft .^ tifenty.tfacmaaBd dollars oaiare^ wMofa 
bring him a jAoh harvest ; but before the time cemes 
around to lealize, the bubble bursts, he lose^ all he is 
posesaed of, and theq he leams vrhat he au^t to have 
known at the first, tha(; however successful a man may 
be m) bip /^ym- bumess^if he tui»s from ithat aad 
^^S^^B^ iw fK'^^fwin&SB ^hieti he 4on't .uudetstrad he iflf 
like Sampson when shorn, ^.hii^ l0ci(0, -*^ hisr Itarengtibtr 
has dppf^4?d^ iapd he beoQinea Itke othor laen. * - \ 

If ^ .nia^, hAf plei^i^ of mQney/h0, oughtito iiivest 
some(hipg:;iu. everything th^^t appeatpto promise' suceesp 
and %h^ y^HX , probably bemefit . mankind ; . but lefc thfe 
sums thu9 inve^d be moderate in. amount/andi neivi^i:' 
let a man foolishly jeopardiafe a fortune that hbhuf^ 
earned: iu a *]|egit|inate W!blj^ by inivesting it inr things in 
whic^Jiaerha^ /had no experience* ! 

I>on't i|9Da?(^ !wrp»00T sECiJRTTt. -^^ I hold QieA nb 
niQA o^ht QTer.^o indof se a Bote or beoome security, for 
any^ mlk^ib^.it )m father or brother, to b; greater oxteaft 
than he can afford to lose end eare nothing abouty with-* 
out Ijakii^. ^ood ^curity . H^re is a nian thait : is trotth 
tw^ty t^uaand dollars ; he is deing a thisTiBg.inatiu*- 
factar^g: or . o^ercantile tarade V you^ are retired attdr 
living .on your TQpney; hexomes to you and says : 

^' yo«i(:ore.a\rare*.that I aoi; worth, tlventy-^thonsairfr 
doUsiicp, }9Md don't owe a dollar ;^ if I had five liicnisabbA 
dollars- in oash^I could purchase, b partioAlat lei of 
goods aad' doftble my money in a' couple of months ;^ wilt 
youfU^orse my note for that i^moutit? " ' 

You reflect that he is Worth twenty thousand r dollars,' 
and yon iiiciu: no ;tisk by iixdorsing hie note ; yoil like 
to acGomcaodAte him^ and you letid your jaame witbofnt 
taking t|^ precaution of getting security. Shortly a£leri 



490 THE ART OF MONEY GErnKQ. 

he-showd you tiw note witH yonr indortewtetiC cancelled, 

and' tells you, probably truly, *^tliat lie made the profit 
that he expeWed by the operation," you reflect that 
yon have done a gooid action, and the thought makes 
you feel happy. By and by, the' same Ihing occurs 
again,' aiikl you 'do it again ; you hfeve ali^ady fixed the 
impi«isiion in' yduf mind that it is pei*feitly safe to 
indorse* his notes Tvithbuf sectirity; - - 

But the 'trotible is, thiis man is getting mOncfy too 
^asilyi He has dtily to take your note to the hank, get 
it dis^eouttted and 'take the cash. He gets money for 
l&e^tilne being without effort ; without inconfeiiience to 
himself; N6w mark the result. He sees a chance for 
sp^ulatiOQ ' outside of his business. A temporary 
investment of only f 10,000 is reqdiredi It is sure to 
come back before a note at the bank would be due. 
He pikceb' a note- for that amount before you. You 
fligti it almost' mechanically. Being ■fii-mly tibnVinced 
tfasBit your* friend i6 responsible and trustworthy, you 
indorse' his notes as *' a matter of course.'* 

Unfortuaately the speculation does not come to a head 
quite 80 soon as was expected, and another f 10,000 note 
ihust he discounted to take up the last ohe when due. 
Before this note matures the speculation' has proved an 
itter failure and 'all the money is lost. Does the loser 
leU bis friend, thje indorser, that he has lost half of his 
JbrtHnb? Not at all. He donV even mention that he 
has speculated at alL But he has got excited ; t^e spirit 
of speculation has seized him ; ' he sees others mailing 
large Aims in this way (Ve seldom hear of tfee lowers ) , 
and like other speculators, he ^^ looks for his money 
wiicte he loses lit." He tries again. IndOfemg his 
notes has betiome chrome with ybu, and at every Idss he 



Finally ypn dkoover your friend h^ lost cJl of ius- 
property ^aad all of yoors. You are overwhelaied with 
astoniahv^nt a^d g^ef, apd ypu say ^' it is a l^rd thing, 
my friend h^ve haa Jtui^eci. iQet" but^you should iMld, '* I 
havQ.^kA r{ii9e4 biqi/' If you ha^ s^d in.tiiQ ftr^t 
place^^Vl w|}}^^ppii9<>i£^ ycnii.but I n^ye^indAr?^ witbT 
out tiikkig waf I9. seouiity^'' hq, 90ul4 aft hay^ ^Que 
bey^Bd U^i Jtedgtk. of his ti^Uior. a^id he would never 
have been tempted away f^opi hi^ legitimate business. 
It is a very d^agefouja thji^, therefojre, at any time, to 
let people get possession of money too ea$ily ; it tempta 
them to . haz^d<HM3 . speculationi, if nothing more* 
Soloaion truly 4aid *' he tbfit bateth ^uretiship ia sure/! 

So withtbo.ys»ngnmostai;iwgin.bu^ let him 

und»atfU(Ml the. vjilue of money by earning it. When he 
does understand ita. value, theii^^ase the wheels. a little 
in helping him to start busi^ess^ but remember men 
who §[0<i . money with too gr^at i&Msility oannot usually 
succe04. you.,3iui^t get the fir§»t^ doUart by hwd knockfi» 
and at. ^qme 0acri&;e,. in or<der to appreciate the vahie 
of thflSfi dftUars. 

Advertiss todr Busy^BSS.-r-We 9II depends more or 
less, upon the public for Qur support We i^l trade 
with the public, — lawyers, doctors, shoemakers^ artistSf 
bladtf milhs, showmen, . opera singers, railroad . presi- 
dents, and college professors. Those who deal witii the 
public.must.be careful that thf»ir goods are. valuable ; 
that they are genuine, and will give satisfaction. When 
you get an article which you )r:now is going iio please 
your customers, and that when they have tried it, they 
will fei^l they hav^ got their, money '6 worth, then let the 
fact be Imown that. you have got it. Be ci^ti^ofol to 



41^ TBS AHT OF ^OKBfr avtrHM. 

adVMtiseii i^'MM^ s&a^ i^oilteir, liMlMlMit W^tidad 
l^fiit if a^ nSian bas ever Bt> ^od au iirticle' fM itole, asd 
nobody kxioir A* it, it wiU bring hiDi tio retntn, In a 
Goant^y • ' likte this, Where oearly evetybddy reads; and 
^hcM neWftpvipe)^ (ire Sbsu^' and eirculktcd id ^dkions 
ef tve'ilxcMissind^tofiTvro'hiOidied tbi^ustaid, it woidd be 
very imwi^e if 'tbi« bhatmel tra^ kotttlkett adraatage cf 
toreadbt ttke^iniblio iix adVeitisbig.' ' AnewBpajier'gdes 
iirto tii^ iMdily ^d te n^ead by ivtf e and* «hildmtl, m^mH 
aa the h^ad of ik'^ h6^&i- ^etM h^ojAteSM^ atad'tiioQ- 
fitodti of peo^e may tead your )ad^rfei$omeiit; wMe you 
al^ aMefadin^ to 7^1^ rotftine buritteas. Maiqr, pethlips, 
read it wMlo y^u cure aBloep. The wtiole phUoaopliy of 
Yiie iB^ fiicsti^^MWi*' t]^^^ ^kfiB'tk^ way the 

farther doear he platiti^ Mft potatoosalld'ooiA soirs 

hiis giAiti, aifd theta/ goeid s^bOnt somothitig^ etae, -aind the 
tid(ie> eoanes ^en' he t(S^p^^ Bttt he de^t Ma^ ^fint 
atidf aoFwa- ^te^nrarda. Thi«' ^rineipfe ^uppUm i» all 
kioda «f bMit:ke8$, ciad to notbhig; ttiore ^enfiieiitiji^thaa 
to^ advertisiiii^.' ' If a^ mah has a getiiiiiMft •aartidle, 4here is 
no way in which be tdn reap mere adtantc^iMiftBly'than 
by '' sowing " to the public in this way; He mint, of 
course, -have a really good article, attd onewhic^ 'will 
pleeise his dtistomers; anything' spurious will ndt aae^ 
oeed pettoaMntly, because the pubiio is mfiaefr Aan 
- matiy imagine.' Men and woihen are'^^sh, «]id>^ we all 
prefer piitcha^ng where we can get the mosC'Cckr our 
money ; and we try to find ont where we can mott sorely 
do so. 

Yon may advertiae a spurious article, and ifidace 
many people to call and buy it once, bat they will 
den^mioe you as Kb. imposter and swindler, and^^ur basi- 
ness w^ gradually die out, and leiave you poor: IThis is 



torn. You all need to have your customers return fend 
purch&asr/ again*- A onan said to me, "I IkaT^ tried 
adTextifliiig/ and dld^/nbt^uDceed; yet H bdve ^ ^o^d 
aiticled' i^' -J';;J • i-:'!" .*«' "". i"'/ '»- 'i • - / •■ > "' • •• 

IoiKe{diBdf^^'^M]e(fi»iid^ there marp bier eboeefitionti'to 
agKn6aaderiil0jiiiiBut'h9<r MiycmialTe^ ' 

^^I^M; &t vilr a> ^ekif wmspa^ier : thcreei ifimesi Hfid 
paidta dbllar andbia half for it.'' ' 

£ Tepiiodko ^f fik^ i adudrttaiirg > b iike^ • learaifig -^ ' -ft 
little is a dangerous thing.' '' >; ; * 

A French 't^rttdr MyH'thaV^' Tb€f refad^f <)f a newspa- 
per does not see the first insertion of an ordinary adver- 

tisemmu:r^iiie^1sef6^tA''^^i^ ^, Wt do^s^ Aot 

read r>tf^4hird>ilis^tio«'h^' reads i'fhfe %uiUi tnsertioD, 
he kMlM-^t^Mie^i^^ di^ Mh inistetti^n, b^ speaks of it 
to his wife ^th& sikth'iittertiOn;h6 isreaif to^ purchase, 
and A& «ve4lh iilsertibn, be pui'dhtases.''' Tbui* t)hj6ct 
in aA«trtiB£ftgigt»'*mkft« the public tindeitatand whatt 
you hareigot to mU^ and tf y6a -faafve ^not 'Che pluiik 1x> 
keep-adwAisliigy until 70U htaVe ittpaii?ed (Sxat'informk- 
tion^ oil the money y(m have spent is* lo^. You are 
liha IkB-teUow "wba idld the gentleman if he w6uld 
gkra iiiut.tai cents' i(i tinould eave bfin a dollar. ^ ^* How 
caa riH^^^OH se flfiuch wiAi so small a sum?^ asked 
the gte^BeBMDEK in «iirptise. '^' I started outihU morning 
(hicOQ^ped the ifeUow) wjfli the Itdlkletennination to get 
dnuk^and I harm spent Iby only dollar to accomplish 
the object^ and it baa not quite done it. Ten cents 
worth mose of whiskey' would just do it, and in this 
manner I shotild save the dollar already expended." 

So a.maa who edf eitiies ait till must keep it up u&fii 
the pnblits know who and w&at he is, aad i^hathiS' 



f^^ TBJS AFT OI^ HONnr ttJBI'ITOlJL 

Iiwuia^s ift, M ^6 tbe tiLoii^y mrested in adreilisii^ s 
lost , ' • 

Some men have a peculiar {genius for writing a 
striking lulvert^sement, oue thut wiU arisst the atten- 
tion of the reader at first sight This tact, of coiase, 
givea the Adyertismr a gtai^ ddnuatage^ SdeietiiBes a 
man mak^s himsdf popnlur by am unique t sign or a 
OufiQUS ' dispht/ in his vriodow. Beoeutlyl n^hserved 
a swing sign extending b^er the sidewalk:, iii .£nmt 
of -a. ftdiO» 4n vftiidx .iros tb^i^insoription^ in • plain 
letters, - x 

Of course I.di^i and so didjeve^jbody tld^^|..'l||^ I 
learned that the man had made an indepcoidMtce by 
first attracting the public to- his^ buaA^s in-* thaft way 
and then using his customers w^U aftei'w^rds. 

Genin, the hatter, bought the fy^i Jenny land ticket 
at auction for two hundred amd - twenty: fi^ve- dfdbus, 
because he knew it would be a good adv ei t w i u i c nt' for 
him* '' Wh<> is the bidd^ I " said the anctiafteer,.a6 he 
knocked' down th»t tieket at Cct^tle Gaiden; . r'^ IBenin, 
ihe hatter j"*wa9 the response. Heiao'vere Hiouaaada of 
people from the Fifth Avenue, and £rom distant kcilic^ 
in the h^hest stations in hfe. .^^ Who is > Gmwi,' tb£ 
hatter?" they exclaimed. Tbey had never faeasdofdiim 
before. The next morning tb# newapapers m^^itie^ 
graph bad ciroulated the iwH Irom Maine to Texas^ and 
from five to ten millions of people had nad' that the 
tickets sold at auction for Jenny Lindas first concert 
amounted to about twenty thousand dcdkrs, and that a 
fijng^^ tid^et was sold at . two hundred and Iweu ty-'five 
dollaiis, to ^ Genib, 'the hatter.'^ Men tiireughont: the 



IHB AKT-OF MGl?Br QatMEX^. 495 

co naflfy mvohmtarily^bok off their hats to «ee if they 
had a ^^ OFcnin " hat «d their heads. At a town in loTv^a 
it was foand that -in the crowd around the Post Office, 
there Wtt9 tae tnaii'^ who had a ^ Gemn " hat, and he 
showed it in trinnqifi, although it was worn t)ut and not 
wiH?fli tw» cents; ^* Why," xme man exclaimed, *^you 
hare a- real * Qenin^ haft ; what a luclty fellow'you are." 
Anotbtt matf said •* Sang on to that hat, it will he a 
valuable heir-loom itt yotur fannly . " Still another man 
in tfae crowd, who seemed- to ^ envy fee possessor of this 
good fortune, said, *^ come, give us all a chance ; put it up 
at auction!"'- He did so, and it was sold as alceepsake 
for nine dollars and fifty cents ! What was the conse- 
qneace to Mr. Greiiila ? He sold ten thousand extra hats 
per ^aan^tm^ the first six years. Jfine-tenflis of - the 
piBTchasArs bought 6f him, probably j out of curiosity, 
and many of them, findingthat he gare them an equiva- 
lent for their money, becAme his regular custoiners. 
Thi* -novel adverSseinent first struck their attention, 
and*- then* «8 he made- a good article, they came again. 

Now, ]tdon't say that everybody should advertise as 
Mr. Genin did. But I say if a. man has got goods 
for sale,: and he doa't advertise them in some way, the 
chances are that some day the sheriff will do it for him. 
Nor del say that everybody must advertise in a news- 
papte, or indeed use ^ printers' ink " at all. On the 
conlrary, although that ai-tide is indispensable in the 
majority of cases^ yet doctors and clergymen, and some- 
timed lawyers and scmie others can more effectually reach 
4he p«ibHe in some of&er manner. But it is obvious, 
they must be known in some way, else how could they 
be support^? 

Be polite and itmn to toub 'customers. • Politeness 



^flfg? ; stojcefl,. gilt 8)^89 flamingi) ^dyertiwiwenta, urill 

yi9^^^ : J?a^9M , j^ijlwpptls i Jk^i . j^Wtlj. ,4fc tiha wife. . kjad 
«j5vd; iibar^ .ft, naazi ^ith€.,w»cff« ,gW^W»8i.wjlli.V9, the 

.tOj)fiip$plf a prp^t) wi^igf}^^^a^y /Bu^pas4^tfwt,im.ti» .long 
^H»-io pis b»i?gft u^^^^.t^. ig^J^^iTpl©,.^'^ A»- JB 
w^^ld, that meii.^ouldxl^ to j^Qi^, 4o j^ alao to. ;diem,'' 
apd, ttiqy ; wll do b^tw by yoi^. Jiiii^i if ypu always 
tirea^d. tbem 08 if jfln want^ tflt{ge(;.^bQ mWtyQU Gould 
out o^jt^W fop lil?P )L?MtJ jretmrp. ) M#o. wbo/d^ve sharp 
l)^g^5lTyith 4;^ja: cjwtWiaeipa, a^g . w if . th^y . never 

e]X3)ecte4 tRs^q them ^iM^vWiU 141^ They 

neyei: yRi|l ;8eg J;heiSL . agaka. ^< cuitoiiipra* FeQf^ doat 
lika.to^pay andget Hipked. ^80^*' . / . • • . r ,. « 
, Qjieof ^b^:}is)i;^ief in my Mu^euw oaoe t^idi^ixm he 
intended to.w^ip c^ mam^hp waa m j^a iQCtWQJrcitiaag 
socga. aa he, Q?fliQ Qu^ . ■ •, 1. 

."What for ?"1 inquired. .: . 

..," Because he aaid I -i^aa ^o g^Blj^^aiii". ropliad the 

''Never mind// 1 replied, ^ he pojf ^ for that«iaad yoa 
wULi^qt cpnviace hijpa you are a ^^tlesnanby iWhjippiBg 
him. I canQot; afford to Ipse a customer*. If yo« 79iof 
him, he will never visit the Muaeum a^^aiAi dnd he wiU 
indi^pe £4^^ to go with him to o^b^ plaoes^ef ,aa»ise- 
ment instead of this^and thus, jo^ 8ee> I should t be a 
serious loser," ,] .. 

" But he insulted me," muttered the ushe3U • ' 

« Exacjtly/', I rej>lie^, " apd^ if hjs, QWAed the Museum, 



md y«siih94 IMud him fof tbe rpHrllege of iriaithig* it, 
md be hdd then inwUed you^ there might be some rea- 
son in.jrour resenting it, biit ia this instance he ia the 
aaa ^hp p^ya^ wrbile we ineceive^fami^ytm.inilBt^ fther^ 
are, putup wi^l^ biftibftd mawnersl^ .! * *- ; •' 

My Q$^. laugbmgly x^nierrked} that this imn Biidcnibt)- 
?(Jly the true policy, but he added that he should not 
object to* au increase pfi salary if be was expected toi be 
i b used ip order to. pttomote ray toterests* : 

Bi;.CH4anu.BL64T^Qf <50tirM inei^ should be charitable; 
)ocaiise it is. a duty dnd ^ pleasUrea But even as a mat^ 
;cr o£ po^cy, if you popsQsa no higher incentiTe, yoil 
^vill fiad tboA the liberal mbn will command patronage; 
whil^ tbeaoii^idi usvQharitable mte^t will "be aTOided. 

Soloi^n aaya: ^^ There is that acattereth' aiid yet 
increuspth*; and. there is that withboldeth more than 
meet, but it tendeth to poverty." • Of course the only 
true charity is that which ^is from the heart. 

Tbe:be«t kind of charity is to help those who ar^ 
willing to help themselves. FixHntscuoiis dm^ving; 
without inquiring into the worthiness of the applicant, 
is bad in every sense. But to search out and qniedy 
<.s.sist those who are st^ruggling for themselves^ is* thd 

« 

kiud that .^^ Bcattereth atid yet in<lreafiefth." But don't 
fkU into the idea that>iome persons^ ptuctise, of giving a 
\n'ayet instead of «: potato^ and a bencdictioit instead at 
'•read, to the haqgry* ^ It is. easier to make GhristianB 
with full stomachs than empty, 

Dok't BI4AB. — SofBe men have a' foolish habit of tell* 
ing their 'business seerets. If they make money they 
like to tell their neighbors how it was doiie. Nothing 
is gained by this, and ofttimed much is lost Say noth* 
ing about your pttifits, your hopes» your, expectations^ 



;43B TH^B JkBT OF MONEY OBTMKO. 

your intentions. And this" f^duM ap^ly t6' letters as 
well as to couversstion. ' Goethe'makes Mephistbpliiles 
gay : " never write a letteif nor 'destroy one.** Business 
.mennmsfe write letters, bnt they should be careful what 
they put in them. If- yon ar6 losing monfe'y, Be^specially 
<^nti0n0 and mA tell of it^ or you Will lose yduf reputa- 
tion. 

' Pbeserte your iNTEoannr.— *If Is more priecious flian 
diamonds or rubies. ' Ttte old tniser said to His tons: 
'^Qet money; get it hon^tly^if 7dttTan, but gfet'tooney." 
This advice was not only atrootobsly wicked, btittt was 
the very essence of stupidity. It "wits as much as to say, 
*' if yon find it difficult to obtain money honestly, you 
can edsily get it dishonestly. Get it in that tray." 
Poor fiiol ! Not to know that 4he * most diffictilt tTiiog 
in life is to nTake mon^y dishonestly f not io know fiiat 
oiir prisons are full of men ^ho attempted ta fo&c^ 
this advice ; not to nnderstand that no man can be dis- 
honest without soon being found out, and that when his 
lack of principle is dificovered, nearly every avehue to 
success is doised against him foifever. The ^UbKc very 
properly shun all whose ihtegrity is doubted. No mat- 
ter how polite and pleasant and* accommodating a man 
may be, none, of us diu:e to .deal w^h hilnlf we ifuspect 
^ false weights and measures." fiMct honesty not only 
lies at the foundation of all success in life (fh&ncjally), 
bnt in every other respect. Uncotopitftnising integrity 
of character is invaluable. It secures to its possessor a 
peace and joy which cannot be attained without it — 
which' no amount of money, or houses and lan^* can 
purchase. A man who is known to be 8tricdy*h5nest, 
may be ever so poor, but he has the purses oF aH the 
community at his' disposal;-— for all kliow, 6lat if ^he 



W J 



THE ABT OF MOKEY GETTHKO 49 () 

protnises tOtre|wii what he boixows, he will neyqi dis* 
appoint th^Qtk- As a mere matt^ of selfishness, there- 
fore, if a maa ha^ no higher motive for being honesty 
all wilJt find that the maxim of Dr. Franklin pa^ never 
fail to be trae^ that >' ^ae^y is the best policy/* 

To.get rich, is not always equivalent to being successful • 

^' There are many rich poor men," while there are many 

others, honest and deyout men and women, who have 

never possessed so much money as some * rich persons 

squander in a week, but whq are nevertheless really richer 

and happier than any man can ever b^ while he is a 

transgressor of the higher laws of his being. .^ , 

The inordinate love of ^ money,, no doubt, may be and 

is *' the root. of all pvil," bpt n^oney itself, when properly 

used, is npt only a "handy thing .to have in the house," 

but affords the gratificatipn of blessing o]jr race by 

enabling its possessor to enlarge .th^ s(;ope of human 

happ^n^^ and human influenc^. The desire for wealth 

is nearly universal, and none can say it is ,not laudable, 

provided the possessor of it accepts its responsibilities, 

and uses it as a friend to humanity. 

The history of money getting, which is commerce, is 
a history of civilization, and wherever trade has 
flourished most, there, too, have art and science pro- 
duced the noblest fruits. In fact, as a general thing, 
money getters are the benefactors of our race. To 
Ihem, fn a. great measure, are we indebted for our insti- 
tutions of learning and of art, our academies, col- 
leges and churches. It is no argument against the 
desir^ for, or the possession of wealthy to bay that 
there are sometimes misers who hoard money only 
for the sake of hoarding, and who have no higher aspi- 
ratioA. tl^ to. grasp everything which - comes wiUauin 

23* 



500 THE ABT OF MOKEY GETTINO. 

their reach. As we have sometimes hypocrites in rcl 
ion, and demagogues in politics, so there are occasion ! 
misers among money getters. These, hawever. i 
only exceptions to the genferal rule. But when, 
this coun^T) w^ find ETuch d nnfsance and Btnnil j 
block as a miser, we remember \*ith* gratitude that 
America we harvc no laws of priifa<ygeiiiture,' and that 
the due course of iiature the thne will conie when t 
hoarded dnst will be scattered for the benefit of ihankH 
To all men and women, therefore, do I cons«entio': I 
itxjj make money honestly; and not otherwise, for Shaki 
peare has tmly said, " He that wants money, means r. 
content, is without three good friends." 

' Nearly every paper .in Loudon had something to 5 
about my lecture, ani in almost, every instance : 
tiiatter and manner of the lecturer were unqualifi.' 
approved. Indeed, the profusion of praise quite ov 
whelmed me. The London Times\ December 30, l"-' 

concluded a half-column criticism with the fallov^: 

> i . I . 

paragraph : ' 

* ■ 

:" We are bound to ftdmit Hii\t Mr, Bamnm is one of the most enterfA-; 
lecturers tLiit ever atldrcsscd an audience on a thetAo "univcrtallylnttr.'. 
The iipiiearruvce of Mr. j6amn|Q, it ehmild be 'acK]<^, haf noting vf * 
'charlatan* about it, but is that of the thoroughly respectable mafi of bu.-:. 
and lie has at command a fond of diy h^mor that amvnifee!? everylKMiK - 
laufdit^f, ^fhH« Iw himself rcinAin^ perf^otlv setvoua. A 66iiarans vsAcf .^ 
a^liuirabiy clear delivery complete his qualificationa as a lecinrer, in w 
6af^\city be x9 no ^ftuibbug;' either in a hi|^r or liyvrer cAaite^l tbe HPnl." 

. The Londoti iforninff Pqsty the Achertiser^ ^&€h'-\ 
iclcj the Tel£grtipU, the 'Herald^ the Keios^ the &to5e, L 
Sim^ and other lessor journals' of the saitie date, a* 
contained lengthy and favorable nbtices afid criticis:: 
of my lecture. My own lavish advertisements were \. 
nothiilg to the notoriety which the London newspapo: 
Votenfarily add editdrially gave tb my new enterprisL 



The We€fkfy finA UteWi^ pB,pm Iblbmed in :tli^" train ; 
and even Puneh^ whicfi^ had a}#eddy done ^ miiich t^ 
keep Tom Thumb before the public, ga^ve me a JuAS^ 
pag^e notice, with an illustratioQ, and' theii»ifter facvored 
me WiA fre(Juent pai:ttgTa{)hir. The citfy ihu« j^pared 
the pit>vinft69^ to gite me ik e(Mi^ ji^eeptidii; *. 

Dafifirg4he^.yter 1850*, I dett?«ftdi ^id te?5ti!M ^arly 
one hundred times in different parts of Bnglond, 
returaing odcasjbfaallf tb iLdndMh to repeat It to> fresh 
andie&ees, and always Wi& peciidiAry mi^c^^. £wi^ 
provifteidl - paper h«l sOmetiiIng to »«^ bbottt Baiimtti 
and ^* The art of Mon^y Getting,**^ atid I Wa^ nether mo)tb 
pleasanfly or profosely ^tertised;- iTb^ ttmr, tOd'vtnUdb 
me aeqnainted with man^ new pe(>pl^ - and added fr^h 
and fast fri^fids to mj^ ecnHnUally incr^ading Ifat* My 
lectaring seclsOn is among my most gtateful ifiembries of 
England. ] ^ 

Remembieilng my experiences, 'edme yeard beford, 
with General Totn Thumb at' Oxford ofed Cambridge, 
and the fondness of the undergraduates f* pi*^€%ictfl 
joking, I was quite prepared when I rtiade up ttiy- taind 
to visit- those Two cities, to take ariy quantity of •' "ehaff *' 
and lampooning which the University biys might choose 
to bring. I was dure of 8i full hottsg in 0afi^ -^Ity, ind 
as I was anxious te earn all tii6 mMey I conld, 4Sb af to 
hasten fey deKverten<H^ ftoiA fihaftifeial ^dSlR^nfties/i* ftiDy 
resolved to put up with whatever offered — inde^dv)^ 
rather^ Hkbd the idea erf' ail episQde fn tfe fitfeady^rtit^ of 

* * * 9 

prai^ which' had foUdwed my lecture eVery whef&, and 
T felt, too, in the coiAing encounter that I mi^« give 
quite as mnch ds I was compell^ to take. 

I commenced at Cambridge, and, as I expeclfed. To fen 
overflowing house, largely ctom^oded of iuldergradtjisites 



5QS ^W^ i^BT OF MONST OETTIKO. 

So«a after I begail to spcfal^, one of the ycnmg men 
(Galled out: ^* Whore k Joice Hcth? " to which I very 
iboUy replied : . , ' 

^^ Young gentleikiaQ, please to restarain yourself till the 
(eoncltt«i|Oii tif the leetur^^ whea I shall take great 
delight in a&i^ditf^g yoa, or aiiy others of her postentr, 
£(11 tfae n£(MA^tim I possess toQcemiog yoor deceased 
.telativer 1 • ; ^ ' . 

: TSiii) reply ttimed the laugh ogaltist the youthful and 
asixiOus iaquicer at)d hc^ ^he effect' of keeping other 
'rtodeiits quiist for a half hour. Thereafter, i questions 
of a similar ofaimoter . were oocasionally npcoponnded, 
but- as each' inquiirer gtoerally received a prompt Roland 
for hlU Qli\Mt th^e w^ &r leap interruption than I 
liad anticipated. The proceeds of the evening were 
mord thaii One hundred pounds sterling, an important 
addition to my treasury at that time. At the close of 
,the lecture, several students invited^ me to a sump- 
tuous suppet where I met^ amoi^ other undergraduates, 
a nephew of Lord Macaulay» the historian. This 
yoiwg gef^tleman insisted upon my breakfasting with 
him Hi; his rooms next morning, but as I, was anxious to 
take an ' eairly train for London, I only called to leave 
;my oardy And after his *^g}'p " had given me a strong 
oup of/Coffeci I heastened away, leaving the young 
MA^atil^y, whom I did not wish to 4istatb; faat asleep 
an-bed^ / . - 

M Olcford the large hall was filled half an hour 
.'b^ra the time announced for the lecture to . ^begia and 
the sale of tickets was stopped. I then stepped upon 
the platform, and said : ^^ Ladies and Gentlemen : As 
every seat is occupied and the ticket-'offi.ce is dosed, 
I propose to . pijoceed with my lecture noWt an^ not 
keep you waiting till tlie advertised hour." 



** Good for yon, old, BJEunaum," said one; ^^fFim^ is 
money," said andther ; '* Nothing like eoonomy^*' came 
from a third, adid other reiaaxka and. exdiuaBtioiiB 
followed whieh e:icited mach laughter in the andir 
ence. Holding up my hand as a signal tibat.I was 
anxions te say something so soon assilenot du)uld 
be restored, I thus addressed my .audieBce:. 

^^ Yonng gentlemen^ I have a woid ex two.to' say» in 
order that we may.haye a thorough ! undersfianding 
between omrselves at the putset. - 1 see symptoms of a 
pretty jolly time. here this evening^. and yx>vL have paid 
me liberally for the single hour of mf time whaoh is at 
your service. I am an old traveller and an old show- 
man, and I like to please my patrons. Now, it is quite 
immaterial to> me ; you may furnish the' exutertainsnent 
for the hour, dr I will endeavor to do so, or we will take 
portions of the time hy turns *-^ you supplying a part 
of the amusement, and I a part ;-**<- as we say sometimes 
in America,'^ yon paya your money, and you takes your 
choice.'" 

My auditors were in the best of humor from the 
beginning, and my frankness pleased theuL '^ Good fbir 
yon, old Barnum," cried their leader; and I went on 
with my lecture foiL some fifteen minutes, when a voice 
called out: 

'^ Come, old chap ! you must be tired by this thne ; 
hold up now till we sing * Yankee Poodle,' " whereupon 
they all joined in that pleasing air with a vigor which 
showed that they had thoroughly prepared themselves 
for the occasion, and meanwhile I took a chair and sat 
down to show them that I. was quite satisfied with their 
manner of passing the time. When the song was ocoi- 
cluded, the leader of the party said: ^^ Now, Mr. Bar- 
num, you may go ahead again." 



SKI SME, ABT or Minms mss^xsi^. 

I. looked Bt mjr watdi sad . qtdetljr reif^^lil^f ^ Oh ! 
ihete iff tnnefiir kts qf filn yet ; we li/9^e nearly forty 
mimiteo of thi >iioiH: lemaiiiiog/" and. I p^eeed^d with 
my iectore^ or rather a lecture^ £qx I began to adapt my 
iBinarks to fke^udieBceiand.the occasion, ^intervals 
.of iaa suxuites^ or >BO^ caniiB .interroptiou whkh I,, as 
my audience saw, d&illy: enjeyed as mach as- tbe lionae 
idid. Whe« this lioisoeUaQeoils I enffiztaiiuiieitf jm4 con- 
idinted, .and I ^stopped short at the end of &e hour, 
crowds* of ^e 'young men pressed forwaid to ahake 
ha^ds with sie, dechuring that they had . had a ^^ jolly 
good tfane," whife. the ieadesr Jtaid : ^^ Stay with \m a 
-week, Saraum^ and me will dine you, wine yo^» and 
giFO you fuli houses every night/! But I waa annou&ced 
to Jbecture in Londoathe next oreniDg -and I. could not 
aooeptithe pressing invitation, though I would giadly 
haye. stayed thcough -the. week. They asked. me all 
sorts of' questions -about America, the Muaeum^ my 
Tariotts shows axul successes, and . expressed the hope 
that I would come out of my clock troubles all rig^t. 

At Inst aacore.of .ihem pressed me to breakfast with 
themr neoct momiztg, but I declined, till one young :gentle- 
man put it on: this purely personal ground::. '^My. .dear 
sir, you must breakfast > with me ; I have almost spUt 
my throat in screaming here to-night and it is only fair 
that you should repay me by coming to see me in the 
morning.'* This iq)peal was in^esistible, and at the 
appointed time I met him and half a dozen of his 
friends at his table and. we spent a very pleasant hour 
togedii^r; They complimented me on the tact and 
.equanimity I had eachil^ited the previous evening, but I 
replied: ^^Ohl I.wa9'quite.in£liQed.to hare yon enjoy 
jxmi-Bgoi^ aad camaiuUy pvepased for if: 



THB ABT OF MONEY GBTTIK0. 505 

But they liked better, they said, to get the party angry. 
A fortnight before, they told me, my friend Howard 
Paul had left them in disgust, because they insisted 
upon smoking while his wife was on the stage, adding 
that the entertainment was excellent and that Howard 
Paul could have made a thousand pounds if he had- not 
let his anger driv^ 4i^ i^ ■'My neW-found friends 
parted with mp at the j^ailv$ray statiqii, heartily urging 
me to come again, and my ticket seller returned £169 
as the immediate restllt of an evening's good-natured 
fun with the Oxford boys." - ■ > < 

After SeliveriQg my feature many J;imes in different 
places, a promineflt ptibHsfaing house in Ijondon,- offered 
meJBl,200 (|fi,000,) for .the copyright. This oflfer I 
declined, not that I thought th6 iecttwe worth more 
money, but b^au^ I bail eng^g^ to deliver it in several 
towns and dties^ and I thought the publication would 
be detrimental to the puhilic delivery of ray' l^o* 
tiure. Jt was a source of very .considerable emolument 
to me, bringing i^ much money, which w;^nt towards the 
redemption of my pe^euniary oblig^tioxxs, ?o that the lec- 
ture itaelf was an admirable illustration, of '^ The Art of 
Money ^Getting/' « 



> ( 



. CHAPTER XXXIX, 

A3r ENTBBiPSIKrKCi ENGLlfeHBIAK. 



JOr SirOZJSH YAXOfXa^ur FXBST UTTSBYISW with ^IX — his F^iAIIB baskd ot 
BARNUM^S BOOK— ^ADVERTISIKG' VoE PA^NBBB — l^OW xIT B0I.KS MAI^B 
HDC RICH— METHOD IN MADITBSS — TH^ ^3A9iWM*' Of BVBlT-^ bpQfBX TQ 
TOM 'thumb ANP commodore KUTT — MY AGENT IK PARIS -- MR A8XJRING A 
MONSTER — HOW OIAirrSAlTO DWARf* STRETCH AWD CONTRACT — A7f UX- 
"WlUaSQ KEBVGHICAH— A rEBSISTUiT MB^UBBR — A QIOANTIC HOauirG — 
THE BTEAM-EKOINES "B/VRNUM** AND " CHARITY " — WHAT **'CHABIT Y " I>ID 
FOR '^BAHNTK"— SBLUNQ T^ BlOUt irO#I>$ A 7H6t7*AND KHdB^TBE 
GREAT' <]AKBS—a)MlWU 801UU.Y — XBS 8ANX|CA«Y CQMMTSMOX VAfR, 

w 

' While visiting Manchester, in 1858, 1 was invited by 
Mr. I^eacock, the lessee, to deliver a lecture in f * Free 
Trade Halh* I gare a lecture, the title of which F now 
forget ; but I well remember it contained numerbus per- 
scfnal reminiscences. The next day a gendeman ^nt 
his card to toy room at the hotel where I was stopping. 
I requested the -servant to show the gentleman up at 
once, and he soon appeared and introduced' himself. 
At first he seemed somewhat embarrassed, but gradually 
broke the ice by saying he had been pleased in listening 
to my lecture the previous evening, and added that he 
knew my history pretty well, as he had read my auto- 
biography. As his embarrassment at first meeting with 
a stranger wore away, he informed me that he was joint 
proprietor with another gentleman in a " cotton-mill " 
in Bury, near Manchester, " although," he modestly 
added, " only a few years ago I wa^ working as a jour- 
neyman, and probably should have been at this time. 



had it not been for yottr book." Observing my «urj)]^ise 
at this annonncement, he continned : 

" The fact is, Mr. Bamum, upon reading your auto- 
biography, I thought I perceived you tried to make 
yourself out something worse than you resdly were ; for 

^ I discovered a pleasant spirit and a good heart under tbe ^ 
rougher exterior in whie^ you ehosa to present yourself 
to the public; but," he added, ^ after reading your 
life I found myself in possession of renewed stFdlngth, 
and awakened energies and- aspirations, and I said' to 
myself, ^ Why can't I 'go ahead smd make money ad Baiv 
num did? He commenced without money and suc- 
ceeded; why may not I?' In this train of thought," 
he continued, " I went to a newspaper office and adver- 
tised for a' partner with money to join me in eGrtabiishing 
a cotton-mill. I had no applications, and, remembering 
your experiences when y6u had money and wanted a 
partner, I spent half a cro\vn in a similar experiment. 
I advertised for a partner to join a man who had plenty 
of capital Then I had lots of applicants ready to intro- 
duce me info all sorts bf occupations, from th^t of a 
banker to that of a horse-jockey or gambler, if I would 
only furnish the money to start with. After a while, I 
advertised again for a partner, and obtained onjB with 
money. We have a good mill. I devote myself closely 

,to business, and have been very successful. I know 
every line in your book ; so, indeed, do several members 
of my family ; and I have conducted my* business on the 
principles laid down in your published 'Rules for 
Money-makiog.' I find them correct principles; and, 
sir, I have sought this interview in order to thank you 
for publishing your autobiography,. and to tell you that 
to that act of yours I attribute my present position in 
life." ^ 



506 :A^, m^a^mm^i^fi^ mtmsmw^. 

tion, and, feeling th^t my n^w frieadi wjjom. I;fvaU/c^ 
Mr» WikpUj hajd somewhat exaggerated the remltB of 
my labors, a^ influencing his owji, I fiai4 * 

" Your ^t^tamQut i^ certainly very flattering^ and I am 
gla<l \£ X biaye bean aUe in any manner, tbrpugb mj 

expmmm^tM c44 ym.in p^^ting w life ; b^t X iw^si^tfae 

your gfflsiW'FcmW iayi^ foijnd .Ten*, m gpQ4 jiiftif I 
h8d,»^iiier;.iwri4tpa a boftf , . . 

*' Np,in/^gd i^ Wiwid; P9fer'' Ijft repjie4> i^ l» «»i»e8t 
tone ;, '-{ .a# su^a I ^bQul^ Ji^vs w^cm:^^?^ ^ f^ miU^Jiand 
iiljl my life if it JaLa4 not t^eoi ^or.you. 01^, I iic^F? node 
no Bi^X!^ 9f j.lf,'' he cpntiuued ; V^he 9omaEi^cial maa 
witd whppi X 4p^ Isw)W ^l ajbout i( : iade^^, i^^y coll 
me. * Bftwum ' qr 'iQbftUge her/a. in Maadtifister/'^ . 

: ^btf fMgu)^ yet. .gmfcifyi^ iate^Fiew led . to . «ftv«ral 
otbera, wA. froaji tfeat^tisjie ^ w^gji ^pQEa^KOfd j&iejadif]bip 
8p«»0g ^p bfttwesp »Si. J» ow fion^versatipps, imy.^thu- 
sifistie fae^d 7Hrpi4]4 pflf^m quotes «d^tirp pages from .my 
autpbiogr^phy, wl^ic^ I hftd ftlpaft^jk forgotten ; ^,^fi^ 
he h£||d.frefltM«Btly vi^i^ »0, by ?ppqi?itfl^ent,wl^^WB I 
bftppeiied to ljp,«tpppi«< in ^ie^enrt partaof Cfepat 
Bjfitftiu, be wpuld write n^e If^era, pftoJ^i qu^tipg §ci9p^ 
of .my co&i^er^aAioq, .An4 exi^liog wl^ bei;^^^ the 
*^ Mfisdcya " pf tbpf9 icai:$.lpfi6 . i^^im^rka. X }aughqd at 
him^ cind.^toW few M®. wa^.abou); half Bamumft?ra*y. 
•* Wf^^i' be replied, *'.then there i^ method in. my «ad- 
nesa, for whenev^er I follow tl^e 3arunm rules J aqi 

aiwi^ys $uccp8sful.'' 

«0n one ocGa6i<^;i| whe^ Gen^^l Tom Thumb exhi- 
bited in Bury^ Mr, Wilson .dosed his ^ull^ and gave 
ef^oh of his eniplpyes a ticl^et to the exhibition ; out 
of respect, as h» Sftid. to B^rpupi. Op .a avbseqwent 



AN £NT£ItPBISIHa BNGLISHHAIf. 509 

occadom^ when jthe. little Qeneral Tisited finglaod the 
last time, Mr* Wilson invite^ himy his wife, Coo^modore 
Nutt, Minnie Warren, and the managers of " the show," 
to a splendid and sumptuous dinner at his house, which 
the distinguished little party enjoyed exceediugly; and 
several interesting incidents occurred on th^ plecusant 
oocaaion, which the miniature guests will never cease 
to remember with gratitude. Whei^ I was about to 
leave Eoglwd f^r hQU)^, in i^$9, my f^e^d Wilson 
made-an appop^fcmex^ tp .come .l;o li^erpQa]! to ^e tne 
off. He earner the. |lay. before I sailed,; and fb,ro$(ghi(; his 
little daughter, some twelve ye^i;8 old, with Jw»*' We 
had a remj^kably pleawnt and: spcial time, aQd:I did 
not part with them until the tug was almost dropping off 
from the steamer in the river, Merpi^y. It was a veiy 
reluctant parting. We waye^ our handkerchiefs until 
we OPuld 1^0 longer distinguish each qthev ; atid up to 
the presept exiting we have never aga^i m^t. To my 
numeroi;^ invitatjions to him and his fan|ily, to visit me 
in America, he sends but one response, -«^ th^t, ^ yet, 
his business will not permit him to leave home; I hope 
ere long to receive a different answer. Our correspond- 
ence has been regularly kept up ever since we parted. 
My friaid Wilson expressed hin^lf extretmely iani^- 
ious to do any service for me which might at ^ny ti|ne 
be in hip power. Soon after - 1 arrived in ATnerica, I 
read an account of a French giant, then exhibiting in 
Paris, and said to be over eight feet in height As this 
was a considerably greater altitude than any specimen 
of the ffemts homo within my knowledge had attained, 
I wrote to my friend to take a trip to Paris^ for me> 
secure an interview with this modem Anak> and by 
actual measurement obtain for xote his exact heightt I 



510 AN ENTERPBISINQ ^KGUSHBCAlT; 

enclosed on offer for tMs gianfs serricesr; arrangrng the 
price on a sliditig BCdle, according to what hiB height 
bhould actually prove to he, —• commencing at eight 
feet, and descending to seven feet two inches; and, if 
he wa9 not taller than the latter figtire, I did not want 
him at all. 

Mr. Wilson, placing an English -fwo-foot rule m his 
pocket, «tart^d-foj^ Pans ; and, affce^ mneh difficaltyand 
several days' delay in trying to speak ^ with ihe giant, 
tvho was closely watched hy hi^ exhibitor, Mir. Wilson 
sncoeed^d, by the aid of kn intei^pretcr, in exchanging a 
few words with him, and appointing an interview" at bis 
own- (the giant's) lodgings. And now came a trouble 
which required all the patience and diplomacy* which 
my agenft'fcoidd command. Mr. Wilson, arriving at the 
place of rendezvous, told the gianf who heivas, and the 
object of' his visit. In fact, he showed him my fetter, 
and read the tempting dflfers which Imade for his ser- 
vices, provided hfe meastnred eight feet, or eyeii came 
wi^iin six inches of that- height. 

*'Oh, I measure over eight feet in height,^ batfl the 
giant *^ Very likely," replied my faithful agenfc'* but 
you see niy orders are to measure you." '*Theite*a no 
need ot that, you can see for }*ourself,"stretcSiihg'- him- 
self up a few inches, by aid- of that pecuHto mi^nlar 
kn^ck which giants and dwarfs exercise when Aey 
desire to extend or diminish their apparent tffatnrc. 
'* No doubt yon are right," persisted the agent ; " but 
you see that is not according to orders." **- W^ll, tetand 
alongside of me; see, the top of your hat do n*t come to 
my shoulder,** said the giant, as he swung his' arm com- 
pletely over Mr. Wilson's head, hat and all. 

But jny wary agent happened just then to be watch- 



Qg tbe>gia^t.'6 1^ S^ixd kiiQes,. fMaid he thought lie saw ^ 
[novettienjt m'oiuad.the ^^u^del^6iUuldiags'' tl^it materially 
aelped the ^leyatioa of the " uppexworks." " It is all 
^^ery well," said Mr, Wilsou ; " but I tell you I have 
brought a two-foot x^le froizi England, and, if I am not 
permitted t^ measure your height with th^^t, I shall not 
engage you." My offer had been very liberal ; in fact, 
proYidod he was eight fqet ^ighjit was more thax^ four 
imes Ihe «in8)ur|t the g^a|it was then ^ceiving ; it w^ 
3vidjsntiy ja |pre%t tem^ptqtiqp to his '^ highn^?/' and 
^uite as e.vidoiitiy he did iiot w^nt to ^ fajrly m^sured. 
•Wdl/* a^d the giant;, "if you <?ftn't take my word 
or it, look at .thftt dpQir ; you see myhead is more than 
^wo ieet «ji>0¥^ .the top : " (giving his neck and every 
muscle in .his body asevere .stretch.:)- "just measure the 
beight of that dOPj:," My English friend plainly saw 
that the giant {eit that l^ ^could fiot cQu^e up to. the 
mark, and he Ip^gbed at this last ru^e. "Oh). I don't 
want to ipeai^are .the ^oor ; I prefer to measure jou," 
said Mr. Wilson,. coolly. The giant was ,now desperate, 
and, staretohiBg himself up to the highest point, he e:s:- 
claimed : " W-ellj be /t^uick !. put your rule down to my 
feet ajQkd mea8\ire me ; np delay, if you please." 

The giant knew he cpuld not hold himself up many 
seconds to the few extra inches he had imparted to his 
extended muscles ; but his remark had drawn Mr. Wil« 
sons attention to his feet, and from th^ feet to the boots, 
and he began to open his. eyes, " Look here, Monsieur," 
he exclaimed with much earnestness, " this sort of thing 
wont do, you know. I don't understand this contrivance 
around the soles of. your boots, but it seems to me you 
have got a set of springs in there which materially aids 
your altitude a few inches when you desire it. Now, I 



51 3 AN BNTSBPRiama bkoxiIBhhak. 

shall stand no moi^ nonsenses If I ongageyoji at all, 
you must first take off your boots, and lie fiat upon your 
back in the middle of the floor ; there you will have no 
purchase, and you may stretch as much as you like ; and 
for every inch you fairly measure above seven feet two 
inches you know what I am authorized to give you.'' 
The giant grumbled and talked about his word being 
doubted and Ms honor adsailed, but Mr. Wilson calmly 
persra^ed^ imtil' at length he slowly took off bis coat and 
gradually got down otk the floor. Stretched ypon his 
back, he made several vain efforts to extend his natural 
height* Mr. Wilson carefully applied his • £ngliah two- 
foot rule, the result of the measurement causing liim 
much astonishchent and the giant more indignation, the 
giant measuring exactly seven feet one and one h;df 
inches. So he was not engaged, and my agent returned 
to England and wrote me a most amusing let^r, giving 
the particulars of the gigantic interview.- 

On the occasion of tlie erection of a new engine in his 
mill, Mt. Wilson proposed naming it after his dai^hter, 
but she insisted it should be christened ^^ Barnum,'* and 
it was so done, with, considerable ceremony. Subse- 
quently he introduced a second engine into his enlarged 
mill, and named this, after my wife, " Charity-.'* 

A short time since, I wrote informing him that I de- 
sired to give some of the foregoing facts in my bookj 
nnd asked him to give me his consent, and also to 
furnish me some particulars .in regard to the engines, 
and the capacity of his mill. He wrote in return a 
modest letter, which is so characteristic of my whole- 
soiiled friend that I cannot forbear making the foliowiug 
extr E^^ts- from • it : 



AN ElirnSRPRlSIXG ENGLISHMAl^. 618 

HaA^T irmde ft ibrtum of jnoO^OOO' I fiboiild have b^nt ptohd of fikteh a pUee in 
your bqok ^a Alt>ert Smith has iu your Autobiography; but, Q(A I have only bf^t^n 
aliU; to in'uko (here he named a sum which in this country would be eonMidor(;d 
almodi a fitt-tme)^ I fM L 8)v)uld bet out of pUco in your oogea; at all evonta, 
if you mention me at all, draw it mildly, if you please. 

ITie American war has made *xd hatocfn out tratle/ and It is only by close atten- 
tion to bVMiwst l^al I ^avo lately b^en at all 0UGce.«ifiiL I have b}^ilt a place for 
one thousand looms, and have, as you knoW, put in a pair of cn|?incs, which I have 
uaiiiefl' "Barnmn " and * 'Charity.*^ £ac^ cn^iA^ hM its nkkae dngnaved on two 
lar^e bvaaf platea at £itUci; end of the. oy Under, which haa oftqn caused mtich 
mirth when I have explained tlie clrouuistances to visitors. 1 started' and chris- 
tened f^ChRtStgr" on Hunltth of Jatiuat^. last, And itoanft aavdd aaa jn^per 
month in coahi ever since. The steam from the boiler goes firs^to *' Charity" (sho 
is hijijh pressure), and " Barnum '* only gets the steam after she ha4 dolid with it 
lie hati te ^nn^ M ]o\^ ^ressur^ (o pt»|i<ViTi><«ing engipe), ai^d tt^e.ro^plt JB a.^i^^ng. 
liarnum was extravagant wheu he togk steam direct, but, since I fixed Charity 
betwkt him and the kiiler,- he oak only gpt what she gives* hhn. This remhids 
me that jon atate in yonr *' Ltfe \* y^iu could always maJto nwne^, hut formerly did 
not save it. Perhaps you never too'k care of it till Charity became Chancellor of 
Excheqii^r. i Whan I visited yon at th« Bull Hotd, in Blackburn, you i)oiated to 
(leneral Topi Thumb, and said: "That is m^' piece of goods; I have sold it huu- 
dri'ds of tbou.^ands 6f times, and Rave never yet deUvered itr** Tliat was tea 
years ago, in 18D8. , }f I ^iftd b^n doiag tl^a saoiq vith iny pieces of calico, I most 
have been wealtliy by this time: but I have been hammering at one (cotton) nail 
sovernl months, atod, as It dW not oflBbr to cHnch, I was almost tempted to d6ubt 
one of your '! raknt," and tfaoi^ht I would ddvo at some other nful; ^ut, on reflec- 
tion, I knew I understood cotton better than anything else, and so I back up 
your nde and stick to cotton, not dottbting it^will be all right ^d suiDoeasfuL 



Mr. Wilson was one of the large class' of English 
manufactnrers who snffered seriously from €he effects of 
the rebellion in the United States. As an Englishman 
he conld not have a patriot's^ interest in the progress of 
that terrible struggle ; but he made a practical exhibition 
of sympathy for the suffering soldiers, in a pleasant and 
chamcteristic manner. 

ITie great^'fair of the* Sanitary Commission, held in 
Xew York during the war, aflPords one of the most 
interesting chapters in American history. It meant 
cordial for the sick and suffering in' the hospitals, and 
balm and relief for the wounded in the field. None 
of thode who visited the Fair will forget, in- the multi- 
plicity of offerings to put money into the treasury of the 

83 



514 '^ EiirrBBPBisiHa BarfiTjaHMAy. 

Comniisflioii, two monster cakee, which were as atiange 
in shape and draament as they were fairly mammoth in 
their proportions. One of these great cakes was cov- 
ered with miuiature forts, ships of war, cannon, armies, 
arms of the whole " panoply of war," and it excited the 
attention of all visitors. This strange cake was what is 
called in Bury, England, where name, cake and custom 
originated, a ^^ Sinmel cake," and an interestii^ history 
pertains to it 

There is an anniversary in Bury, and I believe only in 
that place in England, called *' Simnel Sunday." Like 
many old observances, its origin is lost in antiquity 5 but 
on the fourth Sunday in Lent, which is Simnel Sunday, 
everybody in Bury eats Simnel cake. It is a high day 
for the inhabitants, and the streets are thronged with 
people. During the preceding w^ek, the shop windows 
of the confectioners exhibit a plethora of large, flat 
cakes, of a peculiar pattern and of toothsome composi- 
tion. Every confectioner aims to outdo his rivals in the 
bigness of t}^e one ^ow-cake which nearly fills his win- 
dow, and in the moulding and ornamental accessories. 
A local 4e8criptipn, giviog^the requisite characteristics, 
says : '^ The great Simnel must bie rich, must be big, and 
must be novel in ornamentation." Such is the Simnel 
cake, the specialty of Simnel Sunday, in the town of 
Bury, in Old England. 

And such was the monster cake, with its warlike em- 
blems, which attracted so much attention at the Fair, 
and added considera|)ly to the recedpts for the Sanitary 
Comn\ission« It was sent to me expressly for this Fair, 
by my frien4 Wilson, and, while it was in itself a g^er- 
ous gift, it was doubly so as comipg from 91a JEjogli&h 
manufacturer who had suffered by the war* Tijie second 



AK EKTBBPBISING EKGLISHHAN.] 615 

great Simnel cake which stood beside it in the Fair was 
sent to me personally by Mr. Wilson ; but with his per- 
mission I took much pleasure in contributing it, with his 
own oflFering, for the benefit of our suflFering soldiers. 

It may thus be seen that my friend Wilson is not 
only ^' an enterpiiaiiig £|lgH.s^m(Lq^" .bu| that he is also 
a generous, noble-hearted man, — one who in a great 
struggle like the late civil war in America, could sin- 
cerely sympathize with suffering humanity, notwitk- 
standwg) as he ei^pressQd it, '' the American war has 
made sad havoc in our trade." His soul soars above 
'' pounds, shillings and pence "; and I take great pleasure 
in expressing admiration for a gentleman of such marked 
enterprise, philanthropy and integrity. 



CHAPTER XXXm. 



I 



KICHAKD'S HIMSELF AGAIN. 



ja HOXB-r-XXSOfQITISHialirr 03* THY CXOCK PXBTS— A BiUICA]^!^ PROFOBUIDS 

— BARNtTMON HIS FZET AGAIX — BE-^URCHASB OF THB MTTSEUM — A GALA 
PAY — MT RfcCtenOW BY HT ntlENt>8 — TfeOB BTbRT OF JfiT ntCnTBX.SS — 
HOW I WADED ASHOBB^FHOMIS^a TO THE PITBLIC — THE PmUC KBaFO>fi» 

— MUSEUM VISITORS — THB RECEIPTS DOUBI*ED — HOW THE PRESS ftECEITEO 
TUB KIEWS OF BBSTOBATION-^THB STOOk^Aim— «LD AlTD FA«T nUKS'X>§ 

— BOBB&T BOITKER — CONBIJ>BBATION AKI> COURTBSIC OF CBEDITOIKS — THB 
P08T0N SATURDAY BVE2fIirG GAZfeTTE AGAIK — A:SOTkER WORD FOB BABXTM. 



In 1859 I returned to the United States. During my 
last visit abroad I had secured many noyelties for the 
Museum, including the Albino Family, which I engaged 
at Amsterdam, and Thiodon's mechanical theatre, which 
I found at Southampton, beside purchasing many curi- 
osities. These things all afforded me a liberal commis- 
sion, and thus, by constant and earnest effort, I made 
much money, besides what I derived from the Tom 
Thumb exhibitions, my lectures, and other enterprises. 
All of this money, as well as my wife's income and a 
considerable sum raised by selling a portion of her 
property, was faithfully devoted to the one great object 
of my life at that period — my extrication from those 
crushing clock debts. I worked and I saved. When my 
wife and youngest daughter were not boarding in Bridge- 
portf they lived frugally in the suburbs, in a small one- 
story house which was hired at the rate of $150 a year. 
I had now been struggling about four years witk the 
difficulties of my one great financial mistake, and the end 



still seemed to be far off, I felt that the laad^ purchased 
by my wife ia East- Bridgeport at the assignees' sale, 
would, after a whUe, increase rapidly in value ; and on 
the streqgth of this expectation, more money was bor- 
rowed for the sake of taking up the clock notes, and 
some of the East Bridgeport property was sqld in single 
lots,' the- proceeds going to the same object 

At last, in Maroh lti6Q,. all the clock indebtedness 
was aatiafactojrily extinguished* excepting some $20,000 
which I had bound myself to .take up within a certain 
numjlier of months, my friend, J^mes D. Johnson, guaran- 
te^ng my bond ^ to. that. effect. Mr,. Johnson ww by 
far ipy most effective agent in "vyorking me throng^ these 
clock troubles,, and in aiding to bring them to. a success- 
ful conclusion. Another man, however^ who pretended 
to be my friend, and whom I liberally paid to assist in 
bringing me out of my difficulttes, gained, my confidence, 
possessed himself of a complete knowledge of the 
situation of my affairsy and then coolly proposed. to Mr. 
Johnson to counteract cdl yiy effQrjts to get outpf debt, 
and to divide- between. them what could be got out .of 
my estate* Eailing in this,, the scoundrel, taking advan- 
tage of the confidence reposed in - him, ^lyly arranged 
with the owners of clock notes to hold on to them, and 
share with him whatever they might gain by adopting 
his advice, he assuming* that he 'knew all m/y seorets and 
that I would -soon come out all : righit again. Thus I 
had to contend with foes from within as well as without ; 
but the " spotting " t)f th^s traitor was worth something, 
for it opened my eyes in relation to former transactions 
in which I had intrusted large sums of money to his 
hands, and it put me on guard for the future. But I 
bear no 'malice^ towards him ; .1 only pity him, as.I do 



518 mCHAKD'S HIMSELF AG AW, 

any man who knows so little of the true rb^ to 
contentment and happiness as to think that it lies in the 
direction of dishonesty, 

I need not dwell npoil the details of what i suffered 
from ttie doings of those heartiest, unscrupulous men 
who fetten upon the misfortunes of others. It is 
enough to say that I triumphed over them and all my 
troubles. I was once more a free man. At last I was 
able to make proclamation that "Richard's hiiriself 
again ** t that Bamumwas once more on his feel. The 
' Museum had not flourished gteatly in the hands 
of Messrs. Greenwood & Butler, and so, when I was 
free, I wa? quite willing to take back* the pixiperty 
upon terras that were entirely satisfactory to them. 
I had once retired from the establishment a man of 
indepeufleut fortune; I was now ready to return, to 
make, if possible, another fortune. 

On the 17th of March, 1860, Messrs. Butler& Green- 
wood signed an a^eement to sell and deliver to me on 
the following Saturilay, March 24th, thei^ good will 
and entire interest in the MuSetim collection. This 
fact was thoroughly circulated and it was everywhere 
announced in blazing posters; placards and adverlise- 
ment6 which were hdkded, "Bamum on hife feet 
sigain."" it Was furthermore stated that the Xfuseum 
wonilfl be closed, March' iiith,- for one v^ek forTepairs 
and' ^neral -rehbvation, to be * re-opened, lifar^* 31st, 
under the mafiagemeilt arid proprietorship of its 
original owner: It was also announced that on the 
night of closing I would address the audience from the 
stage. ^ . • ' . . 

• The American MUseum, dec6rated on ^at occasion, 
•as 'd* hdlldaya, '-wtth ^a' bfllliarit display of 'ftb^ and 



BICHABD'S HIMSELF A6AIK. 519 

batmen, was filled to its ntmost capacity, and I expe^ 
rienced profound delight at seeing hundreds of old 
friends of both sexes in the audience. I lacked but 
four months of. being fifty years of ^e ; but I felt all 
the vigor and ambition that fired me when I first took 
possession of tide premtse's twenty years before ; and 
I was cbnfident that the tarious experiences df that 
score of years would be valuable to me in my second 
effort to secure an independence. 

At the rising cff the Curtain and before the play Com- 
menced, I stepped on the stage and was received by 
the large and brilliant audience with an enthusiasm 
far surpassing anything of the kind I had ever experi- 
enced or witnessed in a public career of a quarter of a 
century. Indeed, this tremendous demonstrsCtion nearly 
broke me down, and my vojce faltered and tears came 
to riiy eyes as I thought of this magnificent conclusion 
to the trials and strugglfes of the past four years. 
Hecovering myself, however, 1 bowed my grateful 
acknowledgments for the reception, and addressed the 
audience as follows: 

" Ladies and Gentlemen : I should be mdre or less 
than human, if I could meet this unexpected and over- 
whelming testimonial ^t your hands, without the deep- 
est emotion. My oWn personal coiineCtibii with the 
Museum is now resumed, and I &vail myself of the 
circumstancfe to say Why it is so. Nev^r did I feel 
stronger in my worldly prosperity thdn in September, 
1855; ThPRC months later, I was so deeply embarrassed 
that I felt certain of nothing, except the uncertainty of 
everything. A cbtabination of singular efforts and cir- 
cumstances tempted me, to put faith in a: certain clock 
manuftcttttin^ cbmpdny, tod I plkceA iny'siignatilre td 



§30 * BICHAJID'S HIMSELF AfiATN; 

peepers .\^hich ultimately broke m^. dawn. After »jearly 
five 5 eare of h^vd, 9truggJ.e .to ,kecp . my _ head . above 
wateij, I' have, touched bottom at last^ audi here, to-night, 
I am trappy .to announce that I, have waded ashore. 
Every I clocfc debt ojf . which. J have . aixy kaaowledge has 
be,en provided for^ I'erhaps, after . )the ArouWqs aad tur- 
moj^s I have, experienced, I ohoiUd ■• feel m> . desire to 
rerengage.,inthe e;s^ijteiiient& of * business, but a man 
like myself, less than fifty years '• of age, and enjoying 
rpbust . health,, is, scarcely. ;old enoiigh to be, embalmed 
• aftdput in. a ^lass case in the. Museum, as one of its 
million of curiosiitijB^. Mtis better to. wear out than 
rwifc,out,' . B^ai^ee^ if .la naau of active .temperapa/^nt is 
not busy, ,he is ,apt .to. get intq. misiohief. To avoid jevil, 
therefore, ^nd . .sinc^^ bvwnpss a9tivity,is a,necessity of 
my natural here I am, once, more^ an . the Museum^ and 
9,mong thos^. with whom 1 have been so long a^ so 
pleasantly identified^ lam confident of a cordial, wel* 
come,. and heiK^e feel i some claim to. your jindulgence 
>vhile I bwfly allude, to th^ mews. of my pr^ent deliv- 
erance from utter financial ruin. . Nqod J say, in the 
first place, that I ram soipe.what indebted to th^ forbear- 
ance of ,gwero.ii3 creditor?. . Ijx the nqxt place^ permit 
me to speak of sympjathizipg friejids, who^e volunteered 
loans, -wd e^^eitioqs vastly ajid^d my rescue. When my 
day ef son:QW came, Ii first, paid. or, secured evj^xy.debt 
I ofv^ pf a. personal nature. . Jhj$ done, I felt.bQund 
in honor to give up^ al,t of my property .that remained 
towards liquidating my " cluck debts." . X. placed it in 
the hands of trustees and receivers for the .benefit pf all 
the ''clock" credHors.: But, ^t the forced sale of my 
Conpecticut . real- ostate, theijp was a purchaser, behind 
the screen^ of :whpm: ihf iworld had. little.: km wiiedge. 



BICHAHD'S BJUSSUr-ABAXSi. ^JMH 

In tbe day of my ^sperity^' I niade over ib my wilb 
much valuable pfoperty, Budading l^e lesm' ci this 
Museum building, — a lea^e Aen hairing about ttreiity- 
two years to run, ind enhanoed ih value ta nikore than 
double itis original worth. I sold the Musemn collection 
to Messck. Greenwood and Butler, subject tb my wife's 
Beparafe interest in the lease^ and she bas reeeived more 
than eighty thousand . dollars over and "above tite sums 
paid *to ' the owners of the building. Insti^ad of selfishly 
applyijig /this !amonnt ' to private purposes^ my family 
lived with a due Iregard to* economy, aad^^he savings 
(strictly belonging' to nry wife) were devoted to' buying 
in portions of my estate at the assigiiees' sales^-and to 
purchasing ^^ dock ' noted ^' bearing my indorsem^its. 
The ^Oburistian« name of my Wife is Gharity* ' I may Well 
acknowledge^ /therefore, thAt I am not i only a proper 
^ subject .of charity/ but tiiat 'rwithoni; €3i»rity, I am 
nothing/ . . » 

^ Bfit, laffiea and gentlemen, while Charity thus labored 
in my behatf, Ffiitb and Hope were not idle. ! Ihave 
been anything but' indolent during the last feur years% 
Drivei^ £i}om pill6(r to pdst^ and enmjyed beyond desorip* 
tion*by all sorts .of legal cdaims and writs, 1 whs pemsihg 
protests and sumnutatses by day, aiid! dreaiifaig ^of docks 
run down by night My head was f^ror whifezfaag with 
dislocated oog-wheeis and broken mainMsiiritigs ; . my 
whole mind (and my crediK) was rimmttg upoli <^^, and 
everything pressing on me like a dead weight. . ' 

In t^id state of affitifs I feltthaC I wan lofi no use on 
this side q( th^ Atlafatb; iso, giving the: pendulum a 
swingi and 8edsi% time by the farelocky I ' fawnt to 
Ecnope^ There I fmrtivisly 'puUed the • Wires' lof !se^*al 
exhSiii^i^amo^lriiaehthBt^firoB.ilA^ ihaiy be 

24* 



522 BieHABDns himbblf aqast. 

mentioned for ^example. . I managed^a variety of mudical 
axLd coDMneiKial speculatibiis in Great Britkin;^ Germany, 
and Holland. These enterprises, together with the net 
profits of. ray public lectures, enabled me to remit large 
sums tx» confidential agents for the purchase of my obli- 
gations. ' :]ii this manner, I quietly extinguished, little 
by littlest every dollar of my clock ' liabilities. I could 
not have eehkved this difiictdt; feat, however,* without 
the able assistcubce of enthusiadtic friends, -^^ and Kmong 
the chief 1 of them let me grateftilly adcnbwiedge the 
invaluable setyices of Mr. James D^ Johnson, a g^tle- 
man. of wealth, in Bridgeport,* Cionnecticnt Other 
gentlemen haye beiea geiUBrous wi& me. Some have 
loaned me large sums, without (Security, and have placed 
meund^is obligations whieh must ever command my 
hopest gratilmde; ibntfMr. Johnson has 'been a * friend 
indeed,' for he hasibeen- truly a^friepdiri need.*^ 

" You must not infer, from what I have sai3, t&at I 
have* aompletely recovered from the ^stunning blow to 
which I.it^ subjeeted four years ago.' 1 bavo lost 
more imtbe way of tens of tboodands, yeft, htindreds of 
thicrasatids, than I core to femeihber. A valuable ^brtion 
pf my real estate in Connecticut, ^however, had been 
preserved, and. as I ^1 all the atdor of twenty years 
ago, aaad. the prospect here is so flattering, 'my heart 
is animated with the >hope of ultimately, by ente^lise 
and activity^ oUiterating unpleasant reminiscenced, and 
retrieving the losses of the ^ast. Experience, too;' has 
tanght me- not only 'that even 'in the matter of money, 
^ enough in- as. good as a feast,' but. ths^ there are, in 
this: world, some things vastly better -than the Alndghty 
DoUarl FossiUy C may ;centemplale, 'at times, the 
pamfrdi dsgr /whctt) I said: ^Othelio^B occupation's 



BICHABiyS TmffffeLP AGAIK. 52S 

gone ; ' but I shftS* moi^ £^eqti^nfly thed^ Hnt memory 
of this momeat; *iM!%en^I am peimittedto^ annount^e tbat 
' Richard's himself again/ 

^* Many peo^e have wondered that a mlEdi-contsid^ri^ 
so acute as mysetf should hat^ been deluded into 
embarrassments like mine, and not a few have deeiaried, 
in short metre, tiiafr^ Bannim was ^^iooV I can- only 
reply that I never ma^ pretensions ta the sharpness 6t 
a pawi^-hroket', and I hope I shall nevcbr sd entirely' iMe 
conidence in human nature as to consider every maa ar 
scamp by instinct, or a rogue by n^oedsifty. ^ It is betleir 
to be dl»c6ived sometitnes, than to distrust ttlwaiy^;' B^ya 
Lord Baton, and I ag!r«te' with him. 

'^ Experience is sidd tb be a hi^d sehoolmastei*, b«it I 
shoruld be soitj to ftel that thii^ great lesso^n in ddVeri^ty 
baa BOt brought forth fruits of* some value. I^needed 
the diMipline this tribulation has given me, and I i'eally 
feel, after all, that this^ like matiy othe^ appar^t 
3vilB, was only a bksiding in^ disguise. Inclei^, I may 
nention Ihat^thfe very clock factory whiidi Inbuilt in 
Bridgeport, for the pui»pt>8e <»f bringing jfaundreilfii ^ 
ivorkm^ to tiiat city, has- b^en pu3X)hased' 'abd^> qua- 
Irapled in size by thei^ Wkeelei: and Wilson "Sowing 
Machine Company, and -^ now filled with iisitelligent 
N^ew Ei^land mechanics, whose families add^^wo thou* 
sand to the population, and Who are doing>a gt^eat work 
n building ^p and b^'autifyitig thaAflottrishlng dty. 80 
:hat the same coneem which prostrated me seems 
lestined as a most impaUBv/t agent towards my rebapM^ 
ition.- I am certain^ that the > popular* sympathy has 
>eeii with meirom thebeginiidDg ; 1^ this, togetiier with 
i conacionsneBs of netitade, ia* moire ihan> an'oSset to 
dl the vicisaitades to whkh I have been subjected* 



me, will be to cater for your aco^- ^eiar li^f^tbjrj^MPO^^ 

tstwt tuftd .iii9(aru(iti«A;; :J[^r4uitiwe4.9U(^.iBf^^iM^. as I 

p(M6e48 will be 44v<)|ed< t^ tl^^ ii4fia(9j»a|ipe fit, this 
Musi^wl a9/».p9f^l»rtfdaj^ qf.i^mUy ir8mrAi<«9iivriiich 
ftll. that is: ncfyfeLiMd4eifeeTeflingtjh^(j^,-9Mb^i^ 

obatclftai.mftF^tei^it '41) aU > imm TuMitf^idMlKi-v^bout 
9«^ix^^ (The (J:r«EQiti£»)i»trddtteedr 111.^0 J4<m^:ifCI ^BopiB 

allusion; on the cont^c^r](,itb^'tepideiL<D^.FiittddAf^;f^ be 
|o eAC94imgi9 w^tw>^a|)4 6:ownmp«Rf.>^%)nM: i .jz. • 
. ^ *' I. bwf^ iert^|l»^4 f ecaffif ati0p^ iii:]Q«r(^^lf^ ^fiti .wifl 

]]|(>Vel(i|s: ^erwise ^acceafiibd^Qw.tM^tliLiimgbiiXiS^^ 
pey99ac»Uyi>r09^nt mio^ch.i^g tb«.|bini9^i»ndi^o]|at|fi me^J 
mmytof mf^.fdd »qq»aiia|iaw)ea^.4^«6ll^ltof«BP pi^y 
»ewi&»t»9l I;Ml! ^uue yqo ^fiUi t>9i^a4ijioj^g»i:«c4bat{ 
h»wH59T«w>«re4i<bef«ar\ioe8)«rf'if«il^ ofi! fb«:4a|ftofli^|tfi4 
tonE|4 and tl{e «(#y«.^8|»$^i>og t^tiAdhMfsu^i )i|^iJofa| 
^cieeawood, J«: ^A» M)'i«IWi«fl^e^( g^ntleia^i, w 
WQiaM b«L tteJa^t 10 pnwpe»>jbiMiAe^frAHm«'|aL«J>». 
tbftt het ,w toM», :t9 .wbo^ fttflf|«mfa} rflW^t^e^iMf :^i^t)er 
Itw, .th!» ^opilfHr <ePtwtnii !lro eiM te> .fegijfflfftpa^'.ftt^ ba 
often jBtted tltlafteuidiRgffB^ >9!9U :])fl«,ti(^ij«i§B|bK.3u 
mere tl^w feHi«ii Iw-r^B *ft[,'Jtti^?Wff»a«^eaffl^ ta,:jFho 
iftt^^;, 'i#U^i>ee><andt.4e»i^i«A}(ii ^W^t wmK #¥ 
Itn^seot |)ei«4Mtb«f!aetfYCQfi|irata2»tiQtkv< j^ 
ttdU hewtCtar 4<ft faiii a^fjwtwit^;iNMiigfiiv .1«^U9i JNs l(u 

oo^paiteorfcMc^'Biitloiiiliis.^ingt^wlli •smliiaMi jbtrtm 
of buj&ieM^ Onee- flMa&,T tbidlBUB^ ^yoajlall i&r 70 



kind weledme, I bid yoB, till th^ te-openih^, * tit affec- 

This fOfBHiAiitpekihi^m s^^eived with diiiodt tamultf- 
Qcym tipplfirtide; ' At idtiily- ^ty veArs of age, I was rio^ 
once iiiove befet^ tl>e pablie'^i^ the ^tomise to ptit 
on » fulMiead'i of stefc«ti,'^'to '^*rtt9h things," to give 
double ortseble fUxe jQXAimxtr oi aUy:a<^tions ever before 
ofiered at[4hil MttMUm^ iaad to deVotd all my own time 
atid'0€ridcesitb']theiienlefptisej Iti retu)*n, I ^ked that 
tber iMfeliciiftboiiid |[^Y(i my effoHs tii^^attonage they 
merited, jndijithfa^pi^to tobk. m* a* my 'woid. ' The 
daily 'iimnber>4)f(yiiitbM' stt^ dndo' mme 'tllati donbled, 
andrttfy e;scbf«toii$ to^ g^a^ ' them trith* rapid cha^gi^^ 
atidt«ftm*tS»''4te*tir«ttea/-^ ''-^•'- *' 

The toiiidtinteetednt tfiAt^" lafebtecTfa Wmbelf a^ih " — 
ibari Sw&s^tRrlMCofif^of l&^'S&anei^ exifa*tiglement^ 
vai^lMsty !«c«it^ iri^'thfe ■<iommttoity. Thfet portion 6f 
tWe'ptes»»1^iyh^iittd ilillt>wed me Vin?th ab^fee when I was 
d©t<iw,' niftd^t thia ^b^id" th*A 'fiof^^^t^ w^ pait recor- 
ery, tjJ^e^clIarjr M €iIltrtieiis^*o^the fle^ «fcEtte of things, 
or ipM^ th^talid^er 'l^thbUe ^imimi^tit. (The syci^pliant^* 
a3rwk)K»^ kn^W^I WoulO'^t' ii}>^ aigain,^ ''^-afod' said so' at ihf 
tim^ f""' itkemiiSiii bid' ndbl& j6tii^^^ irhich ha^ stood' 
by me and upheld me in^ my mibfortmteS, Wfejfe rf course 
r^teed; aiJd^^ttiAr v^brtfs of ^iticm cioiigrktalatibn gave 
melu^h^hifr datMaibttott Aaa f havfe j)bWr of language 
to aCfendWled^. - Lettel^' ctf fcotigraCtrilatioia came in upon ' 
merilifdift #Wt^(^iK«tV \ *WeMy hands ifeat h^d never' 
been withheld dftHftj^ the^lotig peiririd of 'my misfortune, 
were now exte^d^dj with ai sttil) heMilahsar/grip. I never 
knew till now the w^xm^tii. «fid.irum^r o£ my dbiends. 

My editorial friend, Mr: Hobert Bonner » of tjie New 
York Ledger^ sincerely 4»iigrataiLai<df n^e^ ^ijpon my fall 



A2!WP&m^ WOHU FOR ^ BAlWtTM. 

Tou stand wbere you "have stood ^foreJ, 



|BQ BIOHABD'S HIMflFJi.V AGUIN. j 

and complete restoration. I had some. new plays whicli 
were adapted from very popular stories which had been 
written for Mr. Bonner's papar, aQd I weittito Mm to pur- 
chase, if I could, the l^xge cuts he* had used to advertise 
these stories in his sjtreet pl^^oatda. He atoxice generously 
offered to lend them to me as. long as I wished to use 
them and tendered mq his.iaWMices. i<n>any 'way. Mr. 
Bonner was the boldest of i^dveartisetd, following me 
closely in the ^Id in. which I <wi» the pioneer, aad to 
his judicious i^e of pj^iiters' ink, he owes the fine* for- 
tune which hesQ worthily deseivrb^ and'tojoya. * ' 
. Hot mu§t I neglect to/^t^te- that jk ilixge^ mmnber 'of 
my cr^tprs who held thp cloc^noteS) prowl very misg* 
nanimous in taking into considerfttkfipi th^r<M die€iepti0n 
which had put ^e ii^ tl\f if povypr. If ^t ^ few of them 
said to me ji^ substanpe; :V:y9u aeyer supfHised you' had 
made yourseljF liable for.; thi§ <de|bt; yoH W9W deUided 
into it^H; is not xigbt.th^^ it should bP:|if(ld'Oyer y<m to 
keep yoA hopelessly .4owfi; tjake^t,rfuiflp{iyiQ6auch'per- 
centage as,.underr<the c|r9J^nKtaQcp§> fti i^i possible ft>r 
yoji to. pay." But :ff>r.#^fJh. 9)0n {pni su^h^otisideEatMm 
X fear X sl^^uld: j^eyer Imve got qn iqyif^et ag^ii^ ; aod of 
the.ma^ w|;io rq|oic;ed in my ,bette|red fortune, not a few 
were of this^,class.of my creditoi:^* .,r .; 

My old friend, the Bos^n Saim4^ ^vwing Giusttiey 
which printed a few pbeer^i^. po9)Jl9^ 4ines of QOasola- 
tion ^nd hope when I was fiowi^,. now gave me the fol- 
lowing f^om the s^me gmf;efnl pen,^^vQ^veyu;ig^ l^owing 
words of ^congratulation at.my risq 9gA¥^: . . 



HIOHABD'B ' HIMBBUr . AOADf. £27 

You now can laugh with friends, all low, 
Ne'er heed^ig Mrs. Grandy'fl tattle ; 
YouWc dealt aud: taken tttuvdy Ulowtt, • 
- Kegardlesa of the rabble's prattleu 

Not yours the heart to .harbor^ ill 

' Gainst tkuse who've dealtin trivial JeetiQg ; 
You pass them with tUe same goofl wiU 

Erst shoM-n when they tlieir wit were testing. 
You're the 8.ime Barnum that we knew, 

You're good for years, still fit for laboW 
Be aa of old, be bold and true, 

Hou^t aa nian, as friend, ail neighbor. 

At about this period, the following poem was pub- 
lished in a Potts ville, Pa,, paper, aud copied by many 
joumals of the day: 

A HfcALXtt: TO BARNttM. ' ' 

Companions! fill your glasses round, 
, . y. .*i .' And drink a health to one ':...... .. 

"Who has few coming after him, 

To do as he has done ; 
Who made a fortune for himself, 

Made fortunes, too, for many, 
Yet wronged no t)osoui of a sigh. 

No pocket of a iHJUuy. 
€k)mo ! shout a gallant chorus, 

Aud make the glasses ring, — 
Here's health and hick to Barnum! 

The Ejdiibition King. 

"Who lured the Swedish Nightingale 

To Western woikIs to come? 
"Who prosperous ai»<l happy made 

The life .of littlo Thumb? 
"Who oped Amusement's golden door 

So cheaply to the crowd, 
And taught Morality to smile 

On all his stage allowed? 
Come! shout a gallant chorus, 

JTntil the glasses ring, — 
Here 's health jftid Inck to Barnum! 

The Exhibition King. 

And when tlie sad reverses came. 

As come they may to all, 
Who stood a Hero, bold and trad, 

Amid his fortune's £edl? 



£08 XIOfiAKD'S HniSELF AGAOL 

Who to tiie Qtraom yielded up 

Whst Honor ooold not keopv 
Then took the field of life again 

With ooomi^e eaim sad deep? 
Cornel shont a gallant chonu, 

Until the glasses dance, — 
Here*s health and luck to Bamnn^ 

The Kapoleoa of Fhumofc 

Yet, no— otir hero would not look 

With smiles on mch a cop; 
Throw out the wine — with waiter dear. 

Fin the pure crystal up. 
Then rise, and greet with deep lespeet^ 
./ ., , The oovnv^. ho hA9 showiH 

And drink to him who well desenres 
-* I • ' A Beat <A('Forttine'0 throne. 

Here's health and luck to Bazmnal 

An Elba he has seen. 
And nerer may his map id li& 

Display a SL Selene I 






CHAPTER XXXIV. 

MENAQEBIE AND MUSEUM MEMORANDA. 

A REMABXABtiE CH ARACTE B -=- OLD GRIZ7XT ADAMS — THS CALTFORNIA MEN AGE- 
BIS ^-TBBBIBI^T WOIXZrDED BY BEABS't^MY UP'TOWN SHOW — ^XTRAOKD^^ 
NABY WILIi ASD VIGOR— -A L£8S02f FOR MUNCHAUSEN — THE CALIFORNIA 
GOLDBSr PIQBOK8 — PIOEON8 OF ALL COLORS — PROCESS OP THEIR CREATION 

— M. GUILLAUDEU — A NATURALIST DECEIVED — TUB MOST WONDERFUL 
BIBDS IN THE WORLD — THE CURIOSITIES TltANSFERRED TO THE MENAGEUIB 

— OLD ADAMS TAKEN' IN— A CHANGE OF COLOR — MOTLEY THE ONLY WEAR 

— OLD GRIZZLY I7NDBCBIVED — TOUB OF THE BEAR-TAMER THROUGH THB 
OOtJWTBY — A DEATTTIFUL KUNTING SUIT — A LIFE AND DKATU STRUGGLE FOR 
A WAGBB'^OJJ> ADAMS WINS— HIS DEATH — THK LAST SPOKE ON BARNUM — 
THB PBINCB OF WALES VISITS THE MUSEUM-^ I CALL ON THE PRINCE IN 
BOSTON — ffrBFHXN A. DOUGLAS — ** BEFORE AND AFTER " IN A BARBER SHOP 
— BOW TOU HlOaCNSON *'DID" bABSXV^ — THE MUSEUM FLOURISHING. 

I WAS now fairly embarked on board the good old 
ship American Museum, to try once more, my skill as 
captain, and to see wbat fortune the voyiige would bi:ing 
me. Curiosities began to jpour into the Museum halls^ 
and I was eager for enterprises in the show Ime, 
whether as part of the Museum itself, or as outside 
accessories or accompaniments. Among . the first to 
give me a call, with attractions sure to prove a success, 
was Jame^ C. Adams, of hard-earned/grizzly-bear fame. 
This extraordinary man was eminently ,what. is called 
" a character." He was universally known as " Grizzly 
Adams," from the feet that he had captured a great 
many grizzly bears, at fhe risk and cost of fearful 
encounters and perils, fie ,was brave, and with his 
bravery there was enough of the romantic in his nature 

84 



530 MENAGERIE AKD MtTSEITM MBMOBANDA« 

to make him a real hero. For many years a hunter and 
trapper in the Rocky and Sierra Nevada Mountains, he 
acquired a recklessness, which, added to his natural 
invincible courage, rendered him one of the most strik- 
ing men of the age, and he was emphatically a man of 
pluck. A month after I had re-purchased the Museum, 
he arrived in New York with his famous collection of 
California animals, captured by himself, consisting of 
twenty or thirty itamense grizzly bears, at the head of 
which stood "Old Sj^mpaon," togeth^;r with,, several 
wolves, half a dozen different species of Galifomia bears, 
California lions, tigers, buffalo, elk, and "Old Nep- 
tune," the great sea-lion from the Pacific. 

Old Adams had trained all these monsters so that with 
him theiy were as docile as kittens, though many of the 
most ferocious among them would attack a stranger 
without hesitation, if he came within their grasp, . In 
fact the trainittg of these animals was no fool's pla3r, as 
Old Adams learned to his cost, for the terrific blows 
which he received from time to time^ while teaching 
them. " docility, * finally cost him his life. 

Adams called pn me immediately on his arrival in 




which appeared his stiff, bushy, ^Tay hair, and his long, 
white, grizzly beard ; in fact Old Adams' was quite as 
much of a show as his beasts.^ They had come, around 
Cape Horn on the clipper ship '^ Golden tifeece,** and a 
sea voyage of three and a half months had probably 
not added much to the beauty or neat appearance of 



HEKACTSKTE AlSD KTJTSEtJM MEHOBAKDA. 531 

the old bear^hxmter. During our conyersation, Grizzly 
Adanus took off his cap, . and shdwed me the top of his 
head. His sktdl was - literally broken in. It had on 
variona occasions been struck by the fearful paws of his 
grizzly students ; and the last blow, from the bear called 
'' General Fremont," had laid open his brain so that its 
workings were plainly visible. I remarked that I 
thooght it was a dangerous wound and might possibly 
proye fatal. "^ 

" Yes,** replied Adams, " diat will fix me out. It had 
nearly healed ; but old Fremont opened it for me, for 
the third or fourth time, before I left California, and 
he did his business so thoroughly, Fm a used-up man. 
Howeyer I reckon I may lite six months or a year 
yet." This was spoken as coolly as if he had been 
talking about the life of a dog. The immediate object 
of ** old Adams" in tailing upon me was this ; I had 
purchased, a week previously, one-half iiitereist in his 
California menagerie, 'froto a man who had come by 
way of the Isthmus from Califoniia, and who claimed 
to own an equal interest with Adams in thb show. 
Adams declued that the man had only advanced him 
some money, and did not possess the right to sell 
half of the concern. However, the man held a bill 
of sale for half of the ^^ California Menagerie,'' and 
old Adams finally oon6ettted to accept me as an e^tial 
partner in the l^culation, saying Ibat he guessed I 
could do the managing part, and he would show up 
the animals. I obtaiiH^ a canvas tent, and erecting 
it on the present site of Wallack's Theatre, Adams 
there opened his novel Oalifomia Menagerie. On the 
morning of opening, a band of music preceded a pro- 
cession of animal cages ^wn Broadway and up the 



53!^ MBKAOBSIS AHD HU&EHM HDMOBASFDA. 

Boi^rery, qld Adaii)6^ dreesad in liis bunting •eartu»e» 
h^dipg the lino, with a platform \yag)oii'!da which j^xe 
p}^c5ed three immense grit^ly bears, two of ^rhich he 
held j;)y ^xains, whilaho w^s mounts 'On 4he back of 
th? largest grizzly^ which stood in the oeBti?o a»dr wo« 
not secured. in wv manner whatever. • This- vtas- the bear 
known as'* General Fremont," and so docile had *he 
bqcome, that Adarqs said be h^ ueeid him hs a pack* 
bear to carry his cooking and hunting apparatus through 
the- mount^ns. for. six months j and had «viddon him Ihiu- 
dreds. of pailes.. .Butapt>arently doeile aSv we»t many 
of the^^ .a9;i2nalS)i,tiiere was not one. among. thetn thiit 
Vfpuld not P9casionany<g\ve,.A.dams a sly blow or a sly 
bite whi^ ai go(>4 chanc'e • ol^ar«d;; Jaettce old Adams 
was.; but. a wreck, of ]^ forn^oF' self, and expressed 
pretty nearly ^th.^ tmth whan l^sgnid: • • 

*^Mr. Barnum. X a^., not the -man I was jite years 
ago. ,, T^hjen-I, feit. able to .stand the' hag of aiiyrgita- 
zly liyingi. ^nd wj^ ^vlways '^ad to- ^oicoiiiiteri s&lgle 
hapded, anyrso^tof anrAHinxal .th<f<; dw9d pre^enb- him* 
sel^^i Butf I rhave.heen beaten to a< jelly ^ to^n allaost 
limb Uom limb,'^ndia?|ir'ly'Ohaw^diU^ $xki ^pft oa<i('by 
th^e ^rec^ch^rou^ t glibly f^earsi Hp^t'^ereri I^mm good 
f^a^^a few Q^nli;^! y^.4 am^ hy-Cbat thQ^l^^hope^wb s%hll 
ga^ enO|Ug^rJbQi ,m^t^ mj"' 6l^ wtim^coiolortable^'f&f I 
ha,Ye bm^ ab^m^fii^m-hen^ Bom^ years/* >•.>• ••' 

Hi^ wife csMpe f^ora MaasaeMiBettts ibo: Noif York ftnd 
xu^i'sed .bimi.v ^\ J^ht^ drfssqd hid< woiMEids <evefy day, 
and not pnly toldr Adiuna » he couid iievor rek)0¥^t* but 
assured hie &ipnds> .|fr^ prf^abjy, a.veryafewiWfekft 
wo^ld^Jay bw iuahi? gji;«iVfi^rfr.Butr^^^m^rwMfe6^^iariaft 
adamai]|t;.and a^TOs^^t/; a^^ a lion. . Among the thontend^ 
whp saw,»J|4mM<iF€ywfyii i»/i* g^xj|«^qif^e ibipiter'a «akv 



aad witnessed the seerakig, vi^liQar ivji^h wl)ich he '^per- 
formed" the,^ai;9ge iqoost^iB, l^e^tipg ^d. whipping . 
them into apparently the^most perfect docility,rprobably 
not ouue su^pect^ that this rqugh^ fiei^ce looki,ag, power- 
ful deiwiTsayqge, as. Ixq. appeared to be, w^ suffering 
intense pain from his broken skull a^^d fevered .system, 
and that npthiug kept him ,^rom stretching, himself on 
his death-I?ed but his mo^t indomitable: ^ and,. extraordi- 
nary wiU- . 

Q)d Ad;ams. liked to ^3tonish others, as he /often, did, 
with his astounding stories, but no one could astonish 
him; he had. seen everything and knew evjary thLing, and 
I was anxious to get ,a; chance of exposing this^weak 
point, to him. A i^ occasion soon presented itself. One 
day, wkUe engag^c^ in. my office at the Museum, ; a man 
with marked 'X'eutonic features and aiccent . approached 
the door, and asked if 1 wc)uld. like to .bmy a pair of 
living goldqn pigeons. . , f., 

^' ,ye9," I replijed^ "I.ijvould. like a flock of gqlden 
pig^ns^. if I CQifilfl h^Y tliem- fpf the;f .weight hi silver ; 
for,4h?re.are ,np 'gpldeu' pigeqn^j in existpijice, unj^ss 
they* ai^e mMe, from the pw:e mjeJUd,"' ..... r 

'' You,^bal\ siep spipe gpl^W pig?|Q?fs aliye," he replied^ 
at the s^e.tipae entpriffg^^my ,oi^e,i^n|d,TpIosi^g.the dooi 
aft^^f^hiqa, • IJp,tl]^en rejpoy^d the ,^4 .f«on^ t ^ ^all- bas- 
ket whiclf^ he^.carjcied'JiV' W<5 ha,n|di,..apd j^nre ejapugh, 
thei)? ,w^rj?t 8pw?gly. pnsQonc/?^. ^ pair of.beap^iful, living 

ruflfTueckpdjpigtjon^,.^ y^ow^aa sa^roA,.^nd ai? bright 
as, a doiibk-c^le ,fresh, .from tl^ mioit. 

I confess I was somewhat .staggered at thi^; sight and^ 
quickly ask€i4 tl)ip n^an . if^herct those hir^s o^pe from. A 
dull, lazy smile crawled over the sohe;^! fltc^ of V(^y Ger^ 
man vjjsitor, W:M i^pjied* i»^r|a alo^,igut,tjii;^..tQn(j of 
voice : v 



534 BIEKAOXnSIB: Aim HUEEUM MEMdBAlTDJL' 

*« What' you think yourself ? " 

Catchmg his meaning, I quickly replied: 

^* I think it is a tumbng.'" * ' 

" Of course, I know you will say so ; because yon 
* fdrstha' such things ; sol shall not try to humbug you ; 
I Tiave color them myself." 

On furthet inquiry I learned that this German was a 
chemist, and that he possessed the aft of coloring birds 
any hue desu'ed, and yet retain a natural gloss* on the 
feathers, which gave every shade the apjpearance of 
reality. 

" I ban paint a ^reen pigeon or a blue pigeon, a gray 
pigeon or a black pigeon, a brbwn pigeon or a pigeon 
half blue or half green," said the German ; " and if you 
prefer it, I can pamt them pink or purple, or give you 
a little of each color, and make you a rainbow pigeon." 

The " raiiibow pigeon " did not strike me as partic- 
ularly desirable; but thinking here was a good chan re 
to catch" Grizzly Adams," I bought the pair of golden 
pigeons for ten dollars, and sent them' up to the " Happy 
Family'* (where I knew Adamis would soon see them), 
marked, " Golden Pigeons, from California." Mr. Tay- 
lor, the great pacificator, who had charge of the Happy 
Family, soon came' down in a state of excitemeiifc 

** HeaHy, Mr. Barnum," said he', ** I could not think 
of putting thbsfe elegant' goldbri' pigeons into the Happy 
Family, -=—ihey are tdo vslluable at bird, and thejr might 
get injured ; they ^re by far the most beautiful pigeons 
I ever saw ; and as they are so rare, I would not jeopar- 
dize their live^ for anything." ' 

"Well," said I, « you may ;piit them in ,a separate 
cage, pTopfeirly labelled." ' 

Monsieur Gftdllatld^u,'the naturalist tod IJttidermist 



JCHXAOHKEB AHB lOXEfUW HEOiOBAXDJL. 536 

of tbejMjifeeniii, had been) att^shdd to tiiot establiehnient 
since the year it was founded, in 1810.. li^qsjaJRreneh^ 
man, and has read neftrty eveirythiag upoai nittaral- his- 
tory ihfki Wi^'ev^' pubUabled in his owttioranr' the^iEng- 
lish Iai:]^9g§^ Wheoi he. >Bfiw; the MGoUen I%ebaa 
from (Jalifoiaua^" he was cadstderiibly {astonished; He 
examined them with great delight fbr helf . ati^ houT) 
expati^tit^i Italian itheirj . betoti&l; coUor aniA / thB. near 
resemblance which evezy< featore fioie to^thei Araaricaa 
ruff-neQkfijd' pigfwiii ; He' jspoQ ckmite ita !my( offijo^ and 
said:- ', • ..i f^..- : '..- •»' '; ^ .'• . 'i'/' '' *•'•** 

^M^, Banl^m) those :g6ldco ^ige(ms:a[Te siijwr^j but 
they (aunot be ftoia C^ifomia. .Aaiiliib<fti.fmetitixnis no 
suph birAiXihi^ wm^k TipaiiiiiLtn&i(k;anX3nutl^^ 

I told him he had better take Audufton home witb 
him th6t;xiigbt^ wdtpechapB by stodying bim aMentiTely 
he would see oeoasion to . cbajDge bisi laiad^ . ' . i - 

The ,ne^fciday, the> old >io^tiuri|li8|t caUediiat diy* office 
and remarked: . ! . i. ./' . j .• ! : 

'* Mj;. Barnum^ those .paeons ' dre a mqtei laffe/bird 
than .yQU;im^Qeu i .Thejiaire: iiuiit inehtionedlbf Littfltt^^ 
Cuvier, Goldsmith, or any othei wptet OH < wtiwil 
histarjjr% so-^ faifj w I. have be^ ^et^' 4i8«ov^i^. ' I 
expect tikey > knust holYe - coine , fiom ffeqie ^ imdcplbted 
portioit'of [Aiisteblia.'^ I. / .' i' • '.;.// .^ '« 

" Never mind," I replied, " we way get mwe light oa- 
the subject, peihapa/ bdforerlang. * We-will cdnthme to 
label them ^ California Pigeons.? ttxitil wb can fix tiietr 
nativity elsewhere." 

The next, monung, '^Old Griezly Adatma;'" passed 
through the Musensn whenhiiB eyies fell «q the^^' Golden 
California Pigeons." He > looked aimomentaaoid dodbtilefis 
admindL i>Be ^odiil aA^3oimei4O'iii]^i40ffiMi^ i • ^^ " 



536 MBNAGBKEB AND MUSBUM MEDKOBANDA. 

^^ Mr. Bamum," said h^v^* you must let me have those 
Oalifomia pigeons." 

"I can't spare them," I replied. 

^^But you mtist spaxe them. All the birds and 
animals from California ought to be togetbet. You 
own half of my California menagerie, and you must 
lead me those pigeons." 

^^ Mr. Adams; tbey are too rare and valtiable a bird to 
be hawked. about in that manner." 

" Ohv do n't be a fool," replied AdsMs. "Rare bird, 
indeed ! Why they are just as common in California 
as any other pigeon ! I oould have brought a btihdred 
of tbemffirom San Fiancisco, if I had thought of it.'' 

" But why did yon not think of it ? " I asked, with a 
suppressed smile; ^ ' 

>' Because they are so common there,*^ 'said Adams, 
" I did not think- ihey would be any curiosity here. I 
have eaten them in pigeompies hundreds of times, and 
have shot them by the thousands ! " 
' .I.was ready to burst wzth laughter ta see how readily 
Adams swallowed the bait, but •maintaining the most 
xi^d gravity, I replied : 

" ,0h welU Mr. Adams, if they are really so coittmon 
in C^liforaiav you bad probably better take them, and 
you may write over and have half a doizea paird sent 
to me for tibe -Museums." 

"AH right," said Adams, ^ I will send over to a 
friend in San Francisco,, and you shall have them here 
in a couple of months." 

I told Adfims that, fojT certain reasons^ I would prefer 
to have him cfaabge the Uibel ibo as to have it read : 
" GcMeoai F^ens firpm; A;^9fcralia."^ 

" Well, I wiU'^oali^eia wbatyoa Ifte^" Md Adams ; 



MKNAOsBBra Aim UXJSSUM MBVOBAimA. &$7 

"I suppose tbey axe probaMy aitioiit. m plenty in 

Australia as they are in Califonda." 
Six or eight weeka after this inddfint^ I was in the 

California Mem^gerie^ and noticed that the ^^ Golden 

Fige<m8" had. assumed a frightfully mottled appearwce. 

Their ^ feathers had grown out .and they were half 

whiteu Adams had been, so busy widi hiis. beass that 

he had npt noticed the change. I called him np to the 

pigeon oage, and Demarked } : i 
'',Mr. fAdama, I fqar .yQjgi wiU Iwes ypur Gol^n 

Pigeons ; they must be very sick ; I observe they [Mfp 

turning quite p^lp." . , . 

Adams looked at< ^em a moment ynjAk astonisli^meQt, 
then turning to me, and seeing that I cou^dfO^ suppress 
a smile, he indignantly exqlaime4 • 

" JpUst th^ .Golden Pig^QR?! Yovu had bett^ take 
them bacl^ to the Mu£)fii^. Yqq, ^anlt.'hi^abugi.mer 
with ypijr p^int^d pigeon^ ! " . 

This was too msitdikv .^Rd/M {l^ughed)!^ I crie4»'' to, 
witness the inixfKl j^oq^k ; of astpiushfy^nt ^d ve:i^ation 
which marked the grizzly feat^):^A:of , old A4£HP9*' . 

After the exhibjutionj on Xhirtaeiii^h Street %p4 Broad- 
way had beoA op0q>siK weeks, ti^ doctor jf^ted.that 
Adamjs.f ^onl4 pell 91^ his ^it^fOi ;b|^h&. aoiinaja andr 
^settle up all his worldly affairs, for he i^swe4 him that 
he wa3 growing, weaker Qvery day, and his- efirthly exis- 
tence must 8|00A,tQ]rminate. /Si shall Jive a good deal 
longer ^ij,: you, doctors, thipik for,V replw^d, Adams 
doggedly ; and th^n, seeming after alj; to realize , the 
truth qf the doctor's asfiertioQ^ he turned to m^ and said : 
''Well, Mr. Barnuni, .you 9^)}^ buy nie ^ out." ^e 
named his price for his hftll ofM^h* '* sjjfiw/' «pd I 
acoepteiiJto :«&fc ,We.,had,fflaig«^ te *e. 



SSd lilWTJUttmiH AMDHQmmiL ^AWMJLimiL 



b^aisf :i]i» ^Cottiedliciit axri M»8Bficlui«et^ dtariagi jblpersutii- 
mer, in connection witiiia oirtUB, )and Aidams insisted 
thbit t ^6Uld>^hiif6 liint'to titftvelr for tbe deasoa and 
exhibit" th^iibeltarft in thlBir cmnous: .p^vfovmanc09. He 
offi^i^d' tt}^go ^01* $^ pidr^we^ and trarellingp expensed 
^ ihirn^^tf i(nd \«tfe. '^ i replied du(* I^ woi^ld: gkdly 
^^^^Mftn'i^'lMgf^a^ lie o<»ild .standi ^ I adtised 

hiih^'tcf: gi<r^> u|» bumikess aod^D U>\ii9 kofile in M^sn- 
chusetts ; " for," I remarked,^^^yotlIWfcfgK)Willg Weaker 
fe^^j^^da^i «tAdJ.d|ibebt^6a^^mtt sland ii moi^ itian ft Yort- 

"What will yon give me extra if-I Will' faavel and 
^l^n^ (fa'6 bftdtd^ 'gV^'^ay fort> t^]^ \^6ekd T' addbd old 

"Five hundred dollars}^ I I^p4i6ii,wilb a laugh. 

^^^ybdiV' '^^Ub^d'AAm^,^''!^^ do it, 8(>Jdraw 
lii^^adr'^gf^emeti^ td ttMt# eff^ ftt Oiicef. Bat mind "yon, 
draw it payable to my wife, for I mby b^ too^ WAak to 
^eniiHo^b^i^kag^iftUe teti we^k^ ana np, «hd if* I 
p^6!Mi^niy^]^al« »f ^the'^KitttiM:t^'i«ilrabt b^ tli^ get die 
$500 w*«ft^^attyUfOuM«.'' > i' '^::r' ■ 

- I'fli^W *p Ja^fttj^toW^to pay hkn^f 6» p^ W*fek fbr'^s 
fifet'Mce^; knd tf 'h^'coMSntied fo-'exlflbit fiie Wari for 
1ibii'c(m«d6^ve^4fe6ks'I'#a8 tiieci! 'to'^and 1^, or his 
iiWffc, fBOOt'e^era^' ■=' 'J' ' . 'l^ ' ^' -i ^ ^ 

*' Y6tt^Mve^ lodt^ yotti^^fSWr" exdaifi^' A^ms • on 
takttigfh^c^tr^^t ; "^^lor^^I )am*bbUMdit() ^frnit/' 

•"* I holpe^ Jrou m^y, wiA alt flay feeaft^, tod » handled 
years thorfe if yon* desire it/' 1 rejrfiedv • ; ' 

"Call mfe afobHf*! dda^t earn th* fSOO*! ''^xdaimed 
A5kms, with *i triiihiplrtltie lattgh. r ; - ^l .-' ' 
] ttm " fifiow" Btaftkfied ofi^ iH' a feWiday^'lafidtf U fte 
^ or«#^ftM»iglltoI^IMtl4l^ia«y&aj^^ €Ub^tidut> 



** Weill" /said. J, ,f'>A4^W> 74?iu„8Be.ifl.,$9r.aH^.^p|:elily 
welL , 1 •hppe,iy<w,^n4 y<?ur ^^ aiffv Cj^flaft^l^f 1 ",. .^, 

".Yes," he replied,. Y?ith a If^^l^ ; :> ^tt(^ , you, . may a« 
well try , to be con^fort^ble, tpo, . fpn y,o»r |5,06 is a 
goner." .,..;, •. .• • . •, : ., :- ■ ,..• ,; 

/^ All jigl^V I ?;«Blie4, " I Uppe.jrou .will ,grqy , bet; 
tereyery:4*y.l' ^. .;,, ^ ; .:k . , . -, , .^. 

But I saw by his pale face a^ o^t iik^k^q^B 
th^t Jae ' \iFas rapidly faUiflg. . hx ^yee^ j i^^^^h* W'^j I 
met him again at N^w Bedford, ..i^Jij^Sii^hfjpei^ts-. , ; jjt 
seeoied to Qie^'tl)^, that h^ f auloi, i^ot %e a w^^^jfor 

Uisieyea waji:^ . gj^y asd bis. bawds AreieJipiejirfW,^ 
pluck was as great' as ever. . ., » 

"This hot weatb<^^ig pretty bxid jfo^r njLi^/' Ji^p-aaid, 
" but my: t^; weeks ^re half .expired^ wd\l ^iw^good 
for your $500, and, probably, a month ar.tW9[;^ouger/' 
'Tbi^> wi^.'^^id, \vith £^s loucb bcayadjc^ ^^,i£;,)jje was 
offering to bet upon a horse-race. I Offfe^ije^.^to p^y 
him feoJf ;o£ tim $5|90;if-^e .wouttj give np ,^ jgcxlppme ; 
but he peremptorily declined making any ^Di|i;Lpipi^^ 

rfhAi^Met.. rl.metMWf tk^z/im^ Wf^ l^Vi^ ^^ostgxf^^ ,He 
had failed considerably since X^^tf any; him^ bi^t^he at^lj 
co»tii>u0<|l tQ e^hibitt,thq^:i3«s^;fll)tlM?wg]ij ^^^ ww (too 
weak to lead them in, and he^hu^Ifl^4/<)^er his r al^ipjst 
4?0itAu^. triuffipb. <T. l?i»?gi^d . iu; return, .^wJ isiiiperely 
congratulated him on hie;} uerve ,;[^«i, pwtoble /^uccct^s. 
I reii3iaiQ/8d w$th him tiutil tbei tezxth w^k Wfis .finished, 
and.hwded him bis .f 500.r , He took it witb a rle^r. of 
sot^sfa^tioni £U(id . remarked^, tbfit iie was sprry^I was a 
teetotaler, fpr he would lifce; to stand ttfi^at! 

Just before, the meivagerie:left New iToy^^ J bafi.paid 
^IdQ for ^ jpteTT ImiSting suita^aad^ pf bf ay^r fl(^uns,/fliim- 
ilaaritp thfe.onb'wbicb.Ado'^*^^'*^^'^ ^hv^ frintfvT^ri^*! 



540 MBN^OEttlte AND MUSSUM MBICOBAKD A. 

fi>t Hehr^Difesttitcli, tbe^tttlimal tietm^r, wlio was engaged 
by me to take the place of Adams,- Ivhcueyer he should 
be compelled io give up. Adams, on starting from 
New York, asked trie to loan this n^W dress to him to 
perform in once in a while in a fair day, where he had 
a large audietice, for his own costume was considera- 
bly soiled. I did so, and now when I .handed him 
his {J}500, he remarked r ' ' 

' ^* Mf. Bamtim, I suppose you are going to give me 
this new hunting dress ? " 

" Oh, no,"^ I replied, '* I got that for your successor, 
who Will' exMbtt the bears to-mditow • besides, you have 
no possible use for it." 

^Now, doti't be meati, but lend me the dress, if you 
won't giVe it ib me, 'for I want to wear it home to mj 
native tiHage.'' • ' 

I coiild liot i-eftise the podr old mian anything, and I 
therefore IreplJed : 

**'Well, A^ms, I will lend you the dress; but you 
win send it back to me ? " 

" Ye^, when I have done 'With it,*' he replied, wifli aa 
evident chuckle of triumph. 

1 Hiought to iny^elf , lie will soon be done with it, and 
replied :" That'a all right.*' 

A ti6 w idea evidently struck hitn, for, with a brighten- 
ing look of satisfaction, he said : 

" NoWj'Bamum, you have made a good thing out of 
the California menagerie, and so have I ; but you. will 
make a heap more. ' So if you won't give me this new 
hunter's dress, just dk^aW a little writing, and sign it, say- 
ing that I may wear* it until I have done with it." 

Of coursed, I kii6iV tfeat in a few days at longest, 
he Vbuli *be' "donfe"'With this worid altogether, 



^CBKAGBBIB Alin> MUSBUM MEUOBANDA. 541 

and, to gratifj him, I efaeesrfiiUy drew and. signed 
the paper. 

'• Come, old Yankee, Tve got yon this time — see if 
I hai&t!" exclaimed Adams, with a broad grin, as he 
took the paper. 

I smiled, and said : 

" AU right, my dear fellow ; the longer yon« lire the 
better I shall like it." 

We parted, and he went to Neponset, a small, town 
near Qo^ton, where, his wife and daughter lived. He 
took at once to his bed, and never rose from it again. 
The excitement had passqd away>, and his vital energies 
could accomplish no more. The fifth day after arriving 
home, the physician told him he could not live until the 
uext morning. He received the announcement in per- 
fect calmness^ and with the most apparent indifference ; 
then, turning to his wife, with a smile he requested her 
to have him buried in the new hunting suit .*' For," 
said he, " Bamum agreed to let me have it until I have 
done with it, and I was determined to fix his flint this 
time. He shall never see that dress again." His wife 
assured him that his request; should be complied with. 
He then spnt for the clergyman and they spent several 
hours in communing together. 

Adams, who, rough and untutored, had nevertheless, 
a natural eloquence, and often put his thoughts in good 
language, said to the clergyman, that though he had 
told some .pretty big stories about his bears, he had 
ahvays endeavored to do the straight thing between man 
and man. " I have attended preaching every day, Sun- 
days and. all," said he, /^ for the last six years. Some- 
times an old grizzly gave me the sermon, sometimes it 
was a jmnther ; often it was the thunder and 



litius^leDlpeit, .^KrithelaAumieMte ob the ipefjkjikot tbd Siem 
Nevada, or in the gorges of the Rocky Moust8(isi$ ; bui 

:.whate¥er .^raaohed >to^ luei. it .al^aysi^ taught me ih 
xhajestyioi th0rGl:eator,<and xeWal^ito me the undying 
and unchangiag love of our kind Father tnliiearen 
Although I am a pretty rough custbbier^" 0(Ml'tihued th( 

odyiQ)g:bia(n//M^aaQiyAfi)yr hmrlii;^ iaaboutrthe ngl^ places 
and look with confidence for that ir^t '^lUiich I fib much 

i3ieed,Ihiui wiiich Iihg^vigrnetdrteiiiyoy^dtipon ^sin^;*' ' He 
then.desfired tfaeolerg^niau4b^prayi ^ritbMnaf;^^^ 

.ihe took hitn^hy the'ihand/thanked kith ^r J:)&<>kliidiics§. 

' atid badi liim fi^rewQlLy in knotb^r hdiir hUr ^ ^liiiit had 

: taken its 'diglyt.'' Iti^^aA-^id by (those >'p!i^e^,'fliat hij 
jface lighted into iaismile asiitfaiellaM^br3i5l6k''6bea{i6d him, 
un^ that smile he curried- idto his gtav^. 'Ahiltl^t hib last 

; irwrd^ wi^re : j^ Wq^'t Batnum-opifttf hfe' eyea^-When he 
ifidds I ha,Terhufaibiigged ihim by bein^ biirtiM' i^ his new 
"hunltitig dteas V! .Thktvdmsa Was i indeed <&e' shroud in 

'Which lijia>nra6 entodttbed; .: f * ! ■ -i , . .•iifiu.:. i •• 

-And thai) wias the^ilasfaxlw eavthi bf: >''.Old ^€rmzly 

After! the ^ death oi Adtens^ tfaeii^J^iakJyfiilieiYS and 

iothes?^ anii^al0^iiE^ebe;;added^ to[ Unii w\14GtiXiW in my 

Museum, and I employed JEiJebrihsiQdDaoh^^euc^bTated 

.Ikilt-'ttoer, as>aii ixhdbitouj :Somb tiniQt'flffiterwajrds the 

!baars'Svere ^old ^ ajmeBa^^erieixonpany^.'but J kept 

;*^ old Neptonfe," ; the . aeafdiemv for abvertiUyearisfv^feiidiB?: 

him obcaaioilaUy' for. cixhihitkiti: ^iiotjiieff* cities^ us far 

.west as Chd62igbilt 3^s noble : and dbifodons^onmal wds 

-a very great ouriosity and attiact^ greafc attention. He 

was^kept-^in a large- tank^i which wbs.'isiip plied- with salt 

'water evecy .day &om the Fiali Rcrer stei^aubbate, whose 

dcN^ hsutidb.rfilieAxnijr bd^idis dm emry ^p^magt 4o the 



• • 



\ 



MBNAGBBIB AND MU6BUM WSHORANDA. 9^ 

city wi^ Bait wpter from tbe, dfee^ent p«rt M tLobg 
Island S^uiul. Ob hW tours ihtoiigh' ih$ eomnlrir the 
fiegrlion Uve4 very well ia fwsh wateir« > ' 

It was ai 09^ time my sesious idtenttoii to engage in 
an AmeriioaQ Indian !B:2)bU>ition On sl ^ttipen^ua aoale. 
I proposed to seonLre a( the ftur. Wefsti not k^s fhsui dtie 
hundred, oi the: ]t»eeti . Bpeoimeri^ ^'fulWblocid Inditob^, 
Tfitb their squaws and pap^o^eif j Hbeii p^isyt^ r X>^ee, 
dresaest and weaponsyfor a gebeiml tonr ihr(wgh6iM!the 
United States and £urop«. . Th^/pUn cclwp*efe«rfBd a 
grand entry njt every ' towtt and; city Wbbre tbe/IrtdiilwB 
were to exhibit *-«- the I^diatta in ajtl the giory o£ phiot 
and featherSt beafds and bright 1t>la<nhe1;ftv ridiiig (m ; theii: 
ponpes, followed f by imoA btiffaldefi, elka and anlirloped ; 
then*i||i exhibltiot On a lot largvi :eni)ttgh) to 'It4mi6 pf 
a display of ^1 the Indian ' games and dandesi; their 
nvethod of hntHiagt their style !of/tooi^ing, liVkig^ etd. 
Such an exhitritiG^ if^ pearfbi^y! . pjfacticable now t6 
any one who has th^ capital ' aitd ^sabt to uildef take ill, 
and a sure j^rtune i^otdd.follo^y'tthe enteifpiis^. 

On the 13A of October, ISeOvihe Piittoe cif WiTey, 
then mahing a^v^oui; i|!i[ the U^tfed Stat^Sn in:coitlpluiy 
with his suite^ visited the AiAerieaniMna^nmi; This wsls 
a veiry grqat eitepliiaentb "sit^ee k )v^a9 tbe^'enl]^ plaee of 
amusement the/ JPrinoe ; alitenfded ior thta country. XTn^ 
fortonately^ I wee in Bridgepcnrd at. the 'fime» and tb)e 
Musann wta in eh.ai^ oi vif ttmnjBgjer^, Mi?« Green'* 
woodi Knowing that the mam^ of th« Ariu^tioite 
Mosepm waa familiar throughoiit B^opoi I was qoite 
confident of a call from the- Prinoe^^ and fr<ml' regaord to 
his filial feelingSf I had, a day oir two gfter Im ah4val 
in New York, .ordered to be removed to a dark doset 
a fnghtfhl wax fignce o£ his royal moliter^ which, for 



nineteen -yetrt, Had! exciwd feiS ^aamtkttoii^ of the 
nillljon and Ivhlch bote «A pkcferrf Vitli the legend, 
" An exact likeness of Her Majesty' Qii^eh VictoiTa, 
taken frorm life."' Mr. Greenwood, who was fiii Eng- 
lishman, ^as dfeef^ly impressed with the condescension 
of the Prince,' and* bacted hifr way through the* halk, 
followed by the I^nnce, the Duke of JleVcastle, and 
other I members of thfe royal sUit^,' attd He achiaDy 
trembleil w he attdiipted U> dd lihe iWfeptton hotforS. 

•Pfes^itly th6y aftiVi^d'in front of' the platforth on 
^hich werfe exhibited tliO't aridUs livings humath ctino^ities 
and monstrosities. The tall giaiit Woninn madd her be?t 
bow; the fat boy waddled out and kissed His hand; 
the ^** negro tumihg white" showed Ws ivory^ and Ms 
spots J the' dwarfs kicked xxp th^T heels, and Iflce the 
clown- in the' ring, cried ** here W^ are' agiaiti"; the 
living skeleton stalkM otit, rdtninditig -iho Prince, pet- 
haps, of the wish ; of. Sidney Smitfe iti a hot day that 
he could' lay ^dff hife flesh and sit in his bones*; the 
Albino . family went 'through thdr performance^ ; the 
^ What is itr grinted ; thO' Tnfafit t)rrimmer-boy'beat 
a tattoo ;t and the 'Aitec cliiMrett'%^W 8ho\^ iatid 
described as epeclfaens of "d, rern^^kable aiid * 'ancient 
'^ace in Mexico' and'Oentrtil Adiettoy:: Th^ Plrkice and 
his- suite seemed * f leases ^i^d * G^i^^ciod* 1^ 
delighted; He Wafe, how^6^, qilite iSVferWhelttied ^h 
the responsibility of his' pbsitfoli, 5g8pfifefciafl!y x^t^erer 
the Prince addressed hifti, ^nfl leading Ih^'wliy td the 
^a3;'%«re hall h<e' called'attentioii to-fhe fl^^res of the 
Siamese Twins knd tti^ Quakier t5idnt add his i^lffe.' 
^ ^r snpposii," sfiSd^^te^ ftiricej *^ tti^se %ttre9 are 
irepiesentkiire^ ■ d(' dMfer^ift ' li^i% '^^^ttribsi^tefe 'eXhifetfed 
-frOiwJ tiiixe to t&he iii y<!«ir iSluilSUM'^^ ' •' Inlt.N-^^ 



«* Yes, yout ^liibyal ^Highnisd^, all of <iiem/' v^li^ 
the confosed Gi^enWoi^d^ 4isd as ^ *' all of 1 them " 
included ves^ fdir figus^e&of the £tiiperoi« Ni€tK)las and 
Napoleoil, ttie Empress Eugqme, kid other equally dis- 
tingaished personages, the Prince must hate thought 
that the Miuseum had. contained,: in times past, some 
famous M'livk)g>4umsities/' • On * leaving' the Museuna, 
the'Fxinoeask^d tosee Mr. Baihainbi, Mid^when he^was 
told .that I wai9 out ^of ttmn^ bd remarked : ""^We have 
znissed thjb>most intepestrng fdatorel of the.es'iabii^bmeut*'' 
A'iMir days^ after.#a|dA, wheitthe ^brines ^waajn Boston, 
laippftting to be in riiat cityv Laen* m^ cai^) tl> him at 
:tbe Revtere Housey dnd' was- cordSaUy ireceiTedJ He 
«nsiled. <whdn I. reminded hiiti ithat I had seen himl when 
he waa'a little^ boy, on- the<oc(3asion of one : of my Visits 
t<^ Buokii^hanx Faiqce* with General Tdmi Thumb. > The 
Prince told me that he! Kvas much jirleased tv^ith his 
xecent inspeetion of my Miuseumi and that; lie and his 
suite had loft their autogrkphs in the ^edtablishnieal;, as 
mettientod itf^ their yisit. 

Wh^n I * arrived/ in Boston, 'by ithe by^.onthidi Tisit, 
tbeistre^is were throng<^d with th^ militi^ry and citizens 
assembled to receive the Prince of Wales, and I had great 
diffic^lfty^ in^startiugfrom tfaedepdttb the Rerere Hodse, 
iuf getltiii^i tlixsougb' t^e assembled iCitowd* tAt^last^ a 
policeman espied me, andi taking^me foi- Senator Stephen 
A. Doiiglas^ he t ecied' : out, at the top / of his voice : 
'^Mkke w^ay ithere foD Jiudge Douglas's carriage/' The 
croif'd op^Qied a passage for my cai^riage at short notice^, 
and shouted out '' Douglas, Douglas, hurrah for Doug- 
las.'' J tCH9)&(jOff >my bail. and hDwed^) smiling from the 
windows oaeach sidet of my > c&rribge ; the> cbecjos. and 
enthuqiasmiikinqasfe^.asil advanced,! 9iid. all the. ^ to 

85 



MS JCVKAOBEIB/ AOSlk . MnSBXTU MBKOIUKPA. 

grat0£ur!.acktiowl6dgiitef9ls £9^ tbe .enthD^icMstic reoep^ 
tioQ. Therb mmt bftVte bben at least fifty |;lipu$aild peo- 
ple' itbo jolQQd in tki» epputauaous id^mmatntioa ki 
hiooojc of Judge Dou^las^ 

WI30E Dou^s x^n fo£ thio presidimoy in 1860,;m7 
deioocDattic £ri^ud> J« : Dt Johoaoii, bet m^ a bat that the 
Judge would be . tdected^ . Douglaa pitted tiuoagh 
Bxidgefibrt qh bid deotioimmiig^ tQur dawa £Mt« and 
made a. brief epoteh iraoa Uiq rear platform' of the -^an 
to.thci pfiOplejoaaeitiblod at the d^pot. The ue^bbi^^ 
Mr,* JohxQscbL met me in a croipdwi* harbor. ak#p;.w4 
asked mi if I haid' ener seen Douglas 1 I aoswered 
that I hlid« and /ohuoii then aaked what nort of t 
looking mail he) Was^. Remembering our hat bet, and 
knowing that Johnson expeoled a pretty hard desCsrip^ 
tion of bii fietvoHte amdidate^ I said : 

"He ia a r^-noaed^ bleai>-eyed, dumpy^ swaggering 
ohapv lookihg like a .Togular bar-^room leafec/* 

"I thought as much/' said Johnson, ^^f<Mr hfmiatbf 
New HaTenpi^ecof this iBonaing, which: says that he 
i» the; yeiry image, in persdnal appearance, of F. X^ 3a^ 
num*'^ ....'' '".'■. ♦ III 

When the Jroar tilait ^followed subsided, X toU John* 
Bon I must hive had jsome ether man in my niiftd'a .eye, 
when I anawesed his (]piestio]L 

One day I went oiiiiof the MusfiiuBi in gceit hadteto 
Tom Higginfion's bairber shop,, in the Park Hotel, iKihere 
my daily tonsorial operations were performed, and find* 
ing a rougb*lQoking GUbernian jnat ahead of me^ I told 
him:tiiai if .fae..nrQhld'he good enough. tay^;iareime bis 
'^ tnra," IVould paf his hill ; to whtdi he ci)neented,>Bsd 
taking his. turn i end any owta shay o, I jpttdiljr : departed. 



nvcfiHgt^ Ibiti, a^'I ^eiit but': '*^ J*{i; out thi^ xnai^^, 
and ftit WhatJevet ' iie has dbhet will pay the bill.** 

Twd rtr* threi6 derks liiid i^eporfers, who were in ^e 
shop; ptidwho knew me, put their freshly-dressed heads 
together and snggedt^d to Torn diat here :was an oppbr-* 
tunity tb peftpetlute a practical joke on Bamum, and 
they esplahied the plan, itt trhich Higginspn readily 
acqftle^^ed* 

*W6w,** says one of them to the Inshman, "get 
ererytbihg' dori6' which yoii'lite, ind it Will cost yoii 
notbkgf it>lll te charged td the ^fitlemaii ib v^hom 
yougafe^ydn*tehi-'-' '' " " " ' ' 

^^Shre and cL libeifat gfntlemain he ibtist be'/' said 
Pat ' ■ ' . ' *■'■"• 

"Wfll yon take a ba&t'^ afeked the barber. 

"^^'Thtit indade I will, if ttie ^tleman pays,** was the 
reply. 

VPlien he catie out of the bath he was ksked If he 
woald be fifhampoded. **And what is that? ^* asked 
th!6 btei^riWcred Hibiemiaii: The proce^s^ Was explained 
and he consented to go through with the ' operation! 
Thereafter, moved and instigated thereto by the barber 
and his confederates, Pat permitted Higginson to dye 
his red hair and whiskers a beautiful brown, and then 
to curl them. When all was done, the son of Erin 
looked in the mirror and could scarcely believe the 
evidence of his own eyes. A more thorough transforma- 
tion could scarcely be conceived, and as he went out 
of the door he said to Higginson : 

*^ Give the generous gintleman me best complements 
and tell him he can have my turn ony day on the same 
tfirms." 

One of the newspaper reporters, who assisted in the 



5,48 MENAGERIE , AND MUSEUM MEMORANDA* 







t/urrier, the lithographer, put the joke mto.p}^ 
fora^, repre!|enljin]g^^h|Ir^^i^jna^^..^ ajj^wdj,' 
also .ai li^a^p;i8a^-^^aJ)jef.4q/;%%-fti^,;-;<^ 

for Higginson ; ana it would nave I'l^f^ 1^^, 

form that I should have objected to. j^^^ 

Meanwhjile, thte jMjapeugi. flqurlp^d btt.i^x,;^i^'(^er ; 

and I began f'o n^ftUe, . 1^1^ "^ols*, V/*?*!^i-.Rfflf^i''«^ 
wh'icK covered' the property of my wife in New Yj9d& 

and.in Connecticut, r ^^tiU^ifieis^f/)^ ^^e^^se,^^^ 
of* ^ebte T?s^»i? ^P^^ *U bfiJ^ r6.4>^?iW^?t:^*i, l^'^lrt^W 
but time^ ecoupijtg, ^),4»§]ii-3[- an<^r^»ftPF l^ftH^ffi ^fifSm 
theljutdens..,., . ., ,' ; , , .jj,... ,,., ..j j,, 



' • ," In:.; I' !V-.('i ,•'. '■"»!•>! 






• ' • • ' '- ^ ':• !. >: ;,.'> ^.d M 



■ « 






I •« 



_•.■.♦ , • , /r t 



1 f 






. I /i -. • ' hill '•) ti" 



« ■ • 



i . • 



CHAPTER XXXV. 

SeTTLEBS — ItT OFFEBt-EV^^T Iff AN HIS OWN HOUSB-QWNER. — WHWK^r 

»AJ«i-^P»5iAr ]|IA]97nfACiPJ|lES-*rW£aWI«^ff ,A^ Trif8p»nr-8<JHp&IJ>f^ 
BlShftitr'A^ *6itABAM — HOTCHKISS^ BOX AUd' tSdllPANX — 'STRBET NAMES 
-^'|t«]irX'TirO)CBAH» qHADte 'rttEBf H-Jlt:«lN«SA!lM l^.N^W'ClW'-Ht^^AttAA- 
UELBD QBOWTH AND PB09PERITY — PBOBABiL|TIpS IN I^ FCTUIIB-* 

tfrnrATMylK of BBttibB^ftr-^tT's AtyVANrkofcA'Aim 1»bo&i^(^-^1:hjs sEdoND, 
tv NOV t^ »FOBB^498(r ^x^' lir. DONifvoxvpcpr. , • 



I < 



'i'dk nearly five years my. family. had hie^ii knoclcpd 
ahoat, the Alport ot adverse fortune^ without a, settled 
homp. Sometimes we boarded, and at pthejr tioptes we 
Uvea m a sipall hired house, Two of .my daughters 
were married, and my youngest daughter, ^l^^ijiliue, n^aa 
away at boarding school. The health of my wife Wjas 
much ippaired, and she espeoisjly .]ieed^4 ^ fix^d 
residence .which, she could call/* home." Aceord- 
ingly, m 1860y I built ^ plec^sant house adjoining that 
of my cl^ughter Caroline, iu, Bridgeport, a^d one 
hundred 'rods west of the grounds of Irani^tan, I had 
originally a trafct of twelve acres, but half of it had 
been devoted to my daughter, and on the other half 
I now proposed to establish my own residence. To 
prepare the site it was necessary to cart in several 
thousands of loads of dirt to fill up the hollow and to 
make the broad, beautiful lawn, in the centre of which 
I erected the new house, and after supplying the place 



550 EAST BRIDGEPORT. 

with fountains, shrubbery, statuary and all that could 
adorn it, I named my new home " Lindencroft/' It 
was, in truth, a very delightful place, complete and 
convenient in all respects, and there is scarcely a more 
beautiful residence in Bridgeport now. 

Meanwhile, mjypfs^/ciU^y.^SpMt ^f|(^eport, was pri> 
gressing with giant strides. The Wheeler and Wilson 
Sewing Machine nmntifActory hid been quadrupled in 
BUie^ a^d .^ipploypd. abpilt.a ,tlM»swd. ,w^rk«t^n..^.,.K#r 
merons other kwge factories had been * built, and'scpres 
of fir&t-claisft hQU6«6;W€re exected^ besidea maay neaty^but 
smaller and cheaper houses for laborers and me(;h^i^ic&. 
That piece of property, which, but eigbt years before, 
had been farm lapd, wit^ scarcely six hpusei upon the 
whole tract, was now a beautiful new city, teeming with 
busy life, and looking as neat as a new pin. The great- 
est pleasure which I then took, pr eveii now tsjce, was 
in driving through; thPse busy streets',' admjfing the 
beautiful houses and substantial factories, with their 
thousadds 6f plrosperous workmen, and reflecjfing that I 
had, in so gi^eat a measure,^ been the means of adding 
all this liffe, bustle and wealth to the City of Bridgeport. 
And reflection on this subject only confirmed in. ray 
mind the great doctrine of compensations. How plain 
was ft in my case, that kn " apparent evil •* was a "ties- 
sing in dlsgtiise?** ' HoW^sClpable was It now, that,^ had 
it not been for ihe clock failure, this prosperity could 
not have existed hefe. An ol^ citizen of Bridgeport 
used to say to me, wh^n, a few years before,Tie had 
noticed my zekl in trying to build up the east side :' 

**Mr. Barnum, your contemplated new, city is like a 
fire made with chestnut wood ; it burns so long as y^u 
keep blowing it ^ and when you stop, it goes out! ** 



XAST BBIDGEPOBT. 551 

I Itke^ now««^lays to laugh at faim about his ^^ chestnut 
^ood fire." Of course, I did blow the fire in all possi- 
ble ways, but the result prored that the wood which 
lod the fire was not chestnut, but- the best and soundest 
)ld hickory. The situation was everything that could 
be desiretl, andl-kniewYhat in order toinduce manufac- 
turers to establish their business in the neW city, a 
prime requisite was the advantage I could offer to em- 
ployers, agenfe and workmen, to, secure good and 
cheap homes -in the vicinity of their place of labor. 
ro show the method I adopted to secure this end, I 
copy from the files of the Bridgeport Standard^ an ofier 
which I made, and the editorial comment thereon. 
This offer, I may add, was not so much for the purpose 
of blowing the fire, which was already fairly roarinij 
with a lively blaze, as for the sake of helping those 
who were willing to help themselves, and, at the same 
time, contribute to my happiness, as well as their 
own, by forwarding the growth of the. iaew city, 

"NEW HOrSES lyC EAST bhibgeport. 

"BTVlft it/WN TO OWif XaB H0U6B HS I^irKB CT. 

" Theie iA a demand at tfao present moment for t«(ro hundred move dwelling- 
lioiifi^glti Eaat BrWIgeporC. It is evident that if the money expended in rent 
' m be paid tovard* jthcr porrjtafrae of a hoojse and lot, the perwrn ao pftyin^ 
u -11 in ft few yei\ra own the house he liven in, instead of always remaining a tc»n- 
;mu Id view of this factJ, I propose to loan money at six per cent to nuy nuni- 
i>^'r, not exceeding fifty, industrious, temperate and respectatUe individoali), whu 
u' >ire to build their own hoanes. 

*' They may engage their own builders, afnd build according to any reasonable 
T 1^11 (which I may approve), or I will havie it done for tliem at the lowest passi^ 
. I- rate, without a farthing profit to" rayst^lf or agent, I putting the lot at a fair 
\>Ticii and a/lvancing eighty per ceiit of the entire cost ; the other party to furnish 
•v.-iity per cent in Inhor, material or money, and they may pay me' in small 
Miiii.-i weekly, monthly or quartt»rly, any amount not less than three per cent 
\}t-T quarter, all of vbich is to apply on the mouoy advanced until it is pixUl. 

" It has been ascertained that by purchasing building -materials for cash, and in 
] ir^^e qtiaittitics, nice dwellings, painted and furnished with green blinds, can 
be erected at a coat of $1,000 or $1,800, for house, lot» fences, etc., all complete, 



$gd liAdt :biaD^^;pb£t7; 



Terandas w frout, the average cos^nee^ iu[>t exoeed about* ^SkdOO' per house saJ 
lot It 116^et«ir, '«dnie t^iniei Wdiild "pr^tet a'single or driuble house fllat would 
oOBtf2^|b>$3i/)00,I^aHl)eglaatoriB«ettb4iBvi^ ' '. ' 

P. T. B'AXtruM. 

"Pebrtittryl6,1864.*» 

The editor . of . tbi^ Stqmfard priql^d the foUomisig 
upoa my ajonoimcement ; 

Bamam*8 advertisement, offering assistance to foiy nuniber ct persoxn, iii>t 
^x<;ei9diA^ A%, in'illieer6ctioVl'of dM^eSli^ boti^tes. Ttils i>lati oOtabisvM id! ti» 

adYan^ei^ and poji^. 9f tj^ |0^*{9P8 9^ ^*WJP8 4{^^¥>1^^ - .A^ in^ridi»I 
who can furnish m caAh, labor, or^matefti^l, one-fi^ only of the {unount cdquif^U 
{|r,ihei ftrMttbh 6fiA. d<MIlit^ lJ(ndiA,|6ML'i:e(tei\^t|^WottMr ^^fMM'ie^m Mr. 
Barnum, rent his |iou8^>n4.)>jr merely pacing nhst m«y t» cpxjM^red As only * 
£Jiir t^httdt A'f^t^ yeardj fiifd hi ms^ at' last the owner, an^ all mrt^er jp^ytsttnts 
o^af^ IJ^:ihe m^fui thp^ft he c49; hermabtBg 9tidh intecpcaisitQlmptovelneafls in hi« 
property as would greatly improve, its market vfUue, and l^sides ha:ve the 
ddvant^eofany'risbin'thevalu^ of teA est£i^.' It is not 'ofieU that such a 
genexons offer is, m^e tf i^or^lng inepi^ Xi ia n' V^n on what intxM h^ ;g^^wraUy 
ci)nsidered inadegaate secaritjy, at six per cent, at a time w^en ^ much better use 
at vaon^j ttta i be: melde %y ttiy edpitefidt. ' li is thertfefe geneit^tiA Mr^ ^Bmen urn 
may make v^on^y by the operati^n.^ Yery weli p^hapa. 1^ l«ill,hut if he doe#p 
it Win be by hiaKing others richer, not poorer; oy helping those who beed assi^rc- 
ano^i '^oi^' by Ijib^Vfinf Cheint «BiA we> QUK only "Wish • that i^tbry t-kb 4:iiaii wouU 
follow such a noble example^ apd thpB, wi&oat ix\jux7 to tbemselvee^ ^^ive a 
helping handC to 'th^se tf ho ti^e(f 'ft ^ t^ttceew t6 t^e:iSAt6TpH^ Wc^^Oo^ th^it 
fifty men vrill be found before the week ends, each of whom desires in such a 
manner to obtain a roof which he cai^ c^L his own." 

Quite a number of men At oiice availed theinselyes of 
my offer, and eventually succeeded in paying fpr their 
honQies without much effort. I am sorry to add, that irent 
is still paid, month after months by many men whp.wpuld 
long ago have owned neat homesteads, free from' all 
incumbrances, if they had accepted my proposak and 
had signed ajhd kept the temperance pledge, and given 
up the use of tobacca The money they have since 
expended for whiskey and tobacco, would have gfiven 
them a house, of their own, if the money had been 
devoted to that object, and their positions, socially and 
mor^y, would have been far better than tiiey are 



p^rte ^ the eoUttt#jr,.\^htt ecruld'how be irid^t^etideAt," 
and ev^x owner* of theli- ()Wii cAi'riages, bait for theiif 
slavery to these miserable habits ! 

I htiit a number of hotise^ to let. in order to accom- 
modate those who W^e titikble to buy.' I find this the 
most unpWascmt pfert^ ^ of my feoHneetion with th^ new 
city: TJie itttferest ^n . thit' iH Vestment/thfe taxefe, repairs, 
weht Ati*tfeatr,'^ariaih8ti5rttWe^r6trd6ir 4enant-h6tlscS' the 
most/ taipliiofltable 'p^op^rty ' t6 b wtr t ' beJiiiies which th« 
lantiRwrA ia'bft*tf Idbkid'ta^dii'by-th^ fdhaiifai'as'ab'oyeN 
bearifig, grttftptti^ man afid ■ ^rie VlK)sfe piiopterty ^ 
their highest duty to injure as nltich as T)ossfble;for all 
concerned* <her6foire, it iis rrhidh beittei? that eVery person 
should somelidw manage to own the roof he sleeps 
undt*. " ' Mfen aW i!m>ite ihdependfenf ttnd ' feel' hap^^^^ • 
who live iti their own hoteses ; ttrey k^p' thd' prettiisei 
in ueakr ordei'', and they inake better' titizens. Heiice 
I alwayrf encourage poor people to beciotate hotisehblderS 
if possible, for I find' that oftentimes wheil they have 
lived long'in one of my houses they tbitik it very hard if 
the jirOpeSty i^ not '^iven- -to teem: They'ar^ue that the 
landldr* ifi rich and ' wbuM net'er' feel' the loss ^of 6ne 
little place', Aot stbppih^ to cionsld^r that the aggregate 
of a gi^tnaatiy ^''little places '' thhd given aw^ay would 
make the landlord pobr,-—^ nor would (he' tenauts be 
benefited «6 much by homes that were given to them 
as tti6y would by homes that Were thefruilifr'of their 
own* industry and economy. 

The land in Ea^t Bridgeport was originally pui?- 
chased by me at from $50 to $75, and from those sUms 
to $SOO»i)er acre ; and the average cost of all r bbught 
on that tside of the Hver was $200 per acre. Soine 



5&4 £AfiT BBIDGBPOBT* 

portions of ibiftiaud are bow assessed in tl^ ^^ridgeport 
tax-list at from $3)000 to $4,000 pear, ^cr^ At ^ time 
I joined Mr. Noble in this enterprise, theisitejMr^ pui- 
. chased was not a part of the City -of Bridgeport It is 
now« however, a most important section of the city, and 
the three bridges connecting the two bai^ks pf the nvei, 
and originally chartered ^ tolltl\ridg6S». ;ihay^ been 
bought by the city and thrown ppen as free Jiigh ways 
to the public. A horse railroad^ in which. litoolf one- 
tenth part of the stock, connects the two po:f l^pnf^ of the 
city, extending westerly beyond Iranistan ai\d linden- 
croft, while a branch road runs to the beatifal ^^ Sea-side 
Park " on the Sound shore. 

The eai^rn line of East Bridgeport, when I first pur- 
chased so lar^e a portion of the property, w;a8 bounded 
by a long, narrow swale or valley of salt meadow, 
through which ^ small stream passed, and whiph was 
flooded with salt water at every tide. At consi^rable 
expense, I erected a dam at the foot of this meadow, 
and thus converted this heretofore filthy, repulsive, 
mosquito-inhabited and malaria-breeding marsh inlo a 
charming sheet of water, which ii; now known as Pem- 
broke Lake. If this improvement had not beeu made, 
in all probability the eastern portion; of my property 
would never have been devoted to dwelling houses ; as 
it is, Bamum Street has been extended by means of a 
bridge across the lake, and the eastern shore is already 
studded with houses. The land on that side of the lake 
lies in the town of Stratford, and the growth of the new 
settlement promises to be as rapid as that of East 
iPridgcport. 

General Noble, in laying out the first portion of 
our new city, named several streets after members 



« 

of his pwnii^.ttj,.im4:ajp<» pf wi»^ f:%nw»,\fft;l»aiF$ 
a "Nol?le" Street— .^4 la.-po^e ftir^.tit i«; a:",Bftrr 
num " Stxf et ; while. othejr atr^fsfs .fijtp oi^i^fid " "William," 
from Mr: Noble,; ''Parriet," the Christian name^qf Mr^ 
Noble ; " I^^lletV' the jnai^eu. name of my wife ; and 
*• Caroline," "Helen/\ftn4,'!?auUiie,''>hejiaiBe8 of my 
three daughters. There is also the. *' BaT5nti.9i Schx>o][ 
Distiict" and schpol-luQusi^ ;; sp; t\iatit seems 'a§ if« lar a 
few a^orefic'^f 3fear^|Ui jeas^ ppstejn^y wofildi kftpw who 
were tjie .fouzvJer&^f ^q jfBjf, g^tMiri^bing, a^4 be^u^ifiil 
city. liVd Wfl Fpt9iM>$li«r.^»dux»g Mia.fiV^rgrflwitig 
monum^ ia^he vsBny, thousands loftieet whic^,w0,9ejt 
out and -which nf>w I^ue an^ gmte^^ully siiade the strpets 

of Eaat Bi?dgf |M?rt, ^ ^ .; . , ^ .,,, : 

Figones c^ squccely give an. i^preciable ideft of the 
rapid growth and material prosperityi of thia iniportatit 
portiop .pf the , City ojf Bridgeport; but :the city 
records show that iny first purchase of. ^and.on.thajt 
side of the river was a,pprais^ ii> . Ae Bridgt^pott 
assessment lii^tyjin October » 1 351, at; |i36^Q00, while ju 
July, 1859, the safie r^l estajte, wit^ Ji^proy^ments^ lead 
the Washington Park, the Public School lot iu Barimm 
District) the land, for streets^ a^d ff^^ri dhu^h/lats, wa3 
valued in the city assessment list at ill ,900,OQQ« When 
we bought the property • tj^ere w?r6 hut ^is pld-farm 
hoQses^ on the 9nii(re tr^ct^ vh^V^ (be ceji^tre bridges wm 
built :^4 ,op^^e4-. Now there are o^ the saipe lajid 
hundreds of dwelling-houses, some of thiefa as fine a^ 
any in ^he State. Three handsome churches, Methodist, 
Episcop^ and Congregational, «£ront on the beautiful 
Wa^ington F^rk of seren aci^fii) whi(^ Mft .Noble and 
myself, p^eseiftedto thp cit3r,.^lid ^bicb <Vobld be wotrth 
|1 00,000 to d4y. for j>iuljdiQg Idte^;. XAiiis ; pl^ai^nt pairk 



-ftn^, tftittuHal^ >• ^6^fe 'i^ fuH-^ttlfm ^ ttiee», wh^'' tlie 

and, on one Or moi^ evenings in the weefk cTtiring the 
fiUttimer, the'tity Uand, oi- thfe' Wheeler & Wilson band, 
plays in the Park for thi6 amusement aid benefit ctf the 
cittzeiis of IDiJ^t Bridgeport 

Sonie of the l^ge^- and* mti*t'pitWperoiit maiirfat*- 
tiftie^ in thfe^TJiiiwalSfatiftb dr« lofeatcfd'^ -UhO A\i# dty. 
attfottg ' thesd ' ki^^ <fe* rW%!eelfeir'*'^1Vift«ki 'feeing 
Mti€htee>M^(lfectoriWi •t*hid^'c6«f«i^fdilt'«itife^fequaie9, 
with-fi^e-iiro*f 'WiMiilgs, totf'^ iift)««f ''*itei«hf^i'-and 
Employ ttiof^ 'tbah-oie «6bt»«A4id • <^p*SW*dird ;' thfe^ffllowe 
Sewing Machine Factory is also ari ' iWiifeeto^ ^^difiee, 
eibploying^aiodrlfy the. BaMe ttUtobfer rf tnttn; SiASttyler, 
Hartley, Grahfem- & Company^d great dAttiMge^ and 
^tnmimifioA Works, ahno^^ sApplyth^'^rmifes *df the 
J^rbrld With Ith^' bi^n^ of deiMrUctidn i li^side^'thei^e, the 
Winchester Artn^ MAftntefctoTy for making fri* " *trefnty- 
8hooiter'biisfefeh4oadej» " > eC large braSs* tnktitiftetWy ; an 
imtiefide -hati mknu(\K5to^yi atid Hotchktsd.^SbnA k 
QomfAtLfii BiiiT&WikB M «niifti(^ttiry, ar6 <^bh^ thfc^ inore 
promineint odtabliAhniehtfi^, arid oth^r a!i!Hi iilM^c^ibems 
are^ cdnstanftt addifi^. Indfeetf; at this ihne'j[l86^)ttne- 
fotlrth of «ie {)Opirtati«n atidUliriie4fbarthtf^oftW*f'Aan^ 
tifftbttmng' cap^al' ^nd birsiness of Brid<^pO^ aVc^ KH^ted 
on the east &ide '^ithih' limits whi(^, in 1950, 6Mtai^ed 
only six old farm ^lotiAes. * ^ * • 

The fbllowingfidetails respecting the bnsinesS' of 4ome 
of the laii^6t establifebmleBfts will giiref ah id6a : bf the 
manttfaotriirin^ itidia6trie& '^f East' BridgepoJrt.' 'KThe 
Wiieeler ^uid« Wilsbii/' MtiltiufsUituring d!Mip«tfy 7 elhploy 



WUBfJ^ MUgMBPCOtH?. 557 



m avferaga o^ ths^ b^viMlisd 8ei^^ ma^liitl^sr {>^ day ; 
he total niimliegr^ Marines 4!i|atiufa;ctuK^ to Joly 1, 
L869, ^ over fom tiuddred tbotidand, and the fkctories 
:^over sK'fmd 0ae-half acrei^ df gtoftadt. The Unioti 
VIetallic Oartndge Odmpaiiy^ Me6er». ScliTiyle]:v^aftIey» 
3raham & Co.J have a capital. of ^850/)00;' employ 
:wo ]i«mdjre& and fifty ^^n^ fi^ inaimfketure eartridged 
iiid pvimdis 1 4xf . BetttenW patent ^ooliMiry ' mA spoiti^g 
:ap9,;aBd.^a8tic goq waddi&gs, at .the teit^ of 1 jdoO^'OOA 
rartridges, 720,000 primers, and 720,000 caps per we^lt, 
inii.to Jniyi IvlAflS^A^ faadiiuimilk 50,000,^00 

^artzadgsaJ The Hrid^eport Bi'asft Omipaify employ 
two himdBeA mtev liaive a cii|>itftl i of $450^^00^ and 
namifaotiure iJoUed^ i)viids wiid ttnd tobkig^* iLeitMeft^ 
bumeisy iamp/'goodd^ corset ateds; oii cans^^etc., and roll 
md u^ in/ tbiece gbods 4,000i0QiBpduuds of brass ^ 
rear. TheWinohdster'Artxis' C^paby'hsve a capita 
of $450j006, ettiplby ^ree hundred m^n*, and mannfacr 
ture AeiWittcbeeter riAb,.caMridge» and ammuniti)6n; 
I he H^we Micl^lne Ooiorpany ' have< - k ^ ea^ital( of fSOO,^ 
DOG, etufftoy fi^e^^hmidredi^^ii^, HAd manffrfalettaro s^wi^ 
niaohiii^siAtlh^ Mte of one [hnndited and^ fifty p^rday^ 
Messrs; B<feehk{lf6 atfd 8o6s, ifi^itbe eapitafl ^|16>2^50&; 
and oni^- tetldife*' a»d> twfenty^fiy^; tiieA, mantiftrttire 
[laiidwa^o, ^Wrl-yc()ibb&, j^mefta^ps, and harness snap^ 
to tiK;atn^tifr<e^ |80,00«) p6r tnitoth. Tbe^ Bridgeport 
Manufacturing Coibpany^ mth fifty men, and a capital 
of $300^0j' manufactOTe- • the American- enbmerged 
pump; The Odorless Blubber Oompatoy, with fifty meii, 
and $200s0d0 Capital, m^Mif^ture 8>^ ' rtibbef' ]^dd», 
ho8e^ «olotMa^,^'eic« • The^ iA«ierito^ - Silver' Steel 
Companjtf,^m|flqE^fWokre sted ft^th^Mke Hilli'Ao^bttryi 

w 



•££(£ 92^p^ apd a qapjj;al of $500>000w MesBirs. Glover 
S'suzfo^d aad: Sons, enapiloy. tWomkuiidred and fifty 
;P}[en, and manufacture ttfo ihnndted and .fifty dozen 
i^?.9ij bats pe| day. jThe N^\» York Tap and Die 
^^qmpaji^ Wjitfe ar; capital of $150,000, and oHd hundred 
aiipn, pitmuijactpr^ tapR, di<j^,, drills;, bits, etc. These 
compq^ies thus employ abQut sii: aud lone-liatf' millions 
in <;fLpital, a^nd i^sa^ly tweinfyidOT^eiihulidred men, &]ul| 
^e^^ irn^e. than, | f ^jOOO^pOO a jfisix in wiagea to the 
,0Ber*t^ves, . . ^^ >.\, ^ . . •: \.' ■ , 

. Ill additiotUi tbefe a^Q J3tira:2d..£(ab8taxltial Imek blods 
d^oted to bviw^Hs ;; tfa^re m6 bbok stotiib, drug stoies 
dry goc^,)S(t$£es^ jejwfilry stores^ boot, and ahoe shop 
aiid*,ston&s, taUodng iwd f tumishisg elstaJbiishnients, mo 
than twenty grpoer^ stores, six mes^t mai:iketB, three 
markets, co4li wof^L^ lumber tmd briok yarda, st 
flouring miUs«;a|id 9, hifge hnt^k >oteL. Thew&ter an 
g^s supplies ai:^. th^ eaioe aa those afibfdied. ooi «the othet 
side of the nrer^ It ip quite w^in the^/bcwaids of 
probabiUty thsit ijUjihe iCpuri9e of twentST jr^ars, .the eaat 
si4e wiU contaJua. <^« Iftiigei; pri^por^ intubUaats 

A po§t-offio9: a(nd f. xa^WfE^y station wiUiBoan be built 
on ,that side :of th? rvf^i^ A nefw iroaJ[>ridg|Q i|» aboiit 
tq,po«ftei?fc the twft pwcts^of t)»f qify, a#bff4^«Si a4di/:ianal 
facU^ies fpr jinteiTHi^ompiuni^tion. :Jn I9i^ M^Mh 2, 
a spe4;^ coKaqritt^g of, the Onnmon (tSQiinpU. repotted 
the census of the CU;f ofi Sridgfiport m foUowa: First 
ward, 7,397; Secoojd w»d, 4,237 j Third ward. East 
Bridgeport, 5,497 ; totals 17, 131 1 I& thia emimeratiou, 
pur laevf oity c^»taii|^ *€ftriy pne-third ofi the «n<ire 
populatipA} an^. it^ j#^eaa«i idincei .hfLS.^finiar more 
rapid thjin th9toi^^y;{9);h»ripart of Sfiiflgffiwt . 



»• 



EAST BBIDGEPORT. - 659 

The entire City of Bridgeport is advancing in popula- 
tion and prosperity with a rapidity far beyond that of 
any other city in Connecticut, and everything indicates 
that it will soon take its proper position as the second, 
if not the first, city in the State. Its situation as the 
terminus of the Naugatuck aiid tne^ H^satonic rail- 
ways, its acce^sib^ity to New York, with its two daily 
steamboats to and from the metropolis, and its dozen 
daily trains of the New York and Boston and Shor6 
lAne railways, are all elements of prosperity which are 
rapidly telling in favor of. this busy, beautiful and 
charming city. 






• r. \ • . * • . . . . 



«.*^ - 



•) . • J 



t >. ■ - 



»••**': ■ . ' ♦ 



1 / 



' . # 



• i 



« 



^ 



• • • « 



I 



••'I'l "1 r '»-j-'.f, » », ,, 



t 



. • • • I . , , 

I 






,C H A T^J E B . XXXVI. 

MORE Aiiuf tftE Mtl^ETM. 



I < f I • 



4^QTMWR R^-QPE^OXa — 4 CfI|;^T-<K)l/)t9ED CA^^-THi^ O^T UTT. OUT OP 7 1 
BAG — MY FIRST WHALIKO tX^feDlTtON — PLAAS' T6B CAPTirMt — 5T\ • 



• . » 



J CITK^ayr — TH|B GREAT . TANK r- SALT WATER PU)U*ED FfiOM THE I'. A'. 

' niE iltTST?tn*r — MOAE ^^^Atm -^ E^EDftiO^ •TO ^AskAboJt -^ THE F* I 
HIPPOPOTAMUS nr AMERICA — TROPICAL FUH •— COKMODOkHK ^TVXT AM' ' I 
PIR9T *' EXOAOEMENT" — THE TWO DBOMIOS — PRESIDENT LtNCOLN •-; \ 
COMMODOIIE NUTT — WADING ASHORE— A QUESTION OF LBOS — SELF-Pr : ^ 
TION — THE GOLDEN ANGEL FISH — ANNA SWAN, THE KOVA BOOTIA GM^ 
ESS — THE TALLEST WOMAN IN THE WORLD — INDIAN CHIEFS — EXI'EI'i:' I 
TO CYPRUS — MY AGENT IN A PASHA's HARKlff, 

On the 13th of October, 1860, the American Musein 
was the scene of another re-opening, which was, in he 
the commencement of the fall dramatic season, t!^ 
summer months having been devoted to pantomime, 
grand flourish of trumpets in the way of newspap . 
advertisements and flaming posters drew a orowdi . 
house. Among other attractions, it was announc . 
that Mr. Bamum would introduce a mysterious novt!' 
never before seen in that establishment I appear^ 
upon the stage behind a small table, in front of whii 
was nailed a white sack, oa which was inscribed, i: 
large letters, " The cat let out of the bag." I tbe . 
stated that, having spent two of the summer months h 
the country, leaving the Museum in charge of Mi 
Greenwood, he had purchaMd a curiosity with which 
he was not satisfied ; but, for my part, I thought li'^ 
had received his money's worth, and I proposed to ex- 



libit it ta tihe' ^odil^ncoi Ipr the pwrpoBe oltgttJfyig Ihek 
ipiuion Q& tbi^ s|alge«t. I I 9tittei} . th£|t a faano w ics^mb in 
Vom the <$(miitryy aed »aid he had got a ^' cherry-ooiored 
*at " »t home whieh he would like to Bell ; . that Mr« 
Greenwood gave him a writing promising to pay him 
wenty^ye : deUaii^ £oi^ raeh A eftt- d^iTi^ived in g0od 
lealthi provided itwa^^ftot:. lOrtifiaially colored } Mi^ that 
he cat waa thanin the ba^ ior* fixtnt c^ th^^jtahle^ readjir 
or e2^hitu>n4 iWh^reupon^ my as^iatanti di:ew fccjq 
he hag a conmicin ^hlack ioat) ^^4 1/inlorioisd the i^^di* 
mce tbM when the :f(^m&r hsronght hia '^ cherry-colored 
:at," he <qn]etly ■ remiurkod to Mi, Greenwood, that^ of 
:ourse, he mean^t ^> a^^M^ of H^ color of bls^ck ch^rjries/' 
rhe lai^Hter thaA rfoUowed this narration waa upro^^ 
iotis, and the audience unanimowly Yo^ed, that the 
^ cheiry-colored cati" ^U things coQj^idered, wa$ weU 
irorth tw^ty^ftve doilara.t The eat; adomied with a 
collar bearing the inscription) ^^The Cherry*coIored 
Datr wiak then placed toctbe cage of th^ '^ Happy 
Pamify/' atid th^ story gettiiig into the 'n$w»p^ersi it 
kecame another aidyortifiemeat of the Museum. 

In 18(1, 1 learned th^t aome fishermen at the m^th 
orf the StJ tLawMnce haid ciuceeeded in ^aptnring a living 
^ hite "^hble, and I Was alse ipolormed that' a whale of 
Lhis kiddf if plueed in* ar hp^ lined with Aea-weed and 
partiaQy£I]6drWith;$E^,W/a|er/cquld betiwwpoil by 
land ti^a considerably didtanoe^ and,b9 kept alive. , It 
waa fiisiply iMcCMary that! an 'attendant, supplied with a 
barrel <)f sidt : waA^r and a spong^i. 'should keep th^ 
mouth Uidi bL(>w*hele of t^ whale constancy moist. It 
seemed xmarediblethat a -living whale could be *'ex^ 
presied^ by nwlroad On a five days' journey, and al-i 
tbou|(h I knew nothi&g of the white whale or ita habits^ 

36 



36S *6r« Aliotri? ¥fr» Mtr^BmC 

in that directloti; Tidiidflman sis I %b8, F beUe^d'tliat I ^ 

#as ^tiite as competetrt as a fet. lia^rende ftsheraian to 
superintend the <;apture and' tmiilpertatida ^ ^* lite . 

When 1 bad ftiUy made \ip tnj mifed taafCMbpVthe . 
ia^k, L inaide eV^ry proviiiioQ' foir' the^ toped{ltt>Br «ik1 '• 
tbok pf eca^t!dn agamsl;^ e^ei^ cdticeilnabfocofilii^ency. ^ 
I determined upon the ;capturQ arid transptfH? to i&J^^Mih \ 
8enm of at iedst fwd Imng Whaiebj and fr^pai^dftfii the * 
basement of the' building a brkik ^nd cemetit - taH fe;^* ^^ ^ 
feet* long, and dghteen feet widei fdr' the reception -of , 
the maritie monatfei*s. • When thi^ was' doiie^* fiftiBg \ 
two trusty assietante, I started upon ray whaSSftg Expe- 
dition. 'Going by. rail to Queb^, and thenee by- the 
Gra*id Trunk ftailrcfed; ninety iniles; «o WeHa:lMver, 
where I chartered* a sWp to EJbew tsi&ivdl (Isl^'aii 
Coudres), in ^e^ 6t. Lawrence RiVfer, ind-fi^d the 
. place populated by Catiadlnn French pedple of Ae most 
ignorant and diWy description.. . They Were liosp^bie, 
but frightfully ^fthy , and ' they gained th^r liVelthood 
by farlnin'g ai^d fishing. lihm^lise quAntiti^- of^ieOSflC' 
sugar aire ihade. there, and in ^^tpknring abdolt^bViAllmd, 
w^ daw hut^recii (if bircb^bofrk- bu<!^ketb ^U^p^fttiftt'n^^tfae 
trees to caitch ^be sap; After 'n&&ieit>^& IcdnsillMiims 
extending over tfil-ee whble ifeys, *'Wfth-a pai^itff !lWBtT- 
fiur fishermen, wii6se gibberish was almost lis^ tOftFanfi* 
Iktable as it was unbearable; I eu^c^eded i^' ^oi^fMikting 
foi^' their servio&s to'dtCpture for ih^, alivd andliAhahs^d. 
a couple of whitfe whaks, 6C0tes bf which' fcifeifcl^il ull 
times be discovered by their ^* spOutitig ** witbui sight 
of the isl^d. I wais to pay <ii^€f tb^ a stipulated 
price per day for their labor, and if diey secikred the 
whales, they were to have a liberal bonus. 



MOHB ABOUT TH£ IftrSBUM. 663 

The plan decided upon was to pltyat In the river a 
^' kraal," composed of. stakes driiFen down In tbe f&tm 
of a Y, liBavi&g tl^e broad end open for the whales to 
enter. This was done^in a shallow place, with the 
point of the kraal towards shore ; and if by diance one 
or more whales should enter the trap at high water» my 
fishermen were to occupy the entrance with their boats, 
and keep up a. tremendous splashing and noise till the 
tide receded, when the frightened whaleis would fiiad 
themselves nearly " high and dry," or with : too little 
water to einable them to swim, and their capture ^buld 
be the next thing in orden This was to be effected by 
securtug a slip-noose of stout rope orer their talls^ and 
towiug them to the sea-weed lined boxeis in which they 
were to be transported to New York. 

All this was simple enough '^ on papet " ; btit several 
days elapsed before a single spout was seen inside the 
kraal, though scores of whales were constantly around 
and near it. In time, it became exceedingly aggravating 
to see the whales glide so near the trap without going 
into it, and our patience was sorely tried. One day a 
whale actually went into the kraal, and the fishermen 
proposed to capture it ; but I wanted another, and while 
we waited, for number two to go in, number one, know- 
ing Uie proverb, probably,